Forthcoming Titles


August 2019

Ng'ambo Atlas

Berend Van Der Lans
Aug 2019 - LM Publishers
Ng'ambo is the lesser known "other side" of Zanzibar Town. During the British Protectorate the area was designated as the Native Quarters; today it is set to become the new city center of Zanzibar's capital. Local and international perceptions of the cultural and historical importance of Ng'ambo have for a long time remained overshadowed by the social and cultural divisions created during colonial times. One thing is certain: despite its limited international fame and lack of recognition of its importance,...

The Lord of Everywhere

John Hodgen
Aug 2019 - Lynx House Press
The poems in The Lord of Everywhere are about strength and courage and the will to hold on, about home and homelessness, and the tension that floats like Emily's feather between knowing what home means and finding our true home. These poems praise those caught between glaciers of clarity and wildfires of cruelty, those who take that "new step," which Dostoevsky called our greatest fear. These poems honor those who make their way home each day, together or alone, and who still believe, somehow, inexplicably, almost...

Stories in Stone

David B. Williams
Most people do not think to observe geology from the sidewalks of a major city, but all David B. Williams has to do is look at building stone in any urban center to find a range of rocks equal to any assembled by plate tectonics. In Stories in Stone, he takes you on explorations to find 3.5-billion-year-old rock that looks like swirled pink-and-black taffy, a gas station made of petrified wood, and a Florida fort that has withstood three hundred years of attacks and hurricanes,...

Black Lives, Native Lands, White Worlds

Jared Ross Hardesty
Shortly after the first Europeans arrived in seventeenth-century New England, they began to import Africans and capture the area's indigenous peoples as slaves. By the eve of the American Revolution, enslaved people comprised only about 4 percent of the population, but slavery had become instrumental to the region's economy and had shaped its cultural traditions. This story of slavery in New England has been little told. In this concise yet...

The Case of the Slave-Child, Med

Karen Woods Weierman
In 1836, an enslaved six-year-old girl named Med was brought to Boston by a woman from New Orleans who claimed her as property. Learning of the girl's arrival in the city, the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society (BFASS) waged a legal fight to secure her freedom and affirm the free soil of Massachusetts. While Chief Justice Lemuel Shaw ruled quite narrowly in the case that enslaved people brought to Massachusetts could not be held against their will, BFASS claimed a...

Georgetown Journal of International Affairs

Dane Alivarius
The Georgetown Journal of International Affairs is the official publication of the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. Each issue of the journal provides readers with a diverse array of timely, peer-reviewed content penned by top policymakers, business leaders, and academic luminaries. The Journal takes a holistic approach to international affairs and features a Forum that offers focused analysis on a key topic with each new issue. This...

Identities and Interests

Randy Besco
Aug 2019 - UBC Press
Identities and Interests offers an entirely new perspective on the role of racial and ethnic identities in Canadian elections. Using a series of experiments, as well as candidate and census data, Randy Besco demonstrates that self-identification matters far more than self-interest, ideology, or policy. The largest minority groups – Chinese and South Asian Canadians – tend to support candidates of their own ethnicity. Yet inter-minority affinity voting also reveals the...

Fire, second edition

Stephen J. Pyne
Over vast expanses of time, fire and humanity have interacted to expand the domain of each, transforming the earth and what it means to be human. In this concise yet wide-ranging book, Stephen J. Pyne—named by Science magazine as "the world's leading authority on the history of fire"—explores the surprising dynamics of fire before humans, fire and human origins, aboriginal economies of hunting and foraging, agricultural and pastoral uses of fire, fire ceremonies, fire as an idea and a technology, and industrial...

Understanding Bharati Mukherjee

Ruth Maxey
Bharati Mukherjee was the first major South Asian American writer and the first naturalized American citizen to win the National Book Critics Circle Award. Born in Kolkata, India, she immigrated to the United States in 1961 and went on to publish eight novels, two short story collections, two long works of nonfiction, and numerous essays, book reviews, and newspaper articles. She was professor emerita in the Department of English at the University of California, Berkeley, until her death in 2017. In...

The Collectors of Lost Souls, updated edition

Warwick Anderson
Winner, William H. Welch Medal, American Association for the History of Medicine Winner, Ludwik Fleck Prize, Society for Social Studies of Science Winner, General History Award, New South Wales Premier's History Awards When whites first encountered the Fore people in the isolated highlands of colonial New Guinea during the 1940s and 1950s, they found a people in the grip of a bizarre epidemic. Women and children succumbed to muscle weakness, uncontrollable tremors,...

