Political Science



The Good Fight

Brendan Kelly
Sep 2020 - UBC Press
The distinguished career of Marcel Cadieux makes him arguably the most important francophone diplomat and civil servant in Canadian history. Cadieux's decision to join the Department of External Affairs in 1941 was unconventional for a French Canadian of the time, yet public service became his vocation. Against the backdrop of rising Quebec separatism and the Cold War, he headed the department from 1964 to 1970 and served as Canada's first francophone ambassador to the United States...

Intelligence in the National Security Enterprise

Roger Z. George
This textbook introduces students to the critical role of the US intelligence community within the wider national security decisionmaking and political process. Intelligence in the National Security Enterprise defines what intelligence is and what intelligence agencies do, but the emphasis is on showing how intelligence serves the policymaker. Roger Z. George draws on his thirty-year CIA career and more than a decade of teaching at both the undergraduate and...

Spy Sites of New York City

H. Keith Melton
Through every era of American history, New York City has been a battleground for international espionage, where secrets are created, stolen, and passed through clandestine meetings and covert communications. Some spies do their work and escape, while others are compromised, imprisoned, and—a few—executed. Spy Sites of New York City takes you inside this shadowy world and reveals the places where it all happened. In 233 main entries as well as listings for...

¡Presente!

Kyle B.T. Lambelet
¡Presente! develops a lived theology of nonviolence through an extended case study of the movement to close the School of the Americas (also known as the SOA or WHINSEC). It analyzes how the presence of the dead — a presence proclaimed at the annual vigil of the School of the Americas Watch — shapes a distinctive, transnational, nonviolent movement. The book argues that such a messianic political theology devolves into neither violence nor sectarianism but generates...

American Intelligence

Lafferty
The rapid expansion of the newspaper business in the first decade of the American republic had crucial consequences for cultural, commercial, and political life in the early United States, as the nation went from having dozens of weekly newspapers to hundreds. Before organized newsrooms and bureaus came on the scene, these fledgling publications were filled with content copied from other newspapers as well as letters, poems, religious tracts, and...

Contested and Dangerous Seas

Davis
Deep-sea fishing has always been a hazardous occupation, with crews facing gale-force winds, huge waves and swells, and unrelenting rain and snow. For those New England and British fishermen whose voyages took them hundreds of miles from the coastline, life was punctuated by strenuous work, grave danger, and frequent fear. Unsurprisingly, every fishing port across the world has memorials to those lost at sea. During the 1960s...

The Snow Leopard and the Goat

Shafqat Hussain, hD
Following the downgrading of the snow leopard's status from "endangered" to "vulnerable" by the International Union for Conservation of Nature in 2017, debate has renewed about the actual number of snow leopards in the wild and the most effective strategies for coexisting with these enigmatic animals. Evidence from Pakistan and other countries in the snow leopard's home range shows that they rely heavily on human society—domestic livestock accounts...

Axis of Hope

Catherine Z. Sameh
Political tensions between Iran and the United States in the post-9/11 period and the Global War on Terror have set the stage for Iranian women's rights activists inside and outside Iran as they seek full legal equality under the Islamic Republic. Axis of Hope recounts activists' struggles through critical analysis of their narratives, including the One Million Signatures Campaign to End Discriminatory Law, the memoirs of human rights lawyer and Nobel Prize–winner...

Breaking Protocol

Philip Nash, Ph.D.
"It used to be," soon-to-be secretary of state Madeleine K. Albright said in 1996, "that the only way a woman could truly make her foreign policy views felt was by marrying a diplomat and then pouring tea on an offending ambassador's lap." This world of US diplomacy excluded women for a variety of misguided reasons: they would let their emotions interfere with the task of diplomacy, they were not up to the deadly risks that could arise overseas, and they would...

Roses from Kenya

Megan A. Styles
Kenya supplies more than 35 percent of the fresh-cut roses and other flowers sold annually in the European Union. This industry—which employs at least 90,000 workers, most of whom are women—is lucrative but enduringly controversial. More than half the flowers are grown near the shores of Lake Naivasha, a freshwater lake northwest of Nairobi recognized as a Ramsar site, a wetland of international importance. Critics decry the environmental side effects of...

