Recent Titles


November 2020

Building Gender Equity in the Academy

Sandra Laursen and Ann E. Austin
Despite decades of effort by federal science funders to increase the numbers of women holding advanced degrees and faculty jobs in science and engineering, they are persistently underrepresented in academic STEM disciplines, especially in positions of seniority, leadership, and prestige. Women filled 47% of all US jobs in 2015, but held only 24% of STEM jobs. Barriers to women are built into academic workplaces: biased selection and...

Modernism after Postcolonialism

Mara de Gennaro
Existing studies of literary modernism generally read Anglophone Atlantic texts through the lens of critical theories emanating from Europe and North America. In Modernism after Postcolonialism, Mara de Gennaro undertakes a comparative Anglophone-Francophone study, invoking theoretical frameworks from Gayatri Spivak, Édouard Glissant, Françoise Vergès, Michel-Rolph Trouillot, Dipesh Chakrabarty, and others. Examining transnational poetics of...

Neighborhood of Fear

Kyle Riismandel
The explosive growth of American suburbs following World War II promised not only a new place to live but a new way of life, one away from the crime and crowds of the city. Yet, by the 1970s, the expected security of suburban life gave way to a sense of endangerment. Perceived, and sometimes material, threats from burglars, kidnappers, mallrats, toxic waste, and even the occult challenged assumptions about safe streets, pristine parks, and the sanctity of...

Stories of Struggle

Claudia Smith Brinson
In this pioneering study of the long and arduous struggle for civil rights in South Carolina, longtime journalist Claudia Smith Brinson details the lynchings, beatings, bombings, cross burnings, death threats, arson, and venomous hatred that black South Carolinians endured—as well as the astonishing courage, devotion, dignity, and compassion of those who risked their lives for equality. Through extensive research and interviews with more than one hundred...

White Lawyer, Black Power

Donald A. Jelinek
Inspired by a colleague's involvement in the Mississippi Summer Project of 1964, Wall Street attorney Donald A. Jelinek traveled to the Deep South to volunteer as a civil rights lawyer during his three-week summer vacation in 1965. He stayed for three years. In White Lawyer, Black Power, Jelinek recounts the battles he fought in defense of militant civil rights activists and rural African Americans, risking his career and his life to further the...

The Metamorphoses of the City of God

Étienne Gilson, translated by James G. Colbert
Étienne Gilson (1884-1978) was a French philosopher and historian of philosophy, as well as a scholar of medieval philosophy. In 1946 he attained the distinction of being elected an "Immortal" (member) of the Académie française. He was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1959 and 1964. The appearance of Gilson's Metamorphosis of the City of God, which were originally delivered as lectures at the University of Louvain, Belgium, in the Spring of 1952,...

Multicultural Cities of the Habsburg Empire, 1880–1914

Catherine Horel
This book offers a comparative analysis of the societal, ethnic, and cultural diversity of twelve cities in the last decades of the Habsburg Monarchy. The following cities are discussed (by their current names): Arad, Bratislava, Brno, Chernivtsi, Lviv, Oradea, Rijeka, Sarajevo, Subotica, Timioara, Trieste, and Zagreb. This selection aims to counter the disproportionate attention that the largest cities in the empire...

The Bishop's Burden

Celeste McNamara
In 1563, the Council of Trent published its Decrees, calling for significant reforms of the Catholic Church in response to criticism from both Protestants and Catholics alike. Bishops, according to the Decrees, would take the lead in implementing these reforms. They were tasked with creating a Church in which priests and laity were well educated, morally upright, and focused on worshipping God. Unfortunately for these bishops, the Decrees provided few practical...

The Figure of Jesus in History and Theology

edited by Vincent Skemp, Kelley Coblentz Bautch
One of the leading Historical Jesus scholars of our time, John Meier has also made significant contributions in the areas of early Judaism and New Testament studies writ large. The Figure of Jesus in History and Theology features more than a dozen prominent scholars who engage Meier's work and address its reception today. These scholars, whose areas of expertise range from second temple Judaism to early Christianity,...

Renewing Catholic Schools

edited by R. Jared Staudt, R. Jared Staudt, foreword by Most Reverend Samuel J. Aquila
Catholic education remains one of the most compelling expressions of the Church's mission to form disciples. Despite decades of decline in the number of schools and students, many Catholic schools have been experiencing renewal by returning to the great legacy of the Catholic tradition. Renewing Catholic Schools offers an overview of the reasons behind this renewal and practical...

