Titles

48 Titles

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AIA Guide to the Architecture of Washington, D.C., fifth edition

G. Martin Moeller, Jr.
This lively and informative guide offers tourists, residents, and architecture aficionados alike insights into more than 400 of Washington, D.C.'s, most important landmarks. Organized into 19 discrete tours, this thoroughly redesigned and updated edition includes 45 new entries, encompassing the House of Sweden and the U.S. Institute of Peace, classic buildings that epitomize the city—the White House, the Capitol, Union Station—and a number of private buildings off...

Abraham Lincoln

Michael Burlingame
In the first multi-volume biography of Abraham Lincoln to be published in decades, Lincoln scholar Michael Burlingame offers a fresh look at the life of one of America's greatest presidents. Incorporating the field notes of earlier biographers, along with decades of research in multiple manuscript archives and long-neglected newspapers, this remarkable work will both alter and reinforce current understanding of America's sixteenth president. In volume 2, Burlingame examines Lincoln's presidency and the...

Academia Next

Bryan Alexander
The outlook for the future of colleges and universities is uncertain. Financial stresses, changing student populations, and rapidly developing technologies all pose significant challenges to the nation's colleges and universities. In Academia Next, futurist and higher education expert Bryan Alexander addresses these evolving trends to better understand higher education's next generation. Alexander first examines current economic, demographic, political, international, and policy...

Adolescent Depression, second edition

Francis Mark Mondimore, MD, Patrick Kelly, MD
In Adolescent Depression, psychiatrists Francis Mark Mondimore, MD, and Patrick Kelly, MD, explain that serious depression in adolescents goes beyond "moodiness." Depression is in fact an illness—one that can be effectively treated. The authors describe the many forms of depression and the many symptoms of depression in young people—from sadness to irritability, self-harm, drug and alcohol abuse, and violent rages. Incorporating the latest research from the...

Adrenaline and the Inner World

David S. Goldstein, M.D., Ph.D.
This accessible work is the first in more than seventy-five years to discuss the many roles of adrenaline in regulating the "inner world" of the body. David S. Goldstein, an international authority and award-winning teacher, introduces new concepts concerning the nature of stress and distress across the body's regulatory systems. Discussing how the body's stress systems are coordinated, and how stress, by means of adrenaline, may...

Advertising Progress

Pamela Walker Laird
Originally published in 1998. Drawing on both documentary and pictorial evidence, Pamela Walker Laird explores the modernization of American advertising to 1920. She links its rise and transformation to changes that affected American society and business alike, including the rise of professional specialization and the communications revolution that new technologies made possible. Laird finds a fundamental shift in the kinds of people who created...

African Perspectives on Colonialism

A. Adu Boahen
This history deals with the twenty-year period between 1880 and 1900, when virtually all of Africa was seized and occupied by the Imperial Powers of Europe. Eurocentric points of view have dominated the study of this era, but in this book, one of Africa's leading historians reinterprets the colonial experiences from the perspective of the colonized. The Johns Hopkins Symposia in Comparative History are occasional volumes sponsored by the Department of History at the Johns Hopkins University...

After the Flood

Lydia Barnett
Many centuries before the emergence of the scientific consensus on climate change, people began to imagine the existence of a global environment: a natural system capable of changing humans and of being changed by them. In After the Flood, Lydia Barnett traces the history of this idea back to the early modern period, when the Scientific Revolution, the Reformations, the Little Ice Age, and the overseas expansion of European empire, religion, and commerce gave...

The Agile College

Nathan D. Grawe
Demographic changes promise to reshape the market for higher education in the next 15 years. Colleges are already grappling with the consequences of declining family size due to low birth rates brought on by the Great Recession, as well as the continuing shift toward minority student populations. Each institution faces a distinct market context with unique organizational strengths; no one-size-fits-all answer could suffice. In this essential follow-up to...

Agricultural Development Principles

Robert D. Stevens, Cathy L. Jabara
What are the food and agricultural development problems facing Third World nations? Does current economic theory help accelerate growth? Does it foster useful development policies? This book addresses these and other questions to provide a wide-ranging and thorough introduction to the theories, policies, and practices aimed at increasing food production and agricultural development. Individual sections examine recent agricultual...

