History

The Contagion of Liberty

Andrew M. Wehrman
A timely and fascinating account of the raucous public demand for smallpox inoculation during the American Revolution and the origin of vaccination in the United States. The Revolutionary War broke out during a smallpox epidemic, and in response, General George Washington ordered the inoculation of the Continental Army. But Washington did not have to convince fearful colonists to protect themselves against smallpox—they were the ones demanding it. In The...

Restraining Air Power

Robert C. Owen
Is it possible for two combatants who possess equally strong air forces to conduct limited warfare by restraining air operations? In Restraining Air Power, Robert C. Owen asks this question and allows contributing authors to provide theoretical and empirical assessments of restrained air warfare through five historical case studies since 1945. Through an objective analysis of the past, this collection evaluates the principles of escalation and escalation...

Rock & Roll in Kennedy's America

Richard Aquila
A rousing, poignant look at the cultural history of rock & roll during the early 1960s. In the early 1960s, the nation was on track to fulfill its destiny in what was being called "the American Century." Baby boomers and rock & roll shared the country's optimism and energy. For "one brief, shining moment" in the early 1960s, both President John F. Kennedy and young people across the country were riding high. The dream of a New Frontier would soon give way,...

A Strange Whim of the Sea

Tim Loughman
On January 16, 1944, the submarine rescue vessel USS Macaw (ASR-11) ran aground at Midway Atoll while attempting to get a towing line to the stranded submarine USS Flier (SS-250). The Flier was pulled free six days later, but another three weeks of salvage efforts, plagued by rough seas and equipment problems, failed to dislodge the Macaw. Then on Saturday, February 12, amid an episode of freakishly enormous waves, the sea accomplished that task, nudging the ship from her perch...

The Finest Place We Know

Robert L Jackson, Sean J. McLaughlin, Sarah Marie Owens, OtherCris Ferguson
"The work of this institution has only begun I want to see this faculty continue to develop in not only teaching ability, but heart power—the ability to lead and inspire I want to see the fullest opportunities furnished to students I want to see young men and women who will become effective leaders I want to see all of these things and more"—Dr. John W. Carr, First President of Murray State...

Eastern Christians in the Habsburg Monarchy

edited by John-Paul Himka, Franz A.J. Szabo
This collection brings together ten studies by scholars from various countries on a wide array of topics related to the history, culture, and ritual practice of Eastern Christians in the Habsburg Empire from the eighteenth to early twentieth century. This book represents a contribution to the development of newer perspectives on the Habsburg Monarchy emerging in recent years. These newer tendencies seek to understand the dynamics of the Monarchy's...

First Among Men

Maurizio Valsania
Dispelling common myths about the first US president and revealing the real George Washington. George Washington—hero of the French and Indian War, commander-in-chief of the Continental Army, and first president of the United States—died on December 14, 1799. The myth-making began immediately thereafter, and the Washington mythos crafted after his death remains largely intact. But what do we really know about Washington as an upper-class man? Washington is...

Norman Cousins

Allen Pietrobon
Influencing US presidents and public opinion, the American journalist Norman Cousins had an incredible but overlooked diplomatic impact during the Cold War. As the editor of the Saturday Review for more than thirty years, Norman Cousins had a powerful platform from which to help shape American public debate during the height of the Cold War. Under Cousins's leadership, the magazine was considered one of the most influential in the literary world. Cousins's progressive, nonpartisan...

The Many Lives of the First Emperor of China

Anthony J. Barbieri-Low
Ying Zheng, founder of the Qin empire, is recognized as a pivotal figure in world history, alongside other notable conquerors such as Alexander the Great, Genghis Khan, and Julius Caesar. His accomplishments include conquest of the warring states of ancient China, creation of an imperial system that endured for two millennia, and unification of Chinese culture through the promotion of a single writing system. Only one biased historical account, written a century after his...

Seattle from the Margins

Megan Asaka
From the origins of the city in the mid-nineteenth century to the beginning of World War II, Seattle's urban workforce consisted overwhelmingly of migrant laborers who powered the seasonal, extractive economy of the Pacific Northwest. Though the city benefitted from this mobile labor force that consisted largely of Indigenous peoples and Asian migrants, municipal authorities, elites, and reformers continually depicted these workers and the spaces...

