Hardback
December 14, 2007
9780813124711
English
344
9.00 Inches (US)
6.00 Inches (US)
1.35 Pounds (US)
$70.00 USD
v2.1 Reference
Electronic book text
December 14, 2007
9780813136981
English
344
9.00 Inches (US)
6.00 Inches (US)
$70.00 USD, £31.00 GBP
v2.1 Reference
Electronic book text
December 14, 2007
9780813172804
English
9.00 Inches (US)
6.00 Inches (US)
$70.00 USD
v2.1 Reference

Liquor in the Land of the Lost Cause

Southern White Evangelicals and the Prohibition Movement

In the late 1800s, Southern evangelicals believed contemporary troubles—everything from poverty to political corruption to violence between African Americans and whites—sprang from the bottles of "demon rum" regularly consumed in the South. Though temperance quickly gained support in the antebellum North, Southerners cast a skeptical eye on the movement, because of its ties with antislavery efforts. Postwar evangelicals quickly realized they had to make temperance appealing to the South by transforming the Yankee moral reform movement into something compatible with southern values and culture. In Liquor in the Land of the Lost Cause: Southern White Evangelicals and the Prohibition Movement, Joe L. Coker examines the tactics and results of temperance reformers between 1880 and 1915. Though their denominations traditionally forbade the preaching of politics from the pulpit, an outgrowth of evangelical fervor led ministers and their congregations to sound the call for prohibition. Determined to save the South from the evils of alcohol, they played on southern cultural attitudes about politics, race, women, and honor to communicate their message. The evangelicals were successful in their approach, negotiating such political obstacles as public disapproval the church's role in politics and vehement opposition to prohibition voiced by Jefferson Davis. The evangelical community successfully convinced the public that cheap liquor in the hands of African American "beasts" and drunkard husbands posed a serious threat to white women. Eventually, the code of honor that depended upon alcohol-centered hospitality and camaraderie was redefined to favor those who lived as Christians and supported the prohibition movement. Liquor in the Land of the Lost Cause is the first comprehensive survey of temperance in the South. By tailoring the prohibition message to the unique context of the American South, southern evangelicals transformed the region into a hotbed of temperance activity, leading the national prohibition movement.

Reviews

"The Temperance Movement was one of the great American ecumenical events, linking Protestants North and South, liberal and conservative and bridging divisions as deep as the Civil War. With insight and sensitivity, Joe Coker traces the Southern Temperance Crusade, a movement grounded in piety, equality and social responsibility. Excellent research that takes us beyond myths and caricatures." —Bill J. Leonard, Dean and Professor of Church History Wake Forest University Div"

"Engagingly written and carefully researched, this study entices readers to explore how and why southern evangelicals abandoned their aversion to prohibition and became the movement's most zealous advocates. Coker's tale is stunningly contemporary; his well-crafted argument helps explain why the religious right became such a powerful political force in the South in the later 20th century. And along the way, we meet in fresh ways the familiar themes of race, gender, honor, and the nature of the church. It's 'must reading' for anyone interested in Southern religion and culture." —Charles H. Lippy, LeRoy A. Martin Distingushed Professor of Religious Studies, U"

"This book tells a fascinating story of how prohibition became the moral reform issue that brought evangelical Protestantism to a central position in the South's public culture in the early twentieth century. The author carefully shows how advocates for prohibition adapted to southern culture a reform movement that had begun in New England and was long suspect in the South. This study is highly original in helping scholars understand the interplay between religion and culture in the American South. Its historical insight cast considerable light on how later conservative evangelical reform efforts, from antievolution laws in the 1920s to the moral agenda of the Christian Right, achieved success." —Charles Reagan Wilson, Kelly Gene Cook Sr. Chair of History and Professor of Sou"

"In his impressively researched, well argued, and original monograph, Joe L. Coker tells us much that we had not known about how southern white evangelicals became teetotalers and prohibitionists such as the internal evangelical conflict about the 'spiritual' church entering the vulgar world of politics and the recasting of the southern value of honor." —David M. Fahey, author of Temperance and Racism: John Bull, Johnny Reb, and the"

