Titles

870 Titles

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John Cage
Mainly mesostics inspired by music, mushrooms, Marcel Duchamp, Merce Cunningham, Marshall McCluhan, etc. and includes "Mureau"-composed from the writings of Henry David Thoreau.

MASH

Otto F. Apel, M.D., Pat Apel
When North Korean forces invaded South Korea on June 25, 1950, Otto Apel was a surgical resident living in Cleveland, Ohio, with his wife and three young children. A year later he was chief surgeon of the 8076th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital constantly near the front lines in Korea. Immediately upon arriving in camp, Apel performed 80 hours of surgery. His feet swelled so badly that he had to cut his boots off, and he saw more surgical cases in those three and a half days than he would have in...

MLA Guide to Digital Literacy

Ellen C. Carillo
Students face challenges assessing, responding to, and producing information in today's fast-paced, complex digital landscape. This guide helps students understand why digital literacy is a critically important skill: their education, future careers, and participation in democratic processes rely on it. Hands-on, structured activities give students strategies for evaluating the credibility of sources, detecting fake news, understanding bias, and more. Readings and writing prompts support specific...

MLA Guide to Undergraduate Research in Literature

Elizabeth Brookbank, Faye Christenberry
What makes a good research topic in a literature class? What does your professor mean by "peer-reviewed" sources? What should you do if you can't find enough material? This approachable guide walks students through the process of research in literary studies, providing them with tools for responding successfully to course assignments. Written by two experienced librarians, the guide introduces the resources available through college and university...

MLA Handbook (OFFICIAL), ninth edition

The Modern Language Association of America
Relied on by generations of writers, the MLA Handbook is published by the Modern Language Association and is the only official, authorized book on MLA style. The new, ninth edition builds on the MLA's unique approach to documenting sources using a template of core elements—facts, common to most sources, like author, title, and publication date—that allows writers to cite any type of work, from books, e-books, and journal articles in databases to song lyrics, online images, social...

MOOCs, High Technology, and Higher Learning

Robert A. Rhoads
The first book to explore the rise of MOOCs through a social science lens. In MOOCs, High Technology, and Higher Learning, Robert A. Rhoads places the OpenCourseWare (OCW) movement into the larger context of a revolution in educational technology. In doing so, he seeks to bring greater balance to increasingly polarized discussions of massively open online courses (MOOCs) and show their ongoing relevance to reforming higher education and higher learning. Rhoads offers a provocative...

MUSICAGE

John Cage, Joan Retallack
The entire range of John Cage's work and thought, explored in three wide-ranging dialogues, which constitute his last unified statement on his art. "I was obliged to find a radical way to work — to get at the real, at the root of the matter," John Cage says in this trio of dialogues, completed just days before his death. His quest for the root of the matter led him beyond the bounds of the conventional in all his musical, written, and visual pieces. The resulting expansion of the...

The Ma & Pa, Second Edition, Revised

George W. Hilton
Affectionately known as the "Ma & Pa," the Maryland and Pennsylvania Railroad was one of the country's longest running and best known "archaic" railroads, holding on to steam locomotion and other outmoded technologies well into the twentieth century. Connecting Baltimore and York, the line had everything needed to endear itself to local residents and rail enthusiasts: picturesque equipment, marvelous scenery, antique passenger trains, handsome small-scale locomotives, and...

Machiavelli in Love

Guido Ruggiero
Machiavelli in Love introduces a complex concept of sex and sexual identity and their roles in the culture and politics of the Italian Renaissance. Guido Ruggiero's study counters the consensus among historians and literary critics that there was little sense of individual identity and almost no sense of sexual identity before the modern period. Drawing from the works of major literary figures such as Boccaccio, Aretino, and Castiglione, and rereading them...

The Machine in America, second edition

Carroll Pursell
2008 Outstanding Academic Title, Choice Magazine From the medieval farm implements used by the first colonists to the invisible links of the Internet, the history of technology in America is a history of society as well. Arguing that "the tools and processes we use are a part of our lives, not simply instruments of our purpose," historian Carroll Pursell analyzes technology's impact on the lives of women and men, on their work, politics, and social relationships—and how, in turn,...

