Food & Drink


Bourbon Is My Comfort Food

Heather Wibbels
Bourbon Is My Comfort Food reveals the delicious beauty of bourbon in cocktails and the joy of creating them. Whether readers are new to bourbon or already steeped in its history and lifestyle, they will gain the knowledge to make great bourbon cocktails, share them with friends and family, and expand their whiskey horizons—because the only thing better than a glass of bourbon or a bourbon cocktail is sharing it with a friend. As the saying goes, "There are no strangers with a glass of bourbon in your...

Savory Memories

edited by Linda Elisabeth LaPinta
Writers love to tell stories, so when L. Elisabeth Beattie remarked that her next book ought to be a Kentucky writers' cookbook, Betty Layman Receveur replied, "Actually, all my sons ever demand of me is my pound cake." Adding a cup of this and a pinch of that, Beattie cooked up Savory Memories, a collection of twenty-two essays about particular dishes that call up warm memories in the writers. Featuring recipes and memories from writers such as Joy Bale Boone, George Ella Lyon, Ronni Ludy, Ed...

Burgoo, Barbecue, and Bourbon

Albert W. A. Schmid, photographs by Jessica Ebelhar, foreword by Loreal “Butcher Babe” Gavin
Burgoo, barbecue, and bourbon have long been acknowledged as a trinity of good taste in Kentucky. Known as the gumbo of the Bluegrass, burgoo is a savory stew that includes meat—usually smoked—from at least one "bird of the air," at least one "beast of the field," and as many vegetables as the cook wants to add. Often you'll find this dish paired with one of the Commonwealth's other favorite...

Early Jewish Cookbooks

András Koerner
The seven essays in this volume focus such previously unexplored subjects as the world's first cookbook printed in Hebrew letters, published in 1854, and a wonderful 19th-century Jewish cookbook, which in addition to its Hungarian edition was also published in Dutch in Rotterdam. The author entertainingly reconstructs the history of bólesz, a legendary yeast pastry that was the specialty of a famous, but long defunct Jewish coffeehouse in Pest, and...

Kentucky Moonshine, updated edition

David W. Maurer, foreword by Wes Berry, wes Berry
When the first American tax on distilled spirits was established in 1791, violence broke out in Pennsylvania. The resulting Whiskey Rebellion sent hundreds of families down the Ohio River by flatboat, stills on board, to settle anew in the fertile bottomlands of Kentucky. Here they used cold limestone spring water to make bourbon and found that corn produced even better yields of whiskey than rye. Thus, the licit and illicit branches of the distilling industry grew up side-by-side...

Kentucky Moonshine, updated edition

David W. Maurer, foreword by Wes Berry
When the first American tax on distilled spirits was established in 1791, violence broke out in Pennsylvania. The resulting Whiskey Rebellion sent hundreds of families down the Ohio River by flatboat, stills on board, to settle anew in the fertile bottomlands of Kentucky. Here they used cold limestone spring water to make bourbon and found that corn produced even better yields of whiskey than rye. Thus, the licit and illicit branches of the distilling industry grew up side-by-side in the...

Taste the State

Kevin Mitchell, David S. Shields
From the influence of 1920s fashion on asparagus growers to an heirloom watermelon lost and found, Taste the State abounds with surprising stories from South Carolina's singularly rich food tradition. Here, Kevin Mitchell and David S. Shields present engaging profiles of eighty-two of the state's most distinctive ingredients, such as Carolina Gold rice, Sea Island White Flint corn, and the cone-shaped Charleston Wakefield cabbage, and...

Two Hundred Years of Charleston Cooking, second edition

compiled by Blanche S. Rhett, edited by Lettie Gay, introduction by Helen Woodward, foreword by Elizabeth Hamilton, Nathalie Dupree, Rebecca Sharpless
First published in 1930 as 200 Years of Charleston Cooking, this collection of more than three hundred recipes was gathered by Blanche S. Rhett from housewives and their African American cooks in Charleston, South Carolina. From enduring favorites like she-crab soup and Hopping John to forgotten delicacies like cooter (turtle) stew, the recipes Rhett...

Communist Gourmet

Albena Shkodrova
Communist Gourmet presents a lively, detailed account of how the communist regime in Bulgaria determined people's everyday food experience between 1944 and 1989. It examines the daily routines of acquiring food, cooking it, and eating out at restaurants through the memories of Bulgarians and foreigners, during communism. In looking back on a wide array of issues and events, Albena Shkodrova attempts to explain the paradoxes of daily existence. She...

The Cheese Biscuit Queen Tells All

Mary Martha Greene
Some Southern cooks keep their prized family recipes under lock and key, but not Mary Martha Greene. Why? She says few things can truly be kept secret in the South and recipes, like cheese biscuits, are meant to be shared. That's why she's the "Cheese Biscuit Queen." So many stories could be written about Greene's Aunt Mimi's cheese biscuits—the countries they visited, and the lies, half-truths, cheating, and...

Just a Few Miles South

Ouita Michel, edited by Sara Gibbs, Genie Graf, illustrated by Brenna Flannery, foreword by Silas House
For twenty years, diners in the Bluegrass have been able to satisfy their cravings for Ouita Michel's sustainable, farm-to-table cuisine at her many acclaimed restaurants. Each restaurant—from Wallace Station to Holly Hill Inn—features dishes that combine Kentucky's bounty with Michel's celebrated vision. Diners can enjoy traditional southern staples like buttermilk biscuits,...

