Health & Fitness



Staying Healthy Abroad

Christopher Sanford, M.D.
Whether planning a long weekend in Mexico or an African safari, travelers need current and practical information on protecting their health in foreign countries. Staying Healthy Abroad gives straightforward and easy-to-follow recommendations for those traveling for pleasure, study, business, or volunteer work; for short- or long-term stays; and to destinations ranging from rural areas to large cities, in both developing and industrialized nations. Observing that risk is...

The Other Milk

Jia-Chen Fu, hD
In the early twentieth century, China was stigmatized as the "Land of Famine." Meanwhile in Europe and the United States, scientists and industrialists seized upon the soybean as a miracle plant that could help build modern economies and healthy nations. Soybeans, protein-packed and domestically grown, were a common food in China, and soybean milk (doujiang) was poised for reinvention for the modern age. Scientific soybean milk became a symbol of national growth and development on...

Vaccines Did Not Cause Rachel's Autism

Peter J. Hotez, MD, PhD
foreword by Arthur L. Caplan
In 1994, Peter Hotez’s nineteenth-month-old daughter, Rachel, was diagnosed with autism. Dr. Hotez, a pediatrician-scientist who develops vaccines for neglected tropical diseases affecting the world’s poorest people, became troubled by the decades-long rise of the influential anti-vaccine community and their inescapable narrative around childhood vaccines and autism. The alleged...

Take Control of Your Depression

Susan J. Noonan, MD, MPH
foreword by Jerrold F. Rosenbaum, MD, and Timothy J. Petersen, PhD
Some call it the blues or a storm in their head. William Styron referred to it as "darkness visible." Whatever the description, depression is a disorder of the mind and body that affects millions of adults at some point in their lives. In Take Control of Your Depression, Dr. Susan J. Noonan provides people experiencing depression with strategies to take stock of their mental...

Making Tough Decisions about End-of-Life Care in Dementia

Anne Kenny, MD
Each year, more than 500,000 people are diagnosed with dementia in the United States. As stunning as that figure is, countless family members and caregivers are also affected by each diagnosis. Families are faced with the need to make vital end-of-life decisions about medical treatment, legal and financial matters, and living situations for those who no longer can; no one is prepared for this process. And many caregivers grapple with sadness, confusion, guilt,...

Cesarean Section

Jacqueline H. Wolf
Between 1965 and 1987, the cesarean section rate in the United States rose precipitously—from 4.5 percent to 25 percent of births. By 2009, one in three births was by cesarean, a far higher number than the 5–10% rate that the World Health Organization suggests is optimal. While physicians largely avoided cesareans through the mid-twentieth century, by the early twenty-first century, cesarean section was the most commonly performed surgery in the country.

The Organic Profit

Andrew N. Case
From green-lifestyle mavens who endorse products on social media to natural health activists sponsored by organic food companies, the marketplace for advice about how to live life naturally is better stocked than ever. Where did the curious idea of buying one's way to sustainability come from? In no small part, as Andrew Case shows, the answer lies in the story of entrepreneur and reformer J. I. Rodale, his son Robert Rodale, and their company, the Rodale Press.

Paddle Maryland

Bryan MacKay
With the Chesapeake Bay—the largest estuary in the United States—the Potomac, Monocacy, and Patapsco Rivers, and countless streams, creeks, swamps, and marshes, Maryland is an ideal locale for people to take to the water and enjoy the natural beauty of the Free State. In Paddle Maryland, lifelong Marylander and devoted paddler Bryan MacKay presents twenty-two of his favorite canoe and kayak trips. From lazy floats down the Potomac to swamp excursions on the Eastern Shore,...

Living with HHT

Sara Palmer, PhD
Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) is a rare genetic disorder that causes blood vessel abnormalities in the nose, skin, gastrointestinal tract, lungs, brain, and liver. Nosebleeds are the most common symptom of HHT, but abnormal vessels in other organs, if they are not diagnosed and treated, can lead to serious medical complications, including stroke, hemorrhage, anemia, and brain abscess. Psychologist Sara Palmer, who has HHT...

Your Child with Inflammatory Bowel Disease, second edition

North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition
edited by Maria Oliva-Hemker, MD, David Ziring, MD, Shehzad A. Saeed, MD, and Athos Bousvaros, MD, MPH
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a common condition in children and adolescents. Parents and other family members typically have many questions about the diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments associated with various forms of IBD including Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, and...

