History

The Antislavery Movement in Kentucky

Lowell H. Harrison
As one of only two states in the nation to still allow slavery by the time of the Thirteenth Amendment in 1865, Kentucky's history of slavery runs deep. Based on extensive research, The Antislavery Movement in Kentucky focuses on two main antislavery movements that emerged in Kentucky during the early years of opposition. By 1820, Kentuckians such as Cassius Clay called for the emancipation of slaves—a gradual end to slavery with compensation to owners. Others, such as Delia Webster, who...

Erin's Heirs

Dennis Clark
"They will melt like snowflakes in the sun," said one observer of nineteenth-century Irish emigrants to America. Not only did they not melt, they formed one of the most extensive and persistent ethnic subcultures in American history. Dennis Clark now offers an insightful analysis of the social means this group has used to perpetuate its distinctiveness amid the complexity of American urban life. Basing his study on family stories, oral interviews, organizational records, census data, radio scripts,...

Eternal Offerings

edited by Liu Yang, with Robert Bagley, Li Xueqin, Jenny F. So, Zhu Fenghan
The collection of ancient Chinese bronzes at the Minneapolis Institute of Art is exceptional in its depth and rarity. It is generally considered to be one of the most important in the United States. The works span millennia, from the Shang through the Han dynasties (1600 BCE to 220 CE), illustrating the evolving function of ritual bronzes in Chinese society. This luxuriously illustrated...

Patton's Tactician

Geoffrey Keyes, edited by James W. Holsinger, Jr.
Nineteen months after Japanese forces attacked Pearl Harbor and forced the United States to enter World War II, boats carrying the 7th US Army landed on the shores of southern Sicily. Dubbed Operation Husky, the campaign to establish an Allied foothold in Sicily was led by two of the most noted American tacticians of the twentieth century: Major General George S. Patton Jr. and Major General Geoffrey Keyes. While Patton is...

Tengautuli Atkuk / The Flying Parka

Ann Fienup-Riordan, Alice Rearden, Marie Meade
Parkas are part of a living tradition in southwest Alaska. Some are ornamented with tassels, beads, and elaborate stitching; others are simpler fur or birdskin garments. Although fewer fancy parkas are sewn today, many people still wear those made for them by their mothers and other relatives. "Parka-making" conversations touch on every aspect of Yup'ik life—child...

Anatomy of a Duel

Stuart W. Sanders
When the popular musical Hamilton showcased the celebrated duel between Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr, it reminded twenty-first-century Americans that some prominent, honor-bound citizens once used negotiated, formal fights as a way to settle differences. During the Civil War, two prominent Kentuckians—one a Union colonel and the other a pro-Confederate civilian—continued this legacy by dueling. At a time when thousands of soldiers were...

The Coal Miner Who Became Governor

Paul E. Patton
Born in Fallsburg, Kentucky, in a tenant house insulated with newspapers, Paul Patton had a humble upbringing that held few clues about his future as one of the most prominent politicians in the history of the state. From the coal mines of eastern Kentucky to the governor's office in Frankfort, Patton's life exemplifies triumph through hard work, determination, and perseverance, as well as the consequences of personal mistakes. In The Coal Miner Who Became Governor, Patton, with Jeffrey S. Suchanek,...

Gatewood

Matthew Strandmark
When Louis Gatewood Galbraith passed away in 2012, a flood of tributes merely scratched the surface of this "colorful" and controversial figure. Throughout his life and political career, regional and national media outlets focused on the policy ideas and public acts that made Gatewood a cultural fixture: public demonstrations, an affinity for recreational drug use, unfiltered language, and recurring political campaigns. Best known as an advocate for the legalization of cannabis, second amendment...

Kentucky Quilts and Quiltmakers

Linda Elisabeth LaPinta
Although they are commonplace in American homes, quilts are much more than simple patchwork bed coverings and wall adornments. While many of these beautiful and intricate works of art are rich in history and tradition, others reflect the cutting-edge talent and avant-garde mastery of contemporary quiltmakers. Kentucky Quilts and Quiltmakers: Three Centuries of Creativity, Community, and Commerce is the first comprehensive study to...

Uniting against the Reich

Luke W. Truxal
On August 17, 1942, twelve Boeing B-17 Flying Fortresses of the United States Eighth Air Force carried out the first American raid over occupied Europe, striking the rail yards at Rouen, France. Soon after, hundreds of American B-17s and Consolidated B-24 Liberators filled the skies above Europe. Despite frequent attacks against Germany and its allies by four different air forces, American commanders failed to stage a successful air offensive against Germany in the summer...

