Forthcoming Titles


July 2020

The Art of the Game of Chess

Michael J. McGrath
The Art of the Game of Chess is the first English translation of Fr. Ruy López's 1561 book about chess, Libro de la invención liberal y arte del juego del ajedrez. López was a priest who served as King Philip II's confessor and royal advisor. As a connoisseur of chess, King Philip II promoted the game in his court, and it did not take long for López to become known as Spain's and one of Europe's greatest chess players. López is widely acclaimed as one of the most influential chess thinkers of all time...

American Spies

Michael J. Sulick
A history of Americans who spied against their country and what their stories reveal about national security What's your secret? American Spies presents the stunning histories of more than forty Americans who spied against their country during the past six decades. Michael Sulick, former head of the CIA's clandestine service, illustrates through these stories — some familiar, others much less well known — the common threads in the spy cases...

Freshwater Fishes of North America, Volume 2

edited by Melvin L. Warren, Jr., and Brooks M. Burr
with Anthony A. Echelle, Bernard R. Kuhajda, and Stephen T. Ross
illustrated by Joseph R. Tomelleri
When the first volume of Freshwater Fishes of North America was published, it was immediately hailed as the definitive reference in the field. Readers have been fervently awaiting the next volume in this encompassing three-book set ever since. Now complete, volume 2, covering families Characidae to Poeciliidae, is...

Laws of the Constitution

Donald F. Bur
Laws of the Constitution: Consolidated gathers all of the historical and contemporary constitutional documents pertaining to Canada, its provinces, and its territories, organized thematically and topically for ease of reference and supported by comprehensive lists and a thorough index. The volume excludes overridden and irrelevant documents, making it a comprehensive yet focused and precise reference that presents the words, ideas, and documents that have brought the constitution into being. A...

Austerities and Aspirations

Bela Tomka
This monograph updates existing scholarship on the economic performance of Czechoslovakia, Hungary, and Poland since 1945, contrasting it to Western Europe. For this longitudinal comparative exercise, the author goes beyond the traditional growth paradigm and analyzes the historical patterns of consumption and leisure, as well as quality of life, broadly understood, aspects that Tomka argues can best...

The Butler's Child

Lewis M. Steel
Lewis M. Steel, born a Warner Brothers' grandson, inherited a life of privilege, access, and opportunity. With every option available, he chose a life of purpose, spending more than fifty years as a no-holds-barred civil rights lawyer whose victories set legal precedents still relevant today. In The Butler's Child, Steel explores the important role race played in his upbringing, anchored by his relationship with the family's African American butler, and why...

Labor in State Socialist Europe, 1945-1989

Marsha Siefert
Labor regimes under communism in East-Central Europe were complex, shifting and ambiguous. This collection of sixteen essays offers new conceptual and empirical ways to understand their history from the end of the Second World War to 1989, challenging accepted notions of East European "transitions" and "transformations." The authors reconsider the history of state socialism by reexamining the policies and problems of communist regimes and...

Lviv – Wrocław, Cities in Parallel?

Jan Fellerer
In the 20th century, both Lviv and Wrocław went through cataclysmic changes. Assertively Polish pre-war Lwów became Soviet Lvov, and then, after 1991, it became assertively Ukrainian Lviv. Breslau, the third largest city in Germany before 1945, was in turn 'recovered' by communist Poland as Wroclaw. Practically the entire population of Breslau was replaced, and Lwów's demography too was dramatically restructured: many Polish inhabitants migrated to...

Making Kantha, Making Home

Pika Ghosh
In Bengal, mothers swaddle their infants and cover their beds in colorful textiles that are passed down through generations. They create these kantha from layers of soft, recycled fabric strengthened with running stitches and use them as shawls, covers, and seating mats. Making Kantha, Making Home explores the social worlds shaped by the Bengali kantha that survive from the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. In the first study of colonial-period women's embroidery...

