Forthcoming Titles



June 2017

Unlikely Alliances

Zoltán Grossman
Often when Native nations assert their treaty rights and sovereignty, they are confronted with a backlash from their neighbors, who are fearful of losing control of the natural resources. Yet, when both groups are faced with an outside threat to their common environment—such as mines, dams, or an oil pipeline—these communities have unexpectedly joined together to protect the resources. Some regions of the United States with the most intense...

Health Advocacy, Inc.

Sharon Batt
Jun 2017 - UBC Press
Over the past several decades, a gradual reduction in state funding has pressured patient groups into forming private-sector partnerships. Health activist, scholar, award-winning journalist, and cancer survivor Sharon Batt investigates the relationship between patient advocacy groups and the pharmaceutical industry, as well as the contentious role of pharma funding. This analysis of Canada's breast cancer movement from 1990 to 2010 argues that the...

Psalms for Living, revised edition

Mark Lanier
A trial lawyer by trade, a Christian by heart—author Mark Lanier has trained in biblical languages and devoted his life to studying and living the Bible. Living daily with the tension between the demands of his career and the desire for a godly life, Lanier recognizes the importance and challenge of finding daily time to spend in God's Word. He credits the Psalms in particular for his continued growth in faith, obedience, wisdom, and understanding.   In Psalms for Living, Lanier...

Hell and the Mercy of God

Adrian J Reimers
If God is truly merciful and loving, perfect in goodness, how can he consign human beings created in his own image to eternal torment in hell? God's goodness seems incompatible with inflicting horrible evil upon those who oppose his will and defy his law. If to this paradox we add the metaphysical requirement that God be perfect in goodness, the eternal evil of hell seems to be contradictory to God's own nature. Catholic philosopher Adrian Reimers takes on these challenges in Hell and the Mercy of God,...

Smell Detectives

Melanie A. Kiechle
What did nineteenth-century cities smell like? And how did odors matter in the formation of a modern environmental consciousness? Smell Detectives follows the nineteenth-century Americans who used their noses to make sense of the sanitary challenges caused by rapid urban and industrial growth. Melanie Kiechle examines nuisance complaints, medical writings, domestic advice, and myriad discussions of what constituted fresh air, and argues that...

July 2017

Gerry Studds

Mark Robert Schneider
Representative Gerry Studds served the Massachusetts South Shore, Cape Cod, and New Bedford congressional district from 1973 to 1997. During his first decade in the House he helped pass legislation that protected American fishermen from overfishing by international boats and limited President Ronald Reagan's wars in Central America. The defining moment of his career, however, came in 1983, when he was censured by the House for having had an affair with a page ten years...

Growing Down

Jaco J. Hamman
Growing Down explores the theological and psychological implications of humanity's fascination with technology. Author Jaco Hamman examines how our virtual relationships with and through tablets and phones, consoles and screens, have become potentially addictive substitutes for real human relationships. At the base of the technological revolution, as Hamman shows, are abiding theological questions—questions about what it means to be and to become a person in a technological...

Mediating Morality

Clare Daniel
The approach the United States has taken to addressing teen pregnancy—a ubiquitous concern in teen education and perennial topic in popular culture—has changed dramatically over the past few decades. Specifically since the radical overhaul of welfare policy in 1996, Clare Daniel argues, teen pregnancy, previously regarded as a social problem requiring public solutions, is seen as an individual failure on the part of the teens involved. Daniel investigates...

Religion in Enlightenment England

Jayne Elizabeth Lewis
Religion in Enlightenment England introduces its readers to a rich array of British Christian texts published between 1660 and 1750. The anthology documents the arc of Christian writings from the reestablishment of the Church of England to the rise of the Methodist movement in the middle of the eighteenth century. The Enlightenment era witnessed the explosion of mass print culture and the unprecedented expansion of literacy across society. These changes...

An Introduction to Vatican II as an Ongoing Theological Event

Matthew Levering
Contemporary scholars often refer to "the event of Vatican II," but what kind of an event was it? In this first book of the new CUA Press series Sacra Doctrina, Matthew Levering leads his readers to see the Council as a "theological event"—a period of confirming and continuing God's self-revelation in Christ into a new historical era for the Church. This is an introduction to Vatican II with a detailed summary of each of its four central documents—the dogmatic...

Victorian Watercolours

Peter Raissis
This book features over eighty artworks by more than seventy artists that represent the glory of British watercolors from the Victorian period. Artists include: Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Edward BurneJones, George John Pinwell and Myles Birket Foster. Peter Raissis explores the social, cultural, and technical background to watercolor painting in nineteenthcentury Victorian Britain, as well as the reception and appreciation of the medium both in Britain and Australia. Entries on each of the works give insights into...

Wild by Nature

Andrea L. Smalley
From the time Europeans first came to the New World until the closing of the frontier, the benefits of abundant wild animals—from beavers and wolves to fish, deer, and bison—appeared as a recurring theme in colonizing discourses. Explorers, travelers, surveyors, naturalists, and other promoters routinely advertised the richness of the American faunal environment and speculated about the ways in which animals could be made to serve their colonial projects. In practice,...

The Short List of Certainties

Lois Roma-Deeley
"It's been a long time since a collection has so affected me. Whether she is writing of our twisted relational lives or of her own seemingly innate sense that something's wrong, Roma-Deeley writes with that curious blend of authority and self-doubt that marks our best poets. Ultimately, and reassuringly, she finds the affirmation that sustains her through it all; as her title poem urges, "having courage, let us write a word or phrase on the short list of certainties something that sounds very much like...

A Political Companion to Flannery O'Connor

Henry T. Edmondson, III, Ph.D.
Acclaimed author and Catholic thinker Flannery O'Connor (1925–1964) penned two novels, two collections of short stories, various essays, and numerous book reviews over the course of her life. Her work continues to fascinate, perplex, and inspire new generations of readers and poses important questions about human nature, ethics, social change, equality, and justice. Although political philosophy was not O'Connor's pursuit, her writings frequently address themes that are...

Wars of Modern Babylon

Pesach Malovany
As long as there have been wars, victors have written the prevailing histories of the world's conflicts. An army that loses—and especially one that is destroyed or disbanded—is often forgotten. Nevertheless, the experiences of defeated forces can provide important insights, lessons, and perspectives not always apparent to the winning side. In Wars of Modern Babylon, Pesach Malovany provides a comprehensive and detailed history of the Iraqi military from its...

Cultivation and Catastrophe

Sonya Posmentier
At the intersection of social and environmental history there has emerged a rich body of black literary response to natural and agricultural experiences, whether the legacy of enforced agricultural labor or of the destruction and displacement brought about by a hurricane. In Cultivation and Catastrophe, Sonya Posmentier uncovers a vivid diasporic tradition of black environmental writing that responds to the aftermath of plantation slavery, urbanization,...

The Marshall Plan

Günter Bischof
On June 5, 1947, George C. Marshall delivered a speech at Harvard University that would change the world. With that speech, the U.S. Secretary of State, and close confidant of President Truman, ushered in the European Recovery Program (ERP), which would soon burgeon into the most successful political project in U.S. and European history. Underwritten by the American taxpayer, an unbelievable fourteen billion dollars was made available between 1948 and 1952 for the Marshall Plan, money...