Health & Fitness


The Caregiver's Encyclopedia

Muriel R. Gillick, MD
Caregivers hold the key to the health, well-being, and happiness of their aging relatives, partners, or friends. The Caregiver's Encyclopedia provides you with all of the information you need to take the best care of your loved one—from making major medical decisions to making sure you don't burn out. Written by Muriel R. Gillick, MD, a geriatrician with more than 30 years' experience caring for older people, this book highlights the importance of...

BodyStories

Andrea Olsen
BodyStories is a book that engages the general reader as well as the serious student of anatomy. Thirty-one days of learning sessions heighten awareness about each bone and body system and provide self-guided studies. The book draws on Ms. Olsen's thirty years as a dancer and teacher of anatomy to show how our attitudes and approaches to our body affect us day to day. Amusing and insightful personal stories enliven the text and provide ways of working with the body for efficiency and for...

Coach Hall

Joe B. Hall
Until I was nine or ten, everyone called me Joe or Joe Hall. Then one day, my grandmother, for reasons known only to her, pulled me aside, telling me my name was "too short and too plain." She said, "Let's add your middle initial to make it more interesting. From now on, you say your name is Joe B., not just Joe. It's Joe B. Hall." Joe B. Hall is one of only three men to both play on an NCAA championship team (1949, Kentucky) and coach an NCAA championship team (1978, Kentucky), and the only one...

Conquer the Clutter

Elaine Birchall and Suzanne Cronkwright
Why does Cliff, a successful lawyer who regularly wins landmark cases, step over two-foot piles of paper whenever he opens his front door? Why do Joan and Paul ask Children's Services to take their three children instead of decluttering their home? Why does Lucinda feel intense pressure to hold onto her family's heirlooms even though she has no room for them? They have hoarding disorder, which an estimated 2% to 6% of the adult...

The Pursuit of Parenthood

Margaret Marsh, and Wanda Ronner
Since the 1978 birth of the first IVF baby, Louise Brown, in England, more than eight million children have been born with the help of assisted reproductive technologies. From the start, they have stirred controversy and raised profound questions: Should there be limits to the lengths to which people can go to make their idea of family a reality? Who should pay for treatment? How can we ensure the ethical use of these...

Thinking Differently about HIV/AIDS

edited by Eric Mykhalovskiy, Viviane Namaste
Jun 2019 - UBC Press
Almost four decades after the discovery of HIV/AIDS, the world continues to grapple with this public health challenge. Thinking Differently about HIV/AIDS explores the limits of mainstream approaches to the HIV/AIDS epidemic and challenges readers to develop different solutions, emphasizing the value of critical social science perspectives. The contributors investigate traditions of inquiry – governmentality studies,...

Hip Replacement

edited by Adam E. M. Eltorai, PhD, Alan H. Daniels, MD, Derek R. Jenkins, MD, and Lee E. Rubin, MD
Each year, more than 300,000 adults in the United States undergo hip replacement surgery. What can the many people experiencing hip pain in this country expect before, during, and after surgery? Hip Replacement—part of a new series of Johns Hopkins University Press books on specific surgical procedures—is designed to provide quick answers to all of the most common questions individuals have about hip...

Indigenous Peoples and Dementia

edited by Wendy Hulko, Danielle Wilson, Jean E. Balestrery
May 2019 - UBC Press
Dementia is on the rise around the world, and health organizations the United States, Canada, and New Zealand are responding to the urgent need – voiced by communities and practitioners – for guidance on how best to address memory loss in Indigenous communities. This innovative volume responds to the call by bringing together, for the first time, studies and traditional stories that address three key...

Sir Barton and the Making of the Triple Crown

Jennifer S. Kelly, foreword by Steve Haskin
He was always destined to be a champion. Royally bred, with English and American classic winners in his pedigree, Sir Barton shone from birth, dubbed the "king of them all." But after a winless two-year-old season and a near-fatal illness, uncertainty clouded the start of Sir Barton's three-year-old season. Then his surprise victory in America's signature race, the Kentucky Derby, started him on the road to history, where he would go on to dominate the...

Abortion across Borders

edited by Christabelle Sethna and Gayle Davis
Safe, legal, and affordable abortion is widely recognized as an essential medical service for women across the world. When access to that service is denied or restricted, women are compelled to carry unwanted pregnancies to term, seek backstreet abortionists, attempt self-induced abortions, or even travel to less restrictive states, provinces, and countries to receive care. Abortion across Borders focuses on travel across...

