Titles

49 Titles

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AIA Guide to the Architecture of Washington, D.C., fifth edition

G. Martin Moeller, Jr.
This lively and informative guide offers tourists, residents, and architecture aficionados alike insights into more than 400 of Washington, D.C.'s, most important landmarks. Organized into 19 discrete tours, this thoroughly redesigned and updated edition includes 45 new entries, encompassing the House of Sweden and the U.S. Institute of Peace, classic buildings that epitomize the city—the White House, the Capitol, Union Station—and a number of private buildings off...

Academia Next

Bryan Alexander
The outlook for the future of colleges and universities is uncertain. Financial stresses, changing student populations, and rapidly developing technologies all pose significant challenges to the nation's colleges and universities. In Academia Next, futurist and higher education expert Bryan Alexander addresses these evolving trends to better understand higher education's next generation. Alexander first examines current economic, demographic, political, international, and policy...

Achieving Health for All

edited by David Bishai, PhD, MD, MPH, Meike Schleiff
The Alma-Ata Declaration of 1978 marked a potential turning point in global health, signaling a commitment to primary health care that could have improved the safety of air, food, water, roads, homes, and workplaces in all 180 countries that signed it. Unfortunately, progress in many countries stalled in the 1980s. The declaration was, however, embraced by a number of countries, where its implementation led to substantial improvement in...

Adolescent Depression, second edition

Francis Mark Mondimore, MD, Patrick Kelly, MD
In Adolescent Depression, psychiatrists Francis Mark Mondimore, MD, and Patrick Kelly, MD, explain that serious depression in adolescents goes beyond "moodiness." Depression is in fact an illness—one that can be effectively treated. The authors describe the many forms of depression and the many symptoms of depression in young people—from sadness to irritability, self-harm, drug and alcohol abuse, and violent rages. Incorporating the latest research from the...

Adrenaline and the Inner World

David S. Goldstein, M.D., Ph.D.
This accessible work is the first in more than seventy-five years to discuss the many roles of adrenaline in regulating the "inner world" of the body. David S. Goldstein, an international authority and award-winning teacher, introduces new concepts concerning the nature of stress and distress across the body's regulatory systems. Discussing how the body's stress systems are coordinated, and how stress, by means of adrenaline, may...

Advertising Progress

Pamela Walker Laird
Originally published in 1998. Drawing on both documentary and pictorial evidence, Pamela Walker Laird explores the modernization of American advertising to 1920. She links its rise and transformation to changes that affected American society and business alike, including the rise of professional specialization and the communications revolution that new technologies made possible. Laird finds a fundamental shift in the kinds of people who created...

African Perspectives on Colonialism

A. Adu Boahen
This history deals with the twenty-year period between 1880 and 1900, when virtually all of Africa was seized and occupied by the Imperial Powers of Europe. Eurocentric points of view have dominated the study of this era, but in this book, one of Africa's leading historians reinterprets the colonial experiences from the perspective of the colonized. The Johns Hopkins Symposia in Comparative History are occasional volumes sponsored by the Department of History at the Johns Hopkins University...

After Auschwitz, second edition

Richard L. Rubenstein
In this revised and expanded edition, Richard Rubenstein returns to old questions and addresses new issues with the same passion and spirit that characterized his original work.

After the Revolution

Ilja A. Luciak
"Gender equality and meaningful democratization are inextricably linked," writes Ilja Luciak. "The democratization of Central America requires the full incorporation of women as voters, candidates, and office holders." In After the Revolution: Gender and Democracy in El Salvador, Nicaragua, and Guatemala, Luciak shows how former guerrilla women in three Central American countries made the transition from insurgents to mainstream political players...

The Agile College

Nathan D. Grawe
Demographic changes promise to reshape the market for higher education in the next 15 years. Colleges are already grappling with the consequences of declining family size due to low birth rates brought on by the Great Recession, as well as the continuing shift toward minority student populations. Each institution faces a distinct market context with unique organizational strengths; no one-size-fits-all answer could suffice. In this essential follow-up to...