Machines in Our Hearts

Kirk Jeffrey
Today hundreds of thousands of Americans carry pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) within their bodies. These battery-powered machines—small computers, in fact—deliver electricity to the heart to correct dangerous disorders of the heartbeat. But few doctors, patients, or scholars know the history of these devices or how "heart-rhythm management" evolved into a multi-billion-dollar manufacturing and...

Macroeconomic Policies and the Development of Markets in Transition Economies

Fabrizio Coricelli
Presenting the first integrated view of transition based on a unified analytical framework, this book evaluates the experience of several transition economies. Fabrizio Coricelli's view of transition emphasizes the connection between peculiar initial conditions and the effects of market reforms. Taking the starting point of underdeveloped markets and market institutions, he evaluates macroeconomic policies in relation to their impact on...

Mad Blood Stirring

Edward Muir
Nobles were slaughtered and their castles looted or destroyed, bodies were dismembered and corpses fed to animals—the Udine carnival massacre of 1511 was the most extensive and damaging popular revolt in Renaissance Italy (and the basis for the story of Romeo and Juliet). Mad Blood Stirring is a gripping account and analysis of this event, as well as the social structures and historical conflicts preceding it and the subtle shifts in the mentality of revenge...

Mad Dogs and Other New Yorkers

Jessica Wang
Rabies enjoys a fearsome and lurid reputation. Throughout the decades of spiraling growth that defined New York City from the 1840s to the 1910s, the bone-chilling cry of "Mad dog!" possessed the power to upend the ordinary routines and rhythms of urban life. In Mad Dogs and Other New Yorkers, Jessica Wang examines the history of this rare but dreaded affliction during a time of rapid urbanization. Focusing on a transformative...

Mad-Doctors in the Dock

Joel Peter Eigen
A captivating history of the defense of the insanity plea in England. Shortly before she pushed her infant daughter headfirst into a bucket of water and fastened the lid, Annie Cherry warmed the pail because, as she later explained to a police officer, "It would have been cruel to put her in cold water." Afterwards, this mother sat down and poured herself a cup of tea. At Cherry’s trial at the Old Bailey in 1877, Henry Charlton Bastian, physician to the National Hospital...

Madam Belle

Maryjean Wall
Belle Brezing made a major career move when she stepped off the streets of Lexington, Kentucky, and into Jennie Hill's bawdy house—an upscale brothel run out of a former residence of Mary Todd Lincoln. At nineteen, Brezing was already infamous as a youth steeped in death, sex, drugs, and scandal. But it was in Miss Hill's "respectable" establishment that she began to acquire the skills, manners, and business contacts that allowed her to ascend to power and influence as an...

Madam Chief Justice

edited by W. Lewis Burke Jr., Joan P. Assey, foreword by Sandra Day O’connor, introduction by Ruth Bader Ginsburg
In Madam Chief Justice, editors W. Lewis Burke Jr. and Joan P. Assey chronicle the remarkable career of Jean Hoefer Toal, South Carolina's first female Supreme Court Chief Justice. As a lawyer, legislator, and judge, Toal is one of the most accomplished women in South Carolina history. In this volume, contributors, including two United States Supreme Court Justices, federal and...

Made to Last

Lawrence Kreisman
Despite the relative youth of the Pacific Northwest, its buildings and historic sites are reminders of a rich and colorful heritage. Made to Last describes exemplary preservation programs in Seattle and King County, how they developed, and the process and the extent of protection offered landmark properties. Descriptions and photographs provide a guide to individual buildings and landmark districts, demonstrating how each played a part in the remarkably swift...

Made to Play House

Miriam Formanek-Brunell
In Made to Play House, Miriam Formanek-Brunell traces the history of nineteenth- and twentieth-century dolls and explores the origins of the American toy industry's remarkably successful efforts to promote self fulfillment through maternity and materialism. She tells the fascinating story of how inventors, producers, entrepreneurs—many of whom were women—and little girls themselves created dolls which expressed various notions of female...

Madeline McDowell Breckinridge and the Battle for a New South

Melba Porter Hay, foreword by Marjorie J. Spruill
Preeminent Kentucky reformer and women's rights advocate Madeline McDowell Breckinridge (1872–1920) was at the forefront of social change during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. A descendant of Henry Clay and the daughter of two of Kentucky's most prominent families, Breckinridge had a remarkably varied activist career that included roles in the promotion of public health, education, women's rights, and...