Titles

39 Titles

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Hamlet's Perfection

William Kerrigan
How does the rash yet serene Hamlet of Act 5 arise from the passive and grief-stricken Hamlet of Act 1? What path leads him from sickened thoughts of birth and incest to the certainty that thoughtfulness itself must be escaped through bold action? The roles of Senecan avenger and patient Christian may seem worlds apart, observes William Kerrigan, but Shakespeare fused them in a character that has fascinated the world for centuries. In this lively study, Kerrigan celebrates both Hamlet's perfectionthe...

Happy Days

H. L. Mencken
With a style that combined biting sarcasm with the "language of the free lunch counter," Henry Louis Mencken shook politics and politicians for nearly half a century. Now, fifty years after Mencken's death, the Johns Hopkins University Press announces The Buncombe Collection, newly packaged editions of nine Mencken classics: Happy Days, Heathen Days, Newspaper Days, Prejudices, Treatise on the Gods, On Politics, Thirty-Five Years of Newspaper Work, Minority Report, and A Second Mencken...

Happy Pills in America

David Herzberg
Valium. Paxil. Prozac. Prescribed by the millions each year, these medications have been hailed as wonder drugs and vilified as numbing and addictive crutches. Where did this "blockbuster drug" phenomenon come from? What factors led to the mass acceptance of tranquilizers and antidepressants? And how has their widespread use affected American culture? David Herzberg addresses these questions by tracing the rise of psychiatric medicines, from Miltown in the 1950s to Valium in the 1970s...

Hart Crane's Poetry

John T. Irwin
In one of his letters Hart Crane wrote, "Appollinaire lived in Paris, I live in Cleveland, Ohio," comparing—misspelling and all—the great French poet's cosmopolitan roots to his own more modest ones in the midwestern United States. Rebelling against the notion that his work should relate to some European school of thought, Crane defiantly asserted his freedom to be himself, a true American writer. John T. Irwin, long a passionate and brilliant critic of...

Haunted English

Laura O'Connor
Haunted English explores the role of language in colonization and decolonization by examining how Anglo-Celtic modernists W. B. Yeats, Hugh MacDiarmid, and Marianne Moore "de-Anglicize" their literary vernaculars. Laura O'Connor demonstrates how the poets' struggles with and through the colonial tongue are discernible in their signature styles, using aspects of those styles to theorize the dynamics of linguistic imperialism—as both a distinct process and...

Healing Heartburn

Lawrence J. Cheskin, M.D., F.A.C.P., Brian E. Lacy, Ph.D., M.D.
Nearly everyone has experienced heartburn, the sensation of burning discomfort in the chest, often brought on by eating a large meal. In fact, heartburn is the most common gastroesophageal disorder in the United States—more than seven in ten adult Americans suffer from heartburn each month. Few people, however, realize that heartburn is really just one symptom of the disorder known as acid reflux disease or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a condition in which...

Health Care in World Cities

Michael K. Gusmano, Victor G. Rodwin, Daniel Weisz, M.D., M.P.A.
New York. London. Paris. Although these cities have similar sociodemographic characteristics, including income inequalities and ethnic diversity, they have vastly different health systems and services. This book compares the three and considers lessons that can be applied to current and future debates about urban health care. Highlighting the importance of a national policy for city health systems, the authors use...

Health Disparities in the United States, third edition

Donald A. Barr, MD, PhD
The health care system in the United States has been called the best in the world. Yet wide disparities persist between social groups, and many Americans suffer from poorer health than people in other developed countries. In this revised edition of Health Disparities in the United States, Donald A. Barr provides extensive new data about the ways low socioeconomic status, race, and ethnicity interact to...

Health Program Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation

edited by Lawrence W. Green, Andrea Carlson Gielen, Judith M. Ottoson, Darleen V. Peterson, Marshall W. Kreuter, foreword by Jonathan E. Fielding
For more than 40 years, the PRECEDE-PROCEED model, developed in the early 1970s by Lawrence W. Green and first published as a text in 1980 with Marshall W. Kreuter, Sigrid G. Deeds, and Kay B. Partridge, has been effectively applied worldwide to address a broad range of health...

Health and Healing in Eighteenth-Century Germany

Mary Lindemann
Although the physicians and surgeons of eighteenth-century Germany have attracted previous scholarly inquiry, little is known about their day-to-day activities—and even less about the ways in which those activities fit into the economic, political, and social structures of the time. In this groundbreaking work, Mary Lindemann brings together the scholarly traditions of the history of structures, mentalities, and everyday life to shed light on this complex relationship. Opening...

