Titles

162 Titles

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LGBTQ Health Research

edited by Ron Stall, Brian Dodge, José A. Bauermeister, Tonia Poteat, Chris Beyrer, MD, MPH
Over the last 30 years, the health needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer Americans have become increasingly recognized, in particular for the ways in which they are distinct from those typically assessed and addressed in society. Universities and researchers are paying greater attention to LGBTQ public health issues and how they might adapt existing methods to research marginalized...

LISREL Issues, Debates and Strategies

Leslie A. Hayduk
LISREL: Issues, Debates, and Strategies examines issues of concern to researchers already familiar with the basics of structural equation modeling. Building on his earlier work in Structural Equation Modeling in LISREL, Leslie Hayduk explains procedures that maximize researchers' control over the meanings of their concepts and integrates the modeling of single and multiple indicators. The constraints and deceptions of the factor model are used to highlight measurement issues and the debate...

Labor and Industrial Relations

Matthew A. Kelly
Comprehensive and current, Labor and Industrial Relations is an essential three-part reference and source book for students, teachers, and practitioners of labor-management relations. Drawing from both classroom and bargaining-table experience, Matthew A. Kelly provides a detailed glossary of collective bargaining and labor-related terms, a chronological compendium of labor legislation, and concise summaries of major court decisions and...

Laboratory Disease

Christoph Gradmann, translated by Elborg Forster
In the nineteenth century, the new field of medical bacteriology identified microorganisms and explained how they spread disease. This book interweaves the history of this discipline and the biography of one of its founders, Nobel Prize–winning German physician Robert Koch (1843–1910). Koch contributed to modern medicine by inventing or improving fundamental techniques such as bacterial staining, solid culture media, mass pure cultures, and...

Lacrosse, second edition

David G. Pietramala, Neil A. Grauer
For thirty years Bob Scott's Lacrosse has been the ultimate guide to the "fastest game on two feet," explaining the men's game at its highest level and promoting the Johns Hopkins philosophy, which has become synonymous with lacrosse excellence. In this long-awaited updated edition, Coach Dave Pietramala, whose Blue Jays won the 2007 and 2005 NCAA men's lacrosse championships, and Neil Grauer, a Hopkins graduate and veteran writer...

Lacrosse

Donald M. Fisher
North America's Indian peoples have always viewed competitive sport as something more than a pastime. The northeastern Indians' ball-and-stick game that would become lacrosse served both symbolic and practical functions—preparing young men for war, providing an arena for tribes to strengthen alliances or settle disputes, and reinforcing religious beliefs and cultural cohesion. Today a multimillion-dollar industry, lacrosse is played by colleges and high schools, amateur clubs, and two professional...

Lacrosse Legends of the First Americans

Thomas Vennum
An ancient Native American sport, lacrosse was originally played to resolve conflicts, heal the sick, and develop strong, virile men. In Lacrosse Legends of the First Americans, Thomas Vennum draws on centuries of oral tradition to collect thirteen legends from five tribes—the Cherokee, Ho-Chunk (Winnebago), Seneca, Ojibwa, and Menominee. Reflecting the game's origins and early history, these myths provide a glimpse into Native American life and the role of the "Creator's Game" in tribal...

Lady Rachel Russell

Lois G. Schwoerer
Originally published in 1987. Lady Rachel Russell (1637–1723) was regarded as "one of the best women" by many of the most powerful people of her time. Wife of Lord William Russell, the prominent Whig opponent of King Charles II who was executed for treason in 1683, Lady Russell emerged as a political figure in her own right during the Glorious Revolution and throughout her forty-year widowhood. Award-winning historian Lois G. Schwoerer has written a biography that illuminates both...

Lagomorphs

edited by Andrew T. Smith, Charlotte H. Johnston, Paulo C. Alves, Klaus Hackländer
Numbering 92 species worldwide, members of the order Lagomorpha are familiar to people throughout the world, and yet their remarkable diversity and ecological importance are often underappreciated. In this book, Andrew T. Smith and his colleagues bring together the world's lagomorph experts to produce the most comprehensive reference on the order ever published, featuring detailed species accounts, stunning color...

Lake Hydrology

William LeRoy Evans III
With fresh water becoming a critical issue around the world, lake mass balance—the hydrology or water movement in lakes—is increasingly important to environmental studies and remediation projects. Unfortunately, lake hydrology is often only briefly covered in broader texts on hydrogeology and hydrology or is confined to specialized research papers. Lake Hydrology rigorously describes the hydrology of flow into and out of lake systems. Explaining the physical parameters...

