History



Caring for Glaciers

Karine Gagné
Regional geopolitical processes have turned the Himalayan region of Ladakh, in northwest India, into a strategic border area with an increasing military presence that has decentered the traditional agropastoralist economy. This in turn has led to social fragmentation, the growing isolation of elders, and ethical dilemmas for those who strive to maintain traditional subsistence activities. Simultaneously, climate change is causing glaciers—a vital source of life in the...

Creating the Universe

Eric Huntington
Buddhist representations of the cosmos across nearly two thousand years of history in Tibet, Nepal, and India show that cosmology is a rich language for the expression of diverse religious ideas, with cosmological thinking at the center of Buddhist thought, art, and practice. In Creating the Universe, Eric Huntington presents examples of visual art and architecture, primary texts, ritual ideologies, and material practices—accompanied by extensive explanatory...

Made Modern

Edward Jones-Imhotep
Jan 2019 - UBC Press
Science and technology have shaped not only economic empires and industrial landscapes, but also the identities, anxieties, and understandings of people living in modern times. Made Modern draws together leading scholars from a wide range of fields who write on topics ranging from exploration and infrastructure to the occult sciences and communications. The contributors use histories of science and technology to enrich our understanding of Canadian history and of Canada's...

Footbinding as Fashion

John Robert Shepherd, hD
Previous studies of the practice of footbinding in imperial China have theorized that it expressed ethnic identity or that it served an economic function. By analyzing the popularity of footbinding in different places and times, Footbinding as Fashion investigates the claim that early Qing (1644–1911) attempts by Manchu rulers to ban footbinding made it a symbol of anti-Manchu sentiment and Han identity and led to the spread of the practice...

Jade Mountains and Cinnabar Pools

James M. Hargett, hD
First-hand accounts of travel provide windows into places unknown to the reader, or new ways of seeing familiar places. In Jade Mountains and Cinnabar Pools, the first book-length treatment in English of Chinese travel literature (youji), James M. Hargett identifies and examines core works in the genre, from the Six Dynasties period (220–581), when its essential characteristics emerged, to its florescence in the late Ming dynasty...

The Other Milk

Jia-Chen Fu, hD
In the early twentieth century, China was stigmatized as the "Land of Famine." Meanwhile in Europe and the United States, scientists and industrialists seized upon the soybean as a miracle plant that could help build modern economies and healthy nations. Soybeans, protein-packed and domestically grown, were a common food in China, and soybean milk (doujiang) was poised for reinvention for the modern age. Scientific soybean milk became a symbol of national growth and development on...

Art AIDS America / Art AIDS America Chicago Boxed Set

Jonathan David Katz
This slipcased boxed set contains the two volumes: Art AIDS America, published in 2015 to coincide with the original exhibit at the Tacoma Art Museum, and the new book Art AIDS America Chicago. Art AIDS America included work by Keith Haring, David Wojnarowicz, Peter Hujar, Robert Mapplethorpe, among many others. Taken together, these two volumes are a stunning overview of the artistic response over the last thirty years to the AIDS epidemic in America, with voices...

Art AIDS America Chicago

Staci Boris
Dec 2018 - Lucia Marquand
The groundbreaking 2015 exhibition Art AIDS America, and the accompanying book, revealed the deep and unforgettable impact that HIV/AIDS had on American art from the early 1980s to the present. The national tour of the exhibit concluded its run at the Alphawood Gallery in Chicago, which had been founded in part to give the exhibition a Midwest venue. Now Art AIDS America Chicago looks at the issues raised by the original exhibition and book with from new, different perspectives. An entirely new set of artworks...

Assembling Unity

Sarah A. Nickel
Dec 2018 - UBC Press
Established narratives portray Indigenous unity as emerging solely in response to the political agenda of the settler state. But unity has long shaped the modern Indigenous political movement. With Indigenous perspectives in the foreground, Assembling Unity explores the relationship between global political ideologies and panIndigenous politics in British Columbia through a detailed history of the Union of BC Indian Chiefs. Sarah Nickel demonstrates...