Cook Together, Eat Together

University of Kentucky, Cooperative Extension Service, Family and Consumer Sciences Extension
In today's fast-paced world, many people find themselves waiting in line at fast food restaurants more often than gathering around the dinner table with loved ones. Cooking and eating together can help families grow closer, but it can be challenging for parents to put a meal on the table when time is limited and money is tight. Cook Together, Eat Together is designed to help families enjoy more home-cooked, healthy meals.

Kentucky Bourbon Country, third edition

Susan Reigler, photographs by Carol Peachee, Pam Spaulding
Like wine lovers who dream of traveling to Bordeaux or beer enthusiasts with visions of the breweries of Belgium, bourbon lovers plan their pilgrimages to Kentucky. Some of the most famous distilleries are tucked away in the scenic Bluegrass region, which is home to nearly seventy distilleries and responsible for 95 percent of all of America's bourbon production. Locals and tourists alike continue to seek out the world's finest whiskeys...

Which Fork Do I Use with My Bourbon?

Peggy Noe Stevens, Susan Reigler, foreword by Fred Minnick
A good bottle of bourbon should be enjoyed in good company. During their travels in bourbon country and beyond to conduct tastings and seminars, entertainment experts Peggy Noe Stevens and Susan Reigler often heard the question, "How do I do this in my home?" This book is their definitive answer. Which Fork Do I Use with My Bourbon? offers a step-by-step guide to...

The Whale and the Cupcake

Julia O'Malley
From fish and fiddleheads to salmonberries and Spam, Alaskan cuisine spans the two extremes of locally abundant wild foods and shelf-stable ingredients produced thousands of miles away. As immigration shapes Anchorage into one of the most ethnically diverse cities in the country, Alaska's changing food culture continues to reflect the tension between self-reliance and longing for distant places or faraway homes. Alaska Native communities express their...

Jewish Cuisine in Hungary

András Koerner
Winner of the 2019 National Jewish Book Award in the category of Food Writing & Cookbooks. The author refuses to accept that the world of pre-Shoah Hungarian Jewry and its cuisine should disappear almost without a trace and feels compelled to reconstruct its culinary culture. His bookwith a preface by Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblettpresents eating habits not as isolated acts, divorced from their social and religious contexts, but as an organic part of a way of...

Bourbon's Backroads

Karl Raitz
With more than fifty distilleries in the state, bourbon is as synonymous with Kentucky as horses and basketball. As one of the commonwealth's signature industries, bourbon distilling has influenced the landscape and heritage of the region for more than two centuries. Blending several topics—tax revenue, railroads, the mechanics of brewing, geography, landscapes, and architecture—this primer and geographical guide presents a detailed history of the development of...

Martini, Straight Up

Lowell Edmunds
Originally published in 1998. From its contested origins in nineteenth-century California; through its popularity among the smart set of the 1930s, world leaders of the 1940s, and the men in the gray flannel suits of the 1950s; to its resurgence among today's retro-hipsters: Lowell Edmunds traces the history and cultural significance of the cocktail H. L. Mencken called "the only American invention as perfect as a sonnet."

Creole Feast

Nathaniel Burton, Rudy Lombard, foreword by Leah Chase
Before there were celebrity gourmands, Creole Feast brought together the stories and knowledge of New Orleans top chefs when it was first presented in 1978. These masters of modern Creole cuisine share the recipes, tips, and tricks from the kitchens of New Orleans' most famous restaurants, including Dooky Chase, Commander's Palace, Broussard's, and Galatoire's. Today, Creole Feast still stands as the most comprehensive...

The Deepest Roots

Kathleen Alcalá
As friends began "going back to the land" at the same time that a health issue emerged, Kathleen Alcalá set out to reexamine her relationship with food at the most local level. Remembering her parents, Mexican immigrants who grew up during the Depression, and the memory of planting, growing, and harvesting fresh food with them as a child, she decided to explore the history of the Pacific Northwest island she calls home. In The Deepest Roots, Alcalá walks,...

The Chesapeake Table

Renee Brooks Catacalos
There was a time when most food was local, whether you lived on a farm or bought your food at a farmers market in the city. Exotic foods like olives, spices, and chocolate shipped in from other parts of the world were considered luxuries. Now, most food that Americans eat is shipped from somewhere else, and eating local is considered by some to be a luxury. Renee Brooks Catacalos is here to remind us that eating local is easier—and more rewarding—than we may think. There is an...

The New Chesapeake Kitchen

John Shields
photographs by David W. Harp
Captain John Smith, upon entering the Chesapeake, wrote in his diaries that the fish were so plentiful "we attempted to catch them with a frying pan." That method sums up classic Chesapeake cooking—fresh and simple. In The New Chesapeake Kitchen, celebrated Maryland chef John Shields takes the best of what grows, swims, or grazes in the Bay’s watershed and prepares it simply, letting the pure flavors shine through. Honoring the farmers, watermen, butchers, cheese makers, and...

Before the Refrigerator

Jonathan Rees
During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Americans depended upon ice to stay cool and to keep their perishable foods fresh. Jonathan Rees tells the fascinating story of how people got ice before mechanical refrigeration came to the household. Drawing on newspapers, trade journals, and household advice books, Before the Refrigerator explains how Americans built a complex system to harvest, store, and transport ice to everyone who wanted it, even the very poor. Rees...