Looking for Betty MacDonald

Paula Becker
Betty Bard MacDonald (1907–1958), the best-selling author of The Egg and I and the classic Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle children's books, burst onto the literary scene shortly after the end of World War II. Readers embraced her memoir of her years as a young bride operating a chicken ranch on Washington's Olympic Peninsula, and The Egg and I sold its first million copies in less than a year. The public was drawn to MacDonald's vivacity, her offbeat humor, and her...

Building Ho's Army

Xiaobing Li
Built upon a solid foundation of sources, memoirs, and interviews, this study sheds new light on China's efforts in the Vietnam War. Utilizing secondary works in Chinese, Vietnamese, and Western languages, and the author's own familiarity as a former member of the Chinese People's Liberation Army, this examination expands the knowledge of China's relations with the North Vietnamese Army (NVA) during the 1950s and 1960s. As a communist state bordering Vietnam, China...

Wonderful Wasteland and other natural disasters

Elidio La Torre Lagares
When Hurricane María unleashed its devastation onto Puerto Rico, thousands of lives were lost to the storm in what was the island's worst natural disaster on record. With so much of the recovery still underway and the scars still fresh, its citizens continue to contend with the reality that life on the island has fundamentally changed. In his first collection of poems written in English, La Torre Lagares journeys through his memory in an effort to recompose his...

Apparitions

Geoffrey Batchen
An engaging and provocative account of photography's first commercial applications in England and their global implications. This book addresses a persistent gap in the study of photography's history, moving beyond an appreciation of single breakthrough works to consider the photographic image's newfound reproducibility and capacity for circulation through newsprint and other media in the nineteenth century.

Engineering Corporate Success

James Hardymon
From growing up on the banks of the Ohio River during the Great Depression to acquiring executive management roles at large international companies, James Hardymon's life has been full of twists, turns, hard work, and achievement. During his career, Hardymon helped build corporations as a CEO, learned the ropes of Wall Street, and interacted with US presidents and congressional leaders. As a result, he acquired a keen, first-hand understanding of corporate America, which propelled his...

The Evolution of Brazil

Manoel de Oliveira Lima
Manoel de Oliveira Lima's The Evolution of Brazil was first published in 1914 as the result of a series of lectures given by the Brazilian historian at Stanford University in the Fall of 1912. A world-renowned scholar of Latin American history, Oliveira Lima taught and lectured at the most prestigious European universities, including the Sorbonne. He was a pioneer in the field in the United States, having inaugurated the Chair in Latin American History at Harvard University and later becoming a Professor...

The Gift of Knowledge / Ttnuwit Atawish Nch'inch'imamí

Virginia R. Beavert
The Gift of Knowledge / Ttnuwit Atawish Nch'inch'imamí is a treasure trove of material for those interested in Native American culture. Author Virginia Beavert grew up in a traditional, Indian-speaking household. Both her parents and her maternal grandmother were shamans, and her childhood was populated by people who spoke tribal dialects and languages: Nez Perce, Umatilla, Klikatat, and Yakima Ichishkíin. Her work on Native languages...

The Landscape Architecture of Richard Haag

Thaïsa Way
Richard Haag is best known for his rehabilitation of Gas Works Park in Seattle and for a series of remarkable gardens at the Bloedel Reserve on Bainbridge Island. He reshaped the field of landscape architecture as a designer, teacher, and activist. In 1964, Haag founded the landscape architecture department at the University of Washington, and his innovative work contributed to the increasingly significant design approach known as urban...

The Propeller under the Bed

Eileen A. Bjorkman
On July 25, 2010, Arnold Ebneter flew across the country in a plane he designed and built himself, setting an aviation world record for aircraft of its class. He was eighty-two at the time and the flight represented the culmination of a dream he'd cultivated since his childhood in the 1930s. Eileen Bjorkman — herself a pilot and aeronautical engineer — frames her father's journey from teenage airplane enthusiast to Air Force pilot and Boeing engineer in the...

Seismic City

Joanna L. Dyl
On April 18, 1906, a 7.8-magnitude earthquake shook the San Francisco region, igniting fires that burned half the city. The disaster in all its elements — earthquake, fires, and recovery — profoundly disrupted the urban order and challenged San Francisco's perceived permanence. The crisis temporarily broke down spatial divisions of class and race and highlighted the contested terrain of urban nature in an era of widespread class conflict, simmering ethnic...