Titles

28 Titles

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The Games Presidents Play

John Sayle Watterson
The Games Presidents Play provides a new way to view the American presidency. Looking at the athletic strengths, feats, and shortcomings of our presidents, John Sayle Watterson explores not only their health, physical attributes, personalities, and sports IQs, but also the increasing trend of Americans in the past century to equate sporting achievements with courage, manliness, and political competence. The author of College Football begins with George Washington, whose...

Gender and Justice

Eliza Earle Ferguson
Historian Eliza Earle Ferguson's meticulously researched study of domestic violence among the working class in France uncovers the intimate details of daily life and the complex workings of court proceedings in fin-de-siècle Paris. With detective-like methods, Ferguson pores through hundreds of court records to understand why so many perpetrators of violent crime were fully acquitted. She finds that court verdicts depended on community standards...

General Psychopathology

Karl Jaspers, translated by J. Hoenig, Marian W. Hamilton
In 1910, Karl Jaspers wrote a seminal essay on morbid jealousy in which he laid the foundation for the psychopathological phenomenology that through his work and the work of Hans Gruhle and Kurt Schneider, among others, would become the hallmark of the Heidelberg school of psychiatry. In General Psychopathology, his most important contribution to the Heidelberg school, Jaspers critiques the scientific aspirations of psychotherapy, arguing that in the realm of the...

Generic

Jeremy A. Greene
Generic drugs are now familiar objects in clinics, drugstores, and households around the world. We like to think of these tablets, capsules, patches, and ointments as interchangeable with their brand-name counterparts: why pay more for the same? And yet they are not quite the same. They differ in price, in place of origin, in color, shape, and size, in the dyes, binders, fillers, and coatings used, and in a host of other ways. Claims of generic equivalence, as physician-historian Jeremy...

Genetic Medicine

Barton Childs, M.D.
In Genetic Medicine: A Logic of Disease, Barton Childs demonstrates that knowledge of the ways both genes and environment contribute to disease provides a rational basis for medical thinking. This "genetic" medicine, he explains, should help the physician use the results of laboratory tests to perceive the uniqueness of the patient as well as that of the family and the cultural conditions in which the patient's condition arose. Childs thus provides a conceptual framework within which to teach...

Germany's Drive to the West (Drang Nach Westen)

Hans W. Gatzke
Originally published in 1950. Hans Gatzke analyzes Germany's ambitions to expand westward during World War I. Germany's wartime plans for expansion to the west had important repercussions at home and abroad. Gatzke proceeds chronologically, starting with the German political parties' outlining of their war aims. Gatzke claims that a combination of interests, including those of industrialists, pan-Germans, the...

Gestures and Acclamations in Ancient Rome

Gregory S. Aldrete
Life in Rome was relentlessly public, and oratory was at its heart. Orations were dramatic spectacles in which the speaker deployed an arsenal of rhetorical tricks and strategies aimed at arousing the emotions of the audience, and spectators responded vigorously and vocally with massed chants of praise or condemnation. Unfortunately, many aspects of these performances have been lost. In the first in-depth study of oratorical gestures and crowd acclamations as methods of...

Global Energy Security and American Hegemony

Doug Stokes, Sam Raphael
This analysis of the United States and energy security examines the close relationship between US military supremacy in oil-rich regions and America's maintenance of global power. Energy security generally evokes thoughts of American intervention in the Middle East to protect US interests in that region's oil-rich fields. Doug Stokes and Sam Raphael move beyond that framework to consider US actions in Latin America, Central Asia, and Africa. Drawing on State and Defense...

Global Markets and Local Crafts

Frederick F. Wherry
Today it is not uncommon to find items in department stores that are hand-crafted in countries like Thailand and Costa Rica. These "traditional" crafts now make up an important part of a global market. They support local and sometimes national economies and help create and solidify cultural identity. But these crafts are not necessarily indigenous. Whereas Thailand markets crafts with a long history and cultural legacy, Costa Rica has created a local...

The Global Political Economy

Stephen Gill, David Law
What lies ahead for the global political economy? How can policy makers channel economic development to increase the chances for peace and prosperity? From a range of competing theoretical viewpoints—liberal, Realist, and Marxist—Stephen Gill and David Law examine how politics help shape international economic relations and how economic changes and structures affect political forces. The Global Political Economy explores contemporary policy questions in such...

