Women

Come My Children

Hekmat Al-Taweel, edited by Ghada Ageel, Barbara Bill
Hekmat Al-Taweel (1922-2008) was a native Palestinian Christian from Gaza City whose narrative provides an unfamiliar perspective on Muslim–Christian relationships in Gaza, highlighting shared history, culture, customs, and traditions. In relating her life story, continuing education after marriage, volunteer work, activism, and aspirations, she invites readers to understand her experiences in a way that contradicts widespread Western orientalized stereotypes of Arab women. She...

Creating Identity

Jayashree Kamble
While the world often categorizes women in reductive false binaries—careerist versus mother, feminine versus fierce—romance novels, a unique form of the love story, offer an imaginative space of mingled alternatives for a heroine on her journey to selfhood. In Creating Identity, Jayashree Kamblé examines the romance genre, with its sensile flexibility in retaining what audiences find desirable and discarding what is not, by asking an...

Jessica Lange

Anthony Uzarowski
Brilliant, beautiful, driven, uncompromising, elusive, iconic—Jessica Lange is one of the most gifted and fascinating actors of her generation. From her rise to fame in Dino De Laurentiis's remake of King Kong (1976) and her Oscar-winning performances in Tootsie (1982) and Blue Sky (1994); to her Emmy-winning work in Grey Gardens (2009) and the American Horror Story series; and her Tony Award–winning turn in Eugene O'Neill's Long Day's Journey into Night (2016), Lange has had a long and...

Black Creole Chronicles

Mona Lisa Saloy
Who are Black Creoles? Saloy's new poems address ancestral connections to contemporary life, traditions celebrated, New Orleans Black Life today, Louisiana Black life today, enduring and surviving hurricanes, romance, #BlackLivesMatter, #wematter, as well as poems of the Pandemic Lockdown from New Orleans. Saloy's new collection of verse advances and updates narratives of Black life to now, including day-to-day Black speech, the lives of culture keepers, and family tales. These poems detail cultural and...

Lin's Uncommon Life

Scott Shackelford, Emily Castle, illustrated by Hannah Dickens
Nobel Prize Winner Lin Ostrom's life was uncommon. Being the first woman ever to win a Nobel Prize in Economics was an achievement of a lifetime. But for Elinor (Lin) Ostrom it was the culmination of a life spent struggling against the odds. From overcoming childhood hardships and a stutter to being denied opportunities because she was a woman, Lin never lost sight of the wonders around her and was always curious to learn more. Lin would teach generations of...

Drinking from Graveyard Wells

Yvette Lisa Ndlovu
"Even in death, who has ownership over Black women's bodies?" Questions like this lurk between the lines of this stunning collection of stories that engage with African women's histories, both personal and generational. Their history is not just one thing: there is heartbreak and pain, and joy, and flying and magic, so much magic. An avenging spirit takes on the patriarchy from beyond the grave. An immigrant woman undergoes a naturalization ceremony in an imagined American state that...

Nine Guiding Principles for Women in Higher Education

Karyn Z. Sproles
Highlighting the nine guiding principles to help women succeed in their academic careers. Although there are more women in higher education than ever before—and increasingly in leadership positions—their paths to success are more difficult than those paved for men. Nine Guiding Principles for Women in Higher Education is a concise and accessible resource aimed at helping women faculty succeed in their academic careers. Karyn Z. Sproles offers guidance, humor, and...

suddenly we

Evie Shockley
Evie Shockley's new poems invite us to dream—and work—toward a more capacious "we" In her new poetry collection, Evie Shockley mobilizes visual art, sound, and multilayered language to chart routes towards openings for the collective dreaming of a more capacious "we." How do we navigate between the urgency of our own becoming and the imperative insight that whoever we are, we are in relation to each other? Beginning with the visionary art of Black women like Alison Saar and Alma Thomas, Shockley's poems draw and forge a...

Texts and Contexts from the History of Feminism and Women's Rights

edited by Zsófia Lóránd, Adela Hîncu, Jovana Mihajlović Trbovc, Katarzyna Stańczak-Wiślicz
A compendium of one hundred sources, preceded by a short author's bio and an introduction, this volume offers an English language selection of the most representative texts on feminism and women's rights from East Central Europe between the end of the Second World War and the early 1990s. While communist era is the...

The Woman Who Dared

William M. Drew
In the early days of motion pictures—before superstars, before studio conglomerates, before even the advent of sound—there was a woman named Pearl White (1889-1938). A quintessential beauty of the time, with her perfectly tousled bob and come-hither stare, White's rise to stardom was swift; her assumption of the title of queen of American motion picture serials equally deserved. Born the youngest of five children in a small, rural Missouri farm town, White...

