Forthcoming Titles

January 2023

Being Human

Robert E. Wood
Being Human is the fruit of many years teaching Philosophical Anthropology, conducting Phenomenological Workshops, and reading classic texts in the light of a reflective awareness of the field of experience. Being Human is intended to look to what is typically assumed but not examined in much of current philosophical literature. Today what typically appear as philosophical are textual studies that draw upon wide-ranging scholarship to learn how past thinkers used to...

A Guide to John Henry Newman

edited by Juan R. Velez
John Henry Newman (1801-1890), renowned thinker and writer, Anglican clergyman and later Roman Catholic priest and cardinal, has had a lasting influence on both Anglicans and Catholics, in the fields of literature, education, and theology. On October 13, 2019, Pope Francis declared him a saint in Rome. Appealing to both the student and the scholar, A Guide to John Henry Newman provides a wide range of subjects on Newman's life and thought relevant for our times and...

American Higher Education in the Twenty-First Century, fifth edition

edited by Michael N. Bastedo, Philip G. Altbach, and Patricia J. Gumport
Now in its fifth edition! An indispensable reference for anyone concerned with the future of American colleges and universities. Whether it is advances in information technology, organized social movements, or racial inequality and social class stratification, higher education serves as a lens for examining significant issues within American society. First published in...

Because Data Can't Speak for Itself

David Chrisinger and Lauren Brodsky
A guide for how to tell clear, data-driven stories that will make an impact. People with important evidence-based ideas often struggle to translate data into stories their readers can relate to and understand. And if leaders can't communicate well to their audience, they will not be able to make important changes in the world. Why do some evidence-based ideas thrive while others die? And how do we improve the...

The Brave New World, third edition

Peter Charles Hoffer
A lively synthesis of early American history, now in its third edition. The Brave New World covers the entire span of early American history, from 30,000 years before Europeans landed on North American shores to the Revolutionary War. With its exploration of the places and peoples of early America, this comprehensive new edition of a classic textbook brings together the most recent scholarship on the colonial and revolutionary eras, Native Americans, slavery and the slave trade,...

The Camphor Tree and the Elephant

Faizah Zakaria, series edited by K. Sivaramakrishnan, foreword by K. Sivaramakrishnan
What is the role of religion in shaping interactions and relations between the human and nonhuman in nature? Why are Muslim and Christian organizations generally not a potent force in Southeast Asian environmental movements? The Camphor Tree and the Elephant brings these questions into the history of ecological change in the region, centering the roles of religion and...

Ends of Painting

edited by David Homewood, Paris Lettau
Contemporary art begins where painting ends, or so goes one of recent art history's most dominant narratives. This book is a postmortem of the supposed death of painting in the period following World War II. In eleven essays by a global array of leading scholars, Ends of Painting offers a counter-history, showing how the practice and discourse of painting remained integral to art throughout the 1960s and 1970s. Written by art historians from Australia, Asia, Europe,...

Ida Lupino

William Donati
British-born actress, singer, director, and producer Ida Lupino (1918-1995) cut one of the most alluring profiles of any Hollywood persona during the forties and fifties. The star of classic films such as They Drive by Night (1940), High Sierra (1941), and Road House (1948), she was a stalwart of the screen throughout her early career and frequently received top billing ahead of stars such as Humphrey Bogart. While her talent was undeniable, her insistence on taking only roles she felt would challenge her...

An Introduction to Black Studies

Eric R. Jackson
For hundreds of years, the American public education system has neglected to fully examine, discuss, and acknowledge the vast and rich history of people of African descent who have played a pivotal role in the transformation of the United States. The establishment of Black studies departments and programs represented a major victory for higher education and a vindication of Black scholars such as W. E. B. Du Bois and Nathan Huggins. This emerging field of study sought to address omissions from...

Junk Food Politics

Eduardo J. Gómez
Why do sugary beverage and fast food industries thrive in the emerging world? An interesting public health paradox has emerged in some developing nations. Despite government commitment to eradicating noncommunicable diseases and innovative prevention programs aimed at reducing obesity and type 2 diabetes, sugary beverage and fast food industries are thriving. But political leaders in countries such as Mexico, Brazil, India, China, and...