Redefining Aging

Ann Kaiser Stearns, PhD
foreword by J. Raymond DePaulo, Jr., MD
Caring for an elderly family member can be overwhelming. But fulfilling life experiences are still possible for both caregivers and their loved ones, despite the stress and fatigue of caregiving. In this comprehensive book, best-selling author Ann Kaiser Stearns explores the practical and personal challenges of both caregiving and successful aging. She couples findings from the latest research with powerful insights and...

Children's Medicines

Edward A. Bell, PharmD, BCPS
Most parents have worried about the side effects and possible long-term consequences of administering a particular medication to their child. The medication may be available over-the-counter, like cough syrup, or it may be prescribed by a doctor, like an antibiotic. Parents want to know: Is the medication safe? Is it effective? Will it help my child? A pediatric pharmacist for nearly thirty years, Edward A. Bell has spent his career...

Alien Universe

Don Lincoln
If extraterrestrials exist, where are they? How likely is it that somewhere in the universe an Earth-like planet supports an advanced culture? Why do so many people claim to have encountered Aliens? In this gripping exploration, scientist Don Lincoln exposes and explains the truths about the belief in and the search for life on other planets. In the first half of Alien Universe, Lincoln looks to Western civilization's collective image of Aliens, showing how our...

Bricklayer Bill

Patrick L. Kennedy
Two weeks after the United States officially entered World War I, Irish American "Bricklayer Bill" Kennedy won the Boston Marathon wearing his stars-and-stripes bandana, rallying the crowd of patriotic spectators. Kennedy became an American hero and, with outrageous stories of his riding the rails and sleeping on pool tables, a racing legend whose name has since appeared in almost every book written on the Boston Marathon. When journalist Patrick Kennedy and...

Eating Disorders, third edition

edited by Philip S. Mehler, MD, FAED, and Arnold E. Andersen, MD
In this new edition of their best-selling work, Drs. Philip S. Mehler and Arnold E. Andersen provide a user-friendly and comprehensive guide to treating and managing eating disorders for primary care physicians, mental health professionals, worried family members and friends, and nonmedical professionals (such as teachers and coaches). Mehler and Andersen identify common medical complications that people who have eating...

A Woman's Guide to Living with Heart Disease

Carolyn Thomas
foreword by Martha Gulati, MD, FACC
Heart disease is the leading cause of death for women worldwide. Yet most people are still unaware that heart disease is not just a man’s problem. Carolyn Thomas, a heart attack survivor herself, is on a mission to educate women about their heart health. Based on her popular Heart Sisters blog, which has attracted more than 10 million views from readers in 190 countries, A Woman's Guide to Living with Heart Disease combines personal experience...

College Athletes’ Rights and Well-Being

edited by Eddie Comeaux
College athletes are at the very center of emerging campus debates over their legal, financial, and academic role. Amid ongoing litigation and pressure from internal and external stakeholders, many policy makers and university leaders are scrambling to determine the nature of this role. This timely and comprehensive volume identifies and discusses bylaws and legal decisions that have impacted the college athlete’s ability to pursue...

Imperfect Pregnancies

Ilana Löwy
In the 1960s, thanks to the development of prenatal diagnosis, medicine found a new object of study: the living fetus. At first, prenatal testing was proposed only to women at a high risk of giving birth to an impaired child. But in the following decades, such testing has become routine. In Imperfect Pregnancies, Ilana Löwy argues that the generalization of prenatal diagnosis has radically changed the experience of pregnancy for tens of millions of women...

Food Allergies, second edition

Scott H. Sicherer, MD
introduction by Hugh A. Sampson, MD, Jaffe Food Allergy Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Posing the urgent questions that anyone with food allergies will think to ask—and then some—Food Allergies provides practical, sensitive, and scientific guidance on the topics that affect your life. Allergy expert Scott H. Sicherer addresses the full spectrum of food allergies, from mild to life threatening and from single foods to food...

The Breast Reconstruction Guidebook, fourth edition

Kathy Steligo
Since 2002, The Breast Reconstruction Guidebook has been the best resource on this topic for women who have had a mastectomy. Equal parts science and support, it is filled with stories that illustrate the emotional and physical components of breast reconstruction. Kathy Steligo, a gifted writer and breast cancer survivor who has twice had breast reconstruction, compassionately answers women’s questions about how they will respond emotionally and...