"Coker's book is a clear, thoroughly researched, and innovative study that helps us understand the intertwining of religion, politics, segregation, and racism in a way that has eluded most historians. Coker manages to tell a complex story in a clear and compelling fashion that helps us understand both the strengths and weaknesses of a cultural Protestantism that lent its moral certainty to a politics of purity and danger that linked sobriety with white supremacy." —Donald G. Mathews, Professor Emeritus of History, University of North Carolina a"

"As thorough, careful, searching, and well-researched an examination of the rise and eventual triumph of the temperance and Prohibition movement in the South as exists in the scholarly literature. Coker shows how a social reform movement of distinctly Yankee origins became part of southern cultural and religious life, to the extent that southern states led the way toward national Prohibition in the early twentieth century. . . . A standout book in southern and religious history." —Paul Harvey, author of Freedom's Coming"

"Coker's work is based on a study of Tennessee, Alabama, and Georgia. Nevertheless, he believes that these states were generally representative of the region and his conclusions widely applicable. This will quite likely be tested by future historians, but for now it is a valuable contribution to understanding the post-Civil War South, religion, reform, and prohibition."—Choice"

"Coker has written a lively, absorbing book that is clearly written and well researched. This text is a fine starting point for anyone who wishes to understand the history of the southern prohibition movement and its most ardent supporters, white evangelical Protestants."—American Historical Review"

"[Coker] successfully argues that the apparent ideological inconsistency was instead a triumph of southern culture, evangelical religion, and, ultimately, racism."—West Virginia History"

"Coker's study is fascinating, and the conflict he describes resonates today in debates about other moral issues. He as an excellent understanding of both New South and Lost Cause motifs in southern history."—Baptist History and Heritage"

"All should welcome this more complex view of white southern evangelicals and their relationship to southern society."—American Studies"

"Liquor in the Land of the Lost Cause will appeal to historians of evangelicalism, prohibition movements, and the fin de siecle South."—Alabama Review"

"Coker's study of evangelicals and Southern prohibition will appeal to scholars and students of Southern history. Students of American religious history may find Coker's claim that prohibition, and not evolution, is the starting point to modern political evangelism in American to be a notion worthy of a closer look."—The Historian"

"Coker achieves the noteworthy end of making prohibition a compelling subject not only for specialists, but also for anyone interested in the American South or Protestant social reform."—Church History"

"Coker's book . . . he makes a compelling case for the role of the church in fashioning the South's prohibition movement."—Louisiana History"—

9780813124711 : liquor-in-the-land-of-the-lost-cause-coker
Hardback
344 Pages
$70.00 USD
9780813136981 : liquor-in-the-land-of-the-lost-cause-coker
Electronic book text
344 Pages
$70.00 USD
9780813172804 : liquor-in-the-land-of-the-lost-cause-coker
Electronic book text
$70.00 USD

Other Titles from Religion In The South

A Genealogy of Dissent

David Stricklin
Jan 2015 - University Press of Kentucky
$60.00 USD - Hardback
$60.00 USD - Electronic book text

Southern Crossroads

edited by Walter H Conser, Rodger M. Payne
Sep 2010 - University Press of Kentucky
$70.00 USD - Hardback
$70.00 USD - Electronic book text
$70.00 USD - Electronic book text

A Coat of Many Colors

Walter H. Conser, Jr.
Nov 2009 - University Press of Kentucky
$35.00 USD - Paperback / softback
$35.00 USD - Electronic book text
$35.00 USD - Electronic book text

Other Titles in HISTORY / United States / 19th Century

Tecumseh's War

Donald R. Hickey
Oct 2021 - Georgetown University Press
$34.95 USD - Hardback
$34.95 USD - Electronic book text

The Long Civil War

edited by John David Smith, Ph.D., Raymond Arsenault, with contributions byMichael J. Birkner, Paul A. Cimbala, Stanley Harrold, James R. Hedtke, James Oliver Horton, Lois E. Horton, Daniel Kilbride, Diane Miller Sommerville, Stephen J....
Jul 2021 - University Press of Kentucky
$45.00 USD - Hardback
$45.00 USD - Electronic book text
$45.00 USD - Electronic book text

Getting Right with Lincoln

Edward Steers, Jr., foreword by Joseph Garrera
Apr 2021 - University Press of Kentucky
$27.95 USD - Hardback
$27.95 USD - Electronic book text
$27.95 USD - Electronic book text