Recent Titles



August 2017

The Pastoral Letters

Larry J. Perkins
The Pastoral Letters: A Handbook on the Greek Text offers teachers and students a comprehensive guide to the grammar and vocabulary of the Pastoral Letters. A perfect supplement to any commentary, this volume's lexical, analytical, and syntactical analysis is a helpful tool in navigating New Testament literature. Larry J. Perkins leads students toward both a greater understanding of the Greek text and an appreciation for the textual and rhetorical intricacies not available in English...

Texts and Contexts

Todd D. Still
Texts and Contexts honors the life and scholarship of David E. Garland. Fifteen colleagues, friends, and former students each offer a study on one of the canonical Gospels or Paul's letters, demonstrating how these texts continue to reveal new surprises and a wealth of resources for service to the gospel. Throughout his productive career as a New Testament scholar—first at the Southern Seminary and later at Baylor University's George W. Truett Theological Seminary—Garland became widely...

Undomesticated Dissent

Curtis W. Freeman
On the north end of London lies an old nonconformist burial ground named Bunhill Fields. Bunhill became the final resting place for some of the most honored names of English Protestantism. Burial outside the city walls symbolized that those interred at Bunhill lived and died outside the English body politic. Bunhill, its location declares, is the proper home for undomesticated dissenters.   Among more than 120,000 graves, three monuments stand...

Forward with Patton

Robert S. Allen
Soldier, journalist, and Soviet spy Robert S. Allen (1900–1981) was a deeply controversial figure. After serving in France during World War I, he left the military, forged a successful career as a syndicated columnist, and even rose to become the Washington, DC, bureau chief for the Christian Science Monitor. During this period, he developed a sideline as a paid informant for the KGB. Still, Allen returned to the army following America's entry into World War...

Rainy Lake House

Theodore Catton
In September 1823, three men met at Rainy Lake House, a Hudson’s Bay Company trading post near the Boundary Waters. Dr. John McLoughlin, the proprietor of Rainy Lake House, was in charge of the borderlands west of Lake Superior, where he was tasked with opposing the petty traders who operated out of US territory. Major Stephen H. Long, an officer in the US Army Topographical Engineers, was on an expedition to explore the wooded borderlands west of Lake Superior and the...

Essential Readings in Medicine and Religion

Gary B. Ferngren and Ekaterina N. Lomperis
Gary B. Ferngren and Ekaterina N. Lomperis have gathered a rich collection of annotated primary sources that illustrate the intersection of medicine and religion. Intended as a companion volume to Ferngren’s classic Medicine and Religion, which traces the history of the relationship of medicine to religion in the Western world from the earliest ancient Near Eastern societies to the twenty-first century, this useful and extensive sourcebook places each key...

Flickering Treasures

Amy Davis
foreword by Barry Levinson
Baltimore has been home to hundreds of theaters since the first moving pictures flickered across muslin sheets. These monuments to popular culture, adorned with grandiose architectural flourishes, seemed an everlasting part of Baltimore’s landscape. By 1950, when the city’s population peaked, Baltimore’s movie fans could choose from among 119 theaters. But by 2016, the number of cinemas had dwindled to only three. Today, many of the...

The Light of Christ

Thomas Joseph White, OP
The Light of Christ provides an accessible presentation of Catholicism that is grounded in traditional theology, but engaged with a host of contemporary questions or objections. Inspired by the theologies of Irenaeus, Thomas Aquinas and John Henry Newman, and rooted in a post-Vatican II context, Fr. Thomas Joseph White presents major doctrines of the Christian religion in a way that is comprehensible for non-specialists: knowledge of God, the mystery of the Trinity, the...

David Aspden

Anne Ryan
David Aspden (1935–2005) came to prominence in Sydney in the 1960s as a luminary in the new wave of young Australian painters. Over the next four decades, he forged an impressive artistic career. Aspden's wonderous paintings reveal an artistic sensibility that is both intuitive and poetic, and a body of work – comprising paintings, drawings, collages and prints – that is a joyous response to the material world. Written by curators at the Art Gallery of NSW, this book presents highlights from the...

