Recent Titles

June 2022

The Moneywasting Machine

Dušan Pavlović
For five months in 2013–2014, Dušan Pavlović took time off from teaching to accept a senior position in Serbia's Ministry of Economy. This short period was long enough for him to make a penetrating diagnosis of the economic activity of the postcommunist government. He found that a coterie of tycoons and politicians live off the wealth of the majority of citizens and smaller entrepreneurs, while the economy performs below its capacities. In academic terms,...

Spirit Possession

edited by Éva Pócs, András Zempléni
Possession, a seemingly irrational phenomenon, has posed challenges to generations of scholars rooted in Western notions of body-soul dualism, self and personhood, and a whole set of presuppositions inherited from Christian models of possession that was "good" or "bad." The authors of the essays in this book present a new and more promising approach. They conceive spirit possession as a form of communication, of expressivity, of...

History by HBO

Rebecca Weeks
The television industry is changing, and with it, the small screen's potential to engage in debate and present valuable representations of American history. Founded in 1972, HBO has been at the forefront of these changes, leading the way for many network, cable, and streaming services into the "post-network" era. Despite this, most scholarship has been dedicated to analyzing historical feature films and documentary films, leaving TV and the long-form drama hungry for coverage. In History...

Southern Voices

Michael Dedrick, Michael Robert Dedrick, foreword by Christoph Giebel
Southern Voices: Biet Dong and the National Liberation Front presents oral histories from former members of an elite squad of Viet Cong operatives, focusing on their experiences during what is known, in Vietnam, as the American War. Author Michael Robert Dedrick conducted interviews with eight former Biet Dong (the equivalent of Ranger or Special Forces divisions in the US military) and sheds new light on this...

Citizenship on Catfish Row

Geoffrey Galt Harpham
A radical reinterpretation of three controversial works that illuminate racism and national identity in the United States Citizenship on Catfish Row focuses on three seminal works in the history of American culture: the first full-length narrative film, D. W. Griffith's The Birth of a Nation; the first integrated musical, Oscar Hammerstein and Jerome Kern's Showboat; and the first great American opera, George Gershwin's Porgy and Bess. Each of these...

Augustine's Confessions and Contemporary Concerns

edited by David Vincent Meconi
Augustine's Confessions and Contemporary Concerns takes each of the thirteen books of Augustine's classic omnibiography to see how the major themes still speak to each of us today. The Bishop of Hippo never intended that the audience for his work be limited to himself and his contemporaries. He wrote on the perennial themes of childhood, humanity's search for meaning, the relationship between religion and science, and the nature of Christian conversion, as...

Christopher Dawson

Joseph T. Stuart
The English historian Christopher Dawson (1889-1970) was the first Catholic Studies professor at Harvard University and has been described as one of the foremost Catholic thinkers of modern times. His focus on culture prefigured its importance in Catholicism since Vatican Council II and in the rise of mainstream cultural history in the late twentieth century. How did Dawson think about culture and why does it matter? Joseph T. Stuart argues that through Dawson's...

Forget Not God's Benefits (Psalm 103:2)

edited by Barbara Reid, OP
Leslie Hoppe, OFM, has had a distinguished career in biblical studies. He is known for his work on the book of Deuteronomy and the Deuteronomistic History, but his interests have ranged over many areas of the Scriptures, including the prophets, biblical geography, archaeology, history, and biblical perspectives on poverty. In his writing and research, he has broken new ground and advanced the discipline time and again. For many...

From the Dust of the Earth

Matthew J. Ramage
The claim that evolution undermines Christianity is standard fare in our culture. Indeed, many today have the impression that the two are mutually exclusive and that a choice must be made between faith and reason—rejecting Christianity on the one hand or evolutionary theory on the other. Is there a way to square advances in this field of study with the Bible and Church teaching? In this book—his fourth dedicated to applying Joseph...

Heresy in the Heartland

Mary J. Brown
Heresy in the Heartland is a narrative case study of the 'Heresy' Affair at the University of Dayton, a series of events predominantly in the philosophy department that occurred when tensions between the Thomists and proponents of new philosophies reached crisis stage in fall 1966. The controversy culminated in a letter written by a lay assistant professor to the Cincinnati archbishop, Karl J. Alter. In the letter, the professor cited a number of...