The Tar Heel State, revised edition

Milton Ready
When first released in 2005, The Tar Heel State was celebrated as a comprehensive contribution to North Carolina's historical record. In this revised edition historian Milton Ready brings the text up to date, sharpens his narrative on the periods surrounding the American Revolution and the Civil War and offers new chapters on the 1920s; World War II and the 1950s; and the confrontation between Jim Hunt, North Carolina's longest-serving governor, and Jesse Helms, a transformational, if...

Understanding the Religious Priesthood

Christian Raab
Most contemporary theologies of Holy Orders consider priesthood mainly in its diocesan context and most contemporary theologies of religious life do not consider how ordained ministry functions when it is internal rather than external to religious life. Understanding the Religious Priesthood provides a history and theology of religious priesthood that contributes to our understanding of this vocation's identity and mission. It uncovers what religious...

All the Feels / Tous les sens

edited by Marie Carrière, Ursula Mathis-Moser, Kit Dobson, with contributions byNicole Brossard, Matthew Cormier, Nicoletta Dolce, Louise Dupré, Margery Fee, Ana María Fraile-Marcos, Smaro Kamboureli, Aaron Kreuter, Daniel Laforest, Carmen Mata Barreiro, Tanis MacDonald, Heather Milne, Eric Schmaltz, Maïté Snauwaert, Jeanette Toonder
All the Feels / Tous les sens presents research into emotion and cognition in Canadian, Indigenous, and Québécois...

Death and Rebirth in a Southern City

Ryan K. Smith
Richmond, Virginia, the former capital of the Confederacy, holds one of the most dramatic landscapes of death in the nation. Its burial grounds show the sweep of Southern history on an epic scale, from the earliest English encounters with the Powhatan at the falls of the James River through slavery, the Civil War, and the long reckoning that followed. And while the region's deathways and burial practices have developed in surprising directions over these...

Fabrications

Pamela Painter
Pamela Painter's short stories have been praised by Margot Livesey for their "wicked intelligence and ruthless humor." In Fabrications, which brings together 7 new and 24 selected stories, characters struggle to avoid the chaos in their lives, but—driven by addictions and appetites—often bring on disaster. Nobody is ordinary in Painter's stories. A burglar can't believe what he is asked to do by the woman whose jewelry he is stealing. Hitchhikers, hell-bent on murder, are thwarted by the miracle...

Grassroots Leviathan

Ariel Ron
The United States was an overwhelmingly rural society before the Civil War and for some time afterward. There were cities and factories, of course, especially in the northern seaboard states. In 1860, Manhattan's population was nearing a million. Brooklyn, which had been farmland at the time of the American Revolution, was itself home to 250,000. New England's mill towns were already well known, and Chicago's growth elicited awe. But these were...

Preparing for a Better End

Dan Morhaim, MD
with Shelley Morhaim
While modern Americans strive to control nearly every aspect of their lives, many of us abandon control of life's final passage. But the realities of twenty-first-century medicine will allow most of us to have a say in how, when, and where we die, so we need to make decisions surrounding death, too. Or those decisions may be made for us. Threading compelling real-life stories and practical guidance throughout, this...

Vaccines Did Not Cause Rachel's Autism

Peter J. Hotez, MD, PhD
foreword by Arthur L. Caplan
In 1994, Peter J. Hotez's nineteen-month-old daughter, Rachel, was diagnosed with autism. Dr. Hotez, a pediatrician-scientist who develops vaccines for neglected tropical diseases affecting the world's poorest people, became troubled by the decades-long rise of the influential anti-vaccine community and its inescapable narrative around childhood vaccines and autism. In Vaccines...

Emerald Street

Daudi Abe
From the first rap battles in Seattle's Central District to the Grammy stage, hip hop has shaped urban life and the music scene of the Pacific Northwest for more than four decades. In the early 1980s, Seattle's hip-hop artists developed a community-based culture of stylistic experimentation and multiethnic collaboration. Emerging at a distance from the hip-hop centers of New York City and Los Angeles, Seattle's most famous hip-hop figures, Sir Mix-A-Lot and Macklemore, found mainstream...

Sacred Cows and Chicken Manchurian

James Staples, foreword by K. Sivaramakrishnan, series edited byK. Sivaramakrishnan
Bovine politics exposes fault lines within contemporary Indian society, where eating beef is simultaneously a violation of sacred taboos, an expression of marginalized identities, and a route to cosmopolitan sophistication. The recent rise of Hindu nationalism has further polarized traditional views: Dalits, Muslims, and Christians protest threats to their beef-eating heritage...