Political Science


Norms in Conflict

Anchalee Rüland
Myanmar was struck by three major human rights disasters during their period of democratization from 2003–2012: the 2007 Saffron Revolution, Cyclone Nargis in 2008, and the 2012 Rakhine State Riots. These events saw Myanmar categorically labeled as an offender of human rights, and major Southeast Asia member states (such as Indonesia, Thailand, and Malaysia) responded to these large-scale violations in very different ways. The context-specific...

Republics of Myth

Hussein Banai, Malcolm Byrne, and John Tirman
Why does the rift between the US and Iran persist? Iran and the United States have been at odds for forty years, locked in a cold war that has run the gamut from harsh rhetoric to hostage-taking, from crippling sanctions to targeted killings. In Republics of Myth, Hussein Banai, Malcolm Byrne, and John Tirman argue that a major contributing factor to this tenacious enmity is how each nation views itself. The two nations have differing...

Contemporary Asian American Activism

edited by Diane C. Fujino, Robyn Magalit Rodriguez
In the struggles for prison abolition, global anti-imperialism, immigrant rights, affordable housing, environmental justice, fair labor, and more, twenty-first-century Asian American activists are speaking out and standing up to systems of oppression. Creating emancipatory futures requires collective action and reciprocal relationships that are nurtured over time and forged through cross-racial solidarity and...

Underground Streams

edited by János M. Rainer
The authors of this edited volume address the hidden attraction that existed between the extremes of left and right, and of internationalism and nationalism under the decades of communist dictatorship in Eastern Europe. One might suppose that under the suppressive regimes based on leftist ideology and internationalism their right-wing opponents would have been defeated and ultimately removed. These essays, on the...

A Diplomatic Meeting

James Cooper
Drawing on a host of recently declassified documents from the Reagan-Thatcher years, A Diplomatic Meeting: Reagan, Thatcher, and the Art of Summitry provides an innovative framework for understanding the development and nature of the special relationship between British prime minister Margaret Thatcher and American president Ronald Reagan, who were known as "political soulmates." James Cooper boldly challenges the popular conflation of the leaders' platforms, and proposes...

The Fall of Kentucky's Rock

George G. Humphreys
This in-depth study offers a new examination of a region that is often overlooked in political histories of the Bluegrass State. George G. Humphreys traces the arc of politics and the economy in western Kentucky from avid support of the Democratic Party to its present-day Republican identity. He demonstrates that, despite its relative geographic isolation, the region west of the eastern boundary of Hancock, Ohio, Butler, Warren, and Simpson...

The Silent Shore

Charles L. Chavis Jr.
The definitive account of the lynching of twenty-three-year-old Matthew Williams in Maryland, the subsequent investigation, and the legacy of "modern-day" lynchings. On December 4, 1931, a mob of white men in Salisbury, Maryland, lynched and set ablaze a twenty-three-year-old Black man named Matthew Williams. His gruesome murder was part of a wave of silent white terrorism in the wake of the stock market crash of 1929, which exposed...

Hosea Williams

Rolundus R. Rice
When civil rights leader Hosea Lorenzo Williams died in 2000, U.S. Congressman John Lewis said of him, "Hosea Williams must be looked upon as one of the founding fathers of the new America. Through his actions, he helped liberate all of us." In this first comprehensive biography of Williams, Rolundus Rice demonstrates the truth in Lewis's words and argues that Williams's activism in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) was of central importance to the success of the...

Subordinating Intelligence

David P. Oakley, Ph.D.
In the late eighties and early nineties, driven by the post–Cold War environment and lessons learned during military operations, United States policymakers made intelligence support to the military the Intelligence Community's top priority. In response to this demand, the CIA and DoD instituted policy and organizational changes that altered their relationship with one another. While debates over the future of the Intelligence Community were occurring on...

An Unseen Light

edited by Aram Goudsouzian, Charles W. McKinney, Jr., with contributions byElizabeth Gritter, Brian D. Page, Darius Young, Elton H. Weaver, III, David Welky, Beverly Greene Bond, Jason Jordan, Laurie B. Green, Steven A. Knowlton, Charles L. Hughes, Anthony C. Siracusa, James Conway, Shirletta Kinchen, Zandria F. Robinson, Michael K. Honey
In An Unseen Light: Black Struggles for Freedom in Memphis, Tennessee, eminent and rising scholars present a multidisciplinary examination of African...

