Literary Criticism

Feeding the Ghosts

Rahul Mehta
Find the beauty. In 2017, writer and educator Rahul Mehta began a writing practice to find solace and beauty—in the natural world, in their family and friends, and in everyday simplicities—during a time of political tensions, environmental disasters, a global pandemic, and personal disappointment. From the vibrant color of a blade of grass, to their dog sleeping quietly in the corner, to delicate petals fallen from a rose, a mindfulness of the beauty in their surroundings helped offset the feelings of fear,...

The Cancer Plot

Reginald Wiebe, Dorothy Woodman
The Cancer Plot examines the prevalence of cancer in Marvel comics. Reginald Wiebe and Dorothy Woodman engage literature in comics studies, the medical humanities, and graphic medicine to explore representations of this disease in Marvel, focusing on four character case studies: Captain Marvel, Spider-Man, Thor, and Deadpool. Cancer, the authors argue, thematically destabilizes moral binaries and symbolizes that which cannot be overcome within a genre...

Numinous Seditions

Tim Lilburn
With Numinous Seditions, celebrated poet and essayist Tim Lilburn investigates aspects of an interiority appropriate to a time and world irrevocably altered by climate change. How will we be under these new conditions? What inner dispositions might sustain and help us bear the new sorrows of the climate crisis? The book draws from retrieved elements of the West's almost forgotten contemplative tradition in its Platonic, Islamic, Christian, and Zoharic forms. It also explores ideas from...

The Ruins of Nostalgia

Donna Stonecipher
New work from one of the most compelling and transformative writers of the contemporary prose poem What is it to feel nostalgia, to be skeptical of it yet cleave intently to the complex truths of feeling and thought? In a series of 64 gorgeous, ramifying, unsettling prose poems addressing late-twentieth- and twenty-first century experience and its discontents, The Ruins of Nostalgia offers a strikingly original exploration of the misunderstood phenomenon of nostalgia as both feeling-state and historical...

Sukun

Kazim Ali
New and selected poems from celebrated poet Kazim Ali Kazim Ali is a poet, novelist, and essayist whose work explores themes of identity, migration, and the intersections of cultural and spiritual traditions. His poetry is known for its lyrical and expressive language, as well as its exploration of themes such as love, loss, and the search for meaning in a rapidly changing world. "Sukun" means serenity or calm, and a sukun is also a form of punctuation in Arabic orthography that denotes a pause over a consonant.

Acts of Faith and Imagination

Brent Little
Acts of Faith and Imagination wagers that fiction written by Catholic authors assists readers to reflect critically on the question: "what is faith?" To speak of a person's "faith-life" is to speak of change and development. As a narrative form, literature can illustrate the dynamics of faith, which remains in flux over the course of one's life. Because human beings must possess faith in something (whether religious or not), it inevitably has a narrative...

Fierce Elegy

Peter Gizzi
Peter Gizzi's powerful new collection reminds us that the elegy is lament but also—as it has been for centuries—a work of love Peter Gizzi has said that "the elegy is a mode that can transform a broken heart in a fierce world into a fierce heart in a broken world." For Gizzi, ferocity can be reimagined as vulnerability, bravery and discovery, a braiding of emotional and otherworldly depth, "a holding open." In Gizzi's voice joy and sorrow make a complex ecosystem. In their quest for a lyric reality, these poems remind us...

Humanism, Empire, and Nation, critical edition

edited by Travis Workman, translated by Travis Workman
Essays featuring twentieth-century Korean thought on literature and culture. Faced with dramatic social and political changes, Korean writers of the twentieth century—writing in the context of Japanese imperialism, World War II, the Korean War, and the Cold War era—explored many pressing questions about modern life: What is the relationship between literature and society? How can intellectual concepts be used politically,...

Hyumŏnijŭm, cheguk, minjok, critical edition

edited by Travis Workman
Essays featuring twentieth-century Korean thought on literature and culture. Faced with dramatic social and political changes, Korean writers of the twentieth century—writing in the context of Japanese imperialism, World War II, the Korean War, and the Cold War era—explored many pressing questions about modern life: What is the relationship between literature and society? How can intellectual concepts be used politically, for good or ill? What are the...

Creating Identity

Jayashree Kamble
While the world often categorizes women in reductive false binaries—careerist versus mother, feminine versus fierce—romance novels, a unique form of the love story, offer an imaginative space of mingled alternatives for a heroine on her journey to selfhood. In Creating Identity, Jayashree Kamblé examines the romance genre, with its sensile flexibility in retaining what audiences find desirable and discarding what is not, by asking an...

