Titles

179 Titles

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Walker's Mammals of the World, sixth edition

Ronald M. Nowak
From aardwolves and bandicoots to yapoks and zorillas, Ernest P. Walker's Mammals of the World is the most comprehensive—the pre-eminent—reference work on mammals. Now, completely revised and updated, this fascinating guide is better than ever. Providing a complete account of every genus of mammal in all historical time, the sixth edition is 25 percent longer than its predecessor. Of the previous generic accounts, 95 percent have been substantively modified, and there are 80 new ones—among them,...

Walking in Baltimore

Frank R. Shivers, Jr.
Outsiders had called it "Mob Town" when, on April 19, 1861, Confederate sympathizers attacked Yankee soldiers and shed the first blood of the Civil War. According to Frank Shivers, Baltimore's unique charm must have something to do with the city's wonderful mix of opposites – North and South, old-fashioned rowhouses and modern office towers, industrial waterfront and revitalized inner harbor, the venerable Walters Art Gallery and funky Fells Point bars. In the 12 tours...

Wallace Stevens

Frank Doggett
Originally published in 1980. Wallace Stevens: The Making of the Poem emphasizes the ideas that Wallace Stevens embeds in his poetry, providing the first study to provide an intellectual biography of Stevens. It examines Stevens' naturalism, his ideas of the self, and the imagination, among other topics. The concepts that emerge from long reading of the poetry of Stevens are slight and basic, but these concepts do accord, even if they never emerge into a coherent philosophy. The accordance is...

Walther Rathenau and the Weimar Republic

David Felix
Originally published in 1971. Walther Rathenau and the Weimar Republic examines reparations in Germany following the First World War. Financial reparation was the most difficult and dangerous of the conditions imposed upon Germany by the Versailles Treaty. The amount of reparations - three times the country's annual income - was beyond Germany's capacity to pay. The United States, by insisting on the payment of Allied war debts, forced the Allies in turn to...

The Waning of the Mediterranean, 1550–1870

Faruk Tabak
Conventional scholarship on the Mediterranean portrays the Inner Sea as a timeless entity with unchanging ecological and agrarian features. But, Faruk Tabak argues, some of the "traditional" and "olden" characteristics that we attribute to it today are actually products of relatively recent developments. Locating the shifting fortunes of Mediterranean city-states and empires in patterns of long-term economic and ecological change, this study shows how the...

War and Health Insurance Policy in Japan and the United States

Takakazu Yamagishi
World War II forced extensive and comprehensive social and political changes on nations across the globe. This comparative examination of health insurance in the United States and Japan during and after the war explores how World War II shaped the health care systems of both countries. To compare the development of health insurance in the two countries, Takakazu Yamagishi discusses the impact of total war on four...

War and Society in Renaissance Europe, 1450-1620

J. R. Hale
In the modern view of Renaissance Europe, the rise of humanism often obscures violence and warfare. As J. R. Hale observes, "there was probably no single period in which there was neither war nor occurrences that looked and felt remarkably like it." This major new assessment by one of the world's foremost Renaissance historians analyzes the impact of war on government, economy, technology, the military, and civilian life and broadens our conception of society in the early modern...

War in the Modern World

Theodore Ropp, introduction by Alex Roland
The landmark survey of the social, political, military, and technological aspects of modern warfare from the Renaissance to the Cold War returns to print in a new paperback edition. "War in the Modern World marked a turning point in the historiography of war. Just as Keegan's The Face of Battle marked the transition to the socail history of the military, so Ropp's classic coincided with the first full flowering of what would later be called the 'new military history'. . . This is...

War under Heaven

Gregory Evans Dowd
The 1763 Treaty of Paris ceded much of the continent east of the Mississippi to Great Britain, a claim which the Indian nations of the Great Lakes, who suddenly found themselves under British rule, considered outrageous. Unlike the French, with whom Great Lakes Indians had formed an alliance of convenience, the British entered the upper Great Lakes in a spirit of conquest. British officers on the frontier keenly felt the need to assert their assumed...

