Forthcoming Titles



October 2018

Amen

Patrick Ryan
In Hebrew and Arabic, the words Amen and Amin—the most frequent conclusions of prayers—derive from cognate consonantal roots. The Greek and other versions of the Hebrew Bible continue to use the word Amen; the New Testament follows suit. The basic meaning of Amen or Amin in all three scriptures is the same, a passionate address to God: 'I entrust myself to You; I put my faith in You, I keep faith with You.' It is the cry of a person struggling to grasp and be grasped by God. Amen:...

Cross-Border Commemorations

Adam Hjorthén
The histories of colonial settlement in America are generally presented as uniquely national stories. Yet because these histories involved settlers who crossed oceans, they are inherently transnational and have been important for different groups throughout the world. To understand how settlement histories are used to promote social, political, and commercial relations across national borders, Adam Hjorthén explores the little-known phenomenon of cross-border...

The Profession of Widowhood

Katherine Clark Walter
The Profession of Widowhood explores how the idea of 'true' widowhood was central to pre-modern ideas concerning marriage and of female identity more generally. The medieval figure of the Christian vere vidua or "good" widow evolved from and reinforced ancient social and religious sensibilities of chastity, loyalty and grief as gendered 'work.' The ideal widow was a virtuous woman who mourned her dead husband in chastity, solitude, and most...

Bracero Railroaders

Erasmo Gamboa
Desperate for laborers to keep the trains moving during World War II, the U.S. and Mexican governments created a now mostly forgotten bracero railroad program that sent a hundred thousand Mexican workers across the border to build and maintain railroad lines throughout the United States, particularly the West. Although both governments promised the workers adequate living arrangements and fair working conditions, most bracero railroaders...

The Gender of Caste

Charu Gupta
Caste and gender are complex markers of difference that have traditionally been addressed in isolation from each other, with a presumptive maleness present in most studies of Dalits ("untouchables") and a presumptive upper-casteness in many feminist studies. In this study of the representations of Dalits in the print culture of colonial north India, Charu Gupta enters new territory by looking at images of Dalit women as both victims and vamps, the construction of Dalit masculinities,...

Native Students at Work

Kevin Whalen
Native Students at Work tells the stories of Native people from around the American Southwest who participated in labor programs at Sherman Institute, a federal Indian boarding school in Riverside, California. The school placed young Native men and women in and around Los Angeles as domestic workers, farmhands, and factory laborers. For the first time, historian Kevin Whalen reveals the challenges these students faced as they left...

Incorporating Culture

Solen Roth
Oct 2018 - UBC Press
Fragments of culture often become commodities when the tourism and heritage business showcases local artistic and cultural practice. But what happens when local communities become more involved in this cultural marketplace? Incorporating Culture examines how Indigenous artists and entrepreneurs are cultivating more equitable relationships with the companies that reproduce their designs on everyday objects. Moving beyond assumptions that...

Live at The Cellar

Marian Jago
Oct 2018 - UBC Press
In the 1950s and '60s, cooperative jazz clubs opened in response to new forms of jazz expression emerging after the war and a lack of performance spaces outside major urban centres. Operated by the musicians themselves, these hip new clubs created spaces where jazz musicians practised their art. Live at The Cellar looks at this unique period in the development of jazz in Canada. Centered on Vancouver's legendary Cellar...

Mastering Chinese through Global Debate

Dana Scott Bourgerie
While language instructors recognize the value of debate as a means of facilitating Advanced- and Superior-level skills, no single advanced Chinese textbook exists that provides level-specific scaffolded language exercises, rhetorical strategies, and topic-specific texts within the context of debate. Mastering Chinese through Global Debate, designed to meet the ACTFL proficiency guidelines and featuring content written by a professional Chinese journalist, offers learners the means...

Mastering English through Global Debate

Ekaterina Talalakina, Tony Brown, Jennifer Bown, William Eggington
Mastering English through Global Debate brings together rhetorical traditions and the best practices of ESL instruction to facilitate superior-level proficiency in the English language. Each chapter addresses a rich topic of debate, providing students with a set of prereading activities, texts covering both sides of a debate topic, and postreading comprehension and lexical development exercises — all of which foster the language and...

