Forthcoming Titles




A Soldier's Life
Ralph Puckett, USA (Ret.)
On November 25, 1950, during one of the toughest battles of the Korean War, the US Eighth Army Ranger Company seized and held the strategically important Hill 205 overlooking the Chongchon River. Separated by more than a mile from the nearest friendly unit, fifty-one soldiers fought several hundred Chinese attackers. Their commander, Lieutenant Ralph Puckett, was wounded three times before he was evacuated. For his actions, he received the country's second-highest award for courage on the...
Religion, Race, and Resistance in Cairo, Illinois
Kerry Pimblott
In 1969, nineteen-year-old Robert Hunt was found dead in the Cairo, Illinois, police station. The white authorities ruled the death a suicide, but many members of the African American community believed that Hunt had been murdered—a sentiment that sparked rebellions and protests across the city. Cairo suddenly emerged as an important battleground for black survival in America and became a focus for many civil rights groups, including the NAACP. The United...
Reference Edition
Carl R. Holladay
Christian interpretation of the Bible is not a simple task. While finding both its beginning and end in the theological claim that Scripture reveals to us "what God has done in Christ," Christian interpretation demands much more. The interaction between believer and text is also conversation between reader and interpretive community, both ancient and modern. Theological interpretation entails close readings of texts but also a close analysis of contexts—the social and...
The Contested Limits of Nature, Law, and Covenant
David Novak
In Jewish Justice David Novak explores the continuing role of Judaism for crafting ethics, politics, and theology. Drawing on sources as diverse as the Bible, the Talmud, and ancient, medieval, and modern philosophy, Novak asserts Judaism's integral place in communal discourse of the public square. According to Novak, biblical revelation has universal implications—that it is ultimately God's law to humanity because humans made in God's image are capable of making...
Crusade Propaganda and Chivalric Literature, 1100-1400
Stefan Vander Elst
The Knight, the Cross, and the Song offers a new perspective on the driving forces of crusading in the period 1100-1400. Although religious devotion has long been identified as the primary motivation of those who took the cross, Stefan Vander Elst argues that it was by no means the only focus of the texts written to convince the warriors of Western Christianity to participate in the holy war. Vander Elst examines how, across three...
The Reagan Administration, Cultural Activism, and the End of the Arms Race
William M. Knoblauch
The early 1980s were a tense time. The nuclear arms race was escalating, Reagan administration officials bragged about winning a nuclear war, and superpower diplomatic relations were at a new low. Nuclear war was a real possibility and antinuclear activism surged. By 1982 the Nuclear Freeze campaign had become the largest peace movement in American history. In support, celebrities, authors, publishers, and filmmakers...
Jacqueline Bhabha
Realizing Roma Rights investigates anti-Roma racism and documents a growing Roma-led political movement engaged in building a more inclusive and just Europe. The book brings to the forefront voices of leading and emerging Romani scholars, from established human rights experts to policy and advocacy leaders with deep experience. Realizing Roma Rights offers detailed accounts of anti-Roma racism, political and diplomatic narratives chronicling the development of European and American policy, and critical...
International Relations and the Performing Arts in Early Modern France
Ellen R. Welch
The seventeenth-century French diplomat François de Callières once wrote that "an ambassador resembles in some way an actor exposed on the stage to the eyes of the public in order to play great roles." The comparison of the diplomat to an actor became commonplace as the practice of diplomacy took hold in early modern Europe. More than an abstract metaphor, it reflected the rich culture of spectacular entertainment that was a backdrop to...
The Lost History of Prosecuting Axis War Crimes
Dan Plesch
Human Rights after Hitler reveals thousands of forgotten US and Allied war crimes prosecutions against Hitler and other Axis war criminals based on a popular movement for justice that stretched from Poland to the Pacific. These cases provide a great foundation for twenty-first-century human rights and accompany the achievements of the Nuremberg trials and postwar conventions. They include indictments of perpetrators of the Holocaust made while the death camps...
Conservative Women and Family Values in New York
Stacie Taranto
03/2017 - HFPEN
Most histories of modern American politics tell a similar story: that the Sunbelt, with its business friendly environment, right-to-work laws, and fierce spirit of frontier individualism, provided the seedbed for popular conservatism. Stacie Taranto challenges this narrative by positioning New York State as a central battleground. In 1970, under the governorship of Republican Nelson Rockefeller, New York became one of the first states to legalize abortion. By...