The Warfare between Science and Religion

edited by Jeff Hardin, Ronald L. Numbers, Ronald A. Binzley
The "conflict thesis"—the idea that an inevitable and irreconcilable conflict exists between science and religion—has long been part of the popular imagination. In The Warfare between Science and Religion, Jeff Hardin, Ronald L. Numbers, and Ronald A. Binzley have assembled a group of distinguished historians who explore the origin of the thesis, its reception, the responses it drew from various faith traditions, and its...

Warrior Pursuits

Brian Sandberg
Warrior nobles frequently armed themselves for civil war in southern France during the troubled early seventeenth century. These bellicose nobles' practices of violence shaped provincial society and the royal state in early modern France. The southern French provinces of Guyenne and Languedoc suffered almost continual religious strife and civil conflict between 1598 and 1635, providing an excellent case for investigating the dynamics of early modern civil...

Washington County

Paul Bourke, Donald A. DeBats
In the 1850s, Washington County, Oregon, gathered together a broad cross-section of antebellum America. More than that, however, it left for historians a rare opportunity to explore political, social, and cultural trends in American history due to its unique practice of viva voce voting—announcing individual ballots publicly rather than recording them in secret. Paul Bourke and Donald DeBats tap into this remarkable resource to reveal how individual...

Washington Irving

William L. Hedges
Originally published in 1965. Despite his prolificacy, Washington Irving remained an underexamined figure among literary scholars at the time William L. Hedges published his definitive study of the author in 1965. Most contemporary scholars believed that Irving's central contribution to the American literary tradition was that his work was "polished" and "suave." These scholars maintained that Irving's aristocratic sensibilities defined the stylistic choices of his literary works. To...

Washington Sculpture

James M. Goode
This sweeping study takes readers on a fascinating tour of Washington, D.C.'s monuments, statues, headstones, and memorials. James M. Goode canvasses more than 500 sculptural pieces, often overlooked by residents and visitors, and presents critical discussions and detailed histories of each work. The result is a graphic history of the cultural, political, and military contributions of America's greatest leaders. Washington Sculpture revises...

Washington Seen

Fredric M. Miller, Howard F. Gillette, Jr.
A steam engine chugs along the Mall. The Knights Templar parade down an unpaved F Street. Workmen finish an arch at the new Library of Congress building. And the paddleboats are lining up for a concert at the Watergate Barge. In Washington Seen Fredric Miller and Howard Gillette bring together nearly four hundred unique photographs from the Gilded Age to the Great Society. Throughout, the focus is not on streets and monuments but on the complex...

Washington and Baltimore Art Deco

Richard Striner, Melissa Blair
The bold lines and decorative details of Art Deco have stood the test of time since one of its first appearances in the International Exhibition of Modern Decorative and Industrial Arts in Paris in 1925. Reflecting the confidence of modern mentality—streamlined, chrome, and glossy black—along with simple elegance, sharp lines, and cosmopolitan aspirations, Art Deco carried surprises, juxtaposing designs growing out of speed (racecars and...

Washington at Home, second edition

edited by Kathryn S. Smith
Washington, D.C., conjures images of marble monuments, national memorials, and world-class museums. To many, the world beyond the National Mall is invisible. Yet within an area of only 68 square miles lies a residential city of diversity, beauty, and charm. In the long-awaited update of her 1988 classic Washington at Home, Kathryn Schneider Smith and a team of historians, journalists, folklorists, museum professionals, and others who...

Water Policy for Sustainable Development

Dave Feldman
The shortage of fresh water is likely to be one of the most pressing issues of the twenty-first century. A UNESCO report predicts that as many as 7 billion people will face shortages of drinking water by 2050. Here, David Lewis Feldman examines river-basin management cases around the world to show how fresh water can be managed to sustain economic development while protecting the environment. He argues that policy makers can employ adaptive management to avoid making decisions that could...

Water Resources

George M. Hornberger, Debra Perrone
The fair allocation and wise use of fresh water presents significant challenges across the world. To avoid unresolvable crises in the future, judiciously managing water resources in the twenty-first century is fundamentally important. Integrating the underlying science of hydrology with real-world usage scenarios, Water Resources offers a nuanced, modern treatment of contemporary water resource management issues. In this ground-breaking new text, renowned environmental...