Albert Meets America

edited by József Illy
In 1919, newspaper headlines said that a British expedition had confirmed Einstein's general theory of relativity. The news stirred the public imagination on both sides of the Atlantic and thrust the scientist into the spotlight of fame. Two years later, Chaim Weizmann led a fund-raising mission to the United States and invited Einstein to join it. The mission traveled to New York, Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, Philadelphia, and Hartford to...

Alexandria in Late Antiquity

Christopher Haas
Second only to Rome in the ancient world, Alexandria was home to many of late antiquity's most brilliant writers, philosophers, and theologians—among them Philo, Origen, Arius, Athanasius, Hypatia, Cyril, and John Philoponus. Now, in Alexandria in Late Antiquity, Christopher Haas offers the first book to place these figures within the physical and social context of Alexandria's bustling urban milieu. Because of its clear demarcation of communal boundaries, Alexandria...

Alfred North Whitehead

Victor Lowe
Originally published in 1985. The second volume of Victor Lowe's definitive work on Alfred North Whitehead completes the biography of one of the twentieth century's most influential yet least understood philosophers. In 1910 Whitehead abruptly ended his thirty-year association with Trinity College of Cambridge and moved to London. The intellectual and personal restlessness that precipitated this move ultimately led Whitehead—at the age of sixty-three—to settle in America and change the focus...

Algebra in Context

Amy Shell-Gellasch, John Thoo
This book's unique approach to the teaching of mathematics lies in its use of history to provide a framework for understanding algebra and related fields. With Algebra in Context, students will soon discover why mathematics is such a crucial part not only of civilization but also of everyday life. Even those who have avoided mathematics for years will find the historical stories both inviting and gripping. The book's lessons begin with the...

The Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798

Terri Diane Halperin
In May 1798, after Congress released the XYZ Affair dispatches to the public, a raucous crowd took to the streets of Philadelphia. Some gathered to pledge their support for the government of President John Adams, others to express their disdain for his policies. Violence, both physical and political, threatened the safety of the city and the Union itself. To combat the chaos and protect the nation from both external and internal threats, the Federalists swiftly...

All a Novelist Needs

Colm Tóibín, edited by Susan M. Griffin
This book collects, for the first time, Colm Tóibín's critical essays on Henry James. Shortlisted for the Booker Prize for his novel about James's life, The Master, Tóibín brilliantly analyzes James from a novelist's point of view. Known for his acuity and originality, Tóibín is himself a master of fiction and critical works, which makes this collection of his writings on Henry James essential reading for literary critics. But he also writes for general...

All the Tsar's Men

John W. Steinberg
All the Tsar's Men examines how institutional reforms designed to prepare the Imperial Russian Army for the modern battlefield failed to prevent devastating defeats in both the 1905 Russo-Japanese War and World War I. John W. Steinberg argues that the General Staff officers who devised new educational and doctrinal reforms had the experience, dedication, and leadership skills to defend the empire in the new age of warfare but were continually...

The Amateur Hour

Jonathan Zimmerman
American college teaching is in crisis, or so we are told. But we've heard that complaint for the past 150 years, as critics have denounced the poor quality of instruction in undergraduate classrooms. Students daydream in gigantic lecture halls while a professor drones on, or they meet with a teaching assistant for an hour of aimless discussion. The modern university does not reward teaching, so faculty members at every level neglect it in favor of research and publication. ...

The Amendments to the Constitution

George Anastaplo
A companion to the widely acclaimed The Constitution of 1787, this new book by eminent constitutional scholar George Anastaplo examines the nature and effects of the twenty-seven amendments to the U.S. Constitution. For Anastaplo, these amendments implement the equality, liberty, and rule of law principles that are fundamental to the American system of government. His appendixes of critical documents and his reflections on the Bill of Rights and on the Emancipation Proclamation set...

America and the Politics of Insecurity

Andrew Rojecki
In America and the Politics of Insecurity, Andrew Rojecki assesses the response of citizens and politicians to a series of crises that confronted the United States during the first decade of the twenty-first century. This period brought Americans face to face with extraordinarily difficult problems that were compounded by their origin in seemingly uncontrollable global forces. Rojecki establishes a theoretical framework for understanding how these new uncertainties contribute to...