Bound to the Fire

Kelley Fanto Deetz
In grocery store aisles and kitchens across the country, smiling images of "Aunt Jemima" and other historical and fictional black cooks can be found on various food products and in advertising. Although these images are sanitized and romanticized in American popular culture, they represent the untold stories of enslaved men and women who had a significant impact on the nation's culinary and hospitality traditions even as they were forced to prepare...

The Beer Cheese Book

Garin Pirnia
The ingredients are simple—beer, cheese, and spices—and the result is delicious. Still, beer cheese is a rarefied dish not common in cookbooks or on menus. Since the 1940s, this creamy appetizer with a kick, traditionally served with pretzels, has quietly found its way into pubs and restaurants throughout the South and Midwest. The original recipe is cloaked in a mystery nearly as deep as the JFK assassination. Ask most makers and they'll act demure about the contents of their dip. Some refuse to disclose what kind of...

A Year Right Here

Jess Thomson, illustrated by Hannah Viano
Armed with "The Here List" and a Type-A personality, Seattle-based writer and cookbook author Jess Thomson sets out to spend a year exploring the food of the Pacific Northwest with her family. Planning to revel in the culinary riches of the region and hoping to break her son, Graham, of his childhood pickiness, the adventures into the great nearby include building a backyard chicken coop, truffle hunting in Oregon, and razor clamming on...

Flavors from Home, revised edition

Aimee Zaring
Each year, the United States legally resettles tens of thousands of refugees who have fled their homelands. Refugees, unlike economic migrants, are forced to leave their countries of origin or are driven out by violence or persecution. As these individuals and their families struggle to adapt to a new culture, the kitchen often becomes one of the few places where they are able to return "home." Preparing native cuisine is one way they can find comfort in...

The Trouble with Tea

Jane T. Merritt
Americans imagined tea as central to their revolution. After years of colonial boycotts against the commodity, the Sons of Liberty kindled the fire of independence when they dumped tea in the Boston harbor in 1773. To reject tea as a consumer item and symbol of "taxation without representation" was to reject Great Britain as master of the American economy and government. But tea played a longer and far more complicated role in American...

The Deepest Roots

Kathleen Alcala, photographs by Joel Sackett
As friends began "going back to the land" at the same time that a health issue emerged, Kathleen Alcalá set out to reexamine her relationship with food at the most local level. Remembering her parents, Mexican immigrants who grew up during the Depression, and the memory of planting, growing, and harvesting fresh food with them as a child, she decided to explore the history of the Pacific Northwest island she calls home. In The...

Kentucky Bourbon Country, second edition

Susan Reigler, photographs by Carol Peachee, Pam Spaulding
Like wine lovers who dream of traveling to Bordeaux or beer enthusiasts with visions of the breweries of Belgium, bourbon lovers plan their pilgrimages to Kentucky's bourbon country. And what a country it is! Some of the most famous distilleries are tucked away in the scenic Bluegrass region stretching between Louisville, Bardstown, and Lexington. Locals and tourists alike seek out the world's finest whiskeys in Kentucky as interest in...

More Kentucky Bourbon Cocktails

Joy Perrine, Susan Reigler, photographs by Jessica Ebelhar
Ninety-five percent of the world's bourbon whiskey is produced in Kentucky, and the drink is as distinctive to the state as Thoroughbred horses and Bluegrass music. As America's native spirit enjoys booming popularity worldwide, award-winning bartender Joy Perrine and celebrated restaurant critic and drinks writer Susan Reigler return to offer new recipes that will delight both the cocktail novice and the seasoned connoisseur. Following up on their...

Maple Sugaring

David K. Leff
The art and science of maple syrup, and stories from the people who make it Maple Sugaring gives readers an intimate look at the art and science of America's favorite sweet. These stories, told by real-life sugarmakers, reveal how this ancient industry has continued into the twenty-first century. Thanks to the newest technology, and patience, New England sugarmakers are still keeping it real. A former maple sugarmaker and board member of the Maple Syrup Producers' Association of...

The Manhattan Cocktail

Albert W. A. Schmid, foreword by Bridget Albert
Alongside other classic cocktails such as the Old Fashioned, the Mint Julep, and the Martini, the Manhattan has been a staple of the sophisticated bar scene since the late nineteenth century. Never out of style, this iconic drink has seen a renaissance in the contemporary craft cocktail movement, its popularity boosted by TV's Mad Men. In theory, the recipe is simple: a mixture of whiskey, vermouth, and bitters stirred with ice, strained, and...

The Birth of Bourbon

photographs by Carol Peachee, foreword by Jim Gray
Whiskey making has been an integral part of American history since frontier times. In Kentucky, early settlers brought stills to preserve grain, and they soon found that the limestone-filtered water and the unique climate of the scenic Bluegrass region made it an ideal place for the production of barrel-aged liquor. And so, bourbon whiskey was born. More than two hundred commercial distilleries were operating in Kentucky before...

Breakfast at O'Rourke's

Brian O’Rourke
Gourmet American recipes with Irish roots Since 1941, O'Rourke's Diner has been a beloved eatery and a second home to generations of Middletown families, Wesleyan students, and diners from all over the Connecticut River Valley. Capturing the magic of the diner itself—classic, hip, eclectic, and full of positive energy—Breakfast at O'Rourke's is a trove of hearty gourmet recipes from one of Connecticut's most beloved diners. The book features menus for twenty-three...