Flowering Plums and Curio Cabinets

Sunglim Kim
The social and economic rise of the chungin class ("middle people" who ranked between the yangban aristocracy and commoners) during the late Chosŏn period (1700–1910) ushered in a world of materialism and commodification of painting and other art objects. Generally overlooked in art history, the chungin contributed to a flourishing art market, especially for ch'aekkŏri, a new form of still life painting that experimented with Western perspective...

Opening the Government of Canada

Amanda Clarke
Dec 2018 - UBC Press
Opening the Government of Canada presents a compelling case for a more open model of governance in the digital age – but a model that also continues to uphold democratic principles at the heart of the Westminster system. Amanda Clarke details the untold story of the federal bureaucracy's efforts to adapt to digitalage pressures from the mid2000s onwards. The book reveals the mismatch between the bureaucracy's Closed Government traditions and evolving...

Poetic Imagination in Japanese Art

Maribeth Graybill
Dec 2018 - Portland Art Museum
Assembled over the last four decades and still growing, the Mary and Cheney Cowles collection of Japanese art is one of the finest in private hands in North America. What began for Cheney Cowles as an almost casual interest in collecting early Imari ware evolved, over time, into a passion for Japanese paintings and calligraphy. Cowles's tastes are broad and eclectic, embracing a dazzling diversity of styles and techniques. This...

Truth and Conviction

L. Jane McMillan
Dec 2018 - UBC Press
The name "Donald Marshall Jr." is synonymous with "wrongful conviction" and the fight for Indigenous rights in Canada. In Truth and Conviction, Jane McMillan – Marshall's former wife, an acclaimed anthropologist, and an original defendant in the Supreme Court's Marshall decision – tells the story of how Marshall's lifelong battle against injustice permeated Canadian legal consciousness and revitalized Indigenous law. Marshall died in 2009, but his legacy...

Puget's Sound

Murray Morgan
With the same ability to make personalities and events come alive that characterizes his classic Skid Road, Murray Morgan here tells the colorful story of Tacoma, "the City of Destiny," and southern Puget Sound, where many major events of Washington's history took place. Drawing upon original journals and reports, Morgan builds Puget's Sound around individuals, interweaving portraits of well-known historical figures with those who are more obscure but have a special...

Proud Raven, Panting Wolf

Emily L. Moore
Among Southeast Alaska's best-known tourist attractions are its totem parks, showcases for monumental wood sculptures by Tlingit and Haida artists. Although the art form is centuries old, the parks date back only to the waning years of the Great Depression, when the US government reversed its policy of suppressing Native practices and began to pay Tlingit and Haida communities to restore older totem poles and move them from ancestral villages into parks designed for...

Art in Seattle's Public Spaces

James M. Rupp
From cedar totem poles to high-tech video installations, downtown Seattle sparkles with hundreds of artworks adorning plazas, lobbies, parks, and waterfront piers and paths. This impressive collection, comprising works by artists with regional or international reputations (and often both), has expanded rapidly as Seattle's urban core has grown. The explosive development of South Lake Union in recent years has brought major works by Jaume Plensa, Julie Speidel, Annie...

Gold Rush Manliness

Christopher Herbert, hD
The mid-nineteenth-century gold rushes bring to mind raucous mining camps and slapped-together cities populated by carousing miners, gamblers, and prostitutes. Yet many of the white men who went to the gold fields were products of the Victorian era: educated men who valued morality and order. Examining the closely linked gold rushes in California and British Columbia, historian Christopher Herbert shows that these men worried about the meaning of their manhood in the...

The Seattle General Strike, Centennial Edition

Robert L. Friedheim
"We are undertaking the most tremendous move ever made by LABOR in this country, a move which will lead—NO ONE KNOWS WHERE!" With these words echoing throughout the city, on February 6, 1919, 65,000 Seattle workers began one of the most important general strikes in US history. For six tense yet nonviolent days, the Central Labor Council negotiated with federal and local authorities on behalf of the shipyard workers whose grievances initiated the citywide walkout. Meanwhile, strikers organized to provide...