Brazil in the Global Nuclear Order, 1945–2018

Carlo Patti
The first comprehensive and definitive history of Brazil's decision to give up the nuclear weapon option. Why do countries capable of "going nuclear" choose not to? Brazil, which gained notoriety for developing a nuclear program and then backtracking into adherence to the nonproliferation regime, offers a fascinating window into the complex politics surrounding nuclear energy and American interference. Since the beginning of the nuclear age, author Carlo Patti writes, Brazil has...

Prophet Without Honor

F. Ross Peterson
Glen Taylor's colorful political career, which ran its course from 1944 to 1956, saw him rise from a barnstorming musician to candidate for the vice-presidency of the United States on the 1948 Progressive party ticket. In this illuminating study, Mr. Peterson delineates the life and public career of this man who, though relatively unknown, articulated and fought for many of the policies that later became widely accepted by the American people-policies...

Qualitative Comparative Analysis

Patrick A. Mello, with contributions by Tobias Ide, Matthew A. Andersson, Sarah K. Harkness, Marij Swinkels, Leanne Giordono, Hilary Boudet, Alexander Gard-Murray, Pablo Castillo-Ortiz, Maria Brockhaus, Jenniver Sehring, Kaisa Korhonen-Kurki, Monica Di Gregorio, Tim Haesebrouck
A comprehensive and accessible guide to learning and successfully applying QCA Social phenomena can rarely be attributed to single causes — instead, they typically stem from a myriad...

Eastward of Good Hope

Dane A. Morrison
How did news from the East—carried in ship logs and mariners' reports, journals, and correspondence—shape early Americans' understanding of the world as a map of dangerous and incoherent sites? Freed from restrictions of British mercantilism in the years following the War of Independence, Yankee merchants embarked on numerous voyages of commerce and discovery into distant seas. Through the news from the East, carried in mariners' reports, ship logs, journals, and...

Challenges to Academic Freedom

edited by Joseph C. Hermanowicz
A must-read collection on contemporary threats to academic freedom. Academic freedom is an idea so closely associated with academic work—at least in the West—that it assumes a defining characteristic of the academic profession. Yet it is under recurring threat. Confusion endures about what professors have a defensible right to say or publish, particularly in extramural forums like social media. At least one source of the confusion in the United States is the way in which academic...

Rituals and Riots

Sean Farrell
Sectarian violence is one of the defining characteristics of the modern Ulster experience. Riots between Catholic and Protestant crowds occurred with depressing frequency throughout the nineteenth century, particularly within the constricted spaces of the province's burgeoning industrial capital, Belfast. From the Armagh Troubles in 1784 to the Belfast Riots of 1886, ritual confrontations led to regular outbreaks of sectarian conflict. This, in turn,...

Mašina za rasipanje para: Pet meseci u Ministarstvu privrede

Dušan Pavlović
For five months in 2013–2014 Dušan Pavlovi? took time off from teaching to accept a senior position in Serbia's Ministry of Economy. This short period was long enough for him to make a penetrating diagnosis of the economic activity of the post-communist government. He found that a coterie of tycoons and politicians live off the wealth of the majority of citizens and smaller entrepreneurs, while the economy...

Philanthropy, Conflict Management and International Law

edited by Dietmar Müller, Dietmar Müller, Stefan Troebst, Stefan Troebst
This book centers on the Report of the International Commission to Inquire into the Causes and Conduct of the Balkan Wars, published in Washington in the early summer of 1914 by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. The volume was born from the conviction that the full assessment of the significance of the Carnegie Report—one of the first...

The Right to Be Rural

edited by Karen R. Foster, Jennifer Jarman, with contributions byRay Bollman, Clement Chipenda, Innocent Chirisa, Logan Cochrane, Pallavi Das, Laura Domingo-Peñafiel, Laura Farré-Riera, Jens Kaae Fisker, Lesley Frank, Greg Hadley, Stacey Haugen, Kathleen Kevany, Eshetayehu Kinfu, Al Lauzon, Katie MacLeod, Jeofrey Matai, Ilona Matysiak, Kayla McCarney, Rachel McLay, Egon Noe, Howard Ramos, Katja Rinne-Koski, Sulevi Riukulehto, Sarah Rudrum, Ario Seto, Nuria Simo-Gil, Peggy Smith, Sara Teitelbaum,...
In this collection, researchers...