Political Science

Building Inclusive Communities in Rural Canada

edited by Clark Banack, Dionne Pohler
This collection challenges misconceptions that rural Canada is a bastion of intolerance. While examining the extent and nature of contemporary cultural and religious discrimination in rural Canadian communities, the editors and contributors explore the many efforts by rural citizens, community groups, and municipalities to counter intolerance, build inclusive communities, and become better neighbours. Throughout, scholars and community leaders focus on...

Restraining Air Power

Robert C. Owen
Is it possible for two combatants who possess equally strong air forces to conduct limited warfare by restraining air operations? In Restraining Air Power, Robert C. Owen asks this question and allows contributing authors to provide theoretical and empirical assessments of restrained air warfare through five historical case studies since 1945. Through an objective analysis of the past, this collection evaluates the principles of escalation and escalation...

Conspiracy

Michael Shermer
Best-selling author Michael Shermer presents an overarching theory of conspiracy theories—who believes them and why, which ones are real, and what we should do about them. Nothing happens by accident, everything is connected, and there are no coincidences: that is the essence of conspiratorial thinking. Long a fringe part of the American political landscape, conspiracy theories are now mainstream: 147 members of Congress voted in favor of objections to the 2020 presidential election...

Norman Cousins

Allen Pietrobon
Influencing US presidents and public opinion, the American journalist Norman Cousins had an incredible but overlooked diplomatic impact during the Cold War. As the editor of the Saturday Review for more than thirty years, Norman Cousins had a powerful platform from which to help shape American public debate during the height of the Cold War. Under Cousins's leadership, the magazine was considered one of the most influential in the literary world. Cousins's progressive, nonpartisan...

Rights and the City

edited by Sandeep Agrawal
Rights and the City takes stock of rights struggles and progress in cities by exploring the tensions that exist between different concepts of rights. Sandeep Agrawal and the volume's contributors expose the paradoxes that planners and municipal governments face when attempting not only to combat discriminatory practices, but also advance a human rights agenda. The authors examine the legal, conceptual, and philosophical aspects of rights, including its various...

10 Days That Shaped Modern Canada

Aaron Hughes
What events, issues, and personalities have shaped modern Canada? Which days stand out in the timeline of our country? Revisiting ten notable days from recent history, Aaron W. Hughes invites readers to think about the tensions, achievements, and people that make Canada distinctive. These indelible dates interweave to offer an account of the political, social, cultural, and demographic forces that have shaped the modern nation. Diverse episodes include the enactment of the War Measures Act,...

Governing Water in India

Leela Fernandes
Intensifying droughts and competing pressures on water resources foreground water scarcity as an urgent concern of the global climate change crisis. In India, individual, industrial, and agricultural water demands exacerbate inequities of access and expose the failures of state governance to regulate use. State policies and institutions influenced by global models of reform produce and magnify socio-economic injustice in this "water bureaucracy." Drawing on historical...

Writing Labor's Emancipation

Greg Hall
Jay Fox (1870–1961) was a journalist, intellectual, and labor militant, whose influence rippled across the country. In Writing Labor's Emancipation, historian Greg Hall traces Fox's unorthodox life to shed light on the shifting dynamics in US labor radicalism from the late nineteenth to the early twentieth century. Radicalized as a teenager after witnessing the Haymarket tragedy, Fox embarked on a lifetime of organizing for labor unions, helping build anarchist...

Keeping the World's Environment under Review

Jan Bakkes, Marion Cheatle, Nora Mžavanadze, Nora Mžavanadze, László Pintér, Ron Witt, László Pintér
How do we take stock of the state and direction of the world's environment, and what can we learn from the experience? Among the myriad detailed narratives about the condition of the planet, the Global Environment Outlook (GEO) reports—issued by the United Nations Environment Programme—stand out as the most ambitious. For nearly three...

Science for a Green New Deal

Eric A. Davidson
Science, not politics, can take us beyond the hype and headlines to forge a realistic green new deal. Since it was first proposed in the US House of Representatives, the Green New Deal has been hotly debated, often using partisan characterizations that critique it as extreme or socialist. The intent was not simply to fight climate change or address a specific environmental concern, but rather to tackle how climate change and other environmental...

