Titles

1608 Titles

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P.S. I Love You

Carlton Jackson
In 1953, the same year that Elvis Presley cut his first demo, Cash Box magazine named the Hilltoppers the top vocal group of the year. Hits such as "Trying" and "P.S. I Love You" raced up the charts and kept the group in Billboard's Top 40. The four fresh-faced singers appeared on The Toast of the Town with Ed Sullivan, who introduced them to the nation. On weekends the Hilltoppers performed in cities across the country, but on Monday mornings they were better known as Western...

The PKU Paradox

Diane B. Paul and Jeffrey P. Brosco
How did a disease of marginal public health significance acquire paradigmatic status in public health and genetics?   In a lifetime of practice, most physicians will never encounter a single case of PKU. Yet every physician in the industrialized world learns about the disease in medical school and, since the early 1960s, the newborn heel stick test for PKU has been mandatory in many countries. Diane B. Paul and Jeffrey P. Brosco’s beautifully written book explains...

PTSD

Allan V. Horwitz
A comprehensive history of PTSD. Post-traumatic stress disorder—and its predecessor diagnoses, including soldier’s heart, railroad spine, and shell shock—was recognized as a psychiatric disorder in the latter part of the nineteenth century. The psychic impacts of train crashes, wars, and sexual shocks among children first drew psychiatric attention. Later, enormous numbers of soldiers suffering from battlefield traumas returned from the world wars. It was not until the 1980s that PTSD became a formal diagnosis, in...

PTSD and the Politics of Trauma in Israel

Keren Friedman-Peleg
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, or PTSD, has long been defined as a mental trauma that solely affects the individual. However, against the backdrop of contemporary Israel, what role do families, health experts, donors, and the national community at large play in interpreting and responding to this individualized trauma? In PTSD and the Politics of Trauma in Israel, Keren Friedman-Peleg sheds light on a new way of speaking about mental vulnerability and...

Pacific

Philip J. Hatfield
If you center a globe on Kiritimati (Christmas Island), all you see around it is a vast expanse of ocean. Islands of various sizes float in view while glimpses of continents encroach on the fringes, but this is a view dominated by water. The immense stretch of the Pacific Ocean is inhabited by a diverse array of peoples and cultures bound by a common thread: their relationship with the sea. In this volume, the rich history of the Pacific is explored through specific objects, each one beautifully...

The Pacific Muse

Patty O’Brien
The Pacific Muse offers a fresh perspective on a seductively familiar topic: the colonial stereotype of the exotic Pacific island woman. By tracing the evolution of female primitivism from Western antiquity to twentieth-century Hollywood images, the book sheds new light on our understanding of how and why this ideal has persisted and the major role it has played in the colonization of Pacific peoples. While examining colonial culture in its many manifestations, from art,...

Pacific Northwest Insects

Merrill A. Peterson
This field guide sets a new standard for insect identification, making it an indispensable resource to naturalists, educators, gardeners, and others. Engaging and accessible, Pacific Northwest Insects features detailed species accounts, each with a vivid photograph of a living adult, along with information for distinguishing similar species, allowing the reader to identify more than 3,000 species found from southern British Columbia to northern California, and as far east as Montana. The book features...

Pacific Rim Modernisms

edited by Mary Ann Gillies, Helen Sword, Steven Yao
The Pacific Rim is a geographical region made up of all areas bordered by the Pacific Ocean, its span reaching countries as diverse as the Canada, Korea, China, Mexico, and Australia. Tracing vectors of appropriation, migration, and exchange, Pacific Rim Modernisms explores the complex ways that writers, artists, and intellectuals of the Pacific Rim have contributed to modernist culture, literature, and identity. Appropriately, given their wide geographical and temporal...

Pacific Voices

Miriam Kahn, Erin Younger
The groundbreaking "Pacific Voices" exhibit grew out of a five-year collaborative process that brought together members of Washington State's diverse Asian, Pacific Islander, and Native American communities. The exhibition became a vehicle for the expression of a variety of voices exploring sources of cultural identity: objects, rituals, ceremonies, and traditions that both anchor and showcase the ways of life of Pacific Rim communities. Each of the seventeen chapters highlights a...

Pacific Walkers

Nance Van Winckel
Nance Van Winckel's wry, provocative slant on the world and her command of images and ideas enliven these stunning poems. Presented in two parts, Pacific Walkers first gives imagined voice to anonymous dead individuals, entries in the John Doe network of the Spokane County Medical Examiner's Records. The focus then shifts to named but now-forgotten individuals in a discarded early-1900s photo album purchased in a secondhand store. We encounter figures devoid of history but enduring among us as lockered remains,...