America and the World

Lawrence A. Peskin, Edmund F. Wehrle
Although the twenty-first century may well be the age of globalization, this book demonstrates that America has actually been at the cutting edge of globalization since Columbus landed here five centuries ago. Lawrence A. Peskin and Edmund F. Wehrle explore America's evolving connections with Europe, Africa, and Asia in the three areas that historically have been indicators of global interaction: trade and industry, diplomacy and war, and the "soft" power of...

America's Constitutional Soul

Harvey C. Mansfield, Jr.
In America's Constitutional Soul, one of America's leading political theorists and most penetrating thinkers on the Constitution describes what's wrong with American politics today—and what political scientists can do about it. Beginning with a chronical of the Reagan elections, Mansfield shows how our politics reveals its nature by the way it pictures the Constitution. He takes aim at the haunted "realism" of contemporary political scientists, contrasting it with the real-world successes of...

American Defense Policy, ninth edition

edited by Miriam Krieger, Lynne M. Chandler Garcia, Lynne Chandler Garcia, John Riley, Will Atkins, John H. Riley
American Defense Policy, first published in 1965 under the leadership of Brent Scowcroft, has been a mainstay in courses on political science, international relations, military affairs, and American national security for more than 50 years. This updated and thoroughly revised ninth edition, which contains about 30% all-new content, considers questions of continuity and change in America's defense policy in the...

The American Faculty

Jack H. Schuster, Martin J. Finkelstein
Higher education is becoming destabilized in the face of extraordinarily rapid change. The composition of the academy's most valuable asset—the faculty—and the essential nature of faculty work are being transformed. Jack H. Schuster and Martin J. Finkelstein describe the transformation of the American faculty in the most extensive and ambitious analysis of the American academic profession undertaken in a generation. A century ago the American...

American Hieroglyphics

John T. Irwin
The discovery of the Rosetta Stone and the subsequent decipherment of Egyptian hieroglyphics captured the imaginations of nineteenth-century American writers and provided a focal point for their speculations on the relationships between sign, symbol, language, and meaning. Through fresh readings of classic works by Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Poe, Hawthorne, and Melville, John T. Irwin's American Hieroglyphics examines the symbolic mode...

American Iron, 1607-1900

Robert B. Gordon
Originally published in 1996. By applying their abundant natural resources to ironmaking early in the eighteenth century, Americans soon made themselves felt in world markets. After the Revolution, ironmakers supplied the materials necessary to the building of American industry, pushing the fuel efficiency and productivity of their furnaces far ahead of their European rivals. In American Iron, 1607-1900, Robert B. Gordon draws on recent archaeological findings as well as archival research to present an...

American National Security, seventh edition

Michael J. Meese, Suzanne C. Nielsen, Rachel M. Sondheimer, foreword by General John P. Abizaid
American National Security remains the ideal foundational text for courses in national security, foreign policy, and security studies. Every chapter in this edition has been extensively revised, and the book includes discussion of recent security policy changes in the Trump administration. Highlights include: •An updated look at national security threats, military operations, and homeland security challenges •An analysis of...

American Nursing

Patricia D'Antonio
This new interpretation of the history of nursing in the United States captures the many ways women reframed the most traditional of all gender expectations—that of caring for the sick—to create new possibilities for themselves, to renegotiate the terms of some of their life experiences, and to reshape their own sense of worth and power. For much of modern U.S. history, nursing was informal, often uncompensated, and almost wholly the province of...

American Public School Librarianship

Wayne A. Wiegand
"Can I get a library pass?" Over the past 120 years, millions of American K–12 public school students have asked that question. Still, we know little about the history of public school libraries, which over the decades were pulled together and managed by hundreds of thousands of school librarians. In American Public School Librarianship, Wayne A. Wiegand recounts the unseen history of both school libraries and their librarians. Why, Wiegand asks, did school librarianship turn out...