Labor under Siege

Harvey Schwartz, Ronald E. Magden
At six feet four inches and with a powerful speaking style, Big Bob—Robert McEllrath's waterfront handle—was heralded for his charisma, unifying vision, and negotiating prowess. President of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) for twelve eventful years, McEllrath retired in 2018 after nearly forty years as a union officer. More than a biography of a storied career, Labor under Siege explores...

Corruption

Mette Frisk Jensen
A short but engaging look at what makes Denmark one of the least corrupt countries in the world. Corruption is a profoundly destructive force around the world, but why does its extent vary so drastically among countries? In Corruption, Mette Frisk Jensen closely links the level of corruption in a country to its wealth, the happiness of its citizens, and the level of trust citizens have in their government. Covering the shifting concept of corruption from ancient Greece to modern-day cases, Frisk Jensen discusses why...

Democracy

Svend-Erik Skaaning
A short but engaging look at democracy: what it is, how it compares to other forms of rule, and why it makes a difference. What is democracy? And even if it can be defined, can true democracy ever be achieved? Without a definition, dictators can pose as democrats and the oppressed can see despotism as the answer to their prayers. But true democracy, author Svend-Erik Skaaning argues, will not automatically solve the world's problems. It is contentious and unfair, even as it keeps tyrants at bay. In Democracy, Skaaning...

Defining Latvia

edited by Michael Loader, Siobhán Hearne, Matthew Kott
In just over a century, Latvia has transitioned from imperial periphery to nation-state, then Soviet republic, and finally following the collapse of the Soviet Union to an independent republic. Defining Latvia brings together the latest research on the multiple social, political, and cultural contexts of Latvia throughout this turbulent period. Its ten chapters are written by leading political scientists, historians, and...

Liberals, Conservatives, and Mavericks

edited by Zachary T. Irwin, Frank Cibulka
No Church is monolithic—this is the preliminary premise of this volume on the public place of religion in a representative number of post-communist countries. The studies confirm that within any religious organization we can expect to find fissures, factions, theological or ideological quarrels, and perhaps even competing interest groups, such as missionary workers,...

Under the Radar

R. Eugene Parta
Western democracy is currently under attack by a resurgent Russia, weaponizing new technologies and social media. How to respond? During the Cold War, the West fought off similar Soviet propaganda assaults with shortwave radio broadcasts. Founded in 1949, the US-funded Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty broadcast uncensored information to the Soviet republics in their own languages. About one-third of Soviet urban adults listened to Western radio. The broadcasts...

Women, Work, and Activism

edited by Eloisa Betti, Leda Papastefanaki, Marica Tolomelli, Susan Zimmermann
The thirteen critical and well-documented chapters of Women, Work and Activism document women's labor struggle from late nineteenth-century Portuguese mutual societies to Yugoslav peasant women's work in the 1930s, and from the Catalan labor movement under the Franco dictatorship to workplace democracy in the United States. The authors portray female labor activism...

Mobilizing Roma Ethnicity

Anna Mirga-Kruszelnicka
The Roma issue is generally treated as a European matter. Indeed, the Roma are the largest European minority—their presence outside of Europe is a result of various waves of migration over the past four hundred years. Likewise, the stereotypes associated with the Roma—the problematized, stigmatized status of a "Gypsy" as well as the historical and contemporary manifestations of antigypsyism—are also of European origin. This book...

The Democratic Ethos

A. Freya Thimsen
A multidisciplinary analysis of the lasting effects of the Occupy Wall Street protest movement What did Occupy Wall Street accomplish? While it began as a startling disruption in politics as usual, in The Democratic Ethos Freya Thimsen argues that the movement's long-term importance rests in how its commitment to radical democratic self-organization has been adopted within more conventional forms of politics. Occupy changed what counts as...

Military Strategy, Joint Operations, and Airpower, Second Edition

edited by Ryan Burke, Michael Fowler, Jahara Matisek, with contributions by Thomas Swaim, Paul Bezerra, Mark E. Grotelueschen, Marybeth Ulrich, Danielle Gilbert, Buddhika Jayamaha, Brian Drohan, James R. Holmes, Kyleanne Hunter, Heather Venable, Michael Martindale, Jon McPhilamy, Judson C. Dressler, Frances V. Mercado, John T. Farquhar, Robert Grant, James Davitch, Ryan Burke, Michael Fowler
An essential introduction to contemporary strategy at the operational level of war,...