History


A Diplomatic Meeting

James Cooper
They were known as "political soulmates" who shared a "special relationship". Grounded in similar democratic systems, common historical discourses, and sustained military alliance through several of the twentieth century's most contentious conflicts, British prime minister Margaret Thatcher and the American president Ronald Reagan shared a deep respect, admiration, and friendship, as well as similar ideologies. Many analysts and historians recycle a popular conception of...

Which Side Are You On?

George Ella Lyon, illustrated by Christopher Cardinale
Which Side Are You On? tells the story of the classic union song that was written in 1931 by Florence Reece in a rain of bullets. It has been sung by people fighting for their rights all over the world. Florence's husband Sam was a coal miner in Kentucky. Many of the coal mines were owned by big companies, who kept wages low and spent as little money on safety as possible. Miners lived in company houses on company land and were paid in scrip, good...

The Assault on Elisha Green

Randolph Paul Runyon
On June 8, 1883, Rev. Elisha Green was traveling by train from Maysville to Paris, Kentucky, when about forty students from the Millersburg Female College crowded onto the train at Millersburg accompanied by George T. Gould, the school's president, and Frank L. Bristow, their music teacher. Gould grabbed the reverend by the shoulder and ordered him to give up his seat. When Green refused, Bristow and Gould assaulted Green until the conductor intervened and...

Zero-Sum Victory

Christopher D. Kolenda
Why have the major, post-9/11, US military interventions turned into quagmires? Despite huge power imbalances, major capacity-building efforts, and repeated tactical victories by what many observers call the world's best military, the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq turned bloody and intractable. The US government's fixation on zero-sum decisive victory is an important part of the explanation why successful military operations to overthrow two developing-world regimes failed...

Tecumseh's War

Donald R. Hickey
A history of the last great Native American war in North America. At the dawn of the nineteenth century, Native American dominance of the Northwest Territory was threatened by a series of treaties designed to open the land to US settlement. In response, a coalition of tribes launched what would come to be known as Tecumseh's War, named after the charismatic Shawnee war chief who was the guiding force behind the Native confederacy. Often treated today as an adjunct to...

Taste the State

Kevin Mitchell, David S. Shields
From the influence of 1920s fashion on asparagus growers to an heirloom watermelon lost and found, Taste the State abounds with surprising stories from South Carolina's singularly rich food tradition. Here, Kevin Mitchell and David S. Shields present engaging profiles of eighty-two of the state's most distinctive ingredients, such as Carolina Gold rice, Sea Island White Flint corn, and the cone-shaped Charleston Wakefield cabbage, and...

The Catholic Enlightenment

edited by Ulrich L. Lehner, Shaun Blanchard
The Catholic Enlightenment: A Global Anthology presents readers with accessible, translated selections from the writings of fifteen major Catholic Enlightenment authors. These early modern authors include women, priests, lay intellectuals, and bishops. Twelve of these figures are being brought into English for the first time. The purpose of the volume is to provide students, scholars, and interested non-specialists with a single point of departure to delve into...

A Thomistic Christocentrism

Dylan Schrader
Saint Thomas Aquinas famously held the opinion that, in God's actual plan for the world, the Word would not have become flesh except to redeem us from sin. Conversely, Blessed John Duns Scotus argued that God intended Christ first, such that Christ would have come even if there had been no sin. While Aquinas and Scotus were far from the first to consider this question, they became emblematic of two seemingly irreconcilable...

In the Service of God and Humanity

Tunde Adeleke
Martin R. Delany (1812–1885) was one of the leading and most influential Black activists and nationalists in American history. His ideas have inspired generations of activists and movements, including Booker T. Washington in the late nineteenth century, Marcus Garvey in the early 1920s, Malcolm X and Black Power in 1960s, and even today's Black Lives Matter. Extant scholarship on Delany has focused largely on his Black nationalist and...

Jesintel

Children of the Setting Sun Productions, edited by Darrell Hillaire, photographs by Fay "Beau" Garreau, Jr., with contributions byLynda V. Mapes, Nicole Brown, afterword by Danita Washington

Brothers of Coweta

Bryan C. Rindfleisch
In Brothers of Coweta Bryan C. Rindfleisch explores how family and clan served as the structural foundation of the Muscogee (Creek) Indian world through the lens of two brothers, who emerged from the historical shadows to shape the forces of empire, colonialism, and revolution that transformed the American South during the eighteenth century. Although much of the historical record left by European settlers was fairly robust, it...

U.S. Naval Gunfire Support in the Pacific War

Donald K. Mitchener
On November 20, 1943, the United States invaded the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands as part of the first American offensive in the Central Pacific region during World War II. This invasion marked more than one first, as it was also the introductory test of a doctrine developed during the interwar years to address problems inherent in situations where amphibious assaults require support by naval gunfire rather than...

Head to Head

Lenny Shulman
In Head to Head, award-winning writer Lenny Shulman offers highlights from the best interviews he has conducted throughout his twenty-year career covering Thoroughbred horse racing. In that time, he has coaxed the innermost thoughts out of the sport's most notable headline-makers. It was to Shulman that Helen "Penny" Chenery, owner of Secretariat, publicly revealed for the first time the mistakes she made with her superstar colt. Arthur Hancock III shared with him...

John J. Pershing and the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I, 1917-1919

edited by John T. Greenwood, Ph.D.
General of the Armies John J. Pershing (1860–1948) had a long and distinguished military career but is most famous for leading the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I. He published a memoir, My Experiences in the World War, and has been the subject of numerous biographies, but the literature regarding this towering figure and his enormous role in the First World War deserves to...

Pensées

Blaire Pascal, Blaise Pascal, translated by Pierre Zoberman, introduction by David Wetsel
Blaise Pascal (1623-1662) was a French mathematician, physicist, and religious philosopher, who laid the foundation for the modern theory of probabilities. The Pensées are made up of some 800 fragments, that have proven to be an enduring masterpiece since their initial publication in 1670. This volume is a translation of Philippe Sellier's edition of Pascal's Pensées, in addition to two shorter texts, the Exchange with M. de Sacy and The Life of Monsieur...

Challenging History

edited by Leah Worthington, Rachel Clare Donaldson, John W. White
For decades racism and social inequity have stayed at the center of the national conversation in the United States, sustaining the debate around public historic places and monuments and what they represent. These conversations are a reminder of the crucial role that public history professionals play in engaging public audiences on subjects of race and slavery. This "difficult history" has often remained un- or...

The Long Civil War

edited by John David Smith, Ph.D., Raymond Arsenault, with contributions byMichael J. Birkner, Paul A. Cimbala, Stanley Harrold, James R. Hedtke, James Oliver Horton, Lois E. Horton, Daniel Kilbride, Diane Miller Sommerville, Stephen J. Whitfield
Contemporary historians and literary scholars continually expand the geographic, temporal, and thematic dimensions of the Civil War era. They analyze the war deeply and expansively, identifying subjects, themes, and topics that emerged...