Titles

30 Titles

Ww

War in the Modern World

Theodore Ropp, introduction by Alex Roland
From the Renaissance to the Cold War, the definitive survey of the social, political, military, and technological aspects of modern warfare returns to print in a new paperback edition. Topics include land and sea warfare from the Renaissance to the neoclassical age; the Anglo-American military tradition; the French Revolution and Napoleon; the Industrial Revolution and war; and the First and Second World Wars and their aftermath.

Washington at Home, second edition

edited by Kathryn S. Smith
Washington, D.C., conjures images of marble monuments, national memorials, and world-class museums. To many, the world beyond the National Mall is invisible. Yet within an area of only 68 square miles lies a residential city of diversity, beauty, and charm. In the long-awaited update of her 1988 classic Washington at Home, Kathryn Schneider Smith and a team of historians, journalists, folklorists, museum professionals, and others who...

Water Technology in the Middle Ages

Roberta J. Magnusson
Focusing attention on gravity-fed water-flow systems in medieval cities and monasteries, Water Technology in the Middle Ages: Cities, Monasteries, and Waterworks after the Roman Empire challenges the view that hydraulic engineering died with the Romans and remained moribund until the Renaissance. Roberta Magnusson explores the systems' technologies—how they worked, what uses the water served—and also the social rifts that...

Western Attitudes toward Death

Philippe Ariès, translated by Patricia Ranum
Reveals the change in Western man's conception and acceptance of death as evidenced in customs, literature, and art since medieval times.

What Ever Happened to the Faculty?

Mary Burgan
In this provocative work, Mary Burgan surveys the deterioration of faculty influence in higher education. From campus planning, curriculum, and instructional technology to governance, pedagogy, and academic freedom, she urges far greater consideration for the perspective of the faculty. Burgan evokes the pervasive atmosphere of charge and counter-charge on U.S. campuses, where competition trumps reason not only in athletics but also in research, faculty...

What Universities Owe Democracy

Ronald J. Daniels, Grant Shreve, with Grant Shreve, Phillip Spector, with Phillip Spector
Universities play an indispensable role within modern democracies. But this role is often overlooked or too narrowly conceived, even by universities themselves. In What Universities Owe Democracy, Ronald J. Daniels, the president of Johns Hopkins University, argues that—at a moment when liberal democracy is endangered and more countries are heading toward autocracy than at any time in generations—it is critical for today's...

What Universities Owe Democracy

Ronald J. Daniels, Grant Shreve, with Grant Shreve, Phillip Spector, with Phillip Spector
Universities play an indispensable role within modern democracies. But this role is often overlooked or too narrowly conceived, even by universities themselves. In What Universities Owe Democracy, Ronald J. Daniels, the president of Johns Hopkins University, argues that—at a moment when liberal democracy is endangered and more countries are heading toward autocracy than at any time in generations—it is critical for today's...

What You Really Need to Know about Cancer

Robert Buckman, foreword by Robert Bast, M.D., illustrated by Martin Nichols
As a medical oncologist, Dr. Robert Buckman has been taking care of people with cancer for more than twenty years. For most of those years, he says, he has spent much of his time talking with patients and their families—describing what is known about cancer (and what isn't), explaining why specialists have recommended one type of treatment rather than another, or...

What about Darwin?

Thomas F. Glick
Charles Darwin and his revolutionary ideas inspired pundits the world over to put pen to paper. In this unique dictionary of quotations, Darwin scholar Thomas Glick presents fascinating observations about Darwin and his ideas from such notable figures as P. T. Barnum, Anton Chekhov, Mahatma Gandhi, Carl Jung, Martin Luther King, Mao Tse-tung, Pius IX, Jules Verne, and...

What the Amish Teach Us

Donald B. Kraybill
It sounds audacious, but it's true: the Amish have much to teach us. It may seem surreal to turn to one of America's most traditional groups for lessons about living in a hyper-tech world—especially a horse-driving people who resist "progress" by snubbing cars, public grid power, and high school education. Still, their wisdom confirms that even when they seem so far behind, they're out ahead of the rest of us. Having spent four decades researching Amish communities, Donald...