Flavors from Home

Aimee Zaring
Each year, the United States legally resettles tens of thousands of refugees who have fled their homelands. Refugees, unlike economic migrants, are forced to leave their countries of origin or are driven out by violence or persecution. As these individuals and their families struggle to adapt to a new culture, the kitchen often becomes one of the few places where they are able to return "home." Preparing native cuisine is one way they can find comfort in...

Swallowing Clouds, second edition

Anthony Zee
Physics professor Zee writes about how to understand the menus in Chinese restaurants, explaining the characters, what they mean, and the colorful stories behind the names of various dishes. Anne Tyler (in the Washington Post) called Swallowing Clouds "a study of the very nature of Chinese culture. Zee has a quirky, personal style that draws the reader in."

Kentucky's Cookbook Heritage

John van Willigen
Food is a significant part of our daily lives and can be one of the most telling records of a time and place. Our meals—from what we eat, to how we prepare it, to how we consume it—illuminate our culture and history. As a result, cookbooks present a unique opportunity to analyze changing foodways and can yield surprising discoveries about society's tastes and priorities. In Kentucky's Cookbook Heritage, John van Willigen explores the state's...

Bourbon Desserts

Lynn Marie Hulsman
The flavor of bourbon adds flair and sophistication to every occasion. Celebrations in the Bluegrass State—or any state, for that matter—are never complete without the unique richness of this signature drink. Every holiday party is made warmer with bourbon balls and velvety bourbon eggnog, and no respectable Kentucky Derby party is complete without ice-cold mint juleps. Bourbon Desserts features more than seventy-five decadent desserts using America's native spirit. Celebrated food writer and home chef Lynn...

Adventures in Good Cooking

edited by Louis Hatchett, Duncan Hines, foreword by Michael Stern
Kentucky native and national tastemaker Duncan Hines (1880–1959) published his first cookbook, Adventures in Good Cooking, in 1939 at the age of fifty-nine. This best-selling collection featured recipes from select restaurants across the country as well as crowd-pleasing family favorites, and it helped to raise the standard for home cooking in America. Filled with succulent treats, from the Waldorf-Astoria's Chicken Fricassee to the Oeufs a la Russe...

Adventures in Good Cooking

edited by Louis Hatchett, Duncan Hines, foreword by Michael Stern
Kentucky native and national tastemaker Duncan Hines (1880–1959) published his first cookbook, Adventures in Good Cooking, in 1939 at the age of fifty-nine. This best-selling collection featured recipes from select restaurants across the country as well as crowd-pleasing family favorites, and it helped to raise the standard for home cooking in America. Filled with succulent treats, from the Waldorf-Astoria's Chicken Fricassee to the Oeufs a la Russe...

The Dessert Book

Duncan Hines, edited by Louis Hatchett, foreword by Michael Stern, Jane Stern
Kentucky native and national tastemaker Duncan Hines (1880–1959) published his first cookbook, Adventures in Good Cooking, in 1939 at the age of 59. This best-selling collection featured recipes from select restaurants across the country as well as crowd-pleasing family favorites, and it helped to raise the standard for home cooking in America. Following the success of this debut, Hines penned The Dessert Book in 1955. Filled with decadent treats, from homemade...

Duncan Hines

Louis Hatchett, foreword by Michael Stern
Duncan Hines (1880–1959) may be best known for the cake mixes, baked goods, and bread products that bear his name, but most people forget that he was a real person and not just a fictitious figure invented for the brand. America's pioneer restaurant critic, Hines discovered his passion while working as a traveling salesman during the 1920s and 1930s—a time when food standards were poorly enforced and safety was a constant concern.

Collecting Culinaria

Merrill Distad, Caroline Lieffers
The Linda Miron Distad Culinaria Collection, housed at the University of Alberta Libraries, currently consists of more than 3,000 food-related texts from around the world, spanning several centuries. Collecting Culinaria accompanies an exhibit at the Bruce Peel Special Collections Library featuring cookbooks and household guides from the collection, as well as other selected items from the Library's holdings.

Kentucky Bourbon Country

Susan Reigler, photographs by Pam Spaulding
Like wine lovers who dream of traveling to Bordeaux or beer enthusiasts with visions of the breweries of Belgium, bourbon lovers plan their pilgrimages to Kentucky's bourbon country. And what a country it is! Some of the most famous distilleries are tucked away in the scenic countryside of the Bluegrass region, stretching between Louisville, Bardstown, and Lexington. Locals and tourists alike seek out the finest flavors of Kentucky as interest in...

The Historic Kentucky Kitchen

Deirdre A. Scaggs, Andrew W. McGraw, foreword by John van Willigen
Kitchens serve as more than a place to prepare food; they are cornerstones of the home and family. Just as memories are passed down through stories shared around the stove, recipes preserve traditions and customs for future generations. The rich, diverse heritage of Kentucky's culinary traditions offers a unique way to better understand and appreciate the history of the commonwealth. The Historic Kentucky Kitchen...

Seeking the Historical Cook

Kay K. Moss
Seeking the Historical Cook is a guide to historical cooking methods from eighteenth- and nineteenth-century receipt (recipe) books and an examination of how those methods can be used in kitchens today. Designed for adventurous cooks and "foodies," this volume is rich with photographs, period images, and line art depicting kitchen tools and cooking methods. Kay K. Moss invites readers to discover traditional receipts and to experiment with ancestral dishes...

