Political Science


A Diplomatic Meeting

James Cooper
They were known as "political soulmates" who shared a "special relationship". Grounded in similar democratic systems, common historical discourses, and sustained military alliance through several of the twentieth century's most contentious conflicts, British prime minister Margaret Thatcher and the American president Ronald Reagan shared a deep respect, admiration, and friendship, as well as similar ideologies. Many analysts and historians recycle a popular conception of...

The Fall of Kentucky's Rock

George G. Humphreys
This in-depth study offers a new examination of a region that is often overlooked in political histories of the Bluegrass State. George G. Humphreys traces the arc of politics in western Kentucky from avid support of the Democratic Party to its present-day Republican identity. He demonstrates that, despite its relative geographic isolation, the counties west of the eastern boundary of Breckinridge County down to the Tennessee state line played...

Contemporary Asian American Activism

edited by Diane C. Fujino, Robyn Magalit Rodriguez
In the struggles for prison abolition, global anti-imperialism, immigrant rights, affordable housing, environmental justice, fair labor, and more, twenty-first-century Asian American activists are speaking out and standing up to systems of oppression. Creating emancipatory futures requires collective action and reciprocal relationships that are nurtured over time and forged through cross-racial solidarity and...

The Silent Shore

Charles L. Chavis Jr.
The definitive account of the lynching of twenty-two-year-old Matthew Williams in Maryland, the subsequent investigation, and the legacy of "modern-day" lynchings. On December 4, 1931, a mob of white men in Salisbury, Maryland, lynched and set ablaze a twenty-two-year-old Black man named Matthew Williams. His gruesome murder was part of a wave of silent white terrorism in the wake of the stock market crash of 1929, which exposed...

Underground Streams

edited by János M. Rainer
The authors of this edited volume address the hidden attraction that existed between the extremes of left and right and of internationalism and nationalism under the decades of communist dictatorship in Eastern Europe. One might suppose that under the suppressive regimes based on leftist ideology and internationalism, their right-wing opponents would have been defeated and ultimately removed. These essays, on the...

Brazil in the Global Nuclear Order, 1945–2018

Carlo Patti
The first comprehensive and definitive history of Brazil's decision to give up the nuclear weapon option. Why do countries capable of "going nuclear" choose not to? Brazil, which gained notoriety for developing a nuclear program and then backtracking into adherence to the nonproliferation regime, offers a fascinating window into the complex politics surrounding nuclear energy and American interference. Since the beginning of the nuclear age, author Carlo Patti writes, Brazil has...

Qualitative Comparative Analysis

Patrick A. Mello, with contributions by Tobias Ide, Matthew A. Andersson, Sarah K. Harkness, Marij Swinkels, Leanne Giordono, Hilary Boudet, Alexander Gard-Murray, Pablo Castillo-Ortiz, Maria Brockhaus, Jenniver Sehring, Kaisa Korhonen-Kurki, Monica Di Gregorio, Tim Haesebrouck
A comprehensive and accessible guide to learning and successfully applying QCA Social phenomena can rarely be attributed to single causes — instead, they typically stem from a myriad...

Eastward of Good Hope

Dane A. Morrison
How did news from the East—carried in ship logs and mariners' reports, journals, and correspondence—shape early Americans' understanding of the world as a map of dangerous and incoherent sites? Freed from restrictions of British mercantilism in the years following the War of Independence, Yankee merchants embarked on numerous voyages of commerce and discovery into distant seas. Through the news from the East, carried in mariners' reports, ship logs, journals, and...

Challenges to Academic Freedom

edited by Joseph C. Hermanowicz
A must-read collection on contemporary threats to academic freedom. Academic freedom is an idea so closely associated with academic work—at least in the West—that it assumes a defining characteristic of the academic profession. Yet it is under recurring threat. Confusion endures about what professors have a defensible right to say or publish, particularly in extramural forums like social media. At least one source of the confusion in the United States is the way in which academic...

Philanthropy, Conflict Management and International Law

edited by Dietmar Müller, Stefan Troebst
The focus of this book lies on the Report of the International Commission to Inquire into the Causes and Conduct of the Balkan Wars, published in Washington in the early summer of 1914 by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. The authors reassess the document—one of the first international non-governmental fact-finding missions with the intention...

