Titles

74 Titles

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"A Pernicious Sort of Woman"

Elizabeth Makowski
WINNER OF THE 2007 HISTORY OF WOMEN RELIGIOUS DISTINGUISHED BOOK AWARD Whether they were secular canonesses or beguines, tertiaries or Sisters of the Common Life, quasi-religious women in the later Middle Ages lived their lives against a backdrop of struggle and insecurity resulting, in large measure, from their ambivalent legal status. Because they lacked one or more of the canonical earmarks of religious women strictly...

"Collecting Stamps Would Have Been More Fun"

edited by Jordan Stouck, David Stouck
This unique exchange of letters between literary icon Sinclair Ross and several prominent writers, publishers, agents, and editors asks why many Canadian artists, especially those in western provinces, spent a lifetime struggling for recognition and remuneration. Featuring exchanges with Earle Birney, Margaret Laurence, and Margaret Atwood, among others, this collection exposes the...

"El encaje roto" y otros cuentos

Emilia Pardo Bazán, edited by Joyce Tolliver
Although written a century ago, the sixteen stories by Emilia Pardo Bazán collected in this volume are strikingly relevant to contemporary concerns. Noted for narrative complexity, stylistic variety, and feminist themes, Pardo Bazán's stories explore many aspects of the relationships between men and women. Readers of these stories will encounter memorable and affecting characters. A mysterious nun spends her days in a convent crying over...

The "Good War" in American Memory

John Bodnar
The "Good War" in American Memory dispels the long-held myth that Americans forged an agreement on why they had to fight in World War II. John Bodnar's sociocultural examination of the vast public debate that took place in the United States over the war's meaning reveals that the idea of the "good war" was highly contested. Bodnar's comprehensive study of the disagreements that marked the American remembrance of World War II in the six decades following its end draws on an array of sources: fiction and...

"Him on the One Side and Me on the Other"

Terry A. Johnston, edited by Jr. Terry a. Johnston
Alexander and James Campbell emigrated from Scotland to the United States as teenagers in the 1850s and settled in vastly different regions of the country—Alexander in New York City and James in Charleston, South Carolina. When the Civil War broke out, Alexander and James opted to fight for their adopted states and causes: Alexander enlisted in the 79th New York "Highlanders" and James in the 1st South Carolina ("Charleston") Battalion. This...

"Inventing the Nonprofit Sector" and Other Essays on Philanthropy, Voluntarism, and Nonprofit Organizations

Peter Dobkin Hall
Philanthropy and voluntarism are among the most familiar and least understood of American institutions. The oldest American nonprofit corporation—Harvard College—dates from 1636, but most of the million or so nonprofits currently in existence were established after 1960. In "Inventing the Nonprofit Sector" and Other Essays on Philanthropy, Voluntarism, and Nonprofit Organizations cultural historian...

"La signorina" e altri racconti

Anna Banti, edited by Carol Lazzaro-Weis
Greatly influenced by writers ranging from Dickens and Proust to Woolf and Colette, Anna Banti was a prominent figure on the Italian literary scene from the 1940s until her death in 1985. The five tales in "La signorina" e altri racconti display her talent across many genres—fiction, science fiction, historical fiction, mystery. Banti's stories portray the ageless conflict between the expectations of society and the aspirations of the individual. In "Vocazioni indistinte,"...

"Let the Little Children Come to Me"

Cornelia B. Horn, W. Martens
Although Jesus called on his first followers to welcome children in his name and to become like children, the lives of the first Christian children have remained in the shadows. This book explores the hidden lives of children at the origins of Christianity. It draws on insights gained from comparisons of children's experiences in ancient Judaism and the Graeco-Roman world. The authors also engage a vast body of early Christian...

"Masquerade" and Other Stories

Robert Walser
translated by Susan Bernofsky
Born in Switzerland in 1878, Robert Walser worked as a bank clerk, a butler in a castle, and an inventor's assistant before discovering what William H. Gass calls his "true profession." From 1899 until he was misdiagnosed a schizophrenic and hospitalized in 1933, Walser produced nine novels and more than a thousand short stories and prose pieces. Walser's contemporary admirers were few but well-placed. They included Franz Kafka, Hermann Hesse, Robert Musil, and Walter...

"No Standing Armies!"

Lois G. Schwoerer
Originally published in 1974. In her study of primary materials in England and the United States, Schwoerer traces the origin, development, and articulation in both Parliament and in the popular press of the attitude opposing standing armies in seventeenth-century England and the American colonies. Central to the criticism of armies at that time was the conviction that ultimate military power should be vested in Parliament, not the Crown. Schwoerer...

"Personality Disorders" and Other Stories

Juan José Millás, translated by Gregory Kaplan
The stories of Juan José Millás, who began writing in the 1970s, depart from both the socially engaged, traditional realism and the linguistic experimentation of post-Francoist Spain. They are populated by strange characters: a man who discovers a passage that connects all the armoires on earth, a woman who finds her obsessions to be better company than her cats, a vacationer who prefers his pancreas to the Bahamas as a destination. Influenced by both...

"Sesame Street" and the Reform of Children's Television

Robert W. Morrow
Outstanding Academic Title for 2007, Choice Magazine By the late 1960s more than a few critics of American culture groused about the condition of television programming and, in particular, the quality and content of television shows for children. In the eyes of the reform-minded, commercial television crassly exploited young viewers; its violence and tastelessness served no higher purpose than the bottom line. The Children's Television Workshop (CTW)—and its fresh...

"Silent Souls" and Other Stories

Caterina Albert, translated by Kathleen McNerney
Caterina Albert i Paradís (1869-1966) began her career with a scandal. Her dramatic monologue "The Infanticide," delivered by a young woman, won prizes and garnered the attention of the Catalan literary world, but its harsh theme drew outrage when the anonymous author was revealed to be a woman. In the tradition of George Eliot, George Sand, and other controversial women authors, Albert had assumed a man's name, Víctor Catalá. She continued to write...

"So Wise Were Our Elders"

John Holmes McDowell
"So wise were our elders!" Thus exclaims Mariano Chicunque, himself an elder, expressing in a single phrase the thrust of the mythic narrative tradition he simultaneously presents and represents in his storytelling. A remarkable body of mythology is documented for the first time in this volume. John Homes McDowell's study revolves around thirty-two mythic narratives of the Kamsá Indians who live in the Sibundoy Valley of the Colombian Andes, collected by the...

"The Convent of Pleasure" and Other Plays

Margaret Cavendish, edited by Anne Shaver
Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle (1623-1673), until recently remembered more as a flamboyant eccentric than as a serious writer, was in fact the most prolific, thought-provoking, and original woman writer of the Restoration. Cavendish is the author of many poems, short stories, biographies, memoirs, letters, philosophical and scientific works (including The Description of a New World, Called The Blazing World, the first work of science fiction by a...

"The Signorina" and Other Stories

Anna Banti, translated by Martha King, Carol Lazzaro-Weis
Greatly influenced by writers ranging from Dickens and Proust to Woolf and Colette, Anna Banti was a prominent figure on the Italian literary scene from the 1940s until her death in 1985. The five tales in "The Signorina" and Other Stories display her talent across many genres—fiction, science fiction, historical fiction, mystery. Banti's stories portray the ageless conflict between the expectations of society and the aspirations of the individual. In...