Kentucky Moonshine

David W. Maurer
" When the first American tax on distilled spirits was established in 1791, violence broke out in Pennsylvania. The resulting Whiskey Rebellion sent hundreds of families down the Ohio River by flatboat, stills on board, to settle anew in the fertile bottomlands of Kentucky. Here they used cold limestone spring water to make bourbon and found that corn produced even better yields of whiskey than rye. Thus, the licit and illicit branches of the distilling industry grew up side by side in the state. This is the story...

Kentucky Moonshine

David W. Maurer
" When the first American tax on distilled spirits was established in 1791, violence broke out in Pennsylvania. The resulting Whiskey Rebellion sent hundreds of families down the Ohio River by flatboat, stills on board, to settle anew in the fertile bottomlands of Kentucky. Here they used cold limestone spring water to make bourbon and found that corn produced even better yields of whiskey than rye. Thus, the licit and illicit branches of the distilling industry grew up side by side in the state. This is the story...

Greek Revival from the Garden

Patricia Moore-Pastides
Patricia Moore-Pastides, author of Greek Revivial: Cooking for Life, heads to the garden in this new cookbook that makes a do-it-yourself healthful lifestyle possible, offering guidance on how to pursue healthy eating, starting from the ground up. Moore-Pastides, an accomplished cook and public-health professional, presents all new recipes focused on bringing the bounty of the garden to the table in easy and accessible ways. Targeting young adults but valuable...

Kentucky Bourbon

Henry G. Crowgey
Bourbon whiskey is perhaps Kentucky's most distinctive product. Despite bourbon's prominence in the social and economic life of the Bluegrass state, many myths and legends surround its origins. In Kentucky Bourbon, Henry C. Crowgey claims that distilled spirits and pioneer settlement went hand in hand; Isaac Shelby, the state's first governor, was among Kentucky's pioneer distillers. Crowgey traces the drink's history from its beginnings as a cottage industry to steam-based...

Kentucky Bourbon Whiskey

Michael R. Veach
On May 4, 1964, Congress designated bourbon as a distinctive product of the United States, and it remains the only spirit produced in this country to enjoy such protection. Its history stretches back almost to the founding of the nation and includes many colorful characters, both well known and obscure, from the hatchet-wielding prohibitionist Carry Nation to George Garvin Brown, who in 1872 created Old Forester, the first bourbon to be sold only by the bottle. Although obscured by...

The Kentucky Barbecue Book

Wes Berry
Kentucky's culinary fame may have been built on bourbon and fried chicken, but the Commonwealth has much to offer the barbecue thrill-seeker. The Kentucky Barbecue Book is a feast for readers who are eager to sample the finest fare in the state. From the banks of the Mississippi to the hidden hollows of the Appalachian Mountains, author and barbecue enthusiast Wes Berry hit the trail in search of the best smoke, the best flavor, and the best pitmasters he could find. This handy guide presents the most succulent...

The Old Fashioned

Albert W. A. Schmid, foreword by John Peter Laloganes
American tavern owners caused a sensation in the late eighteenth century when they mixed sugar, water, bitters, and whiskey and served the drink with rooster feather stirrers. The modern version of this "original cocktail," widely known as the Old Fashioned, is a standard in any bartender's repertoire and holds the distinction of being the only mixed drink ever to rival the Martini in popularity. In The Old Fashioned, Gourmand...

Pumpkin

Cindy Ott, foreword by William Cronon
Why do so many Americans drive for miles each autumn to buy a vegetable that they are unlikely to eat? While most people around the world eat pumpkin throughout the year, North Americans reserve it for holiday pies and other desserts that celebrate the harvest season and the rural past. They decorate their houses with pumpkins every autumn and welcome Halloween trick-or-treaters with elaborately carved jack-o'-lanterns. Towns hold annual pumpkin festivals featuring...

The Kentucky Fresh Cookbook

Maggie Green, illustrated by Cricket Press
A seasonal food journey with native Kentuckian Maggie Green, The Kentucky Fresh Cookbook takes home chefs through a year in a Kentucky kitchen with more than 200 recipes. With a focus on the cook's activities in the kitchen, this book guides both aspiring and experienced cooks in the preparation of delicious meals using the delightful variety of foods found in Kentucky. Green welcomes readers with her modern and accessible approach, incorporating seasonally available Kentucky...

Setting the Table for Julia Child

David Strauss
Before Julia Child’s warbling voice and towering figure burst into America’s homes, a gourmet food movement was already sweeping the nation. Setting the Table for Julia Child considers how the tastes and techniques cultivated at dining clubs and in the pages of Gourmet magazine helped prepare many affluent Americans for Child’s lessons in French cooking. David Strauss argues that Americans’ appetite for haute cuisine had been growing ever since the repeal of...

Mrs. Hill's Southern Practical Cookery and Receipt Book

introduction by Damon L. Fowler
Originally published in 1867 as Mrs. Hill's New Cook Book this encyclopedic treasury of recipes, cooking advice, and household hints brims with insight into the culinary heritage of the South in general and Georgia in particular. With its return to print, the charming volume revises popular legends about the food ways of the Old South, revealing both the bounty of the Southern table and the...

Charleston Recollections and Receipts

edited by Elizabeth Ravenel Harrigan
This collection of Charleston memories and receipts is drawn from Rose P. Ravenel (1850-1943), daughter of a Huguenot planter, merchant, and ship owner, who kept notebooks throughout her life with stories of the Carolina Lowcountry as well as accounts of her family. During her lifetime Ravenel collected more than two hundred receipts from Charleston ladies of her acquaintance. Editor Elizabeth Ravenel Harrigan, great-niece of Rose P.

