History


U.S. Naval Gunfire Support in the Pacific War

Donald K. Mitchener
On November 20, 1943, the United States military invaded the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands as part of the first American offensive in the Central Pacific region during World War II. This invasion, however, marked more than just one first—it was also the introductory test of a doctrine that was developed during the interwar period to address recognized problems inherent in the substitution of naval gunfire for...

Broadway Goes to War

Robert L. McLaughlin
"Theater is the art by which human beings make or find human action worth watching."—Paul Woodruff, The Necessity of Theater: The Art of Watching and Being Watched Before World War II, Hollywood dictated what films were released, debuting movies such as The Man I Married (1940), The Mortal Storm (1940), Escape (1940), and The Great Dictator (1940) that conveyed an unambiguously critical view of Nazi Germany and warned the public about the dangers of fascism and the...

Watchman at the Gates

George Joulwan
Gen. George Joulwan built his 36-year military career during one of the most tumultuous eras in US history—the 1960s. Raised in a small Pennsylvania coal mining town, Joulwan would be present at the rise and fall of the Berlin wall, fight in Vietnam, play a part in university debates on the Vietnam War, and command over twenty operations in the Balkans, Africa, and the Middle East. He ended his career as the supreme commander of NATO forces in Europe (SACEUR). In...

Fallen Tigers

Daniel Jackson
The Japanese invasion and occupation of China was critical to the outcome of the Second World War. Acknowledging China's precarious situation, the US provided crucial aerial support to China. Even before the declaration of war against Japan, the infamous "Flying Tigers," a volunteer force of American airmen, landed in China only weeks before the attack on Pearl Harbor. Japanese and American aircraft fought over the skies of inland China and Southeast...

Just a Few Miles South

Ouita Michel
Wallace Station and Windy Corner are situated in some of the most beautiful farmland in the entire world. The mist rising above the gentle rolling, brilliantly green pastures running with foals is breathtaking. Horsemen and women come in for steaming cups of coffee and piled-high biscuit sandwiches or plates of grits and eggs. It's in settings like these where Ouita Michel's menus shine. Featuring fresh, seasonal ingredients from local farmers, Michel's restaurants...

Getting Right with Lincoln

Edward Steers, Jr.
Of the many presidents and founding figures of the United States, few have garnered more attention than Abraham Lincoln. Much of what we know about Lincoln's life comes from anecdotes providing only brief glimpses of the man. As such, there is great interest in determining the true character of the "Great Emancipator." His life and deeds have been heavily researched, interpreted, and reinterpreted time and again until the multitude of "truths"...

Racing for America

James C. Nicholson
On October 20, 1923, at Belmont Park in New York, Kentucky Derby champion Zev toed the starting line alongside Epsom Derby winner Papyrus, the top colt from England, to compete for a $100,000 purse. Years of Progressive reform efforts had nearly eliminated horseracing in the United States only a decade earlier. But for weeks leading up to the match race that would be officially dubbed the "International," American journalists provided unprecedented...

The Narcotic Farm

Nancy D. Campbell
From 1935 until 1975, just about every junkie busted for dope went to the Narcotic Farm. Equal parts federal prison, treatment center, farm, and research laboratory, the Farm was designed to rehabilitate addicts and help researchers discover a cure for drug addiction. Although it began as a bold and ambitious public works project, and became famous as a rehabilitation center frequented by great jazz musicians among others, the Farm was shut down forty...

Pensées

Blaire Pascal
Blaise Pascal (1623-1662) was a French mathematician, physicist, and religious philosopher, who laid the foundation for the modern theory of probabilities. The Pensées are made up of some 800 fragments, that have proven to be an enduring masterpiece since their initial publication in 1670. This volume is a translation of Philippe Sellier's edition of Pascal's Pensées, in addition to two shorter texts, the Exchange with M. de Sacy and The Life of Monsieur Pascal by Pascal's sister, Gilberte Périer. In addition to a Preface and an...

Fat Chance

Rick Christman
During the early 1990s, the diet drugs fen-phen and Redux achieved tremendous popularity. The chemical combination was discovered by chance, marketed with hyperbole, and prescribed to millions. But as the drugs' developer, pharmaceutical giant American Home Products, cashed in on the miracle weight-loss pills, medical researchers revealed that the drugs caused heart valve disease. This scandal was, incredibly, only the beginning of an unbelievable saga of greed and...

The Sailor

David F. Schmitz
As with sailing, so with politics: make your cloth too taut and your ship will dip and heel, but slacken off and trim your sails, and things head up again. —Euripides, Orestes The Great Depression of the 1930s and the global crisis of World War II created ripe conditions for change in both US and international politics, setting off many questions regarding America's role in the world. The power and influence held by the United States at this time...

A Guidebook to South Carolina Historical Markers

Edwin Breeden
The South Carolina Historical Marker Program, established in 1936, has approved the installation of more than 1,700 interpretive plaques, each highlighting how places both grand and unassuming have played important roles in the history of the Palmetto State. These roadside markers identify and interpret places valuable for understanding South Carolina's past, including sites of consequential events and buildings, structures, or other resources significant for their design or their...

Before the Raj

James Mulholland
During the later decades of the eighteenth century, a rapid influx of English-speaking Europeans arrived in India with an interest in expanding the creation and distribution of anglophone literature. At the same time, a series of military, political, and economic successes for the British in Asia created the first global crisis to shepherd in an international system of national ideologies. In this study of colonial literary production, James Mulholland proposes that the East India...

Live at Jackson Station

Daniel M. Harrison
The smoke was thick, the music was loud, and the beer was flowing. In the fast-and-loose 1980s, Jackson Station Rhythm & Blues Club in Hodges, South Carolina, was a festive late-night roadhouse filled with people from all walks of life who gathered to listen to the live music of high-energy performers. Housed in a Reconstruction-era railway station, the blues club embraced local Southern culture and brought a cosmopolitan vibe to the South Carolina...

The Black Butterfly

Lawrence T. Brown
The world gasped in April 2015 as Baltimore erupted and Black Lives Matter activists, incensed by Freddie Gray's brutal death in police custody, shut down highways and marched on city streets. In The Black Butterfly—a reference to the fact that Baltimore's majority-Black population spreads out on both sides of the coveted strip of real estate running down the center of the city like a butterfly's wings—Lawrence T. Brown reveals that ongoing historical trauma...

The Holy Mass

Mike Aquilina
The Catholic University of America Press is proud to present the third volume in its Sayings of the Fathers of the Church series. Featuring esteemed scholars and writers compiling material from our acclaimed Fathers of the Church volumes, each title is devoted to select areas of theology. The inaugural volumes covered the Seven Deadly Sins and the Four Last Things, and now we turn to The Holy Mass. The documents of early Christianity are rich in mentions of the Mass and its component parts. Sometimes they're detailed...

Allies in Air Power

Steven Paget
In the past century, multinational military operations have become the norm; but while contributions from different nations provide many benefits—from expanded capability to political credibility—they also present a number of challenges. Issues such as command and control, communications, equipment standardization, intelligence, logistics, planning, tactics, and training all require consideration. Cultural factors present challenges as well, particularly when language...