Forthcoming Titles

July 2022

The Flow of Illicit Funds

Ola M. Tucker
High-profile case studies provide compliance professionals with a deep, holistic understanding of modern-day money laundering to better detect and deter it Money laundering is a serious crime that presents a heightened, yet underrated, global threat. Although often thought of as a victimless crime, money laundering significantly impacts the global financial system, which leads to further crime, corruption, human exploitation, and environmental...

The Future of Business Journalism

Chris Roush, foreword by David Callaway
An eye-opening account of how the information gap in business journalism is eroding civic life and impacting the economy——and how we can fix it Business owners, consumers, and employees have long relied on the news to make financial decisions — what to buy, who to hire, and what products to sell. In the twenty-first century, that news has shifted. Only the big businesses and executives can afford expensive subscriptions, while...

Keeping the World's Environment under Review

Jan Bakkes, Marion Cheatle, Nora Mžavanadze, László Pintér, Ron Witt, Ronald G. Witt
How do we take stock of the state and direction of the world's environment, and what can we learn from the experience? Among the myriad detailed narratives about the condition of the planet, the Global Environment Outlook (GEO) reports—issued by the United Nations Environment Programme—stand out as the most ambitious. For nearly three decades the GEO...

Row Upon Row, fourth edition

Dale Rosengarten, McKissick Museum, preface by Jane Przybysz
An in-depth, illustrated history of South Carolina's Lowcountry baskets Coiled grass baskets are icons of Gullah culture. From their roots in Africa, through their evolution on Lowcountry rice plantations, to their modern appreciation as art objects sought by collectors and tourists, these vessels are carriers of African American history and the African-inspired culture that took hold along the coast of South Carolina and...

The Virtues

John Garvey
An ancient question asks what role moral formation ought to play in education. It leads to such questions as, do intellectual and moral formation belong together? Is it possible to form the mind and neglect the heart? Is it wise? These perennial questions take on new significance today, when education — especially, higher education — has become a defining feature in the lives of young people. Throughout his more than 40 years in academia, John Garvey has reflected on the relationship between intellectual and moral formation,...

Critique Is Creative

Liz Lerman, John Borstel
A thorough introduction and lively exploration of a widely recognized method for giving and getting useful feedback Devised by choreographer Liz Lerman in 1990, Critical Response Process® (CRP) is an internationally recognized method for giving and getting feedback on creative works in progress. In this first in-depth study of CRP, Lerman and her long-term collaborator John Borstel describe in detail the four-step process, its origins and...

Rural Republican Realignment in the Modern South

M.V. Hood, III, Seth C. McKee
An inside look at why the Republican Party has come to dominate the rural American South Beginning with the Dixiecrat Revolt of 1948 and extending through the 2020 election cycle, political scientists M.V. Hood III and Seth C. McKee trace the process by which rural white southerners transformed from fiercely loyal Democrats to stalwart Republicans. While these rural white southerners were the slowest to affiliate with the Grand Old Party, they...

The Story of Propaganda in 50 Images

David Welch
From ancient Greek coinage to the sound bites of modern-day political spin doctors, propaganda has existed for thousands of years. But it was in the twentieth century that the art of persuasively communicating ideas truly came of age—when mass media meant that leaders could reach right into our living rooms to deliver their messages. Today, we live in a globalized "post-truth" era of social media and "fake news," in which lies and conspiracies can thrive—and many of us carry this information...

Beatrice's Ledger

Ruth R. Martin, with Vivian B. Martin
A vivid and moving story about family, courage, and the power of education Ruth remembers the day the sheriff pulled up in front of her family's home with a white neighbor who claimed Ruth's father owed her recently deceased husband money. It was the early 1940s in Jim Crow South Carolina, and even at the age of eleven, Ruth knew a Black person's word wasn't trusted. But her father remained calm as he waited on her mother's return from the house. Ruth's...

Cross and Creation

Mark E. Therrien
Even though the theology of Origen of Alexandria has shaped the Christian Tradition in almost every way, the controversies over his legacy have been seemingly endless. One major interpretative trend, for example, has suggested Origen's theology is really akin to the heterodox Gnostics against whom he wrote than the actual teaching of the Gospel, since he (supposedly) had a disdainful attitude towards Creation and ultimately saw little redemptive meaning in the...