The Social History of Bourbon

Gerald Carson, foreword by Michael R. Veach
The distinctive beverage of the Western world, bourbon is Kentucky's illustrious gift to the world of spirits. Although the story of American whiskey is recorded in countless lively pages of our nation's history, the place of bourbon in the American cultural record has long awaited detailed and objective presentation. Not a recipe book or a barman's guide, but a fascinating and informative contribution to Americana, The Social History of Bourbon reflects an aspect of our...

Greek Revival

Patricia Moore-Pastides, foreword by Dimitrios Trichopoulos
Take eighty-seven ambrosial recipes designed for the needs and appetites of everyday cooks, leaven with delectable anecdotes about the Greek lifestyle, then pepper with revealing scientific insight, and the result is Greek Revival: Cooking for Life—an appetizing introduction to wonderful flavors and health benefits of the traditional Mediterranean diet. Patricia Moore-Pastides, an accomplished cook and public-health professional, presents dozens of easy-to-make...

The Kentucky Bourbon Cookbook

Albert W. A. Schmid, foreword by Dean Fearing
Once thought to be only the tipple of southern gentlemen and the companion of confederate roughnecks, bourbon has gained a steady resurgence in popularity over the years with an ever-expanding and diverse audience. A beverage distilled almost exclusively in Kentucky, bourbon has attained prominence and appreciation for its complexity, history, and tradition. In The Kentucky Bourbon Cookbook, Albert Schmid provides readers with the best recipes using the famous spirit of the...

Out Of Kentucky Kitchens

Marion Flexner
Good food is as much a part of the Kentucky heritage as fine horses and bourbon whiskey. And nowhere is Kentucky's traditional cuisine better presented than in Out of Kentucky Kitchens by Louisville's own Marion Flexner. First published in 1949, the book has been popular with cooks and cookbook collectors ever since. A highly skilled hand in the kitchen, Marion Flexner compiled a representative gathering of delicious, thoroughly tested recipes of Kentucky specialties, many of them "heirloom" items given to...

Dining on the B&O

Thomas J. Greco, Karl D. Spence
Passengers who dined on the Baltimore and Ohio during the heyday of American railroading received five-star service: white tablecloths, china, and silver; food cooked from scratch; and the undivided attention of skilled waiters. The B&O's cuisine won wide acclaim as the finest railway food in the country. Passengers enjoyed it as the slightly swaying dining car clicked along over the rails. Captivated by the romance of the subject, Thomas J. Greco and...

Steeped in History

edited by Beatrice Hohenegger
After water, tea is the most frequently consumed beverage on the face of the earth. In ancient China tea was regarded as one of the seven daily necessities of life; for many Japanese it has served as a ritual element in the quest for enlightenment. In England afternoon tea holds an immutable place in the popular imagination, while in the United States it is often associated with the American Revolution. While various teas have been prepared in an assortment of ways and have played...

The Kentucky Bourbon Cocktail Book

Joy Perrine, Susan Reigler, photographs by Pam Spaulding
Interest in bourbon, America's native spirit and a beverage almost exclusively distilled in Kentucky, has never been greater. Thanks in part to the general popularity of cocktails and the marketing efforts of the bourbon industry, there are more brands of bourbon and more bourbon drinkers than ever before. In The Kentucky Bourbon Cocktail Book, Joy Perrine and Susan Reigler provide a reader-friendly handbook featuring more than 100 recipes including seasonal...

The Enduring Reagan

edited by Charles W. Dunn
A former Sunday school teacher and Hollywood actor, Ronald Reagan was an unlikely candidate for president. His charisma, conviction, and leadership earned him the governorship of California, from which he launched his successful bid to become the fortieth president of the United States in 1980. Reagan's political legacy continues to be the standard by which all conservatives are judged. In The Enduring Reagan, editor Charles W. Dunn brings together eight prominent scholars to examine the political career and...

Froth!

Mark Denny
Ever wonder where the bubbles in your beer came from, which way they are going, and why? Have you considered the physical differences among ales, lambics, and lagers? Do you contemplate your pint? Accomplished homebrewer and physicist Mark Denny has crafted a scientifically sound and witty investigation of the physics and chemistry of beer. He recounts and explains the history of and key technological advances in brewing, provides basic instructions for making your own—including a scientific-yet-accessible...

Kentucky Cooks

Linda Allison-Lewis
Kentucky has a rich culinary tradition with distinctive regional recipes that reflect the unique heritage of the commonwealth, and few know that tradition better than Linda Allison-Lewis. In the ten years since the publication of her celebrated first collection, Kentucky's Best: Fifty Years of Great Recipes, letters and e-mails have poured in from readers clamoring for a collection of the best recipes from her popular food column. Kentucky Cooks: Favorite Recipes from...

Kentucky's Best

Linda Allison-Lewis
To many, Kentucky means the greatest thoroughbreds in the world. To others, it is the home of the finest bourbon. But the obvious success of burgoo, Owensboro barbeque, and Harlan Sanders's Kentucky Fried Chicken carries the state's reputation for excellence to a wider audience. From the perfect mint julep to benedictine, from a classic hot brown to cheese chutney, Kentucky's Best captures the full range of the state's culinary delights. Linda Allison-Lewis combines traditional and...

