Titles

36 Titles

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Labor and Industrial Relations

Matthew A. Kelly
Comprehensive and current, Labor and Industrial Relations is an essential three-part reference and source book for students, teachers, and practitioners of labor-management relations. Drawing from both classroom and bargaining-table experience, Matthew A. Kelly provides a detailed glossary of collective bargaining and labor-related terms, a chronological compendium of labor legislation, and concise summaries of major court decisions and...

Lacrosse, second edition

David G. Pietramala, Neil A. Grauer
For thirty years Bob Scott's Lacrosse has been the ultimate guide to the "fastest game on two feet," explaining the men's game at its highest level and promoting the Johns Hopkins philosophy, which has become synonymous with lacrosse excellence. In this long-awaited updated edition, Coach Dave Pietramala, whose Blue Jays won the 2007 and 2005 NCAA men's lacrosse championships, and Neil Grauer, a Hopkins graduate and veteran writer...

Lady Rachel Russell

Lois G. Schwoerer
Originally published in 1987. Lady Rachel Russell (1637–1723) was regarded as "one of the best women" by many of the most powerful people of her time. Wife of Lord William Russell, the prominent Whig opponent of King Charles II who was executed for treason in 1683, Lady Russell emerged as a political figure in her own right during the Glorious Revolution and throughout her forty-year widowhood. Award-winning historian Lois G. Schwoerer has written a biography that illuminates both...

Landfall along the Chesapeake

Susan Schmidt
In 2002, Susan Schmidt retraced John Smith's 1608 voyage on the Chesapeake Bay. In Landfall along the Chesapeake, a cruising guide for Chesapeake boaters and a field log for naturalists, Schmidt compares the beauty of ancestral legacy and childhood memory to her observations on a 100-day voyage in a 22-foot boat. As she circles the Bay counterclockwise from Jamestown, she explores Smith's encounters with Native Americans and the Bay's ecological changes over the...

Late Roman Spain and Its Cities

Michael Kulikowski
The history of Spain in late antiquity offers important insights into the dissolution of the western Roman empire and the emergence of medieval Europe. Nonetheless, scholarship on Spain in this period has lagged behind that on other Roman provinces. Michael Kulikowski draws on the most recent archeological and literary evidence to integrate late antique Spain into the broader history of the Roman empire, providing a definitive narrative and analytical account of the Iberian peninsula from A.D.

The Latin Eclogues

Giovanni Boccaccio, translated by David R. Slavitt
Giovanni Boccaccio is famous for his masterpiece The Decameron, but his Latin Eclogues are relatively unknown. David R. Slavitt's English translation makes these important pieces accessible to a new audience of readers. Elegant and engaging, these pastoral poems address the great issues of Boccaccio's Italy, including the political and military intrigues of the day. Boccaccio modeled his poems on Petrarch's eclogues and, before him, those of Virgil and Theocritus. Slavitt's...

Latinos and the New Immigrant Church

David A. Badillo
Latin Americans make up the largest new immigrant population in the United States, and Latino Catholics are the fastest-growing sector of the Catholic Church in America. In this book, historian David A. Badillo offers a history of Latino Catholicism in the United States by looking at its growth in San Antonio, Chicago, New York, and Miami. Focusing on twentieth-century Latino urbanism, Badillo contrasts broad historic commonalities of Catholic religious tradition with variations of Latino...

Law and People in Colonial America, second edition

Peter Charles Hoffer
How did American colonists transform British law into their own? What were the colonies' first legal institutions, and who served in them? And why did the early Americans develop a passion for litigation that continues to this day? In Law and People in Colonial America, Peter Charles Hoffer tells the story of early American law from its beginnings on the British mainland to its maturation during the crisis of the American Revolution. For the men and women of colonial America, Hoffer...

The Lazarus Case

John D. Lantos, M.D.
In this new, startlingly original book, John D. Lantos weaves a compelling story that captures the dilemmas of modern medical practice. The Lazarus Case: Life-and-Death Issues in Neonatal Intensive Care begins with a fictional malpractice case—an amalgam of typical cases in which Lantos appeared as an expert witness—and uses it as the framework for addressing the ethical issues surrounding neonatal intensive care. Lantos draws on his experience in neonatal medicine,...

Lazy, Crazy, and Disgusting

Alexandra Brewis, Amber Wutich
Stigma is a dehumanizing process, where shaming and blaming are embedded in our beliefs about who does and does not have value within society. In Lazy, Crazy, and Disgusting, medical anthropologists Alexandra Brewis and Amber Wutich explore a darker side of public health: that well-intentioned public health campaigns can create new and damaging stigma, even when they are otherwise successful. Brewis and Wutich present a novel, synthetic...

