History



Lisbon

Magda Pinheiro
Aug 2019 - Tagus Press
Winner of the Máximo Special Jury Prize (2012) Throughout the pages of this highly original and meticulously researched book, we follow the rich and fascinating history of Lisbon—European capital city and cosmopolitan metropolis—from its legendary founding by Ulysses to the present day, covering the most remarkable moments of the city, such as the conquest of Lisbon, the period of discoveries, the great earthquake of 1755, the departure of the royal court for Brazil, the Liberal revolts, the Estado Novo, Carnation...

Moving Violations

Lee Vinsel
Regulation has shaped the evolution of the automobile from the beginning. In Moving Violations, Lee Vinsel shows that, contrary to popular opinion, these restrictions have not hindered technological change. Rather, by drawing together communities of scientific and technical experts, auto regulations have actually fostered innovation. Vinsel tracks the history of American auto regulation from the era of horseless carriages and the first, faltering efforts to...

After the Flood

Lydia Barnett
Many centuries before the emergence of the scientific consensus on climate change, people began to imagine the existence of a global environment: a natural system capable of changing humans and of being changed by them. In After the Flood, Lydia Barnett traces the history of this idea back to the early modern period, when the Scientific Revolution, the Reformations, the Little Ice Age, and the overseas expansion of European empire, religion, and...

Born Yesterday

Stephanie Insley Hershinow
Between the emergence of the realist novel in the early eighteenth century and the novel's subsequent alignment with self-improvement a century later lies a significant moment when novelistic characters were unlikely to mature in any meaningful way. That adolescent protagonists poised on the cusp of adulthood resisted a headlong tumble into maturity through the workings of plot reveals a curious literary and philosophical counter-tradition in the history of the...

Migraine

Katherine Foxhall
For centuries, people have talked of a powerful bodily disorder called migraine, which currently affects about a billion people around the world. Yet until now, the rich history of this condition has barely been told. In Migraine, award-winning historian Katherine Foxhall reveals the ideas and methods that ordinary people and medical professionals have used to describe, explain, and treat migraine since the Middle Ages. Touching on classical theories of humoral disturbance and medieval bloodletting, Foxhall also...

Engineering Rules

JoAnne Yates and Craig N. Murphy
Private, voluntary standards shape almost everything we use, from screw threads to shipping containers to e-readers. They have been critical to every major change in the world economy for more than a century, including the rise of global manufacturing and the ubiquity of the Internet. In Engineering Rules, JoAnne Yates and Craig Murphy trace the standard-setting system's evolution through time, revealing a process with an astonishingly pervasive, if rarely...

POSADA

Diane Miliotes
Jun 2019 - Trout Gallery
José Guadalupe Posada (1852–1913) was one of Mexico's most influential political printmakers and illustrators. He produced an extensive body of imagery, from illustrations for children's games to sensationalistic news stories. Posada is best known, however, for his popular and satirical representations of calaveras (skeletons) in lively guises, which have become associated with the Día de los Muertos celebrations. Posada's prints shaped generations of Mexican artists,...

Brides, Mourners, Bacchae

Vassiliki Panoussi
Powerful female characters pervade both Greek and Latin literature, even if their presence is largely dictated by the narratives of men. Feminist approaches to the study of women in Greek literature have helped illustrate the importance of their religious and ritual roles in public life—Latin literature, however, has not been subject to similar scrutiny. In Brides, Mourners, Bacchae, Vassiliki Panoussi takes up the challenge, exploring women's place in weddings,...

Taking Nazi Technology

Douglas M. O'Reagan
During the Second World War, German science and technology posed a terrifying threat to the Allied nations. Combined with Germany's generations-old reputation for excellence in science and engineering, these advanced weapons, which included rockets, V-2 missiles, tanks, submarines, and jet airplanes, gave troubling credence to Nazi propaganda about forthcoming "wonder-weapons" that would turn the war decisively in the Axis' favor. After...

Gamer Nation

John Wills
In 1975, design engineer Dave Nutting completed work on a new arcade machine. A version of Taito's Western Gun, a recent Japanese arcade machine, Nutting's Gun Fight depicted a classic showdown between gunfighters. Rich in Western folklore, the game seemed perfect for the American market; players easily adapted to the new technology, becoming pistol-wielding pixel cowboys. One of the first successful early arcade titles, Gun Fight helped introduce an entire nation to video-gaming and sold...

Global Forensic Cultures

edited by Ian Burney and Christopher Hamlin
Contemporary forensic science has achieved unprecedented visibility as a compelling example of applied expertise. But the common public view—that we are living in an era of forensic deliverance, one exemplified by DNA typing—has masked the reality: that forensic science has always been unique, problematic, and contested. Global Forensic Cultures aims to rectify this problem by recognizing the universality of forensic questions and the...