A Note on Architectural Policy
Tjeerd Dijkstra
04/2017 - LM Publishers
In 1985, in his role as chief government architect in the Netherlands, Tjeerd Dijkstra wrote a note on the concept of architectural quality and the criteria that, in his opinion, could be applied when assessing building plans. Some thirty years have elapsed and there is still a need for clarity about the concept of architectural quality. Here, Tjeerd Dijkstra describes which concepts play an important part in the definition of architectural quality. After a reflection on these...
Andrew Of Caesarea
The early seventh-century Roman Empire saw plague, civil war, famine, and catastrophic barbarian invasions. Eschatological fervor ran high, as people were convinced that the end of the world was near. In this climate, a noteworthy Greek commentary on the Apocalypse was composed by Andrew, Archbishop of Caesarea, Cappadocia.
A Guide to the Art and Science of Professional Fieldwork
David J. Danelo
Field research — the collection of information outside a lab or workplace setting — requires skills and knowledge not typically taught in the classroom. Fieldwork demands exploratory inquisitiveness, empathy to encourage interviewees to trust the researcher, and sufficient aptitude to work professionally and return home safely. The Field Researcher's Handbook provides a practical guide to planning and executing fieldwork and presenting the...
Irreligion and Religion in Settler British Columbia
Lynne Marks
04/2017 - UBC Press
British Columbia is at the forefront of a secularizing movement in the English-speaking world. Nearly half its residents claim no religious affiliation, and the province has the highest unbelief or religious indifference in Canada. Infidels and the Damn Churches explores the historical roots of this phenomenon. Lynne Marks reveals that class and racial tensions fueled irreligion in frontier BC, a world populated by embattled ministers, militant...
Catholics in Protestant America, 1605-1791: A Documentary History
Robert Emmett Curran
Intestine Enemies: Catholics in Protestant America, 1605-1791, is a documentary survey of the experience of Roman Catholics in the British Atlantic world from Maryland to Barbados and Nova Scotia to Jamaica over the course of the two centuries that spanned colonization to independence. It covers the first faltering efforts of the British Catholic community to establish colonies in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries; to their...
Chequita R. Bhikhi
04/2017 - LM Publishers
This guide focuses on the identification of Surinamese trees, based on field, vegetative, floristic, and wood characteristics. It includes botanical descriptions, wood descriptions, illustrations and photos of one hundred Surinamese commercial timber tree species, potential timber tree species, and tree species protected by Surinamese forest law. It is the first book for Suriname with more than four hundred photos to illustrate the characteristics of each tree species for easy identification in the...
Stephen Vassallo
The field of critical studies recognizes that all knowledge is deeply embedded in ideological, cultural, political, and historical contexts. Although this approach is commonly applied in other subfields of psychology, educational psychology—which is the study of human learning, thinking, and behavior in formal and informal educational contexts—has resisted a comprehensive critical appraisal. In Critical Educational Psychology, Stephen Vassallo seeks to correct this deficit by demonstrating how...
C Passūs 5-9; B Passūs 5-7; A Passūs 5-8
Ralph Hanna
The first full commentary on Piers Plowman since the late nineteenth century, the Penn Commentary places the allegorical dream-vision of Piers Plowman within the literary, historical, social, and intellectual contexts of late medieval England, and within the long history of critical interpretation of the poem, assessing past scholarship while offering original materials and insights throughout. The authors' line-by-line, section by section, and...
Religion, Policy, and Counter-narratives
Nahed Artoul Zehr
In this original and provocative book, Nahed Artoul Zehr explores the theological underpinnings of al-Qaeda and related Islamic movements such as ISIS. She demonstrates how this marginal narrative transformed al-Qaeda from a relatively hierarchical and regional organization to a globalized, decentralized, and diffuse system of networks. She draws connections between religious ideas and strategy in her translation and analysis of leading theoretical and tactical jihad...
An Intermediate Textbook
Rahman Arman
Suitable for students and professionals alike, Dari: An Intermediate Textbook offers a thematically-organized approach to learning the Dari language with task-oriented, communicative activities that develop the four primary language skills — speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Incorporating the latest innovations in foreign language teaching and pedagogy, this textbook enhances learners' ability to communicate successfully with Dari speakers and more fully engage with a rich and vibrant culture. Dari:...