A Leadership Guide for Women in Higher Education

Marjorie Hass
For years, Marjorie Hass, now the president of Rhodes College, was approached by women in higher education looking for advice and support as they took on leadership roles and navigated challenging career paths. Eventually, she began offering online seminars so she could meet in small groups to answer questions and encourage women to develop mutually supportive relationships. In A Leadership Guide for Women in Higher Education, Hass draws on her sixteen years of senior leadership...

Leading the Way

Neil A. Grauer
The first comprehensive history of Hopkins Medicine in more than twenty years, Leading the Way not only recounts the exceptional achievements of Hopkins physicians, researchers, teachers, and students since 1889 but chronicles the extraordinary expansion and accomplishments of Hopkins Medicine over the past two decades. Within the last twenty years, dozens of multidisciplinary research institutes and centers have been created to expand the frontiers of research in such...

Learned Hand's Court

Marvin Schick
Originally published in 1970. This is a study of one of the most highly respected tribunals in the history of the English-speaking world—the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. Situated in Manhattan, the Second Circuit Court, serving New York, Connecticut, and Vermont, is the most important commercial court in the country. But, like other inferior courts, it has never been studied in depth. Marvin Schick provides a comprehensive analysis. From 1941 to 1951, Learned Hand presided over the Second...

Learning Innovation and the Future of Higher Education

Joshua Kim
A quiet revolution is sweeping across US colleges and universities. As schools rethink how students learn - both inside and outside the classroom - technology is changing not only what should be taught but how best to teach it. From active learning and inclusive pedagogy to online and hybrid courses, traditional institutions are leveraging their fundamental strengths while challenging long-standing assumptions about how teaching and learning happen. At this intersection...

Learning to Smell

Donald A. Wilson, Richard J. Stevenson
Written by a neurobiologist and a psychologist, this volume presents a new theory of olfactory perception. Drawing on research in neuroscience, physiology, and ethology, Donald A. Wilson and Richard J. Stevenson address the fundamental question of how we navigate through a world of chemical encounters and provide a compelling alternative to the "reception-centric" view of olfaction. The major research challenge in olfaction is...

Legal Borderlands

edited by Mary L. Dudziak, Leti Volpp
This collection focuses broadly on the role of law in the construction of U.S. borders and takes up an important question raised by the global turn in American studies scholarship: once territory becomes less critical to scholarship in the discipline, what constitutes the frame of American studies? For this project, a "border" is not simply a territorial boundary. Borders are created through formal legal controls on entry and exit, through the...

Legal Philosophy from Plato to Hegel

Huntington Cairns
Originally published in 1949. Huntington Cairns identifies the views that major Western philosophers took on law, the problems they considered significant about law, and the nature of the solutions they proposed. This book develops ideas discussed in Cairns' Law and the Social Sciences (1935) and Theory of Legal Science (1941). The object of these three volumes is the same: to construct the foundation of a theory of law that is the necessary antecedent to a possible jurisprudence. The...

Leo Strauss

Thomas L. Pangle
Leo Strauss's controversial writings have long exercised a profound subterranean cultural influence. Now their impact is emerging into broad daylight, where they have been met with a flurry of poorly informed, often wildly speculative, and sometimes rather paranoid pronouncements. This book, written as a corrective, is the first accurate, non-polemical, comprehensive guide to Strauss's mature political philosophy and its intellectual influence. Thomas L. Pangle...

Lessons amid the Rubble

Sarah K. A. Pfatteicher
The aftermath of September 11, 2001, brought the subject of engineering-failure forensics to public attention as had no previous catastrophe. In keeping with the engineering profession's long tradition of building a positive future out of disasters, Lessons amid the Rubble uses the collapse of the World Trade Center towers to explore the nature and future of engineering education in the United States. Sarah K. A. Pfatteicher draws on...

Liaisons dangereuses

Mary Lindemann
Liaisons dangereuses examines the local and international repercussions of a notorious episode in eighteenth-century Hamburg. Historian Mary Lindemann recounts the mysterious circumstances surrounding the violent death of a counterfeit Milanese count, Joseph Visconti, at the hands of an erstwhile Prussian lieutenant, the Baron von Kesslitz. Reconstructing the drama from the perspectives of four principal players—the count, the baron, an...