The American Red Cross from Clara Barton to the New Deal

Marian Moser Jones
In dark skirts and bloodied boots, Clara Barton fearlessly ventured on to Civil War battlefields to tend to wounded soldiers. She later worked with civilians in Europe during the Franco-Prussian War, lobbied legislators to ratify the Geneva conventions, and founded and ran the American Red Cross. The American Red Cross from Clara Barton to the New Deal tells the story of the charitable organization from its start in 1881, through its humanitarian aid during wars,...

The Amish

Donald B. Kraybill, Karen M. Johnson-Weiner, Steven M. Nolt
The Amish have always struggled with the modern world. Known for their simple clothing, plain lifestyle, and horse-and-buggy mode of transportation, Amish communities continually face outside pressures to modify their cultural patterns, social organization, and religious world view. An intimate portrait of Amish life, The Amish explores not only the emerging diversity and evolving identities within this distinctive American ethnic community, but also its transformation and geographic...

An Amish Paradox

Charles E. Hurst, David L. McConnell
Holmes County, Ohio, is home to the largest and most diverse Amish community in the world. Yet, surprisingly, it remains relatively unknown compared to its famous cousin in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Charles E. Hurst and David L. McConnell conducted seven years of fieldwork, including interviews with over 200 residents, to understand the dynamism that drives social change and schism within the settlement, where Amish enterprises and...

Amish Quilts

Janneken Smucker
Quilts have become a cherished symbol of Amish craftsmanship and the beauty of the simple life. Country stores in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and other tourist regions display row after row of handcrafted quilts. In luxury homes, office buildings, and museums, the quilts have been preserved and displayed as priceless artifacts. They are even pictured on collectible stamps. Amish Quilts explores how these objects evolved from practical bed linens into contemporary art. In this in-depth...

The Amish and Technology

Donald B. Kraybill, Karen M. Johnson-Weiner, Steven M. Nolt
Limits on technology are the signature mark of twenty-first century Amish identity. Riding in horse-drawn buggies and living unplugged from the public grid unmistakably separate Amish people from mainstream Americans. Yet the Amish do not categorically condemn technology. Nor are they technologically naïve. Rather, Amish communities selectively sort out what might help or harm them. More significantly, the Amish modify and adapt technology in...

The Anatomy of Historical Knowledge

Maurice Mandelbaum
Originally published in 1977. In this major work, an overview of the structure of historical writing, Maurice Mandelbaum clarifies some of the problems concerning the nature of history as a discipline, of what constitutes explanation in history, and whether historical knowledge is as reliable as other forms of knowledge. The work is divided into three parts. The first part provides an analytic account of different types of historical inquiry. The second treats at length the nature of causal...

The Ancient City

Numa Denis Fustel De Coulanges, foreword by Arnaldo Mornigliano, S. C. Humphreys
Originally published in 1864 as La Cité Antique, this remarkable work describes society as it existed in Greece during the age of Pericles and in Rome at the time of Cicero. Working with only a fraction of the materials available to today's classical scholar, Fustel de Coulanges fashioned a complete picture of life in the ancient city, resulting in a book impressive today as much for the...

The Ancient Roman City

John E. Stambaugh
To walk through Rome today is to find the past made present at nearly every corner. For John Stambaugh, this continuity of fabric, form, and function affords an extraordinary view of the ancient city, the experience of its inhabitants, and the Roman way of life. Exploring ancient Rome as both a physical and social environment, he has written the first extended survey of its development in English—and a vivid "guidebook into the living past of one of the most emphatically urban cities the world has ever known." ...

Annapolis, City on the Severn

Jane W. McWilliams
The story of Annapolis resonates in every century of American history. Annapolis has been home to tobacco plantations, political intrigue, international commerce, the U.S. Naval Academy, ballooning population growth, and colonial, state, and national government. Jane Wilson McWilliams's captivating history explores Annapolis from its settlement in 1650 to its historic preservation campaign of the late twentieth century. McWilliams brings alive the people of Annapolis as she recounts...

Annotations to Finnegans Wake, fourth edition

Roland McHugh
Roland McHugh's classic Annotations to Finnegans Wake provides both novice readers and seasoned Joyceans with a wealth of information in an easy-to-use format uniquely suited to this densely layered text. Each page of the Annotations corresponds directly to a page of the standard Viking/Penguin edition of Finnegans Wake and contains line-by-line notes following the placement of the passages to which they refer, enabling readers to look directly from text to notes and back again, with no need to consult...

