Forthcoming Titles

January 2022

COPD

Donald A. Mahler, MD
A leading expert answers your questions about how to live to your fullest with COPD. Significant lung damage from smoking, exposure in some jobs, or even diseases such as AIDS and tuberculosis can lead to COPD. Having chronic obstructive pulmonary disease can leave you feeling short of breath, sometimes reluctant to go shopping or for a walk because you are afraid of more difficulties. You may have wheezing, tightness in the chest, or...

Aquinas on Imitation of Nature

Wojciech Golubiewski
Aquinas on Imitation of Nature highlights and explores the doctrine of the imitation of nature, a crucial aspect of Aquinas' metaethics and fills the gap in research on Aquinas' moral doctrine and theory of action. It conveys Aquinas' doctrine of the imitation of nature as a natural feature of right practical reason regarding moral thinking and action, indeed as an indispensable feature of virtuous flourishing in individual and communal aspects of human...

Before the Pen Runs Dry

Janine Molinaro
Through the lens of Samuel Hazo's engaging poems, Janine Molinaro tells the story of this fascinating man's life and career. Facilitated by extensive interviews with the poet and deeply moving excerpts from his personal journals, Molinaro provides insights into Hazo's family history, childhood, military service, and teaching career; his forty-three-year stewardship of the International Poetry Forum, which brought more than eight hundred international poets and performers...

A Drum in One Hand, a Sockeye in the Other

Charlotte Coté
In the dense rainforest of the west coast of Vancouver Island, the Somass River (uumaas) brings sockeye salmon (miaat) into the Nuu-chah-nulth community of Tseshaht. uumaas and miaat are central to the sacred food practices that have been a crucial part of the Indigenous community's efforts to enact food sovereignty, decolonize their diet, and preserve their ancestral knowledge. In A Drum in One Hand, a Sockeye in the...

Fugitive Movements

edited by James O'Neil Spady
In 1822, White authorities in Charleston, South Carolina, learned of plans among the city's enslaved and free Black population to lead an armed antislavery rebellion. Among the leaders was a free Black carpenter named Denmark Vesey. After a brief investigation and what some have considered a dubious trial, Vesey and thirty-five others were convicted of attempted insurrection and hanged. Although the...

Tales of a Minstrel of Reims in the Thirteenth Century

translated by Samuel N. Rosenberg, introduction by William C. Jordan, William Chester Jordan, annotations by Randall T. Pippenger
An anonymous minstrel in thirteenth-century France composed this gripping account of historical events in his time. Crusaders and Muslim forces battle for control of the Holy Land, while power struggles rage between and among religious authorities and their conflicting secular counterparts, pope and German emperor, the kings of England and the kings of...

The Artist as Eyewitness

edited by Charlene Villaseñor Black, Gabriela Rodriguez-Gomez, Miguel Samano
This first survey of Antonio Bernal's life and work, The Artist as Eyewitness features essays that assess his murals, situating them within the historical, political, and cultural frameworks of the Chicano movement. It also includes an analysis of Bernal's unpublished novel, Breaking the Silence; a biography of Bernal; reproductions of his artwork; and a selection of his writings. Drawing on personal correspondence...

Manuscript Cultures and Epigraphy of the Tai World

edited by Volker Grabowsky
Jan 2022 - Silkworm Books
During the past four decades an impressive corpus of manuscripts and epigraphical material in Thailand, Laos, and adjacent Tai-speaking areas has been surveyed, documented, and digitized. Scholarly interest in this material has not been restricted to philological and historical studies of the texts contained in manuscripts and inscriptions but has extended to its material aspects, which encompass manuscripts written on palm-leaf, various forms of paper, cloth,...

Music and Recording in King Chulalongkorn's Bangkok

James Leonard Mitchell
Jan 2022 - Silkworm Books
In Music and Recording in King Chulalongkorn's Bangkok, James Leonard Mitchell provides the first comprehensive history of Siamese music during the celebrated reign of Rama V. Following up on his previous exploration of Thailand's most popular music genre, luk thung, Mitchell focuses on the brief period from 1903 to 1910 when gramophone recording came to Siam and almost failed to capture valuable performances. Compiling research from the EMI Archive in London and...