From Chinese Cosmology to English Romanticism

Yu Liu
A culturally sensitive and rewarding new understanding of the cross-cultural interaction between China and Europe In this important new work author Yu Liu argues that, confined by a narrow English and European conceptual framework, scholars have so far obscured the radical innovation and revolutionary implication of Samuel Taylor Coleridge and William Wordsworth's monistic philosophy. Liu's innovative intellectual history traces the organic...

Light and Legacies

Janaka Bowman Lewis
An engaging examination of Black Girl Magic and its significance in American literature In Light and Legacies, author Janaka Bowman Lewis examines Black girlhood in American literature from the mid-twentieth century to the present. The representation of Black girlhood in contemporary literature has long remained underexplored. Through this literary history of "Black Girl Magic," Lewis offers one of the first studies in this rapidly growing field of study. Light and...

Understanding Michael S. Harper

Michael Antonucci
A fresh examination of Harper's body of work as an archive of Black life, thought, and culture The first book devoted to the groundbreaking poet's work, Understanding Michael S. Harper locates Harper's poetic project within Black expressive tradition. The study examines poems drawn from the eleven volumes of verse that Harper (1938-2016) produced between 1970 and 2010, bringing attention to his poetry's sustained engagement with music, literature, and the visual arts. Author Michael Antonucci...

A Centaur in London

Fabian Kraemer
A nuanced reframing of the dual importance of reading and observation for early modern naturalists. Historians traditionally argue that the sciences were born in early modern Europe during the so-called Scientific Revolution. At the heart of this narrative lies a supposed shift from the knowledge of books to the knowledge of things. The attitude of the new-style intellectual broke with the text-based practices of erudition and instead cultivated an emerging...

Black Creole Chronicles

Mona Lisa Saloy
Who are Black Creoles? Saloy's new poems address ancestral connections to contemporary life, traditions celebrated, New Orleans Black life today, Louisiana Black life today, enduring and surviving hurricanes, romance, #BlackLivesMatter, #wematter, as well as poems of the pandemic lockdown from New Orleans. Saloy's new collection of verse advances and updates narratives of Black life to now, including day-to-day Black speech, the lives of culture keepers, and family tales. These poems detail cultural and...

Leaving Other People Alone

Aaron Kreuter
Leaving Other People Alone reads contemporary North American Jewish fiction about Israel/Palestine through an anti-Zionist, diasporic lens. Aaron Kreuter argues that since Jewish diasporic fiction played a major role in establishing the centroperipheral relationship between Israel and the diaspora, it therefore also has the potential to challenge, trouble, and ultimately rework this relationship. Kreuter suggests that any fictional work...

Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture, Volume 52

edited by David A. Brewer and Crystal B. Lake
The latest work in eighteenth-century studies. Showcasing exciting new research across disciplines, Volume 52 of Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture explores how history's dominant narratives have been challenged and reframed. Anne Lafont shows how early writings about Black art questioned the cultural negation of enslaved peoples' humanity. A cluster of essays on "Decolonizing Eighteenth-Century Studies" connects the current conditions under which we produce...

Dorian Unbound

Sean O'Toole
A bold reimagining of the literary history of Decadence through a close examination of the transnational contexts of Oscar Wilde's classic novel The Picture of Dorian Gray. Building upon a large body of archival and critical work on Oscar Wilde's only novel, Dorian Unbound offers a new account of the importance of transnational contexts in the forging of Wilde's imagination and the wider genealogy of literary Decadence. Sean O'Toole argues that the attention critics have...

Icelight

Ranjit Hoskote
Set in an age of ecological catastrophe, Icelight eloquently accepts transience yet asserts the robustness of hope Icelight, Ranjit Hoskote's eighth collection of poems, enacts the experience of standing at the edge—of a life, a landscape, a world assuming new contours or going up in flames. Yet, the protagonists of these poems also stand at the edge of epiphany. In the title poem, we meet the Neolithic cave-dweller who, dazzled by a shapeshifting nature, crafts the first icon. The 'I' of these poems is not a sovereign 'I'. A...

Everything Is Sampled

Akinwumi Adesokan
Everything Is Sampled examines the shifting modes of production and circulation of African artistic forms since the 1980s, focusing on digital culture as the most currently decisive setting for these changes. Drawing on works of cinema, literature, music, and visual art, Akin Adesokan. addresses two main questions. First, given the various changes that the institutions producing African arts and letters have undergone in the past four decades,...