Monitoring Station

Sonja Ruth Greckol
Sonja Ruth Greckol's Monitoring Station enters a slipstream of space and planetary language, circling time, embodying loss and longing, generating and regenerating in a faltering climate. Orbiting through a mother's death, a grandbaby's birth, and a pandemic summer, these poems loop and fragment in expansive and empathetic ways. The title poem locates a settler voice revisiting Treaties 6 and 7 and the Métis lands of her Alberta childhood, while the overall collection is tethered to Toronto shadowed by northland...

One Poor Scruple

Josephine Ward, introduction by Julia Meszaros, Bonnie Lander Johnson
The Catholic University of America Press is pleased to continue to present new volumes in our Catholic Women Writers series, which will shed new light on prose work of Catholic women writers from the 19th and 20th centuries. Josephine Ward is one of Catholicism's greatest literary treasures and a foremost contributor to English literary history – except that she has all but completely fallen from the historical record. She spent her life in close companionship...

Teaching in Black and White

Barbara E. Mattick
Teaching in Black and White: The Sisters of St. Joseph in the American South discusses the work of the Sisters of St. Joseph of (the city of) St. Augustine, who came to Florida from France in 1866 to teach newly freed blacks after the Civil War, and remain to this day. It also tells the story of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Georgia, who sprang from the motherhouse in St. Augustine. A significant part of the book is a comparison of the Sisters of...

Infertility in a Crowded Country

Holly Donahue Singh
In Lucknow, the capital of India's most populous state, the stigmas and colonial legacies surrounding sexual propriety and population growth affect how Muslim women, often in poverty, cope with infertility. In Infertility in a Crowded Country, Holly Donahue Singh draws on interviews, observation, and autoethnographic perspectives in local communities and Lucknow's infertility clinics to examine access to technology and treatments and to explore how pop culture...

Wandering Women

Laura Di Bianco
Wandering Women: Urban Ecologies of Italian Feminist Filmmaking explores the work of contemporary Italian women directors from feminist and ecological perspectives.   Mostly relegated to the margins of the cultural scene, and concerned with women's marginality, the compelling films Wandering Women sheds light on tell stories of displacement and liminality that unfold through the act of walking in the city. The unusual emptiness of the cities that the nomadic female...

Precarious Workers

Eloisa Betti
The recent vast upsurge in social science scholarship on job precarity has generally little to say about earlier forms of this phenomenon. Eloisa Betti's monograph convincingly demonstrates on the example of Italy that even in the post-war phase of Keynesian stability and welfare state, precarious labor was an underlying feature of economic development. She examines how in this short period exceptional politics of labor stability prevailed. The volume...

A Front Row Seat

Nancy Olson Livingston
From her idyllic childhood in the American Midwest to her Oscar–nominated performance in Sunset Boulevard (1950) and the social circles of New York and Los Angeles, actress Nancy Olson Livingston has lived abundantly. In her memoir, A Front Row Seat, Livingston treats readers to an intimate, charming chronicle of her life as an actress, wife, and mother, and her memories of many of the most notable figures and moments of her time. Livingston...

Activist Literacies

Jennifer Nish
A groundbreaking rhetorical framework for the study of transnational digital activism What does it mean when we call a movement "global"? How can we engage with digital activism without Jennifer Nish "slacktivists"? In Activist Literacies, Jennifer Nish responds to these questions and a larger problem in contemporary public discourse: many discussions and analyses of digital and transnational activism rely on inaccurate language and inadequate frameworks.

Traces

Patricia L. Hudson
An early American adage proclaimed, "The frontier was heaven for men and dogs—hell for women and mules." Since the 1700s, when his name first appeared in print, Daniel Boone has been synonymous with America's westward expansion and life on the frontier. Traces is a retelling of Boone's saga through the eyes of his wife, Rebecca, and her two oldest daughters, Susannah and Jemima. Daniel became a mythic figure during his lifetime, but his fame fueled backwoods gossip that bedeviled the Boone women throughout their...

Women in Wildlife Science

edited by Carol L. Chambers and Kerry L. Nicholson
The first book to address the challenges and opportunities for women, especially from underrepresented communities, in wildlife professions. Women in Wildlife Science is dedicated to the work of promoting equity, diversity, and inclusion in wildlife conservation and management. Editors Carol L. Chambers and Kerry L. Nicholson collaborate with a diverse team of authors to analyze the status and celebrate the achievements of...