The War in Ukraine's Donbas

edited by David R. Marples
This collective work analyzes the ongoing conflict in Ukraine, providing a coherent picture of Ukraine and Eastern Europe in the period 2013–2020. Giving voice to different social groups, scholarly communities and agencies relevant to Ukraine's recent history, The War in Ukraine's Donbas goes beyond simplistic media interpretations that limit the analysis to Vladimir Putin and Russian aims to annex Ukraine. Instead, the authors identify the deeper roots linked...

February 2022

Asked What Has Changed

Ed Roberson
Black ecopoet observes the changing world from a high-rise window Award-winning poet Ed Roberson confronts the realities of an era in which the fate of humanity and the very survival of our planet are uncertain. Departing from the traditional nature poem, Roberson's work reclaims a much older tradition, drawing into poetry's orbit what the physical and human sciences reveal about the state of a changing world. These poems test how far the lyric can go as an answer to our crisis, even calling into question poetic...

The Black Side of the River

Jessica A. Grieser
An insightful exploration of the impact of urban change on Black culture, identity, and language Across the United States, cities are changing. Gentrification is transforming urban landscapes, often pushing local Black populations to the margins. As a result, communities with rich histories and strong identities grapple with essential questions. What does it mean to be from a place in flux? What does it mean to be a specific kind of person from that...

Blacks and Jews in America

Terrence L. Johnson, Jacques Berlinerblau, with contributions by Yvonne Chireau, Susannah Heschel
A Black-Jewish dialogue lifts a veil on these groups' unspoken history, shedding light on the challenges and promises facing American democracy from its inception to the present In this uniquely structured conversational work, two scholars — one of African American politics and religion, and one of contemporary American Jewish culture — explore a mystery: Why aren't Blacks and Jews presently...

The Draining of the Fens

Eric H. Ash
How landowners, drainage projectors, and investors worked with the Crown to transform England's waterlogged Fens. 2017 Choice Outstanding Academic Title The draining of the Fens in eastern England was one of the largest engineering projects in seventeenth-century Europe. A series of Dutch and English "projectors," working over several decades and with the full support of the Crown, transformed hundreds of thousands of acres of putatively...

The Guide to James Joyce's Ulysses

Patrick Hastings
From the creator of UlyssesGuide.com, this essential guide to James Joyce's masterpiece weaves together plot summaries, interpretive analyses, scholarly perspectives, and historical and biographical context to create an easy-to-read, entertaining, and thorough review of Ulysses. In The Guide to James Joyce's 'Ulysses,' Patrick Hastings provides comprehensive support to readers of Joyce's magnum opus by illuminating crucial details and reveling in the mischievous genius of this unparalleled...

Lazy, Crazy, and Disgusting

Alexandra Brewis and Amber Wutich
Promotional headline: How stigma derails well-intentioned public health efforts, creating suffering and worsening inequalities. 2020 Winner, Society for Anthropological Sciences Carol R. Ember Book Prize Shortlisted for the British Sociological Association's Foundation for the Sociology of Health and Illness Book Prize Stigma is a dehumanizing process, where shaming and blaming are embedded in our beliefs about who does and does not have value...

My Quest for Health Equity

David Satcher, MD, PhD
Reading this book is like sitting down with Dr. David Satcher to hear stories of leadership and lessons learned from his lifetime commitment to health equity. Dr. David Satcher is one of the most widely known and well-regarded physicians of our time. A former four-star admiral in the US Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, he served as the assistant secretary for health, the surgeon general of the United States, and the director of the Centers for Disease...

No Place for Saints

Adam Jortner
The emergence of the Mormon church is arguably the most radical event in American religious history. How and why did so many Americans flock to this new religion, and why did so many other Americans seek to silence or even destroy that movement? Mormonism exploded across America in 1830, and America exploded right back. By 1834, the new religion had been mocked, harassed, and finally expelled from its new settlements in Missouri. Why did this religion generate such anger?...

Of the Land

edited by Will Stovall, foreword by Harry Cooper
The emergence of a master artist alongside his first major collection, created during a golden age of art in the nation's capital Renowned for his innovative work with silkscreen printing, Lou Stovall's works are part of numerous collections, including the National Gallery of Art, Smithsonian American Art Museum, and Phillips Collection. Washington Post art critic Paul Richard once wrote, "As a printer of his own art, and of the art of many others, as a...