Political Science



Watchman at the Gates

George Joulwan
Gen. George Joulwan built his 36-year military career during one of the most tumultuous eras in US history—the 1960s. Raised in a small Pennsylvania coal mining town, Joulwan would be present at the rise and fall of the Berlin wall, fight in Vietnam, play a part in university debates on the Vietnam War, and command over twenty operations in the Balkans, Africa, and the Middle East. He ended his career as the supreme commander of NATO forces in Europe (SACEUR). In...

The Sailor

David F. Schmitz
As with sailing, so with politics: make your cloth too taut and your ship will dip and heel, but slacken off and trim your sails, and things head up again. —Euripides, Orestes The Great Depression of the 1930s and the global crisis of World War II created ripe conditions for change in both US and international politics, setting off many questions regarding America's role in the world. The power and influence held by the United States at this time...

On Fire

Sean Patrick O'Rourke
The social, political, and legal struggles that made up the American civil rights movement of the mid-twentieth century produced and refined a wide range of rhetorical strategies and tactics. Arguably the most astonishing and certainly the least understood are the sit-in protests that swept the nation at the beginning of the 1960s. A companion to Like Wildfire: The Rhetoric of the Civil Rights Sit-Ins, this concentrated collection of essays examines the origins and...

The Black Butterfly

Lawrence T. Brown
The world gasped in April 2015 as Baltimore erupted and Black Lives Matter activists, incensed by Freddie Gray's brutal death in police custody, shut down highways and marched on city streets. In The Black Butterfly—a reference to the fact that Baltimore's majority-Black population spreads out on both sides of the coveted strip of real estate running down the center of the city like a butterfly's wings—Lawrence T. Brown reveals that ongoing historical trauma...

Control of the Laws in the Ancient Democracy at Athens

Edwin Carawan
The power of the court to overturn a law or decree—called judicial review—is a critical feature of modern democracies. Contemporary American judges, for example, determine what is consistent with the Constitution, though this practice is often criticized for giving unelected officials the power to strike down laws enacted by the people's representatives. This principle was actually developed more than two thousand years ago in the ancient democracy at Athens. In Control...

Spy Sites of Philadelphia

H. Keith Melton
An illustrated guide to the history of espionage in Philadelphia and the Delaware Valley. Philadelphia became a battleground for spies as George Washington's Patriot army in nearby Valley Forge struggled to survive the winter of 1776-77. In the centuries that followed — through the Civil War, the rise of fascism and communism in the twentieth century, and today's fight against terrorism — the city has been home to international intrigue and some of America's most...

Cold War Correspondents

Dina Fainberg
In an age of mutual acrimony and closed borders, journalists were among the few individuals who crossed the Iron Curtain. Their reporting strongly influenced the ways that policy makers, pundits, and ordinary people came to understand the American or the Soviet "other." In Cold War Correspondents, Dina Fainberg examines how Soviet and American journalists covered the rival superpower and how two distinctive sets of truth systems, professional...

White Lawyer, Black Power

Donald A. Jelinek
Inspired by a colleague's involvement in the Mississippi Summer Project of 1964, Wall Street attorney Donald A. Jelinek traveled to the Deep South to volunteer as a civil rights lawyer during his three-week summer vacation in 1965. He stayed for three years. In White Lawyer, Black Power, Jelinek recounts the battles he fought in defense of militant civil rights activists and rural African Americans, risking his career and his life to further the...

A Simple Justice

Melanie Beals Goan
When the Declaration of Independence was signed by a group of wealthy white men in 1776, poor white men, African Americans, and women quickly discovered that the unalienable rights it promised were not truly for all. The Nineteenth Amendment eventually gave women the right to vote in 1920, but the change was not welcomed by people of both genders in politically and religiously conservative Kentucky. As a result, the suffrage movement in the Commonwealth involved a tangled web of...

Nation and Migration

Csepeli
Nation and Migration provides a way to understand recent migration events in Europe that have attracted the world's attention. The emergence of the nations in the West promised homogenization, but instead the imagined national communities have everywhere become places of heterogeneity, and modern nation states have been haunted by the specter of minorities. This study analyses experiences relating to migration in 23 European countries. It is based on data from the...

America's Entangling Alliances

Jason W. Davidson
A challenge to long-held assumptions about the costs and benefits of America's allies. Since the Revolutionary War, the United States has entered into dozens of alliances with international powers to protect its assets and advance its security interests. America's Entangling Alliances offers a corrective to long-held assumptions about US foreign policy and is relevant to current public and academic debates about the costs and benefits of America's allies. Author Jason W.

I Feel To Believe

Jarvis DeBerry
For twenty years, starting in 1999, Jarvis DeBerry's New Orleans Times-Picayune column was the place where the city got its most honest look at itself: the good, the bad, the wonderful, and yes, also the weird. And the city took note. DeBerry's columns inspired letters to the editor, water cooler conversations, city council considerations, and barbershop pontification. I Feel To Believe collects his best columns, documenting two decades of constancy and upheaval, loss, racial injustice, and class...

Global Struggles and Social Change

Christopher Chase-Dunn and Paul Almeida
In the early decades of the twenty-first century, an international movement to slow the pace of climate change mushroomed across the globe. The self-proclaimed Climate Justice movement urges immediate action to reduce carbon emissions and calls for the adoption of bold new policies to address global warming before irreversible and catastrophic damage threatens the habitability of the planet. On another...

Georgetown Journal of International Affairs

Aaron Baum
Climate — Change is Inevitable is the theme of the twenty-first edition of the Georgetown Journal of International Affairs. This issue confronts one of humanity's most consequential challenges head-on in pursuit of a better world. With insights from practitioners, experts, and academics from around the globe, this edition provides a full and robust picture of the intersecting impacts of climate change — from business to security to culture and beyond. The Georgetown...

Every Hill a Burial Place

Peter H. Reid
On March 28, 1966, Peace Corps personnel in Tanzania received word that volunteer Peppy Kinsey had fallen to her death while rock climbing during a picnic. Local authorities arrested Kinsey's husband, Bill, and charged him with murder as witnesses came forward claiming to have seen the pair engaged in a struggle. The incident had the potential to be disastrous for both the Peace Corps and the newly independent nation of Tanzania. Because of the high stakes...

Geospatial Intelligence

Robert M. Clark
A riveting introduction to the complex and evolving field of geospatial intelligence. Although geospatial intelligence is a term of recent origin, its underpinnings have a long and interesting history. Geospatial Intelligence: Origins and Evolution shows how the current age of geospatial knowledge evolved from its ancient origins to become ubiquitous in daily life across the globe. Within that framework, the book weaves a tapestry of stories about the people, events, ideas, and...

Making and Breaking the Yugoslav Working Class

Music
Workers' self-management was one of the unique features of communist Yugoslavia. Goran Musić has investigated the changing ways in which blue-collar workers perceived the recurring crises of the regime. Two self-managed metal enterprises, one in Serbia another in Slovenia, provide the frame of the analysis in the time span between 1945 and 1989. These two factories became famous for strikes in 1988 that evoked echoes in popular discourses in...