Network Sovereignty

Marisa Elena Duarte
In 2012, the United Nations General Assembly determined that affordable Internet access is a human right, critical to citizen participation in democratic governments. Given the significance of information and communication technologies (ICTs) to social and political life, many U.S. tribes and Native organizations have created their own projects, from streaming radio to building networks to telecommunications advocacy. In Network Sovereignty, Marisa Duarte...

Food Allergies, second edition

Scott H. Sicherer, MD
introduction by Hugh A. Sampson, MD, Jaffe Food Allergy Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Posing the urgent questions that anyone with food allergies will think to ask—and then some— Food Allergies provides practical, sensitive, and scientific guidance on the topics that affect your life. Allergy expert Scott H. Sicherer addresses the full spectrum of food allergies, from mild to life threatening and from single foods to food...

Zhi Lin

Rock Hushka
Aug 2017 - Lucia Marquand
In this pointed and resonant project, internationally acclaimed artist Zhi Lin refocuses on the forgotten Chinese laborers in America from an iconic moment in US history. In the nineteenth century, thousands of men migrated from China to seek fortunes in the gold mines of California; instead they found work building the transcontinental railroads. The contributions of these workers are largely overlooked in the history books, their names and...

The Cleansing of the Heart

Reginald Lynch, OP
Recalling the Biblical and Patristic roots of the Church's sacramental identity, the Second Vatican Council calls the Church the 'visible sacrament' of that unity offered through Christ (LG 9). 'Sacrament' in this sense not only describes who the Church is, but what she does. In this regard, the Council Fathers were careful to establish a strong connection between the symbolic nature of the Church's sacraments and their effect on those...

Insurrections

Rion Amilcar Scott
A suicidal father looks to an older neighbor—and the Cookie Monster—for salvation and sanctuary as his life begins to unravel. A man seeking to save his estranged, drug-addicted brother from the city's underbelly confronts his own mortality. A chess match between a girl and her father turns into a master class about life, self-realization, and pride: "Now hold on little girl. . . . Chess is like real life. The white pieces go first so they got an advantage over the black pieces." These are just a few glimpses...

On the Body of the Lord

Sr. Albert Marie Surmanski, OP
Albert the Great wrote On the Body of the Lord in the 1270s, making it his final work of sacramental theology. A companion volume to his commentary on the Mass, On the Body of the Lord is a comprehensive discussion of Eucharistic theology. The treatise is structured around six names for the Eucharist taken from the Mass: grace, gift, food, communion, sacrifice, and sacrament. It emerges from the liturgy and is intended to draw the reader back to worship. The overall movement of the treatise...

Picturing India

John McAleer
The British engagement with India was an intensely visual one. Images of the subcontinent, produced by artists and travelers in the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century heyday of the East India Company, reflect the increasingly important role played by the Company in Indian life. And they mirror significant shifts in British policy and attitudes toward India. The Company's story is one of wealth, power, and the pursuit of profit. It changed what people in Europe...

Baltimore

Matthew A. Crenson
Charm City or Mobtown? People from Baltimore glory in its eccentric charm, small-town character, and North-cum-South culture. But for much of the nineteenth century, violence and disorder plagued the city. More recently, the 2015 death of Freddie Gray in police custody has prompted Baltimoreans—and the entire nation—to focus critically on the rich and tangled narrative of black–white relations in Baltimore, where slavery once existed alongside the largest community of free blacks in the United States.

Free Speech on Campus

Sigal R. Ben-Porath
From the University of California, Berkeley, to Middlebury College, institutions of higher learning increasingly find themselves on the front lines of cultural and political battles over free speech. Repeatedly, students, faculty, administrators, and politically polarizing invited guests square off against one another, assuming contrary positions on the limits of thought and expression, respect for differences, the boundaries of toleration, and protection from harm. In Free Speech on Campus, political...