The Blue Ribbon Cook Book

Jennie C. Benedict, introduction by Susan Reigler
Jennie C. Benedict's The Blue Ribbon Cook Book represents the very best in the tradition of southern regional cooking. Recipes for such classic dishes as Parker House rolls, lamb chops, corn pudding, Waldorf salad, and cheese and nut sandwiches are nestled among longtime local favorites such as apple butter, rice pudding, griddle cakes, and Benedictine, the cucumber sandwich spread bore Benedict's name. Throughout the cookbook, Benedict's delightful voice shines. Benedict, who...

Eating as I Go

Doris Friedensohn
What do we learn from eating? About ourselves? Others? In this unique memoir of a life shaped by the pleasures of the table, Doris Friedensohn uses eating as an occasion for inquiry. Munching on quesadillas and kimchi in her suburban New Jersey neighborhood, she reflects on her exploration of food over fifty years and across four continents. Relishing couscous in Tunisia and khachapuri in the Republic of Georgia, she explores the ways strangers come together and maintain their...

Profiles from the Kitchen

Charles A. Baker-Clark
In an age where convenience often ranks above quality, many Americans have abandoned traditional recipes and methods of cooking for fast solutions to their hunger and nourishment needs. Modern families are busier than ever, juggling hectic schedules that send them to fast-food restaurant drive-through windows and to grocery stores crowded with pre-processed and ready-to-eat foods. With parents frequently working during the daytime,...

The Blue Grass Cook Book

Minnie C. Fox, introduction by John Fox, Jr., Toni Tipton-Martin
African American cooks were not strangers in the kitchens of the Old South, but white southerners often failed to acknowledge their contributions. One of the first exceptions was Kentucky socialite Minnie C. Fox, who recognized the significant influence and importance of the African American cooks and wrote The Blue Grass Cook Book, first published in 1904. From biscuits and hams to ice creams and puddings, this cookbook is a collection of over three hundred...

Appalachian Home Cooking

Mark F. Sohn
Mark F. Sohn's classic book, Mountain Country Cooking, was a James Beard Award nominee in 1997. In Appalachian Home Cooking, Sohn expands and improves upon his earlier work by using his extensive knowledge of cooking to uncover the romantic secrets of Appalachian food, both within and beyond the kitchen. Shedding new light on Appalachia's food, history, and culture, Sohn offers over eighty classic recipes, as well as photographs, poetry, mail-order sources, information on...

Culinary Tourism

edited by Lucy M. Long
""From Kosher Oreos to the gentrification of Mexican cusine, from the charismatic cook of Basque communities in Spain and the United States to the mainstreaming of southwestern foodways, Culinary Tourism maps a lively cultural and intellectual terrain.""—from the foreword by Barbara Kirshenblatt-GimblettCulinary Tourism is the first book to consider food as both a destination and a means for tourism. The book's contributors examine the many intersections of food, culture and tourism in public and commercial...

Manly Meals and Mom's Home Cooking

Jessamyn Neuhaus
From the first edition of The Fannie Farmer Cookbook to the latest works by today's celebrity chefs, cookbooks reflect more than just passing culinary fads. As historical artifacts, they offer a unique perspective on the cultures that produced them. In Manly Meals and Mom's Home Cooking, Jessamyn Neuhaus offers a perceptive and piquant analysis of the tone and content of American cookbooks published between the 1790s and the 1960s, adroitly uncovering...

Taverns and Drinking in Early America

Sharon V. Salinger
Sharon V. Salinger's Taverns and Drinking in Early America supplies the first study of public houses and drinking throughout the mainland British colonies. At a time when drinking water supposedly endangered one's health, colonists of every rank, age, race, and gender drank often and in quantity, and so taverns became arenas for political debate, business transactions, and small-town gossip sessions. Salinger explores the similarities and differences in the roles of drinking and tavern...

The Kentucky Mint Julep

Joe Nickell
The ultimate guide to the quintessential Derby drink! A simple concoction—bourbon, mint, sugar, and water—the mint julep is legendary. Few people know its history and even fewer know how to properly mix this classic cocktail. Lighthearted, entertaining, and informative, The Kentucky Mint Julep explores the lore and legend of the Kentucky Derby's traditional tipple. Joe Nickell looks at the origins of the julep, offers a brief history of American whiskey and Kentucky bourbon, and shares some classic julep tales.

When Champagne Became French

Kolleen M. Guy
Winner of the Outstanding Manuscript Award from Phi Alpha Theta, this work explains how nationhood emerges by viewing countries as cultural artifacts, a product of "invented traditions." In the case of France, scholars sharply disagree, not only over the nature of French national identity but also over the extent to which diverse and sometimes hostile provincial communities became integrated into the nation. In When Champagne Became French: Wine and the...

Domesticating Drink

Catherine Gilbert Murdock
The period of prohibition, from 1919 to 1933, marks the fault line between the cultures of Victorian and modern America. In Domesticating Drink, Murdock argues that the debates surrounding alcohol also marked a divide along gender lines. For much of early American history, men generally did the drinking, and women and children were frequently the victims of alcohol-associated violence and abuse. As a result, women stood at the fore of the temperance and...

Perryville

Kenneth W. Noe
Winner of the Seaborg Award A History Book Club Selection On October 8, 1862, Union and Confederate forces clashed near Perryville, Kentucky, in what would be the largest battle ever fought on Kentucky soil. The climax of a campaign that began two months before in northern Mississippi, Perryville came to be recognized as the high water mark of the western Confederacy. Some said the hard-fought battle, forever remembered by participants for its sheer savagery and for their commanders' confusion,...

