Languages



Arabic Second Language Learning and Effects of Input, Transfer, and Typology

Mohammad T. Alhawary
Despite the status of Arabic as a global language and the high demand to learn it, the field of Arabic second language acquisition remains underinvestigated. Second language acquisition findings are crucial for informing and advancing the field of Arabic foreign language pedagogy including Arabic language teaching, testing, and syllabus design. Arabic Second Language Learning and Effects of Input, Transfer, and Typology provides...

Soldiers of the Pen

Thomas Howell
From 1942 to 1945, a small, influential group of media figures willingly volunteered their services to form the Writers' War Board (WWB), accepting requests from government agencies to create propaganda. Members included mystery writer Rex Stout, Pulitzer and Nobel Prize winner Pearl S. Buck, novelist and sports writer Paul Gallico, Book-of-the-Month Club editor and popular radio host Clifton Fadiman, and Broadway lyricist Oscar Hammerstein II. The WWB mobilized thousands...

The Georgetown Dictionary of Moroccan Arabic

Mohamed Maamouri
The Georgetown Dictionary of Moroccan Arabic is a modernized language resource for learning and studying Moroccan Arabic that updates the pioneering Arabic dialect dictionary published by Georgetown University Press over fifty years ago. Students, teachers, and scholars of Arabic will welcome this upgraded resource, which includes key Moroccan words, to grow their vocabulary and learn more about Moroccan Arabic language and culture. Created using the...

Bad News Travels Fast

Patrick C. File
At the turn of the twentieth century, American journalists transmitted news across the country by telegraph. But what happened when these stories weren't true? In Bad News Travels Fast, Patrick C. File examines a series of libel cases by a handful of plaintiffs—including socialites, businessmen, and Annie Oakley—who sued newspapers across the country for republishing false newswire reports. Through these cases, File demonstrates how law and...

The Spy Who Loved Us

Thomas A. Bass
Pham Xuan An was one of the twentieth century's greatest spies. While working as a correspondent for Time during the Vietnam War, he sent intelligence reports—written in invisible ink or hidden inside spring rolls in film canisters—to Ho Chi Minh and his generals in North Vietnam. Only after Saigon fell in 1975 did An's colleagues learn that the affable raconteur in their midst, acclaimed as "dean of the Vietnamese press corps," was actually a general in the North...

Why They Can't Write

John Warner
There seems to be widespread agreement that—when it comes to the writing skills of college students—we are in the midst of a crisis. In Why They Can’t Write, John Warner, who taught writing at the college level for two decades, argues that the problem isn’t caused by a lack of rigor, or smartphones, or some generational character defect. Instead, he asserts, we’re teaching writing wrong. Warner blames this on decades of educational reform rooted in...

Community-based Language Learning

Joan Clifford
Community-based Language Learning offers a new framework for world language educators interested in integrating community-based language learning (CBLL) into their teaching and curricula. CBLL connects academic learning objectives with experiential learning, ranging from reciprocal partnerships with the community (e.g., community engagement, service learning) to one-directional learning situations such as community service and site visits. This resource prepares...

SENĆOŦEN

Timothy Montler
The SENĆOŦEN language historically has been spoken on the Saanich Peninsula of southern Vancouver Island and islands in the Strait of Georgia, today divided by the US-Canada border. SENĆOŦEN—also known as Saanich—is now the first language of fewer than ten people, as English has replaced it in everyday use. However, because of revitalization efforts that began in the 1970s with David Elliott Sr., who developed a unique SENĆOŦEN writing system, a large and growing number of people are...

Comme on dit, Première année de français, Bundle

Claude Grangier
Comme on dit, a comprehensive first year French textbook program, engages students in the learning process from day one using an inductive methodology centered around guided observation and rule discovery. Together with students' communicative needs and an analysis of their most pervasive transfer errors from English, the everyday speech patterns of 100 native speakers — culled from 150 hours of unscripted recordings — form the linguistic backbone...

Companion Website Access Key for Comme on dit, Première année de français

Claude Grangier
Comme on dit's companion website includes all homework exercises, enabling students to practice vocabulary, grammar, listening, and speaking. It capitalizes on technology to enrich the experience of students and teachers and improve learning outcomes. Following the sequence of the textbook, the website gives students their homework on a convenient and easy-to-use platform. Automatically graded and teacher-graded exercises provide students...

Ancient Rhetoric and the New Testament

Michael Wade Martin
For the ancient Greeks and Romans, eloquence was essential to public life and identity, perpetuating class status and power. The three-tiered study of rhetoric was thus designed to produce sons worthy of and equipped for public service. Rhetorical competency enabled the elite to occupy their proper place in society. The oracular and literary techniques represented in Greco-Roman education proved to be equally central to the formation...

An Anthology of Old Spanish

Tatiana Fotitch
"Fotitch has done a service to teachers and students of Medieval Spanish in offering a ready source of materials which are scattered in many places, all in a pleasing form." - Hispania "This book is a convenient chrestomathy, well presented, and beautifully printed. Fotich brings together, for students who wish to begin the study of Old Spanish, an excellent choice of texts, succinctly annotated and reproduced from the best sources." - Bulletin Hispanique Spanish is one of the most widely spoken languages...

Jonah, revised and expanded edition

W. Dennis Tucker, Jr.
In the Baylor Handbook on the Hebrew Bible's most widely used volume, Dennis Tucker provides a foundational analysis of the text of Jonah. This second edition of Jonah is distinguished by the detailed and comprehensive attention paid to the Hebrew text. Tucker's analysis is a convenient pedagogical and reference tool that explains the form and syntax of the biblical text, offers guidance for deciding between competing semantic analyses, engages important text-critical debates, and addresses...

What We Talk about When We Talk about Hebrew (and What It Means to Americans)

Naomi B. Sokoloff
Why Hebrew, here and now? What is its value for contemporary Americans? In What We Talk about When We Talk about Hebrew (and What It Means to Americans) scholars, writers, and translators tackle a series of urgent questions that arise from the changing status of Hebrew in the United States. To what extent is that status affected by evolving Jewish identities and shifting attitudes toward Israel and Zionism? Will Hebrew programs survive...

Hosea

Eric J. Tully
In this volume, Eric J. Tully provides a foundational analysis of the text of Hosea. Hosea is distinguished by the detailed and comprehensive attention paid to the Hebrew text. Tully's analysis is a convenient pedagogical and reference tool that explains the form and syntax of the biblical text, offers guidance for deciding between competing semantic analyses, engages important text-critical debates, and addresses questions relating to the Hebrew text that are not always addressed in standard...

Cyberformalism

Daniel Shore
Linguistic forms are essential to meaning: like words, they make a semantic contribution to the things we say. We inherit them from past writers and speakers and fill them with different words to produce novel utterances. They shape us and the ways we interpret the world. Yet prevalent assumptions about language and the constraints of print-finding tools have kept linguistic forms and their histories hidden from view. Drawing on recent work in cognitive and...

The Changing Landscape of Spanish Language Curricula

Alan V. Brown
Spanish remains a large and constant fixture in the foreign language learning landscape in the United States. As Spanish language study has grown, so too has the diversity of students and contexts of use, placing the field in the midst of a curricular identity crisis. Spanish has become a second, rather than a foreign, language in the US, which leads to unique opportunities and challenges for curriculum and syllabus...