A Land Between

Rebecca Fish Ewan
"Owens Valley is a land between, a place tucked behind high mountains, arid yet soaked in water history, draped in desert vegetation yet remembered for its verdant farms, sparsely dotted with towns—some no more than dreams on a map. It exists between stories, between vitality and decline, between granite mountains."—from the Introduction A unique landscape history, A Land Between explores the central idea of how people's preconceptions and perceptions of a place—in this case, Owens...

Land and Labor in the Greek World

Alison Burford Cooper
What value did the Greeks put on farming beyond its capacity to produce food? Who owned the land, and who worked it? Alison Burford examines the Greeks' preoccupation with land and agriculture to understand the nature of their society and culture in general. She focuses on how the need to make the land productive influenced social, economic, and cultural beliefs and practices throughout Greek society. Specific areas of study include land allotment in the early settlements, the function of...

Land and Liberty

Christopher William England
In 1912, Sun Yat-sen announced the birth of the Chinese Republic and promised that it would be devoted to the economic welfare of all its people. In shaping his plans for wealth redistribution, he looked to an American now largely forgotten in the United States: Henry George. In Land and Liberty, Christopher William England excavates the lost history of one of America's most influential radicals and explains why so many activists were once inspired by...

Land-Grant Universities for the Future

Stephen M. Gavazzi, E. Gordon Gee, foreword by C. Peter Magrath
Land-grant colleges and universities occupy a special place in the landscape of American higher education. Publicly funded agricultural and technical educational institutions were first founded in the mid-nineteenth century with the Morrill Act, which established land grants to support these schools. They include such prominent names as Cornell, Maryland, Michigan State, MIT, Ohio State, Penn State,...

Landscapes of the Sacred, expanded edition

Belden C. Lane
This substantially expanded edition of Belden C. Lane's Landscapes of the Sacred includes a new introductory chapter that offers three new interpretive models for understanding American sacred space. Lane maintains his approach of interspersing shorter and more personal pieces among full-length essays that explore how Native American, early French and Spanish, Puritan New England, and Catholic Worker traditions has each expressed the connection between...

The Language of the Self

Jacques Lacan, translated by Anthony Wilden
Jacques Lacan's commentaries on Freud had revolutionary implications not only for the analytic movement but also for contemporary philosophy and literary criticism. Lacan held that if the unconscious, as Freud described it, exists, it functions linguistically, rather than symbolically or instinctually. He refers to the unconscious as a language: "the discourse of the Other." In The Language of the Self Lacan offers a significant and...

Laocoon

Gotthold Ephraim Lessing, translated by Edward Allen McCormick
Originally published in 1766, the Laocoön has been called the first extended attempt in modern times to define the distinctive spheres of art and poetry; its author, Gotthold Ephraim Lessing, has been called the first modern esthetician. As Michael Fried writes in his foreword, it is Lessing who invented the modern concept of the artistic medium, and it is in the Laocoön, ultimately, that we find the source for modernist assumptions...

The Large Hadron Collider

Don Lincoln
Since 2008 scientists have conducted experiments in a hyperenergized, 17-mile supercollider beneath the border of France and Switzerland. The Large Hadron Collider (or what scientists call "the LHC") is one of the wonders of the modern world—a highly sophisticated scientific instrument designed to re-create in miniature the conditions of the universe as they existed in the microseconds following the big bang. Among many...

Last Call

Jack H. Hedblom, foreword by Paul R. McHugh, M.D.
"I knew about drunk, but did not know anything about living sober. I hadn't really been sober for fifteen years. It wasn't enough that I stopped drinking. I had to learn how to live." The journey from alcoholic insanity to sobriety—and the pivotal role of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) in navigating that transition—is the focus of Last Call. Using powerful first-person narratives like the one above (composites of many anonymous speakers), psychotherapist Jack H. Hedblom...

Last Operas and Plays

Gertrude Stein
In the more than seventy-five plats Gertrude Stein wrote between 1913 and 1946, she envisioned a new dramaturgy, beginning with her pictorial conception of a play as a landscape. She drew into her plays the daily flow of life around her—including the natural world—and turned cities, villages, parts of the dramatic structure, and even her own friends into characters. She made punctuation and typography part of her compositional style and chose words for their joyful impact as sound andwordplay. For Strin, the...