Heathen Days

H. L. Mencken
With a style that combined biting sarcasm with the "language of the free lunch counter," Henry Louis Mencken shook politics and politicians for nearly half a century. Now, fifty years after Mencken's death, the Johns Hopkins University Press announces The Buncombe Collection, newly packaged editions of nine Mencken classics: Happy Days, Heathen Days, Newspaper Days, Prejudices, Treatise on the Gods, On Politics, Thirty-Five Years of Newspaper Work, Minority Report, and A Second Mencken...

The Heisenberg Variations

John Bricuth
John Briuth treats the world with extraordinary wit and subtle humar-rare enough qualities in much twentieth-century poetry. Bricuth writes with gusto on a variety of subjects, from the act of writing poetry to the lives of Glenn Miller and Laurel and Hardy. His rare command of verse forms and wide range of tone make his work a distinctive addition to contemporary American poetry.

Hell Before Their Very Eyes

John C. McManus
On April 4, 1945, United States Army units from the 89th Infantry Division and the 4th Armored Division seized Ohrdruf, the first of many Nazi concentration camps to be liberated in Germany. In the weeks that followed, as more camps were discovered, thousands of soldiers came face to face with the monstrous reality of Hitler's Germany. These men discovered the very depths of human-imposed cruelty and depravity: railroad cars...

Helping the Good Shepherd

Susan E. Myers-Shirk
This history of Protestant pastoral counseling in America examines the role of pastoral counselors in the construction and articulation of a liberal moral sensibility. Analyzing the relationship between religion and science in the twentieth century, Susan E. Myers-Shirk locates this sensibility in the counselors' intellectual engagement with the psychological sciences. Informed by the principles of psychology and psychoanalysis,...

Heterocosmica

Lubomír Doležel
"The universe of possible worlds is constantly expanding and diversifying thanks to the incessant world-constructing activity of human minds and hands. Literary fiction is probably the most active experimental laboratory of the world-constructing enterprise."—from the author's Preface The standard contrast between fiction and reality, notes Lubomír Dolezel, obscures an array of problems that have beset philosophers and literary critics for centuries. Commentators usually admit that fiction...

Higher Education for Women in Postwar America, 1945–1965

Linda Eisenmann
This history explores the nature of postwar advocacy for women's higher education, acknowledging its unique relationship to the expectations of the era and recognizing its particular type of adaptive activism. Linda Eisenmann illuminates the impact of this advocacy in the postwar era, identifying a link between women's activism during World War II and the women's movement of the late 1960s. Though the postwar period has been portrayed as an era of domestic retreat...

Hippocrates in a World of Pagans and Christians

Owsei Temkin
In Hippocrates in a World of Pagans and Christians, Temkin shows how the perennial appeal of Hippocratic practice helped establish the relationship between scientific medicine and monotheistic religion. After the first century, Hippocratic medicine competed with powerful beliefs in religious healers from Asclepius to Jesus. Yet the ascendance of Christianity, Temkin explains, did not diminish the stature of Hippocratic science. Hippocrates, after all, saw nature as a divine and...

A History of American Higher Education, third edition

John R. Thelin
Colleges and universities are among the most cherished—and controversial—institutions in the United States. In this updated edition of A History of American Higher Education, John R. Thelin offers welcome perspective on the triumphs and crises of this highly influential sector in American life. Exploring American higher education from its founding in the seventeenth century to its struggle to innovate and adapt in the first decades of the twenty-first century, Thelin demonstrates that the...

A History of Global Health

Randall M. Packard
Over the past century, hundreds of billions of dollars have been invested in programs aimed at improving health on a global scale. Given the enormous scale and complexity of these lifesaving operations, why do millions of people in low-income countries continue to live without access to basic health services, sanitation, or clean water? And why are deadly diseases like Ebola able to spread so quickly among populations? In A History of Global Health,...

History of My Life

Giacomo Chevalier de Seingalt Casanova, translated by Willard R. Trask
In volumes 1 and 2, Casanova tells the story of his family, his first loves, and his early travels. With the death of his grandmother, he is sent to a seminary—but is soon expelled. He is briefly imprisoned in the fortress of Sant' Andrea. After wandering from Naples to Rome in search of a patron, he enters the service of Cardinal Acquaviva. Because every previous edition of Casanova's Memoirs had been abridged to suppress the author's political and religious...