Birds of Nunavut

James M. Richards
Oct 2018 - UBC Press
Nunavut is a land of islands, encompassing some of the most remote places on Earth. It is also home to some of the world's most fascinating bird species. Birds of Nunavut is the first complete survey of every species known to occur in the territory. Cowritten by a team of eighteen experts, it documents 295 species of birds (of which 145 are known to breed there), presenting a wealth of information on identification, distribution, ecology, behavior, and conservation. Lavishly illustrated with over 750 color...

The Book of Divine Works

St. Hildegard Of Bingen
Declared a Doctor of the Church in 2012, St. Hildegard of Bingen (1098-1179) is one of the most remarkable figures of medieval Latin Christianity. A visionary theologian and prophetic reformer, as well as composer, artist, and natural scientist, her voice echoes across the centuries to offer today an integrated vision of the relationship between cosmos and humanity. Completed in 1173, The Book of Divine Works (Liber Divinorum Operum) is the culmination of the Visionary's Doctor's theological project,...

Finding Thoreau

Richard W. Judd
In his 1862 eulogy for Henry David Thoreau, Ralph Waldo Emerson reflected that his friend "dedicated his genius with such entire love to the fields, hills, and waters of his native town, that he made them known and interesting to all reading Americans, and to people over the sea." Finding Thoreau traces the reception of Thoreau's work from the time of his death to his ascendancy as an environmental icon in the 1970s, revealing insights into American...

The Chesapeake Table

Renee Brooks Catacalos
There was a time when most food was local, whether you lived on a farm or bought your food at a farmers market in the city. Exotic foods like olives, spices, and chocolate shipped in from other parts of the world were considered luxuries. Now, most food that Americans eat is shipped from somewhere else, and eating local is considered by some to be a luxury. Renee Brooks Catacalos is here to remind us that eating local is easier—and more rewarding—than we may think. There is an...

Nature and the Environment in Amish Life

David L. McConnell and Marilyn D. Loveless
The pastoral image of Amish communities living simply and in touch with the land strikes a deep chord with many Americans. Environmentalists have lauded the Amish as iconic models for a way of life that is local, self-sufficient, and in harmony with nature. But the Amish themselves do not always embrace their ecological reputation, and critics have long questioned the portrayal of the Amish as models of environmental stewardship. In Nature and the Environment...

Emancipation without Equality

Thomas E. Smith
At the Pan–African Conference in London in 1900, W. E. B. Du Bois famously prophesied that the problem of the twentieth century would be the global color line, the elevation of "whiteness" that created a racially divided world. While Pan-Africanism recognized the global nature of the color line in this period, Thomas E. Smith argues that it also pushed against it, advocating for what Du Bois called "opportunities and privileges of modern civilization"...

Homo Abyssus

Ferdinand Ulrich
Homo Abyssus: The Drama of the Question of Being is one of the most significant works of Catholic philosophy in the twentieth century. In this speculative appropriation of Aquinas, Ferdinand Ulrich lays out a vision of being as an image of divine goodness, drawing out as-yet-undiscovered treasures from Aquinas's texts through a fundamental engagement with modern philosophy, above all Hegel and Heidegger. One of the most unique features of this vision is, as Hans Urs von Balthasar...

The Priest Who Put Europe Back Together

Sean Brennan
Philp Fabian Flynn led a remarkable life, bearing witness to some of the most pivotal events of the twentieth century. Flynn took part in the invasions of Sicily and Normandy, the Battle of Aachen, and the Battle of the Hürtgen Forest. He acted as confessor to Nazi War Criminals during the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg, assisted Hungarian Revolutionaries on the streets of Budapest, and assisted the waves of refugees arriving in Austria feeling...

College for the Commonwealth

Michael T. Benson
In the past decade, states across the nation have cut higher education spending per student by more than 15 percent. Kentucky has experienced some of the largest cuts in the country, leading many to claim that higher education is in a state of crisis. In spite of this turmoil, however, Kentucky's remarkable institutions of higher education stand more capable than ever to prepare new generations for the challenges and opportunities of their time. ...

Counterinsurgency Wars and the Anglo-American Alliance

Andrew Mumford
Andrew Mumford challenges the notion of a "special relationship" between the United States and United Kingdom in diplomatic and military affairs, the most vaunted and, he says, exaggerated of associations in the post-1945 era. Though they are allies to be sure, national self-interest and domestic politics have often undercut their relationship. This is the first book to combine a history of US-UK interaction during major...