Zucchini

John Butler, introduction by Lois Hole
Zucchini is one of the gardens' most prolific plants, but its bounty often leaves gardeners wondering what to do with the fruit, other than hiding them in unsuspecting neighbours' cars and mailboxes. Master Chef John Butler presents 100 fresh ways to use zucchini, from appetizers to main dishes, breads and biscuits, sweet treats and more.

Rhubarb

Sandi Vitt, Michael Hickman, edited by Dale Vitt, introduction by Lois Hole
Almost everyone has a patch of rhubarb tucked in a corner of the garden. In this fun and friendly new book, Sandi Vitt and Michael Hickman have compiled nearly 150 recipes featuring this surprisingly versatile plant. From beverages to quick breads, muffins to main courses-plus a large assortment of pies-these recipes will tempt you to enjoy rhubarb throughout the year. Chock full of facts and delicious suggestions, Rhubarb: More Than Just Pies is a...

Popped Culture

Andrew F. Smith
Whether in movie theaters or sports arenas, at fairs or theme parks, around campfires or family hearths, Americans consume more popcorn by volume than any other snack. To the world, popcorn seems as American as baseball and apple pie. Within American food lore, popcorn holds a special place, for it was purportedly shared by Native Americans at the first Thanksgiving. In Popped Culture, Andrew F. Smith tests such legends against archaeological, agricultural, culinary, and social...

Civil War Recipes

edited by Lily May Spaulding, John Spaulding
Godey's Lady's Book, perhaps the most popular magazine for women in nineteenth-century America, had a national circulation of 150,000 during the 1860s. The recipes (spelled "receipts") it published were often submitted by women from both the North and the South, and they reveal the wide variety of regional cooking that characterized American culture. There is a remarkable diversity in the recipes, thanks to the largely rural readership...

Savory Memories

edited by Linda Elisabeth Beattie, Linda Elisabeth LaPinta
Writers love to tell stories, so when L. Elisabeth Beattie remarked that her next book ought to be a Kentucky writers' cookbook, Betty Layman Receveur replied, "Actually, all my sons ever demand of me is my pound cake." Adding a cup of this and a pinch of that, Beattie cooked up Savory Memories, a collection of twenty-two essays about particular dishes that call up warm memories in the writers. Featuring recipes and memories from writers such as Joy Bale Boone, George Ella...

The Carolina Rice Kitchen

Karen Hess
Where did rice originate? How did the name Hoppin' John evolve? Why was the famous rice call "Carolina Gold"? The early history of the rice kitchen in South Carolina is inextricably bound to slavery. It was the African slaves who cultivated and cooked it. Although rice had not previously been a staple of the Eurospean plantation owners, it began to appear on the table every day. Rice became revered and was eaten at virtually every meal and in dishes that were part of every course: soups,...

The New South Carolina Cookbook

S C Family & Community Leaders
From shrimp-okra gumbo to peach crepes, The New South Carolina Cookbook serves up a feast of Palmetto State favorites. A standard reference for the South Carolina kitchen since its initial publication in 1953, the cookbook has been reprinted nine times and now appears in a greatly updated and expanded edition. On its pages some of the most accomplished cooks in the state share prized family recipes. Their diversity of cooking expertise makes the book a culinary composite of South...

Dr. Anderson's High-Fiber Fitness Plan

James W. Anderson
This pioneering work by internationally known physician Dr. James W. Anderson is a quick and easy guide to a healthier lifestyle. Breaking the steps to healthful living into manageable units, Dr. Anderson shows how making the right choices in diet, exercise and relaxation can improve health and reduce risks of major disease. Dr. Anderson's High-Fiber Fitness Plan is an essential handbook for those who want a hassle-free way to fitness and health. It has an enclosed spiral binding that...

Southeastern Wildlife Cookbook

Preservation Society of Charleston
Featuring more than 300 recipes that use wild game, fresh and saltwater foods, and some natural seasonings, this cookbook is for those who take the time to scout the woods and wetlands—bringing home quail or duck, deer, turkey, crabs, shrimp and fish. And it's also for those who don't have the means to hunt or fish or gather, but do have access to wild foods and want to serve them at their table. Smoke it, sauté it, or stir-fry it—however you like to prepare wild foods—this is...

A Colonial Plantation Cookbook

Harriott Pinckney Horry, edited by Richard J. Hooker
Harriott Pinckney Horry began her receipt book more than two hundred years ago. It is being published now for the first time. You will get a lively sense of what colonial plantation life was like from reading Harriott's receipt book. She began it in 1770, shortly after she was married, writing recipes and household information in a notebook. Her recipes reflect both English and French culinary traditions. You...

The Virginia Housewife

Mary Randolph
The Virginia House-wife was the first cookbook ever published in America. Now published in a facsimile form of the original 1824 work, this ultimate how-to cookbook was the most influential cookbook in nineteenth-century America. Regarded by many critics as the finest cookbook to ever come out of the American kitchen, it was written by Mary Randolph. She and her husband, David Meade Randolph, made their home at Moldavia in Richmond and were celebrated for their displays of lavish hospitality. In 1802, Mr. Randolph...

The Carolina Housewife

Sarah Rutledge, introduction by Anna Wells Rutledge
A facsimile of the 1847 edition, with an Introduction and Preliminary Checklist of South Carolina Cookbooks Published before 1935 by Anna Wells Rutledge.