Madness at the Movies

James Charney, MD
A unique exploration of how mental illness is portrayed in classic and contemporary films. The study of classic and contemporary films can provide a powerful avenue to understand the experience of mental illness. In Madness at the Movies, James Charney, MD, a practicing psychiatrist and long-time cinephile, examines films that delve deeply into characters' inner worlds, and he analyzes moments that help define their particular mental illness. Based on the highly...

The Present Illness

Martin F. Shapiro, MD, PhD, MPH
Beyond political posturing and industry quick-fixes, why is the American health care system so difficult to reform? Health care reform efforts are difficult to achieve and have been historically undermined by their narrow scope. In The Present Illness, Martin F. Shapiro, MD, PhD, MPH, weaves together history, sociology, extensive research, and his own experiences as a physician to explore the broad range of afflictions impairing US health care and explains why...

Skid Road

Josephine Ensign
Affluent Seattle has one of the highest numbers of unhoused people in the United States. In 2021 an estimated 40,800 people experienced homelessness in Seattle and King County during the year, not counting the significant number of "hidden" homeless people doubled up with friends or living in and out of cheap hotels. In Skid Road Josephine Ensign uncovers the stories of overlooked and long-silenced people who have lived on the margins of society throughout Seattle's...

UnAustralian Art

Rex Butler, A. D. S. Donaldson
UnAustralian Art: Ten Essays on Transnational Art History proposes a radical rethinking of Australian art. Rex Butler and ADS Donaldson do not seek to identify a distinctive national sensibility; instead, they demonstrate that Australian art and artists have always been engaged in struggles and creative exchanges with the rest of the world. Examining Australian art as much from the outside in as the inside out, Butler and Donaldson's methodology opens...

Wealth, Cost, and Price in American Higher Education

Bruce A. Kimball
with Sarah M. Iler
Colleges and universities are richer than ever—so why has the price of attending them risen so much? As endowments and fundraising campaigns have skyrocketed in recent decades, critics have attacked higher education for steeply increasing its production cost and price and the snowballing debt of students. In Wealth, Cost, and Price in American Higher Education, Bruce A. Kimball and Sarah M. Iler reveal how these trends began 150...

Wide-Open Desert

Jordan Biro Walters
Throughout the twentieth century, New Mexico's LGBTQ+ residents inhabited a wide spectrum of spaces, from Santa Fe's nascent bohemian art scene to the secretive military developments at Los Alamos. Shifting focus away from the urban gay meccas that many out queer people called home, Wide-Open Desert brings to life a vibrant milieu of two-spirit, Chicana lesbian, and white queer cultural producers in the heart of the US Southwest. Jordan Biro Walters draws on oral histories,...

February 2023

America's Path Forward

edited by Konstanze Frischen, Michael Zakaras
Critiques and solutions offered by social changemakers from all walks of life The United States is living through a period of polarization and upheaval. We hunger for answers, yet too often turn to the same people and institutions, expecting different outcomes. How can this be? This book takes a different angle. It features award-winning social innovators from all walks of life with decades of...

The COVID-19 Intelligence Failure

Erik J. Dahl
An in-depth analysis of why COVID-19 warnings failed and how to avert the next disaster Epidemiologists and national security agencies warned for years about the potential for a deadly pandemic, but in the end global surveillance and warning systems were not enough to avert the COVID-19 disaster. In The COVID-19 Intelligence Failure, Erik J. Dahl demonstrates that understanding how intelligence warnings work — and how they fail — shows why the years of predictions were not...

Civil Movements in an Illiberal Regime

Dániel Mikecz
Dániel Mikecz addresses in this study the tensions between oppositional civil society and party-political actors. As successive elections demonstrate the increasing confidence of the illiberal regime of Viktor Orbán, left and liberal parties of the opposition have faced a prolonged crisis in credibility. At the same time, the civil society has not been immobile, and bottom-up initiatives, social and political movements, and non-governmental organizations have...

Fixing American Cybersecurity

edited by Larry Clinton, foreword by Kiersten Todt, with contributions by Anthony Shapella, Lou DeSorbo, Jeffrey C. Brown, J.R. Williamson, Michael Higgins, Michael Gordon, Josh Higgins, Greg Montana, Gary McAlum, Kenneth Huh, Ryan Boulais, Jamison Gardner, Andy Kirkland, Alex Green, Richard Spearman, Carter Zheng, Tarun Krishnakumar, Larry Clinton
Advocates a cybersecurity "social contract" between government and business in seven key economic sectors ...