When Benjamin Franklin Met the Reverend Whitefield

Peter Charles Hoffer
In the 1740s, two quite different developments revolutionized Anglo-American life and thought—the Enlightenment and the Great Awakening. This book takes an encounter between the paragons of each movement—the printer and entrepreneur Benjamin Franklin and the British-born revivalist George Whitefield—as an opportunity to explore the meaning of the beginnings of modern science and rationality on one hand and...

When Illness Goes Public

Barron H. Lerner, M.D., Ph.D.
Steve McQueen had cancer and was keeping it secret. Then the media found out, and soon all of America knew. McQueen's high profile changed forever the way the public perceived a dreaded disease. In When Illness Goes Public, Barron H. Lerner describes the evolution of celebrities' illnesses from private matters to stories of great public interest. Famous people who have become symbols of illness include Lou Gehrig, the first "celebrity...

The White Separatist Movement in the United States

Betty A. Dobratz, Stephanie L. Shanks-Meile
Although the white separatist movement stereotype is that of a Southern phenomenon tied to an uneducated and disenfranchised segment of men, sociologists Betty A. Dobratz and Stephanie L. Shanks-Meile show that the movement is in reality more complex and multifaceted. To compile this study, the authors interviewed more than 125 white separatists, attended rallies, congresses, and other gatherings, and examined many...

Why Can't I Stop?

Jon E. Grant, JD, MD, MPH, Brian L. Odlaug, Samuel R. Chamberlain, MD, PhD
At some point in our lives, we all engage in behaviors that are risky, irrational, or unwise. We might find it exciting and temporarily rewarding to gamble on the lottery or impulsively buy an expensive gadget. But just as substances like alcohol and narcotics have the potential to become addictive, so do certain behaviors. A person addicted to gambling, shopping, the internet, food, or picking at their...

Why Survive?

Robert N. Butler, M.D.
"Butler questions the value of long life for its own sake; modern medicine, he says, has ironically created 'a huge group of people for whom survival is possible but satisfaction in living elusive.' He proposes sweeping policy reforms to redefine and restructure the institutions responsible for what he calls 'the tragedy of old age in America.'" -New York Times Book Review "Crammed with facts that explode old myths." -Boston Globe "Heavily documented, highly readable . . . jammed with...

Why They Can't Write

John Warner
There seems to be widespread agreement that—when it comes to the writing skills of college students—we are in the midst of a crisis. In Why They Can't Write, John Warner, who taught writing at the college level for two decades, argues that the problem isn't caused by a lack of rigor, or smartphones, or some generational character defect. Instead, he asserts, we're teaching writing wrong. Warner blames this on decades of educational reform rooted in...

Wild Equids

edited by Jason I. Ransom, Petra Kaczensky
Wild horses, zebras, asses, and feral equines exhibit intriguing and complex social structures that captivate the human imagination and elicit a wide range of emotions that influence conservation and management efforts. This book, spearheaded by Jason I. Ransom and Petra Kaczensky, brings together the world's leading experts on equid ecology, management, and conservation to provide a synthesis of what is known about these iconic species and what needs to be...

Wildlife Management and Conservation

edited by Paul R. Krausman, James W. Cain, III
Wildlife Management and Conservation presents a clear overview of the management and conservation of animals, their habitats, and how people influence both. The relationship among these three components of wildlife management is explained in chapters written by leading experts and is designed to prepare wildlife students for careers in which they will be charged with maintaining healthy animal populations; finding ways to...

Will China Democratize?

edited by Andrew J. Nathan, Larry Diamond, Marc F. Plattner
While China has achieved extraordinary economic success as it has moved toward open markets and international trade, its leadership maintains an authoritarian grip, repressing political movements, controlling all internet traffic, and opposing any democratic activity. Because of its huge population, more than half the people in the world who lack political freedom live in China. Its undemocratic example is attractive to other authoritarian regimes. But can China...

William Barton Rogers and the Idea of MIT

A. J. Angulo
Conceptual founder of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, William Barton Rogers was a highly influential scientific mind and educational reformer of the nineteenth century. A. J. Angulo recounts the largely unknown story of one man's ideas and how they gave way to the creation of one of America's premier institutions of higher learning. MIT's long tradition of teaching, research, and technological innovation for real-world applications is inexorably linked to Rogers' educational...