Global Social Change

edited by Christopher Chase-Dunn, Salvatore J. Babones
The essays in Global Social Change explore globalization from a world-systems perspective, untangling its many contested meanings. This perspective offers insights into globalization's gradual and uneven growth throughout the course of human social evolution. In this informative and exciting volume, Christopher Chase-Dunn and Salvatore J. Babones bring together accomplished senior sociologists and outstanding younger scholars...

Global Struggles and Social Change

Christopher Chase-Dunn, Paul Almeida
In the early decades of the twenty-first century, an international movement to slow the pace of climate change mushroomed across the globe. The self-proclaimed Climate Justice movement urges immediate action to reduce carbon emissions and calls for the adoption of bold new policies to address global warming before irreversible and catastrophic damage threatens the habitability of the planet. On another...

Globalization, Power, and Democracy

edited by Marc F. Plattner, Aleksander Smolar
Though the year 2000 marks the turn of the century and of the millennium, the great turn in the realm of international politics occurred a decade earlier, with the Revolutions of 1989-91. The breakup of the Soviet Union's external empire in Eastern Europe, soon followed by the demise of the USSR itself, destroyed the bipolar structure that had characterized world politics for almost half a century. But while the dramatic collapse of communism left no room for...

Golden Rice

Ed Regis
Ordinary white rice is nutrient poor; it consists of carbohydrates and little else. About one million people who subsist on rice become blind or die each year from vitamin A deficiency. Golden Rice, which was developed in the hopes of combatting that problem by a team of European scientists in the late '90s, was genetically modified to provide an essential nutrient that white rice lacks: beta-carotene, which is converted into vitamin A in the body. But twenty years later, this potentially...

Good Business

Bill Novelli, foreword by Jim Clifton, Jo Ann Jenkins
From his humble beginnings selling soap in a sales training program to his rapid rise in the fast-paced New York advertising scene, Bill Novelli was well on his way to becoming a leader in the hypercompetitive business world. But it wasn't long before he became disillusioned with the drive for profits at any cost. He knew that his marketing skills made those companies successful, but what good did that success do for the world? That...

Good Neighbor Diplomacy

Irwin Gellman
Originally published in 1979. American diplomacy during Franklin D. Roosevelt's presidency has received much attention, with one notable exception—the United States' relations with Latin America. Irwin Gellman's book corrects this past neglect through a perceptive analysis of FDR's "Good Neighbor" efforts in Latin America. Based on a fresh examination of State Department records and extensive manuscript sources (including an unprecedented use of Nelson...

Good Work If You Can Get It

Jason Brennan
Do you want to go to graduate school? Then you're in good company: nearly 80,000 students will begin pursuing a PhD this year alone. But while almost all new PhD students say they want to work in academia, most are destined for something else. The hard truth is that half will quit or fail to get their degree, and most graduates will never find a full-time academic job. In Good Work If You Can Get It, Jason Brennan combines personal experience with the latest higher education...

Governing Health, fifth edition

William G. Weissert, Carol S. Weissert
In this classic text, William G. Weissert and Carol S. Weissert describe how government and private interests help define health policy. Under the Obama administration, the federal government took a broadened role in setting health policy and insurance regulations. But the succeeding Trump administration and a Republican congress threatened to dismantle the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and its core tenets. Chronicling these recent important changes, Governing Health...

Grand Central Terminal

Kurt C. Schlichting
Grand Central Terminal, one of New York City's preeminent buildings, stands as a magnificent Beaux-Arts monument to America's Railway Age, and it remains a vital part of city life today. Completed in 1913 after ten years of construction, the terminal became the city's most important transportation hub, linking long-distance and commuter trains to New York's network of subways, elevated trains, and streetcars. Its soaring Grand Concourse still...

The Grand Strategy of the Roman Empire, revised and updated edition

Edward N. Luttwak
At the height of its power, the Roman Empire encompassed the entire Mediterranean basin, extending much beyond it from Britain to Mesopotamia, from the Rhine to the Black Sea. Rome prospered for centuries while successfully resisting attack, fending off everything from overnight robbery raids to full-scale invasion attempts by entire nations on the move. How were troops able to defend the Empire's vast territories from constant attacks? And how did...