History


Which Side Are You On?

George Ella Lyon
Which Side Are You On? tells the story of the classic union song that was written in 1931 by Florence Reece in a rain of bullets. It has been sung by people fighting for their rights all over the world. Florence's husband Sam was a coal miner in Kentucky. Many of the coal mines were owned by big companies, who kept wages low and spent as little money on safety as possible. Miners lived in company houses on company land and were paid in scrip, good only at the company store. The company...

Tecumseh's War

Donald R. Hickey
A history of the last great Native American war in North America. At the dawn of the nineteenth century, Native American dominance of the Northwest Territory was threatened by a series of treaties designed to open the land to US settlement. In response, a coalition of tribes launched what would come to be known as Tecumseh's War, named after the charismatic Shawnee war chief who was the guiding force behind the Native confederacy. Often treated today as an adjunct to...

U.S. Naval Gunfire Support in the Pacific War

Donald K. Mitchener
On November 20, 1943, the United States military invaded the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands as part of the first American offensive in the Central Pacific region during World War II. This invasion, however, marked more than just one first—it was also the introductory test of a doctrine that was developed during the interwar period to address recognized problems inherent in the substitution of naval gunfire for...

Head to Head

Lenny Shulman
With the world changing more rapidly than ever before, we risk losing history and the sense of how we have evolved unless we make a concerted effort to embrace the knowledge of those that have excelled in a particular field and paved the way forward. The Thoroughbred industry is no exception. The voices of those who dominated the various facets of the sport and business in the latter part of the 20th century and through the first generation of the 21st are growing...

John J. Pershing and the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I, 1917-1919

John T. Greenwood, Ph.D.
General of the Armies John J. Pershing (1860–1948) had a long and decorated military career, but is most famous for leading the American Expeditionary Forces in WWI. He published a memoir, My Experiences in the World War, and has been the subject of several biographies; but the literature regarding this towering figure and his enormous role in the First World War deserves to be expanded to include...

The Long Civil War

John David Smith, Ph.D.
In 1873, four years before what historians consider the official end of Reconstruction, Mark Twain wrote that the Civil War era already had become a historical perennial. "History," Twain wrote, "is never done with inquiring of these years, and summoning witnesses about them and trying to understand their significance." The nine years between South Carolina's secession in 1860 and the election of Ulysses S. Grant as president in 1868 signified a watershed in...

Anna Held and the Birth of Ziegfeld's Broadway, updated edition

Eve Golden
Anna Held (1870?-1918), a petite woman with an hourglass figure, was America's most popular musical comedy star during the two decades preceding World War I. In the colorful world of New York theater during La Belle Époque, she epitomized everything that was glamorous, sophisticated, and suggestive about turn-of-the-century Broadway. Overcoming an impoverished life as an orphan to become a music-hall star in Paris, Held rocketed to fame in America. From 1896 to 1910, she starred in...

The Most Hated Man in Kentucky

Brad Asher
For the last third of the nineteenth century, Union General Stephen Gano Burbridge enjoyed the unenviable distinction of being the most hated man in Kentucky. From mid-1864, just months into his reign as the military commander of the district of Kentucky, until his death in December 1894, the mere mention of Burbridge's name triggered a firestorm of curses from Kentucky's editorialists and politicians. By the end of Burbridge's tenure as...

Vitagraph

Andrew A. Erish
Vitagraph: America's First Great Motion Picture Studio is the first comprehensive examination of the company most responsible for defining and popularizing the American movie. Vitagraph was among the five production companies established at the dawn of commercial cinema in America. From its initial studios in Manhattan and Brooklyn to its later base of operations in Hollywood, Vitagraph was America's leading producer of motion pictures for much of the silent era, and for several...

Broadway Goes to War

Robert L. McLaughlin
"Theater is the art by which human beings make or find human action worth watching."—Paul Woodruff, The Necessity of Theater: The Art of Watching and Being Watched Before World War II, Hollywood dictated what films were released, debuting movies such as The Man I Married (1940), The Mortal Storm (1940), Escape (1940), and The Great Dictator (1940) that conveyed an unambiguously critical view of Nazi Germany and warned the public about the dangers of fascism and the...