Pacifists in Chains

Duane C. S. Stoltzfus
Documents the disturbing history of four pacifists imprisoned for their refusal to serve during World War I. To Hutterites and members of other pacifist sects, serving the military in any way goes against the biblical commandment "thou shalt not kill" and Jesus’s admonition to turn the other cheek when confronted with violence. Pacifists in Chains tells the story of four young men—Joseph Hofer, Michael Hofer, David Hofer, and Jacob Wipf—who followed...

Paddle Maryland

Bryan MacKay
Explore the natural beauty of Maryland by water. With the Chesapeake Bay—the largest estuary in the United States—the Potomac, Monocacy, and Patapsco Rivers, and countless streams, creeks, swamps, and marshes, Maryland is an ideal locale for people to take to the water and enjoy the natural beauty of the Free State. In Paddle Maryland, lifelong Marylander and devoted paddler Bryan MacKay presents twenty-two of his favorite canoe and kayak trips. From lazy floats down the...

Pagan Babies

John Denny Ashley, Robert Z. Morgan, and Pagan Babies
A vital moment in Kentucky's queer history captured in sumptuous visuals—half a century in the making. The conceptual lovechild of photographer John Denny Ashley and artist Robert Morgan, Pagan Babies has at long last emerged as a vibrant witness to a particular moment in American history, a time when sexual revolution and gay liberation manifested even in small Southern towns like Lexington, Kentucky. Pagan Babies, the name adopted by Morgan and his band of guerrilla-style street...

Pagan Rome and the Early Christians

Stephen Benko
As perceived by the average Roman citizen, the early rites and behavior of Christians laid them open to charges of cannibalism, immorality, and the practice of magic and conspiring and fomenting rebellion aganst the state. The early church fathers rejected these accusations and portrayed pagans as victims of misinformation or perpetrators of ill will. Benko proposes to give the pagans the benefit of the doubt and analyzes their charges against Christianity under the premise that they may have...

Pagans and Christians in the Late Roman Empire

edited by Marianne Sághy, Edward M. Schoolman
Do the terms 'pagan' and 'Christian,' 'transition from paganism to Christianity' still hold as explanatory devices to apply to the political, religious and cultural transformation experienced Empire-wise? Revisiting 'pagans' and 'Christians' in Late Antiquity has been a fertile site of scholarship in recent years: the paradigm shift in the interpretation of the relations between 'pagans' and...

Page to Page

edited by Colleen J. McElroy, introduction by Brenda Peterson
This spirited and delectable collection of sixteen retrospectives from The Seattle Review, a renowned journal featuring literary luminaries of the Northwest, offers a timeless resource for writers, cultural historians, and bibliophiles everywhere. It includes interviews with some of America's greatest writers as well short literary works and an assortment of their personal photographs spanning several decades of their lives.

Pages from a Black Radical's Notebook

James Boggs, edited by Stephen M. Ward, afterword by Grace Lee Boggs
Born in the rural American south, James Boggs lived nearly his entire adult life in Detroit and worked as a factory worker for twenty-eight years while immersing himself in the political struggles of the industrial urban north. During and after the years he spent in the auto industry, Boggs wrote two books, co-authored two others, and penned dozens of essays, pamphlets, reviews, manifestos, and newspaper columns to...

Pain

Keith Wailoo
Pain touches sensitive nerves in American liberalism, conservatism, and political life. In this history of American political culture, Keith Wailoo examines how pain has defined the line between liberals and conservatives from just after World War II to the present. From disabling pain to end-of-life pain to fetal pain, the battle over whose pain is real and who deserves relief has created stark ideological divisions at the bedside, in politics, and in the courts. Beginning with the return of soldiers after World...

Painful Beauty

Megan A. Smetzer, hD
For over 150 years, Tlingit women artists have beaded colorful, intricately beautiful designs on moccasins, dolls, octopus bags, tunics, and other garments. Painful Beauty suggests that at a time when Indigenous cultural practices were actively being repressed, beading supported cultural continuity, demonstrating Tlingit women's resilience, strength, and power. Beadwork served many uses, from the ceremonial to the economic, as women created beaded pieces for...

Painted Faces on the Prairies

Helen Kwan Yee Cheung
This exhibition catalogue traces more than one hundred years of Cantonese opera in Edmonton within the changing dynamics of the Chinese community. It tells a story of life experiences on the Prairies by highlighting the inextricable relationship between Cantonese opera and the Edmonton Chinese community as this cultural practice moves deftly through historical periods between 1890 and 2009. This period has been selected to coincide with the...