Regional Titles

The Black Side of the River

Jessica A. Grieser
An insightful exploration of the impact of urban change on Black culture, identity, and language Across the United States, cities are changing. Gentrification is transforming urban landscapes, often pushing local Black populations to the margins. As a result, communities with rich histories and strong identities grapple with essential questions. What does it mean to be from a place in flux? What does it mean to be a specific kind of person from that...

Of the Land

edited by Will Stovall, foreword by Harry Cooper
The emergence of a master artist alongside his first major collection, created during a golden age of art in the nation's capital Renowned for his innovative work with silkscreen printing, Lou Stovall's works are part of numerous collections, including the National Gallery of Art, Smithsonian American Art Museum, and Phillips Collection. Washington Post art critic Paul Richard once wrote, "As a printer of his own art, and of the art of many others, as a...

Sixteenth Street NW

John DeFerrari, Douglas Peter Sefton
A richly illustrated architectural "biography" of one of DC's most important boulevards Sixteenth Street NW in Washington, DC, has been called the Avenue of the Presidents, Executive Avenue, and the Avenue of Churches. From the front door of the White House, this north-south artery runs through the middle of the District and extends just past its border with Maryland. The street is as central to the cityscape as it is to DC's history and culture. In...

Black Georgetown Remembered, 30th Anniversary Edition

Kathleen Menzie Lesko, Valerie M. Babb, Carroll R. Gibbs, foreword by Maurice Jackson
Georgetown's little-known Black heritage shaped a Washington, DC, community long associated with white power and privilege. Black Georgetown Remembered reveals a rich but little-known history of the Georgetown Black community from the colonial period to the present. Drawing on primary sources, including oral interviews with...

The Silent Shore

Charles L. Chavis Jr.
The definitive account of the lynching of twenty-three-year-old Matthew Williams in Maryland, the subsequent investigation, and the legacy of "modern-day" lynchings. On December 4, 1931, a mob of white men in Salisbury, Maryland, lynched and set ablaze a twenty-three-year-old Black man named Matthew Williams. His gruesome murder was part of a wave of silent white terrorism in the wake of the stock market crash of 1929, which exposed...

What the Amish Teach Us

Donald B. Kraybill
What do the traditional plain-living Amish have to teach twenty-first-century Americans in our hyper-everything world? As it turns out, quite a lot! It sounds audacious, but it's true: the Amish have much to teach us. It may seem surreal to turn to one of America's most traditional groups for lessons about living in a hyper-tech world—especially a horse-driving people who resist "progress" by snubbing cars, public grid power, and high school education. Still, their wisdom...

Georgetown's Second Founder

Antonio Grassi, translated by Roberto Severino, foreword by Robert Emmett Curran
Observations on the new American republic by an early president of Georgetown University Father Giovanni Antonio Grassi was the ninth president of Georgetown University and pioneered its transition into a modern institution, earning him the moniker Georgetown's Second Founder. Originally published in Italian in 1818 and...

Facing Georgetown's History

edited by Adam Rothman, Elsa Barraza Mendoza, foreword by Lauret Savoy
A microcosm of the history of American slavery in a collection of the most important primary and secondary readings on slavery at Georgetown University and among the Maryland Jesuits Georgetown University's early history, closely tied to that of the Society of Jesus in Maryland, is a microcosm of the history of American slavery: the entrenchment of chattel slavery in the tobacco economy of the...

Between Freedom and Equality

Barbara Boyle Torrey, Clara Myrick Green, foreword by James Fisher, Tanya Gaskins Hardy, Maurice Jackson
An original history of six generations of an African American family living in Washington, DC Between Freedom and Equality begins with the life of Capt. George Pointer, an enslaved African who purchased his freedom in 1793 while working for George Washington's Potomac Company. It follows the lives of six generations of his descendants as they lived...

Inside the US Navy of 1812–1815

William S. Dudley
When the War of 1812 broke out, the newly formed and cash-strapped United States faced Great Britain, the world's foremost sea power, with a navy that had largely fallen into disrepair and neglect. In this riveting book, William S. Dudley presents the most complete history of the inner workings of the US Navy Department during the conflict, which lasted until 1815. What did it take, he asks, for the US Navy to build, fit-out, man, provision, and send fighting ships to sea for extended periods of...