The Dialogue between Tradition and History

Benedict Ashley, edited by Matthew McWhorter
The decades following the Second Vatican Council witnessed Catholic theology's break from the classicism. Deductive, classical theology was replaced by an empirical, historically minded theology. The result was moral confusion and intellectual controversy whose effects are still felt by the Church. Ashley was disappointed with this break and saw the controversies generated by the Council as a sign that...

The Rise and Decline of Communist Czechoslovakias Railway Sector

Tomáš Nigrin
Once the pride of interwar Czechoslovakia, and key during the forced industrialization of the Stalinist period, during the 1970s and 1980s the Czechoslovak railway sector showed the symptoms of the political tiredness and economic exhaustion of the Soviet Bloc. This book examines the failure of central economic planning through the lens of this national transport system. Based on the presentation of its history and on the detailed scrutiny of the actors,...

Citizenship on Catfish Row

Geoffrey Galt Harpham
A radical reinterpretation of three controversial works that illuminate racism and national identity in the United States Citizenship on Catfish Row focuses on three seminal works in the history of American culture: the first full-length narrative film, D. W. Griffith's The Birth of a Nation; the first integrated musical, Oscar Hammerstein and Jerome Kern's Showboat; and the first great American opera, George Gershwin's Porgy and Bess. Each of these...

Corruption

Mette Frisk Jensen
A short but engaging look at what makes Denmark one of the least corrupt countries in the world. Corruption is a profoundly destructive force around the world, but why does its extent vary so drastically among countries? In Corruption, Mette Frisk Jensen closely links the level of corruption in a country to its wealth, the happiness of its citizens, and the level of trust citizens have in their government. Covering the shifting concept of corruption from ancient Greece to modern-day cases, Frisk Jensen discusses why...

Creativity

Jan Løhmann Stephensen
A short but engaging exploration of our changing perception of creativity. Creativity was once seen as the mark of mad geniuses, troubled souls, and avant-garde eccentrics. Today, however, we expect to find the trait thriving in and around us. Why? In Creativity, Jan Løhmann Stephensen provides a historical and contemporary view of creativity and explains why it is not always the answer to every problem. From van Gogh to Springsteen, Løhmann Stephensen explores the creative process of artists in order to craft a new...

Democracy

Svend-Erik Skaaning
A short but engaging look at democracy: what it is, how it compares to other forms of rule, and why it makes a difference. What is democracy? And even if it can be defined, can true democracy ever be achieved? Without a definition, dictators can pose as democrats and the oppressed can see despotism as the answer to their prayers. But true democracy, author Svend-Erik Skaaning argues, will not automatically solve the world's problems. It is contentious and unfair, even as it keeps tyrants at bay. In Democracy, Skaaning...

Happiness

Christian Bjørnskov
A short but engaging look at how the key to our own happiness may lie with other people. Why is Denmark consistently ranked one of the happiest nations? In Happiness, researcher Christian Bjørnskov explores what we mean when we talk about happiness. Based on new research findings on how people perceive their own lives, Bjørnskov argues that the basic factors that constitute happiness are mostly universal across cultures. By evaluating studies and theories on happiness that test how family, genetics, religion, wealth,...

The Hills Remember

James Still, edited by Ted Olson, OtherTeresa Perry Reynolds
James Still (1906–2001) remains one of the most beloved and important writers of Appalachian literature. Best known for his acclaimed novel River of Earth (1940), the Alabama native and adopted Kentuckian left an enduring legacy of novels, stories, and poems during his nearly seventy-year career. The Hills Remember: The Complete Short Stories of James Still honors the late writer by collecting all of Still's short stories,...

History by HBO

Rebecca Weeks
The television industry is changing, and with it, the small screen's potential to engage in debate and present valuable representations of American history. Founded in 1972, HBO has been at the forefront of these changes, leading the way for many network, cable, and streaming services into the "post-network" era. Despite this, most scholarship has been dedicated to analyzing historical feature films and documentary films, leaving TV and the long-form drama hungry for coverage. In History...

Hounds on the Mountain

James Still
First published in 1937, Hounds on the Mountain evokes James Still's personal experiences of eastern Kentucky through reflective folk poems describing Appalachian mountain life from birth through death. Written during the Great Depression, the collection emphasizes a collective reliance on the earth and the primacy of nature that Still observed from the seclusion of his thirty-acre home in Knott County, Kentucky. Still, who became known as the "Dean of Appalachian Literature," describes the changing...