Boston's Twentieth-Century Bicycling Renaissance

Lorenz J. Finison
At the end of the nineteenth century, cycling's popularity surged in the Boston area, but by 1900, the trend faded. Within the next few decades, automobiles became commonplace and roads were refashioned to serve them. Lorenz J. Finison argues that bicycling witnessed a renaissance in the 1970s as concerns over physical and environmental health coalesced. Whether cyclists hit the roads on their way to work or to work out, went off-road in the...

The Other Milk

Jia-Chen Fu, hD
In the early twentieth century, China was stigmatized as the "Land of Famine." Meanwhile in Europe and the United States, scientists and industrialists seized upon the soybean as a miracle plant that could help build modern economies and healthy nations. Soybeans, protein-packed and domestically grown, were a common food in China, and soybean milk (doujiang) was poised for reinvention for the modern age. Scientific soybean milk became a symbol of national growth and development on...

Diabetes Head to Toe

Rita R. Kalyani, MD, MHS, Mark D. Corriere, MD, Thomas W. Donner, MD, and Michael W. Quartuccio, MD
Diabetes Head to Toe is an invaluable resource for anyone living with diabetes. It includes everything you should know about the disease—straight from the experts. The authors, all doctors who specialize in diabetes care, offer simple explanations and essential advice on all things diabetes. Accessible and concise, Diabetes Head to Toe...

Before and After Loss

Lisa M. Shulman, MD
In Before and After Loss, neurologist Dr. Lisa M. Shulman describes a personal story of loss and her journey to understand the science behind the mind-altering experience of grief. Part memoir, part creative nonfiction, part account of scientific discovery, this moving book combines Shulman's perspectives as an expert in brain science and a keen observer of behavior with her experience as a clinician, a caregiver, and a widow. Drawing on the...

Staying Healthy Abroad

Christopher Sanford, M.D.
Whether planning a long weekend in Mexico, a business trip to Ghana, or a semester abroad in Vietnam, travelers need current and practical information on protecting their health in foreign countries. Staying Healthy Abroad gives straightforward and easy-to-follow recommendations for those traveling for pleasure, study, business, or volunteer work; for short- or long-term stays; and to destinations ranging from rural areas to large cities, in both developing and...

Vaccines Did Not Cause Rachel's Autism

Peter J. Hotez, MD, PhD
foreword by Arthur L. Caplan
In 1994, Peter J. Hotez's nineteen-month-old daughter, Rachel, was diagnosed with autism. Dr. Hotez, a pediatrician-scientist who develops vaccines for neglected tropical diseases affecting the world's poorest people, became troubled by the decades-long rise of the influential anti-vaccine community and their inescapable narrative around childhood vaccines and autism. The alleged...

Take Control of Your Depression

Susan J. Noonan, MD, MPH
foreword by Jerrold F. Rosenbaum, MD, and Timothy J. Petersen, PhD
Some call it the blues or a storm in their head. William Styron referred to it as "darkness visible." Whatever the description, depression is a disorder of the mind and body that affects millions of adults at some point in their lives. In Take Control of Your Depression, Dr. Susan J. Noonan provides people experiencing depression with strategies to take stock of their mental...

Making Tough Decisions about End-of-Life Care in Dementia

Anne Kenny, MD
Each year, more than 500,000 people are diagnosed with dementia in the United States. As stunning as that figure is, countless family members and caregivers are also affected by each diagnosis. Families are faced with the need to make vital end-of-life decisions about medical treatment, legal and financial matters, and living situations for those who no longer can; no one is prepared for this process. And many caregivers grapple with sadness, confusion, guilt,...

Cesarean Section

Jacqueline H. Wolf
Between 1965 and 1987, the cesarean section rate in the United States rose precipitously—from 4.5 percent to 25 percent of births. By 2009, one in three births was by cesarean, a far higher number than the 5–10% rate that the World Health Organization suggests is optimal. While physicians largely avoided cesareans through the mid-twentieth century, by the early twenty-first century, cesarean section was the most commonly performed surgery in the country.

The Organic Profit

Andrew N. Case, foreword by Paul S. Sutter
From green-lifestyle mavens who endorse products on social media to natural health activists sponsored by organic food companies, the marketplace for advice about how to live life naturally is better stocked than ever. Where did the curious idea of buying one's way to sustainability come from? In no small part, as Andrew Case shows, the answer lies in the story of entrepreneur and reformer J. I. Rodale, his son Robert Rodale, and...