The Right to Be Rural

edited by Karen R. Foster, Jennifer Jarman, with contributions byRay Bollman, Clement Chipenda, Innocent Chirisa, Logan Cochrane, Pallavi Das, Laura Domingo-Peñafiel, Laura Farré-Riera, Jens Kaae Fisker, Lesley Frank, Greg Hadley, Stacey Haugen, Kathleen Kevany, Eshetayehu Kinfu, Al Lauzon, Katie MacLeod, Jeofrey Matai, Ilona Matysiak, Kayla McCarney, Rachel McLay, Egon Noe, Howard Ramos, Katja Rinne-Koski, Sulevi Riukulehto, Sarah Rudrum, Ario Seto, Nuria Simo-Gil, Peggy Smith, Sara Teitelbaum,...
In this collection, researchers...

Making Liberalism New

Ian Afflerbach
A revisionist history of American liberalism, from the Great Depression to the Cold War. In Making Liberalism New, Ian Afflerbach traces the rise, revision, and fall of a modern liberalism in the United States, establishing this intellectual culture as distinct from classical predecessors as well as the neoliberalism that came to power by century's end. Drawing on a diverse archive that includes political philosophy,...

Career Diplomacy, Fourth Edition

Harry W. Kopp, John K. Naland
An all-new edition of the candid insiders' guide to the US Foreign Service as an institution, a profession, and a career Career Diplomacy takes readers inside the world of American diplomats in the US Foreign Service. Members of the Foreign Service represent the country abroad, protect and support American citizens overseas, manage government programs and facilities, and move foreign policy from the abstract to the actual. In this new and thoroughly revised...

The Moneywasting Machine

Dušan Pavlović
For five months in 2013–2014 Dušan Pavlović took time off from teaching to accept a senior position in Serbia's Ministry of Economy. This short period was long enough for him to make a penetrating diagnosis of the economic activity of the post-communist government. He found that a coterie of tycoons and politicians live off the wealth of the majority of citizens and smaller entrepreneurs, while the economy performs below its capacities. In academic terms,...

Urban Cascadia and the Pursuit of Environmental Justice

edited by Nik Janos, Corina McKendry
In Portland's harbor, environmental justice groups challenge the EPA for a more thorough cleanup of the Willamette River. Near Olympia, the Puyallup assert their tribal sovereignty and treaty rights to fish. Seattle housing activists demand that Amazon pay to address the affordability crisis it helped create. Urban Cascadia, the infrastructure, social networks, built environments, and non-human animals and plants that are interconnected in the...

Zero-Sum Victory

Christopher D. Kolenda
Why have the major, post-9/11, US military interventions turned into quagmires? Despite huge power imbalances, major capacity-building efforts, and repeated tactical victories by what many observers call the world's best military, the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq turned bloody and intractable. The US government's fixation on zero-sum decisive victory is an important part of the explanation why successful military operations to overthrow two developing-world regimes failed...

What's Public about Public Higher Ed?

Stephen M. Gavazzi and E. Gordon Gee
Exploring the current state of relationships between public universities, government leaders, and the citizens who elect them, this book offers insight into how to repair the growing rift between higher education and its public. Higher education gets a bad rap these days. The public perception is that there is a growing rift between public universities and the elected officials who support them. In...

The Black President

Claude A. Clegg III
The first sweeping, legacy-defining history of the entire Obama presidency. In The Black President, the first interpretative, grand-narrative history of Barack Obama's presidency in its entirety, Claude A. Clegg III situates the former president in his dynamic, inspirational, yet contentious political context. He captures the America that made Obama's White House years possible, while insightfully rendering the America that resolutely resisted the idea of a Black chief...

Public Values Leadership

Barry Bozeman and Michael M. Crow
Instead of private gain or corporate profits, what if we set public values as the goal of leadership? Leadership means many things and takes many forms. But most studies of the topic give little attention to why people lead or to where they are leading us. In Public Values Leadership, Barry Bozeman and Michael M. Crow explore leadership that serves public values—that is to say, values that are focused on the collective good and fundamental rights...

Arms Control for the Third Nuclear Age

David A. Cooper
A reappraisal of classic arms control theory that advocates for reprioritizing deterrence over disarmament in a new era of nuclear multipolarity The United States faces a new era of nuclear arms racing for which it is conceptually unprepared. Great power nuclear competition is seemingly returning with a vengeance as the post—Cold War international order morphs into something more uncertain, complicated, and dangerous. In this unstable third nuclear...