Literary Criticism

Her Birth and Later Years

Irena Klepfisz
Collected poems of pivotal Jewish lesbian activist A trailblazing lesbian poet, child Holocaust survivor, and political activist whose work is deeply informed by socialist values, Irena Klepfisz is a vital and individual American voice. This book is the first complete collection of her work. For fifty years, Klepfisz has written powerful, searching poems about relatives murdered during the war, recent immigrants, a lost Yiddish writer, a Palestinian boy in Gaza, and...

National Literature in Multinational States

edited by Albert Braz, Paul Morris
If literature has often informed the creation of a national imaginary—a sense of common history and destiny—it has also complicated, even challenged, the unifying vision assumed in the formation of a national literature and sense of nation. National Literature in Multinational States questions the persistent association of literature and nation-states, contrasting this with the reality of multinational and ethnocultural diversity. The contributors to this...

In a Few Minutes Before Later

Brenda Hillman
"[Hillman's] work is fierce but loving, risk-taking, and beautiful." —Harvard Review An iconoclastic ecopoet who has led the way for many young and emerging artists, Brenda Hillman continues to re-cast innovative poetic forms as instruments for tracking human and non-human experiences. At times the poet deploys short dialogues, meditations or trance techniques as means of rendering inner states; other times she uses narrative, documentary or scientific materials to record daily events during a time...

The Swedish Theory of Love

Henrik Berggren, Lars Trägårdh, translated by Stephen Donovan
In 2020 Sweden's response to COVID-19 drew renewed attention to the Nordic nation in a way that put the finger on a seeming paradox. Long celebrated for its commitment to social solidarity, Sweden suddenly emerged as the last country in the West to resist lockdown while defending individual rights and responsibilities. To explain these contradictions, Henrik Berggren and Lars Trägårdh argue that the long-standing...

Hesiod, third edition

translation, introduction, and notes by Apostolos N. Athanassakis
This best-selling translation of Hesiod's the Theogony, the Works and Days, and the Shield has been updated into the most indispensable edition yet for students of Greek mythology and literature. Next to the works of Homer, Hesiod's poems are foundational texts for students of the classics. His two major surviving works, the Theogony and the Works and Days, address the divine and the mundane, respectively. The Theogony traces the origins of the...

Approaches to Teaching The Plum in the Golden Vase (The Golden Lotus)

edited by Andrew Schonebaum
The Plum in the Golden Vase (also known as The Golden Lotus) was published in the early seventeenth century and may be the first long work of Chinese fiction written by a single (though anonymous) author. Featuring both complex structural features and psychological and emotional realism, the novel centers on the rich merchant Ximen Qing and his household and describes the physical surroundings and material objects of a Ming dynasty city.

Canadian Performance Documents and Debates

edited by Anthony J. Vickery, Glen F. Nichols, Allana C. Lindgren, foreword by Jerry Wasserman
Canadian Performance Documents and Debates provides insight into theatrical activities from the seventeenth century to the early 1970s, and probes important yet vexing questions about "Canada" as a country and a concept. The volume collects playscripts and archival material such as photographs, petitions, performance programs, and musical scores to explore what these documents tell us about...

Citizenship on Catfish Row

Geoffrey Galt Harpham
A radical reinterpretation of three controversial works that illuminate racism and national identity in the United States Citizenship on Catfish Row focuses on three seminal works in the history of American culture: the first full-length narrative film, D. W. Griffith's The Birth of a Nation; the first integrated musical, Oscar Hammerstein and Jerome Kern's Showboat; and the first great American opera, George Gershwin's Porgy and Bess. Each of these...

The Fur Trader

Einar Odd Mortensen, with Gerd Kjustad Mortensen, edited by Ingrid Urberg, Daniel Sims
The Fur Trader is a critical edition of Einar Odd Mortensen Sr.'s personal narrative detailing the years (1925–28) he spent as a free trader at posts in Pine Bluff and Oxford Lake in Manitoba during the waning days of the fur trade. Mortensen's original narrative has been translated from Norwegian to English, and supplemented with a scholarly introduction, thorough annotations, a bibliography, and a reading guide. This...

The Tao of S

Sheng-mei Ma
A study of recent shifts in the depictions of Asian cultural stereotypes The Tao of S is an engaging study of American racialization of Chinese and Asians, Asian American writing, and contemporary Chinese cultural production, stretching from the nineteenth century to the present. Sheng-mei Ma examines the work of nineteenth-century "Sinophobic" American writers, such as Bret Harte, Jack London, and Frank Norris, and twentieth-century "Sinophiliac" authors, such...

Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture, Volume 51

edited by David A. Brewer and Crystal B. Lake
A selection of the most exciting current work in eighteenth-century studies. Focusing on the fraught ways in which communities are defined, volume 51 of Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture showcases groundbreaking research in all of the disciplines that constitute eighteenth-century studies. An article by Aaron Santesso and David Rosen intervenes in the current debates over "critique" by excavating a theory of ethical reading embedded in liberalism. In a...

Christian Humanism in Shakespeare

Lee Oser
Shakespeare, Lee Oser argues, is a Christian literary artist who criticizes and challenges Christians, but who does so on Christian grounds. Stressing Shakespeare's theological sensitivity, Oser places Shakespeare's work in the "radical middle," the dialectical opening between the sacred and the secular where great writing can flourish. According to Oser, the radical middle was and remains a site of cultural originality, as expressed through mimetic works of art...

Understanding Philip Roth

Matthew A. Shipe
A panoramic and accessible guide to one of the most celebrated— and controversial—authors of the twentieth century With the publication of his debut Goodbye, Columbus in 1959, Philip Roth established himself as one of the most prominent and controversial American writers of his generation. By the time of his death in 2018, he had won the Pulitzer Prize, two National Book Awards, and three PEN/Faulkner Awards. In Understanding Philip Roth, Matthew Shipe offers an in-depth introduction to Roth's work and...

Shakespeare and the Idea of Western Civilization

R. V. Young
William Shakespeare is widely regarded as one of the greatest writers of the Western world and most certainly its greatest playwright. His actual relationship to Western civilization has not, however, been thoroughly investigated. At a time when that civilization, as well as its premier dramatist, is subjected to severe and increasing criticism for both its supposed crimes against the rest of the world and its fundamental principles, a reassessment of the culture of the West is...

Craft Class

Christopher Kempf
The hidden history of the creative writing workshop and the socioeconomic consequences of the craft labor metaphor. In a letter dated September 1, 1912, drama professor George Pierce Baker recommended the term "workshop" for an experimental course in playwriting he had been planning with former students at Harvard and Radcliffe. This was the first time that term, now ubiquitous, was used in the context of creative writing pedagogy. Today, the MFA (master of fine arts) industry...

Finalists

Rae Armantrout
A double book by Pulitzer Prize winning poet Rae Armantrout What will we call the last generation before the looming end times? With Finalists Rae Armantrout suggests one option. Brilliant and irascible, playful and intense, Armantrout nails the current moment's debris fields and super computers, its sizzling malaise and confusion, with an exemplary immensity of heart and a boundless capacity for humor. The poems in this book find (and create) beauty in midst of the ongoing crisis. CONTRAST What's to like if not...

The Neverending Quest for the Other Shore

Sylvie Kandé
In Kandé's epic poem, African history collides with the contemporary reality of migration Sylvie Kandé's neo-epic in three cantos is a double narrative combining today's tales of African migration to Europe on the one hand, with the legend of Abubakar II on the other: Abubakar, emperor of 14th-Century Mali, sailed West toward the new world, never to return. Kandé's language deftly weaves a dialogue between these two narratives and between the epic traditions of the...

The Writing of an Hour

Brenda Coultas
Language as a means to transcend the quotidian and to explore the senses What actually happens within the revolution of the clock's hands? In The Writing of an Hour the poet considers the effort and the deliberateness that brings her to her desk each day. Despite domestic and day job demands and pandemic lockdown, Coultas forges connections to the sublime and wonders what it means to be from the Americas. These poems verge on the surreal, transform the quotidian, and respond anew to the marvelous. The Writing of an...

Approaches to Teaching Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment

edited by Michael R. Katz, Alexander Burry
Recounting the murder of an elderly woman by a student expelled from university, Crime and Punishment is a psychological and political novel that portrays the strains on Russian society in the middle of the nineteenth century. Its protagonist, Raskolnikov, moves in a world of dire poverty, disillusionment, radicalism, and nihilism interwoven with religious faith and utopianism. In Dostoevsky's innovative style, which he called fantastic...

Approaches to Teaching the Works of Inca Garcilaso de la Vega

edited by Christian Fernández, José Antonio Mazzotti
The author of Comentarios reales and La Florida del Inca, now recognized as key foundational works of Latin American literature and historiography, Inca Garcilaso de la Vega was born in 1539 in Cuzco, the son of a Spanish conquistador and an Incan princess, and later moved to Spain. Recalling the family stories and myths he had heard from his Quechua-speaking relatives during his youth and gathering information from friends...