Post-World War One Plebiscites and Their Legacies

edited by Sergiusz Bober
Plebiscites, or referendums, are epitomes of direct democracy and the right of self-determination. While direct democracy has always been a key subject in the theory and practice of western liberal democracies, the issue of self-determination has been propelled to the fore by the hegemonistic moves of Russia. By providing a historical analysis of the post-World War One plebiscites, this book deals with enduring, painfully...

COVID-19 and Pandemics in Austrian History (Contemporary Austrian Studies, vol. 32)

edited by Marc Landry, Dirk Rupnow
In early 2020, the emergence of the COVID-19 shook the globe. Quickly the world began to search history for lessons from past pandemics, and to compare the experience of COVID in different countries. This volume of Contemporary Austrian Studies is a part of these efforts, dedicated to exploring aspects of the history of epidemic disease in Austria, as well as the peculiarities of the Austrian experience of...

Commanding Professionalism

William Stuart Nance
When one thinks of influential World War II military figures, five-star generals such as Dwight D. Eisenhower and Omar Bradley instantly come to mind. As important as these central figures were to the Second World War, the conflict produced equally effective lower-profile leaders whose influence had an undeniable impact. Among these leaders are William Simpson, commander of the US Ninth Army, and James Moore, his chief of staff. Working in tandem, the pair...

Queer Arrangements

Lisa Barg
Queer Arrangements is a new study of Billy Strayhorn that examines his music and career at the intersection of jazz and Black queer history The legacy of Black queer composer, arranger and pianist Billy Strayhorn (1915–1967) hovers at the edge of canonical jazz narratives. Queer Arrangements explores the ways in which Strayhorn's identity as an openly gay Black jazz musician shaped his career, including the creative roles he could assume and the dynamics between...

The Words and Wares of David Drake

edited by Jill Beute Koverman, Jane Przybysz
A celebration of the remarkable poem vessels of Dave the Potter David Drake, also known as Dave the Potter, was born enslaved in Edgefield, South Carolina, at the turn of the nineteenth century. Despite laws prohibiting enslaved people from learning to read or write, Drake was literate and signed some of his pots, not only with his name and a date, but with verse—making a powerful statement of...

Engagement, Enlargement, and Confrontation

Graham Timmins
Engagement, Enlargement, and Confrontation provides a holistic view of the European Union's eastern relations explored in an historical context following the end of the Cold War. The author draws out the key achievements and failures of this strategic exercise. The focus is on the institutional adaptation of the European Union as well as on the dynamics of its policies towards the East. Graham...

Charleston Horse Power

Christina Rae Butler
Discover the fascinating history and legact of working equines in Charleston, South Carolina. Featuring thorough research, absorbing storytelling, and captivating photographs, Charleston Horse Power takes readers back to an equine-dominated city of the past, in which horses and mules pervaded all aspects of urban life. Author, scholar, and preservationist Christina Rae Butler describes carriage types and equines roles (both privately owned animals and those in the...

Unwilling to Quit

David L. Prentice
Although US involvement in the Vietnam conflict began long before 1965, Lyndon Johnson's substantial large commitment of combat troops that year marked the official beginning of America's longest twentieth-century war. By 1969, after years of intense fighting and thousands of casualties, an increasing number of Americans wanted the United States out of Vietnam. Richard Nixon looked for a way to pull out while preserving the dignity of the United States at...

Before the Gilded Age

Mark L. Goldstein
The first modern biography of financial pioneer and philanthropist W. W. Corcoran Before the Gilded Age reveals the extraordinary ways in which W. W. Corcoran shaped the emerging cultural elite and changed the capital and the country both for better and for worse. A complex and controversial character, Corcoran influenced banking and finance, art and American culture, philanthropy, and the nation's capital. Based on extensive archival...

Biking Uphill in the Rain

Tom Fucoloro
Seattle was recently named the best bike city in the United States by Bicycling magazine. How did this notoriously hilly and rainy city become so inviting to bicyclists? And what challenges lie ahead for Puget Sound bike advocates? Tom Fucoloro, a leading voice on bike issues in the region, blends his longtime reporting with new interviews and archival research to tell the story of how a flourishing bike culture emerged despite the obstacles of climate,...