The Antibiotic Era

Scott H. Podolsky
In The Antibiotic Era, physician-historian Scott H. Podolsky narrates the far-reaching history of antibiotics, focusing particularly on reform efforts that attempted to fundamentally change how antibiotics are developed and prescribed. This sweeping chronicle reveals the struggles faced by crusading reformers from the 1940s onward as they advocated for a rational therapeutics at the crowded intersection of bugs and drugs, patients and doctors,...

Apollo's Eye

Denis Cosgrove
"Earthbound humans are unable to embrace more than a tiny part of the planetary surface. But in their imagination they can grasp the whole of the earth, as a surface or a solid body, to locate it within infinities of space and to communicate and share images of it."—from the Preface Long before we had the ability to photograph the earth from space—to see our planet as it would be seen by the Greek god Apollo—images of the earth as a globe had captured...

Applications for Advancing Animal Ecology

Michael L. Morrison, Leonard A. Brennan, Bruce G. Marcot, William M. Block, Kevin S. McKelvey
Despite major advances in sampling techniques and analytical methods, many animal ecologists conduct research that is primarily relevant to a specific time and place. They also tend to focus more on the statistical analyses and nuances of modeling than actual study design. Arguing that studies of animal ecology should always begin with a focus on the behaviors and characteristics of individual organisms,...

Arcana Mundi, second edition

Georg Luck
Magic, miracles, daemonology, divination, astrology, and alchemy were the arcana mundi, the "secrets of the universe," of the ancient Greeks and Romans. In this path-breaking collection of Greek and Roman writings on magic and the occult, Georg Luck provides a comprehensive sourcebook and introduction to magic as it was practiced by witches and sorcerers, magi and astrologers, in the Greek and Roman worlds. In this new edition, Luck has...

Arnold's Poetic Landscapes

Alan Roper
Originally published in 1969. Alan Roper studies the degree to which Arnold achieved a unity of human significance and literal landscape. If landscape poetry is to rise above the level of what Roper calls "country contentments in verse," the poet cannot think and describe alternately; his thinking and describing must be a part of one another. That Matthew Arnold was aware of the difficulty in achieving the necessary unity becomes clear in his own criticism, which Roper examines along with a large and...

Asa Gray

A. Hunter Dupree
The leading American botanist of the nineteenth century, Asa Gray helped organize the main generalizations of the science of plant geography. The manual of botany that carries his name is still in use today. Friend and confidant of Charles Darwin, Gray became the most persistent and effective American protagonist of Darwin's views. Yet at the same time, he believed that religion and Darwin's theory of natural selection could coexist. A. Hunter Dupree's authoritative biography offers the...

Asklepios, Medicine, and the Politics of Healing in Fifth-Century Greece

Bronwen L. Wickkiser
Delving deeply into ancient medical history, Bronwen L. Wickkiser explores the early development and later spread of the cult of Asklepios, one of the most popular healing gods in the ancient Mediterranean. Though Asklepios had been known as a healer since the time of Homer, evidence suggests that large numbers of people began to flock to the cult during the fifth century BCE, just as practitioners of Hippocratic...

Astrobiology, third edition

Kevin W. Plaxco, Michael Gross
Informed by the discoveries and analyses of extrasolar planets and the findings from recent robotic missions across the solar system, scientists are rapidly replacing centuries of speculation about potential extraterrestrial habitats with real knowledge about the possibility of life outside our own biosphere—if it exists, and, if so, where. Casting new light on the biggest questions there are—how did we get here, and who else might be out there?—this third edition of Kevin W. Plaxco and...

Audacious Kids, revised edition

Jerry Griswold
Outstanding Book of the Year Award, Children's Literature Association Often called the Golden Age of Children's Books, the years stretching from the Civil War to World War I were a remarkable epoch in juvenile literature, an era when the best authors on both sides of the Atlantic wrote some of their finest work primarily for children. In Audacious Kids, Jerry Griswold provides a groundbreaking and lucid study of twelve of these classic American children's tales, including such...