George Washington's Final Battle

Robert P. Watson
George Washington is remembered for leading the Continental Army to victory, presiding over the Constitution, and forging a new nation, but few know the story of his involvement in the establishment of a capital city and how it nearly tore the United States apart. In George Washington's Final Battle, Robert P. Watson brings this tale to life, telling how the country's first president tirelessly advocated for a capital on the shores of...

Spy Sites of Philadelphia

H. Keith Melton, Robert Wallace, with Henry R. Schlesinger
An illustrated guide to the history of espionage in Philadelphia and the Delaware Valley. Philadelphia became a battleground for spies as George Washington's Patriot army in nearby Valley Forge struggled to survive the winter of 1776-77. In the centuries that followed — through the Civil War, the rise of fascism and communism in the twentieth century, and today's fight against terrorism — the city has been home to...

The Black Butterfly

Lawrence T. Brown
How can American cities promote racial equity, end redlining, and reverse the damaging health- and wealth-related effects of segregation? The world gasped in April 2015 as Baltimore erupted and Black Lives Matter activists, incensed by Freddie Gray's brutal death in police custody, shut down highways and marched on city streets. In The Black Butterfly—a reference to the fact that Baltimore's majority-Black population spreads out on both sides of the coveted strip...

Death and Rebirth in a Southern City

Ryan K. Smith
Richmond, Virginia, the former capital of the Confederacy, holds one of the most dramatic landscapes of death in the nation. Its burial grounds show the sweep of Southern history on an epic scale, from the earliest English encounters with the Powhatan at the falls of the James River through slavery, the Civil War, and the long reckoning that followed. And while the region's deathways and burial practices have developed in surprising directions over these...

A Georgetown Life

Grant Quertermous
An invaluable primary resource for understanding nineteenth-century America. As a Georgetown resident for nearly a century, Britannia Wellington Peter Kennon (1815 — 1911) was close to the key political events of her time. Born into the prominent Peter family, Kennon came into contact with the many notable historical figures of the day who often visited Tudor Place, her home for over ninety years. Now published for the first time, the...

Come and Be Shocked

Mary Rizzo
The city of Baltimore features prominently in an extraordinary number of films, television shows, novels, plays, poems, and songs. Whether it's the small-town eccentricity of Charm City (think duckpin bowling and marble-stooped row houses) or the gang violence of "Bodymore, Murdaland," Baltimore has figured prominently in popular culture about cities since the 1950s. In Come and Be Shocked, Mary Rizzo examines the cultural history and racial politics of these contrasting...

How New York Became American, 1890–1924, updated edition

Art M. Blake
Originally published in 2006. For many Americans at the turn of the twentieth century and into the 1920s, the city of New York conjured dark images of crime, poverty, and the desperation of crowded immigrants. In How New York Became American, 1890–1924, Art M. Blake explores how advertising professionals and savvy business leaders "reinvented" the city, creating a brand image of New York that capitalized on the trend toward pleasure travel. Blake examines the ways in which these early...

Mary Elizabeth Garrett

Kathleen Waters Sander
with a new foreword by Senator Barbara A. Mikulski
Mary Elizabeth Garrett was one of the most influential philanthropists and women activists of the Gilded Age. With Mary's legacy all but forgotten, Kathleen Waters Sander recounts in impressive detail the life and times of this remarkable woman, through the turbulent years of the Civil War to the early twentieth century. At once a captivating biography of Garrett and an epic account of the rise of...

Taxi!, revised edition

Graham Russell Gao Hodges
Hailed in its first edition as a classic study of New York City's history and people, Graham Russell Gao Hodges's Taxi! is a remarkable evocation of the forgotten history of the taxi driver. This deftly woven narrative captures the spirit of New York City cabdrivers and their hardscrabble struggle to capture a piece of the American dream. From labor unrest and racial strife to ruthless competition and political machinations, Hodges recounts this history through...

Going Up the Country

Yvonne Daley
How the counterculture movement changed Vermont—and America Going Up the Country is part oral history, part nostalgia-tinged narrative, and part clear-eyed analysis of the multifaceted phenomena collectively referred to as the counterculture movement in Vermont. This is the story of how young migrants, largely from the cities and suburbs of New York and Massachusetts, turned their backs on the establishment of the 1950s and moved to the...