Essays from the U.S. Catholic Historian
David J Endres
For more than thirty years, the U.S. Catholic Historian has mapped the diverse terrain of American Catholicism. This collection of recent essays tells the story of Catholics previously underappreciated by historians: women, African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, and those on the frontier and borderlands. Timothy Matovina's opening essay sets the theme for the volume, encouraging a remapping of U.S. Catholic history...
El Mustapha Lahlali
Headlines — print and broadcast — have gone global. As a result, news and information from authentic sources make a useful resource for foreign language learners. Advanced Media Arabic, Second Edition systematically introduces authentic texts and audio files from a wide variety of media sources. This textbook helps students develop analytical and translation skills in Arabic and expand their reading, writing, listening, and speaking capabilities. The very successful first edition has been updated in a...
Histoire, culture, et littérature du Québec francophone
Elizabeth Blood, J. Vincent H. Morrissette
Je me souviens invites post-intermediate students of French to improve their language skills while exploring the complex history and culture of Québec. Drawing on cultural products from the earliest days of exploration to the present day, Elizabeth Blood and J.Vincent H. Morrissette curate an array of texts that sample Québécois literature, popular culture, art, music, and politics and frame the texts with pre-reading and...
Dwight E. Neuenschwander
"In the judgment of the most competent living mathematicians, Fräulein Noether was the most significant creative mathematical genius thus far produced since the higher education of women began."—Albert Einstein The year was 1915, and the young mathematician Emmy Noether had just settled into Göttingen University when Albert Einstein visited to lecture on his nearly finished general theory of relativity. Two leading mathematicians of the day, David Hilbert and Felix Klein, dug into the...
An Anthology
edited by Imre Szeman and Dominic Boyer
Energy humanities is a field of scholarship that, like medical and digital humanities before it, aims to overcome traditional boundaries between the disciplines and between academic and applied research. Responding to growing public concern about anthropogenic climate change and the unsustainability of the fuels we use to power our modern society, energy humanists highlight the essential contribution that humanistic insights and methods can make to areas of analysis once thought...
Poems, 2008–2016
X. J. Kennedy
In this, his ninth book of poetry, lyric master X. J. Kennedy regales his readers with engaging rhythm fittingly signaled by the book’s title, which echoes Duke Ellington’s jazz classic "It Don’t Mean a Thing (If It Ain’t Got That Swing)." Kennedy’s poems, infused with verve and surprise, are by turns irresistibly funny and sharply insightful about life in America. Some poems are personal recollections of childhood and growing up, as in "My Mother Consigns to the Flames My Trove of Comic Books." "Thomas...
Francis P. Garvan, American Antiques, and the Alchemy of Collecting in the Interwar United States
Catherine L. Whalen
04/2017 - HFMAS
Francis Patrick Garvan (1875–1937) knew how to wield the power of Americana. In 1930 he donated his outstanding collection of early American decorative arts to Yale University with an explicit goal: to instill patriotism as a bulwark against socialism and communism. Garvan believed his treasures would shore up political fealty in the face of subversive ideologies, and his ambitions for his collection and...
Poems
Albert Goldbarth
04/2017 - Lost Horse Press
True to its title, The Loves and Wars of Relative Scale is a community of poems that address ideas of perspective, of proximity—of what happens when the large-scale universe collides with our human-scale joys and disasters. But this collection is not a dry treatment of its subject: love affairs, a dramatic encounter with whales, and visits to famous consciousness-altering historic moments all lead up to a bravura narrative poem about Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, the first person to recognizably...
Entering the New Era of Deterrence
Sung Chull Kim
North Korea is perilously close to developing strategic nuclear weapons capable of hitting the United States and its East Asian allies. Since their first nuclear test in 2006, North Korea has struggled to perfect the required delivery systems. Kim Jong-un's regime now appears to be close, however. Sung Chull Kim, Michael D. Cohen, and the volume contributors contend that the time to prevent North Korea from achieving this capability is virtually over; scholars...
The Director Who Made Hollywood Dance
Brent Phillips
From the trolley scene in Meet Me in St. Louis (1944) to Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers's last dance on the silver screen (The Barkleys of Broadway, 1949) to Judy Garland's timeless, tuxedo-clad performance of "Get Happy" (Summer Stock, 1950), Charles Walters staged the iconic musical sequences of Hollywood's golden age. During his career, this Academy Award–nominated director and choreographer showcased the talents of stars such as Gene Kelly, Doris Day, Debbie Reynolds, and...