Airs of Providence

Jean McGarry
Providence—a city named in the hope that a direct compliment to God might place Him under some sort of obligation to its inhabitants—provides Jean McGarry with the fertile ground of her comic and gritty, harsh and touching cycle of stories. Weaving in and out of Airs of Providence is a novella telling the story of April and Margery Flanaghan, two sisters trying to grow up in this neighborhood and doing only a so-so job of it. And it is a job, in a world not clearly made for anyone, but better suited to an older...

Albert Meets America

edited by József Illy
In 1919, newspaper headlines said that a British expedition had confirmed Einstein's general theory of relativity. The news stirred the public imagination on both sides of the Atlantic and thrust the scientist into the spotlight of fame. Two years later, Chaim Weizmann led a fund-raising mission to the United States and invited Einstein to join it. The mission traveled to New York, Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, Philadelphia, and Hartford to...

Alexandria in Late Antiquity

Christopher Haas
Second only to Rome in the ancient world, Alexandria was home to many of late antiquity's most brilliant writers, philosophers, and theologians—among them Philo, Origen, Arius, Athanasius, Hypatia, Cyril, and John Philoponus. Now, in Alexandria in Late Antiquity, Christopher Haas offers the first book to place these figures within the physical and social context of Alexandria's bustling urban milieu. Because of its clear demarcation of communal boundaries, Alexandria...

Alfred North Whitehead

Victor Lowe
Originally published in 1985. The second volume of Victor Lowe's definitive work on Alfred North Whitehead completes the biography of one of the twentieth century's most influential yet least understood philosophers. In 1910 Whitehead abruptly ended his thirty-year association with Trinity College of Cambridge and moved to London. The intellectual and personal restlessness that precipitated this move ultimately led Whitehead—at the age of sixty-three—to settle in America and change the focus...

Algebra in Context

Amy Shell-Gellasch, John Thoo
This book's unique approach to the teaching of mathematics lies in its use of history to provide a framework for understanding algebra and related fields. With Algebra in Context, students will soon discover why mathematics is such a crucial part not only of civilization but also of everyday life. Even those who have avoided mathematics for years will find the historical stories both inviting and gripping. The book's lessons begin with the...

The Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798

Terri Diane Halperin
In May 1798, after Congress released the XYZ Affair dispatches to the public, a raucous crowd took to the streets of Philadelphia. Some gathered to pledge their support for the government of President John Adams, others to express their disdain for his policies. Violence, both physical and political, threatened the safety of the city and the Union itself. To combat the chaos and protect the nation from both external and internal threats, the Federalists swiftly...

All a Novelist Needs

Colm Tóibín, edited by Susan M. Griffin
This book collects, for the first time, Colm Tóibín's critical essays on Henry James. Shortlisted for the Booker Prize for his novel about James's life, The Master, Tóibín brilliantly analyzes James from a novelist's point of view. Known for his acuity and originality, Tóibín is himself a master of fiction and critical works, which makes this collection of his writings on Henry James essential reading for literary critics. But he also writes for general...

All the Tsar's Men

John W. Steinberg
All the Tsar's Men examines how institutional reforms designed to prepare the Imperial Russian Army for the modern battlefield failed to prevent devastating defeats in both the 1905 Russo-Japanese War and World War I. John W. Steinberg argues that the General Staff officers who devised new educational and doctrinal reforms had the experience, dedication, and leadership skills to defend the empire in the new age of warfare but were continually...

The Amateur Hour

Jonathan Zimmerman
American college teaching is in crisis, or so we are told. But we've heard that complaint for the past 150 years, as critics have denounced the poor quality of instruction in undergraduate classrooms. Students daydream in gigantic lecture halls while a professor drones on, or they meet with a teaching assistant for an hour of aimless discussion. The modern university does not reward teaching, so faculty members at every level neglect it in favor of research and publication. ...

The Amendments to the Constitution

George Anastaplo
A companion to the widely acclaimed The Constitution of 1787, this new book by eminent constitutional scholar George Anastaplo examines the nature and effects of the twenty-seven amendments to the U.S. Constitution. For Anastaplo, these amendments implement the equality, liberty, and rule of law principles that are fundamental to the American system of government. His appendixes of critical documents and his reflections on the Bill of Rights and on the Emancipation Proclamation set...