Lake Hydrology

William LeRoy Evans III
With fresh water becoming a critical issue around the world, lake mass balance—the hydrology or water movement in lakes—is increasingly important to environmental studies and remediation projects. Unfortunately, lake hydrology is often only briefly covered in broader texts on hydrogeology and hydrology or is confined to specialized research papers. In Lake Hydrology, the first book focused on the topic, William LeRoy Evans III rigorously describes the hydrology of flow...

This Train is Not Bound for Glory

Paola Ravasio
This book explores how spatial displacement correlates to social immobility narratologically by carrying out a hermeneutic of literary trainscapes. Understood as the arrangement of the social and the mobile in the literary representation of movement of people and goods by the railway system across inter-American economies, the book focuses on narratives based at the Panama Canal Zone, across the Central American banana republics, and on the human caravan...

A Body in Fukushima

Eiko Otake
A photographic account of an extended solo performance in irradiated Fukushima between 2014 and 2019 On March 11, 2011 one of the most powerful earthquakes in recorded history devastated Japan, triggering a massive tsunami and nuclear meltdowns at three reactors in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant complex in a triple disaster known as 3.11. On five separate journeys, Japanese-born performer and dancer Eiko Otake and historian and photographer William Johnston visited multiple locations across Fukushima,...

Watchman at the Gates

George Joulwan
Gen. George Joulwan built his 36-year military career during one of the most tumultuous eras in US history—the 1960s. Raised in a small Pennsylvania coal mining town, Joulwan would be present at the rise and fall of the Berlin wall, fight in Vietnam, play a part in university debates on the Vietnam War, and command over twenty operations in the Balkans, Africa, and the Middle East. He ended his career as the supreme commander of NATO forces in Europe (SACEUR). In...

Memory Crash

Georgiy Kasianov
This account of historical politics in Ukraine, framed in a broader European context, shows how social, political, and cultural groups have used and misused the past from the final years of the Soviet Union to 2020. Georgiy Kasianov details practices relating to history and memory by a variety of actors, including state institutions, non-governmental organizations, political parties, historians, and local governments. He identifies the main political purposes of...

Transforming Markets

Andrew Kilpatrick
The second volume of the history of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) takes up the story of how the Bank has become an indispensable part of the international financial architecture. It tracks the rollercoaster ride during this period, including the Bank's crucial coordinating role in response to global and regional crises, the calls for its presence as an investor in Turkey, the Middle East and North...

Applications for Advancing Animal Ecology

Michael L. Morrison, Leonard A. Brennan, Bruce G. Marcot, William M. Block, and Kevin S. McKelvey
Despite major advances in sampling techniques and analytical methods, many animal ecologists conduct research that is primarily relevant to a specific time and place. They also tend to focus more on the statistical analyses and nuances of modeling than actual study design. Arguing that studies of animal ecology should always begin with a focus on the behaviors and characteristics of individual organisms,...

Fallen Tigers

Daniel Jackson
Mere months before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, a volunteer group of American planes, pilots, and ground crews arrived in the Far East. With the world in flames and war clouds gathering over the United States, President Franklin D. Roosevelt realized keeping China in the fight would be crucial to an eventual Allied victory. The legendary "Flying Tigers" went into combat within two weeks of that fateful Sunday in December 1941. For the next...

Wildlife Management and Landscapes

edited by William F. Porter, Chad J. Parent, Rosemary A. Stewart, and David M. Williams
It's been clear for decades that landscape-level patterns and processes, along with the tenets and tools of landscape ecology, are vitally important in understanding wildlife-habitat relationships and sustaining wildlife populations. Today, significant shifts in the spatial scale of extractive, agricultural, ranching, and urban land uses are upon us, making it more important than ever before to...

De-Centering History Education

Nicole Schwabe
Global historical approaches plead for the overcoming of national historical traditions. This goes hand in hand with the demand to consciously reflect the long suppressed category of space in historical research. While there are signs of amending within the scientific landscape in this respect, a national narrative continues to dominate in history education. The demand for de-centering historical learning, provides ideas on how to promote globally...