Titles

15 Titles

Uu

Ultraroyalism in Toulouse

David Higgs
Originally published in 1973. Ultraroyalism in Toulouse examines in detail the origins of ultraroyal hostility to the social and political changes rendered by the French Revolution. France has produced a variety of theories of decline, corresponding to the nation's changing political fortunes in Europe and the world. The Revolution represented another, at least temporary, victory of the state apparatus over local community and privilege, and it stimulated the...

Ulysses, revised edition

Hugh Kenner
There is no book like Ulysses, and no book about it quite like this one. Now completely revised to correspond to the definitive new Galber edition, Hugh Kenner's ULYSSES for the first time becomes widley available in the United States. With characteristic flair, Kenner explores the ways Joyce teaches us to read his novel as Joyce taught himself to write: moving from the simple to the complex, from the familiar to the strange and new, from the norms of the nineteenth-century novel to the open forms of modernism. Kenner offers new...

Unclaimed Experience, Twentieth Anniversary Edition

Cathy Caruth
In Unclaimed Experience, Cathy Caruth proposes that in the widespread and bewildering experience of trauma in our century—both in its occurrence and in our attempt to understand it—we can recognize the possibility of a history no longer based on simple models of straightforward experience and reference. Through the notion of trauma, she contends, we come to a new understanding that permits history to arise where immediate understanding may not. Caruth explores the ways in which...

Undefeated

John Jiloty, photographs by James T. Van Rensselaer
Lacrosse legend Bob Scott describes Johns Hopkins's 2005 men's lacrosse season as "the greatest in the university's history." The last time the Blue Jays claimed the NCAA lacrosse championship, in 1987, Head Coach David Pietramala was on the field as a sophomore defenseman. In Undefeated, photographer James T. Van Rensselaer and writer John Jiloty of Inside Lacrosse magazine tell the exciting story of the Blue Jays' perfect season and...

Understanding Academic Freedom

Henry Reichman
Academic freedom is once again at the epicenter of the crisis in higher education. A community college instructor in Iowa is pressured to resign after his pro-antifa social media comments garner vicious harassment that administrators find threatening to campus safety. A tenured biology professor at a college on Long Island is threatened with dismissal because she allegedly grades students too strictly. And in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, a conservative activist calls on his followers to take...

Understanding Cancer, second edition

C. Norman Coleman, M.D., foreword by Edward C. Halperin
The greatest need of anyone with cancer is to understand the disease—its diagnosis, treatment options, and the often devastating experience of having cancer. In Understanding Cancer, Dr. C. Norman Coleman explains how to gather information about treatments and how to interpret that information to make decisions. He helps the person with cancer prepare for visits to doctors and the hospital and to make those...

Understanding and Managing Your Child's Food Allergies

Scott H. Sicherer, M.D.
For children with food allergies, eating—one of the basic functions of life—can be a nightmare. Children who suffer or become dangerously ill after eating peanuts, seafood, milk, eggs, wheat, or a host of other foods require constant vigilance from caring, concerned parents, teachers, and friends. In this empathetic and comprehensive guide, Dr. Scott H. Sicherer, a specialist in pediatric food allergies, gives parents the information they need to manage their...

Unequal Cities

edited by Maureen R. Benjamins, Fernando G. De Maio, foreword by Julie Morita
The elimination of racial and ethnic inequities—differences that are avoidable, unnecessary, and unfair—has been one of the overarching health-related goals of the United States for decades. Yet dramatic differences in health outcomes between Black people and white people persist, rooted in structural and social determinants of health. Nationally, a Black baby can expect to live four years...

The Universities of the Italian Renaissance

Paul F. Grendler
Italian Renaissance universities were Europe's intellectual leaders in humanistic studies, law, medicine, philosophy, and science. Employing some of the foremost scholars of the time—including Pietro Pomponazzi, Andreas Vesalius, and Galileo Galilei—the Italian Renaissance university was the prototype of today's research university. This is the first book in any language to offer a comprehensive study of this most influential institution. In this magisterial study, noted scholar Paul...

Unless the Threat of Death Is Behind Them

John T. Irwin
Early in the twentieth century a new character type emerged in the crime novels of American writers such as Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler: the "hard-boiled" detective, most famously exemplified by Sam Spade in The Maltese Falcon. Unlike the analytical detectives of nineteenth-century fiction, such as Edgar Allan Poe's Inspector Dupin, the new detectives encountered cases not as intricate logical puzzles but as stark challenges of manhood. In...

Unspeakable

Lynn Sacco
This history of father-daughter incest in the United States explains how cultural mores and political needs distorted attitudes toward and medical knowledge of patriarchal sexual abuse at a time when the nation was committed to the familial power of white fathers and the idealized white family. For much of the nineteenth century, father-daughter incest was understood to take place among all classes, and legal and extralegal attempts to deal with it tended to be swift and severe. But...

The Upper Country

Claiborne A. Skinner
The Upper Country melds myth and conventional history to provide a memorable tale of French designs in the middle of what became the United States. Putting the reader on the battlefields, at the trading posts, and on the rivers with voyageurs and their allies from the Indian nations, Claiborne Skinner reveals the saintly missionaries and jolly fur traders of popular myth as agents of a hard-nosed, often ruthless, imperial endeavor. Skinner's engaging narrative takes...

The Urban Caribbean

edited by Alejandro Portes, Carlos Dore-Cabral, Patricia Landolt
The Urban Caribbean studies urbanization in five countries—Costa Rica, Haiti, Guatemala, the Dominican Republic, and Jamaica—during the 1980s and 1990s when the region's economy shifted from one heavily dependent on imports to one directed more to producing exports. This shift caused producers and entrepreneurs to rely more on microenterprises, thus challenging the informal economy networks of the central cities. Sociologist...

Urban Carnivores

edited by Stanley D. Gehrt, Seth P. D. Riley, Brian L. Cypher
With over half of the world's human population now living in cities, human-carnivore interaction in urban areas is a growing area of concern and research for wildlife managers, conservationists, urban planners, and the public at large. This volume brings together leading international carnivore researchers to explore the unique biological and ecological issues associated with mammalian carnivores in urban landscapes. Carnivores in...

Useful Bodies

edited by Jordan Goodman, Anthony McElligott, Lara Marks
Though notoriously associated with Germany, human experimentation in the name of science has been practiced in other countries, as well, both before and after the Nazi era. The use of unwitting or unwilling subjects in experiments designed to test the effects of radiation and disease on the human body emerged at the turn of the twentieth century, when the rise of the modern, coercive state and the...