A Symphony of Distances

Christopher M. Hadley
The two-fold task of A Symphony of Distances is to provide an overview of Hans Urs von Balthasar's use of distance imagery with regard to personal distinctions in the Holy Trinity and to offer a critical analysis of him as a modern Catholic theologian. A metaphor of "distance" integrates all of Balthasar's theological thought as a primary cipher for the many symbols through which he reads the Christian theological...

In Everything I See Your Hand

Naira Kuzmich
What's the difference between leaving the motherland and leaving the literal mother? When does the journey toward self-possession become something closer to self-exile? Living daily in the tension between assimilation, disillusionment, and desire, the Armenian-American protagonists of In Everything I See Your Hand struggle with the belief that their futures are already decided, futures that can only be escaped through death or departure—if they can be escaped at all. In these ten brilliant stories,...

The Charleston Museum

edited by Carl P. Borick
A look inside the oldest museum in the United States Since its founding in 1773, the Charleston Museum has served as a mecca of learning and discovery. In celebration of its 250th anniversary, this commemorative volume brings its rich history to life, offering insights into many of its 2.4 million collected artifacts while detailing the contributions of key figures, such as Gabriel Manigault, Laura Bragg, and Milby Burton, who made it one of the premier museums in the southern...

Tobacco Harvest

photographs by James Baker Hall, Wendell Berry
With his striking photographs, James Baker Hall powerfully conveys the physical experience of a Kentucky tobacco harvest. He captures the process from the tractor ride out to the field, where rows of tobacco stretch toward the horizon, to the careful, precise cutting of each individual plant, and finally, to hauling the crop away and housing it in the barn. Hall's snapshots of the "gathering of many hands" who come to help and the time-honored practices of the harvest capture the...

Early Jewish Cookbooks

András Koerner, preface by Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett
The seven essays in this volume focus such previously unexplored subjects as the world's first cookbook printed in Hebrew letters, published in 1854, and a wonderful 19th-century Jewish cookbook, which in addition to its Hungarian edition was also published in Dutch in Rotterdam. The author entertainingly reconstructs the history of bólesz, a legendary yeast pastry that was the specialty of a famous, but long defunct...

The Man Who Started the Civil War

Anna Koivusalo
A fresh biography of a neglected figure in Southern history who played a pivotal role in the Civil War. In the predawn hours of April 12, 1861, James Chesnut Jr. piloted a small skiff across the Charleston Harbor and delivered the fateful order to open fire on Fort Sumter—the first shots of the Civil War. In The Man Who Started the Civil War, Anna Koivusalo offers the first comprehensive biography of Chesnut and through him a history of...

Shakespeare and the Idea of Western Civilization

R. V. Young
William Shakespeare is widely regarded as one of the greatest writers of the Western world and most certainly its greatest playwright. His actual relationship to Western civilization has not, however, been thoroughly investigated. At a time when that civilization, as well as its premier dramatist, is subjected to severe and increasing criticism for both its supposed crimes against the rest of the world and its fundamental principles, a reassessment of the culture of the West is...

Understanding Bharati Mukherjee

Ruth Maxey
2021 Choice Outstanding Academic Title Bharati Mukherjee was the first major South Asian American writer and the first naturalized American citizen to win the National Book Critics Circle Award. Born in Kolkata, India, she immigrated to the United States in 1961 and went on to publish eight novels, two short story collections, two long works of nonfiction, and numerous essays, book reviews, and newspaper articles. She was professor emerita in the Department of English at the University of California,...

Teaching Central American Literature in a Global Context

edited by Gloria Elizabeth Chacón, Mónica Albizúrez Gil
Ideas for teaching critically the literature and film of Central America. Central America has a long history as a site of cultural and political exchange, from Mayan and Nahua trade networks to the effects of Spanish imperialism, capitalism, and globalization. In Teaching Central American Literature in a Global Context, instructors will find practical, interdisciplinary, and innovative pedagogical approaches to the cultures...

Isle of Devils, Isle of Saints

Michael J. Jarvis
How can the small, isolated island of Bermuda help us to understand the early expansion of English America? First discovered by Europeans in 1505, the island of Bermuda had no indigenous population and no permanent European presence until the early seventeenth century. Settled five years after Virginia and eight years before Plymouth, Bermuda is a foundational site of English colonization. Its history reveals strikingly different paths of potential...