Multicultural Cities of the Habsburg Empire, 1880–1914

Catherine Horel
This book offers a comparative analysis of the societal, ethnic, and cultural diversity of twelve cities in the last decades of the Habsburg Monarchy. The following cities are discussed (by their current names): Arad, Bratislava, Brno, Chernivtsi, Lviv, Oradea, Rijeka, Sarajevo, Subotica, Timioara, Trieste, and Zagreb. This selection aims to counter the disproportionate attention that the largest cities in the empire...

The River That Made Seattle

BJ Cummings
With bountiful salmon and fertile plains, the Duwamish River has drawn people to its shores over the centuries for trading, transport, and sustenance. Chief Se'alth and his allies fished and lived in villages here and white settlers established their first settlements nearby. Industrialists later straightened the river's natural turns and built factories on its banks, floating in raw materials and shipping out airplane parts, cement, and steel. Unfortunately, the...

Stalin's Italian Prisoners of War

Maria Teresa Giusti
This book reconstructs the fate of Italian prisoners of war captured by the Red Army between August 1941 and the winter of 1942-43. On 230.000 Italians left on the Eastern front almost 100.000 did not come back home. Testimonies and memoirs from surviving veterans complement the author's intensive work in Russian and Italian archives. The study examines Italian war crimes against the Soviet civilian population and describes the particularly grim fate of the thousands of Italian military...

Wars and Betweenness

Aliaksandr Piahanau
This book illuminates a set of crisis and conflicts that marked the 1920s and 1930s in the area between the Baltic and the Black Seas, demonstrating the diplomatic, military, economic or cultural engagement of France, Germany, Russia, Britain, Italy and Japan in this highly volatile region, and critically damaging the fragile post-Versailles political arrangement. By connoting the region as "Middle Europe," the editors revive the symbolic geography of the time and...

Anticipating Future Environments

Shana Lee Hirsch
Drought. Wildfire. Extreme flooding. How does climate change affect the daily work of scientists? Ecological restoration is often premised on the idea of returning a region to an earlier, healthier state. Yet the effects of climate change undercut that premise and challenge the ways scientists can work, destabilizing the idea of "normalcy" and revealing the politics that shape what scientists can do. How can the practice of...

Patriots in Exile

James Waring McCrady
In the months following the May 1780 capture of Charleston, South Carolina, by combined British and loyalist forces, British soldiers arrested sixty-three paroled American prisoners and transported them to the borderland town of St. Augustine, East Florida—territory under British control since the French and Indian War. In Patriots in Exile, James Waring McCrady and C. L. Bragg chronicle the banishment of these elite southerners, the...

Unsettling Native Art Histories on the Northwest Coast

Kathryn Bunn-Marcuse
Inseparable from its communities, Northwest Coast art functions aesthetically and performatively beyond the scope of non-Indigenous scholarship, from demonstrating kinship connections to manifesting spiritual power. Contributors to this volume foreground Indigenous understandings in recognition of this rich context and its historical erasure within the discipline of art history. By centering voices that uphold Indigenous priorities, integrating the expertise of...

Liberty Brought Us Here

Susan E. Lindsey
Between 1820 and 1913, approximately 16,000 black people left the United States to start new lives in Liberia, Africa, in what was at the time the largest out-migration in US history. When Tolbert Major, a former Kentucky slave and single father, was offered his own chance for freedom, he accepted. He, several family members, and seventy other people boarded the Luna on July 5, 1836. After they arrived in Liberia, Tolbert penned a letter to his...

Our Rightful Place

Terry L. Birdwhistell
In 1880, forty-three women walked into the president's office at the University of Kentucky (UK) and signed the student register, becoming the first female students at a public college in the commonwealth. But gaining admittance was only the beginning. For the next sixty-five years—encompassing two world wars, an economic depression, and the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment—generations of women at UK claimed and reclaimed their right to...

Picturing Peter Bogdanovich

Peter Tonguette
In 1971, Newsweek heralded The Last Picture Show as "the most impressive work by a young American director since Citizen Kane." Indeed, few filmmakers rivaled Peter Bogdanovich's popularity over the next decade. Riding the success of What's Up, Doc? (1972) and Paper Moon (1973), Bogdanovich became a bona fide celebrity, making regular appearances in his own movie trailers, occasionally hosting late-night television shows, and publicly advocating for...