Until Further Notice

Amy Kaler
Until Further Notice is a real-time personal account of the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic through the prism of one woman's consciousness. An internal seismograph of living through a global emergency, Amy Kaler's book documents a series of jolts to her thoughts, perceptions, emotions, and habits. Kaler ultimately finds solace in Edmonton's North Saskatchewan River valley, where she bides her time while other public spaces are closed. As a sociologist, Kaler's introspection underlines the...

AIA Guide to the Architecture of Washington, DC, sixth edition

G. Martin Moeller, Jr.
"The model of what a concise, attractive guidebook should be."—Mid-Atlantic Country This lively and informative guide offers tourists, residents, and architecture aficionados insights into nearly 450 of Washington, DC's, most noteworthy buildings and monuments. Organized into 19 discrete walking tours, plus one general tour of peripheral sites, this thoroughly revised sixth edition features projects ranging from early federal landmarks to twenty-first-century commercial,...

The Art of Ceremony

Rebecca J. Dobkins
The practice of ceremony offers ways to build relationships between the land and its beings, reflecting change while drawing upon deep relationships going back millennia. Ceremony may involve intricate and spectacular regalia but may also involve simple tools, such as a plastic bucket for harvesting huckleberries or a river rock that holds heat for sweat. The Art of Ceremony provides a contemporary and historical overview of the nine federally recognized tribes in Oregon,...

Fixing the Image

Jenna Grant
Introduced in Phnom Penh around 1990, at the twilight of socialism and after two decades of conflict and upheaval, ultrasound took root in humanitarian and then privatized medicine. Services have since multiplied, promising diagnostic information and better prenatal and general health care. In Fixing the Image Jenna Grant draws on years of ethnographic and archival research to theorize the force and appeal of medical imaging in the urban landscape of Phnom Penh. Set...

Higher Education in Russia

Yaroslav Kuzminov and Maria Yudkevich
foreword by Philip G. Altbach
A comprehensive, up-to-date look at modern Russian higher education. By the mid-eighteenth century, when the first university appeared in Russia, many European nations could boast of long and glorious university traditions. But Russia, with its poorly developed system of elementary and secondary education, lagged behind other European countries and seemed destined for a long spell of second-tier performance. Yet by the mid-twentieth century, the...

10 Days That Shaped Modern Canada

Aaron Hughes
What events, issues, and personalities have shaped modern Canada? Which days stand out in the timeline of our country? Revisiting ten notable days from recent history, Aaron W. Hughes invites readers to think about the tensions, achievements, and people that make Canada distinctive. These indelible dates interweave to offer an account of the political, social, cultural, and demographic forces that have shaped the modern nation. Diverse episodes include the enactment of the War Measures Act,...

Charleston Renaissance Man

Ralph C. Muldrow
A study of the life, work, and extraordinary influence of an innovative architect In the years between World Wars I and II, Charleston, South Carolina, experienced a cultural renaissance led largely by artists, writers, architects, and preservationists that has been credited with making this port city the popular tourist destination it is today. Architect Albert Simons was foremost among this group and contributed mightily to the cultural...

Governing Water in India

Leela Fernandes
Intensifying droughts and competing pressures on water resources foreground water scarcity as an urgent concern of the global climate change crisis. In India, individual, industrial, and agricultural water demands exacerbate inequities of access and expose the failures of state governance to regulate use. State policies and institutions influenced by global models of reform produce and magnify socio-economic injustice in this "water bureaucracy." Drawing on historical...

The Swedish Theory of Love

Henrik Berggren, Lars Trägårdh, translated by Stephen Donovan
In 2020 Sweden's response to COVID-19 drew renewed attention to the Nordic nation in a way that put the finger on a seeming paradox. Long celebrated for its commitment to social solidarity, Sweden suddenly emerged as the last country in the West to resist lockdown while defending individual rights and responsibilities. To explain these contradictions, Henrik Berggren and Lars Trägårdh argue that the long-standing...

Turning Land into Capital

edited by Philip Hirsch, Kevin Woods, Natalia Scurrah, Michael Dwyer, foreword by K. Sivaramakrishnan, series edited by K. Sivaramakrishnan
In Southeast Asia reversals of earlier agrarian reforms have rolled back "land-to-the-tiller" policies created in the wake of Cold War–era revolutions. This trend, marked by increased land concentration and the promotion of export-oriented agribusiness at the expense of smallholder farmers, exposes the convergence of capitalist...