First in the South

H. Gibbs Knotts
Every four years presidential hopefuls and the national media travel the primary election circuit through Iowa and New Hampshire. Once the dust settles in these states, the nation's focus turns to South Carolina, the first primary in the delegate-rich South. Historically Iowa and New Hampshire have dominated the news because they are first, not because of their predictive ability or representativeness. In First in the South, H. Gibbs Knotts and Jordan M. Ragusa...

Humanity in Crisis

David Hollenbach
The major humanitarian crises of recent years are well known: the Shoah, the killing fields of Cambodia, the Rwandan genocide, the massacre in Bosnia, and the tsunami in Southeast Asia, not to mention bloody conflicts in South Sudan, Syria, and Afghanistan. Millions have been killed and many millions more have been driven from their homes; the number of refugees and internally displaced persons has reached record levels. Could these crises have been prevented? Why do...

Planning on the Edge

Penny Gurstein
Dec 2019 - UBC Press
Vancouver is heralded around the world as a model for sustainable development. In Planning on the Edge, nationally and internationally renowned planning scholars, activists, and Indigenous leaders assess whether this reputation is warranted. While recognizing the many successes of the "Vancouverism" model, the contributors acknowledge that the forces of globalization and speculative property development have...

Queering Representation

Manon Tremblay
Nov 2019 - UBC Press
Political representation requires participation: voting, joining political parties, running as candidates, acting as politicians. Yet the election of openly LGBTQ people is a relatively recent phenomenon in the West. Queering Representation explores long-ignored issues relating to LGBTQ voters and politicians in Canada. What are the LGBTQ electorate's characteristics and voting behaviours? What part do the media play in framing straight voters' perceptions of...

John Hervey Wheeler, Black Banking, and the Economic Struggle for Civil Rights

Brandon K. Winford
John Hervey Wheeler (1908–1978) was one of the civil rights movement's most influential leaders. In articulating a bold vision of regional prosperity grounded in full citizenship and economic power for African Americans, this banker, lawyer, and visionary would play a key role in the fight for racial and economic equality throughout North Carolina. Utilizing previously unexamined sources from the John Hervey Wheeler Collection at the...

The Myth of Triumphalism

Beth A. Fischer
Did President Reagan's hawkish policies destroy the Soviet Union and enable the United States to win the Cold War? Many Americans believe this to be the case. In this view—known as "triumphalism"—Reagan's denunciations of the "evil empire" and his military buildup compelled Moscow to admit defeat. The president's triumph demonstrates that America's leaders should stand strong and threaten adversaries into submission. Drawing on both US and Soviet sources, this...

Horace Greeley

James M. Lundberg
The founder and editor of the New-York Tribune, Horace Greeley was the most significant—and polarizing—American journalist of the nineteenth century. To the farmers and tradesmen of the rural North, the Tribune was akin to holy writ. To just about everyone else—Democrats, southerners, and a good many Whig and Republican political allies—Greeley was a shape-shifting menace: an abolitionist fanatic; a disappointing conservative; a terrible liar; a power-hungry...

From Quills to Tweets

Andrea J. Dew
While today's presidential tweets may seem a light year apart from the scratch of quill pens during the era of the American Revolution, the importance of political communication is eternal. This book explores the roles that political narratives, media coverage, and evolving communication technologies have played in precipitating, shaping, and concluding or prolonging wars and revolutions over the course of US history. The case studies begin with the Sons of...

Governing the Social in Neoliberal Times

Deborah Brock
Nov 2019 - UBC Press
Neoliberalism is most commonly associated with free trade, the minimal state, and competitive individualism. But it is not simply national economies that are being neoliberalized – it is us. Inspired by Michel Foucault and other governmentality theorists, this volume's contributors reveal how neoliberalism's power to redefine "normal" is refashioning every facet of our lives, from consumer choices and how we approach the environment, to questions of national security and border control.