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Our clients include Johns Hopkins University Press, Georgetown University Press, University of Washington Press, The University Press of Kentucky, Catholic University of America Press, Indiana University Press, University of New Orleans Press, The Maryland Center for History and Culture, University of South Carolina Press, Wesleyan University Press, Modern Language Association of America, Northeastern University Press, Family Development Press, Central European University Press, Wayne State University Press, University of Toronto Press, and University of Alberta Press.

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Simone Forti

Ann Cooper Albright
First critical biography of this visionary artist written by a dance scholar Simone Forti, groundbreaking improvisor, has spent a lifetime weaving together the movement of her mind with the movement of her body to create a unique oeuvre situated at the intersection of dancing and art practices. Her seminal Dance Constructions from the 1960s crafted a new approach to dance composition and helped inspire the investigations of Judson Dance Theater. In the 1970s, Forti's explorations of animal...

Michigan's Venice

Daniel F. Harrison, OtherStephen Chrisomalis, Karen Marrero
Few maritime landscapes in the Great Lakes remain so deeply and clearly inscribed by successive cultures as the St. Clair system—a river, delta, and lake found between Lake Huron and the Detroit River. The St. Clair River and its environs are an age-old transportation nexus of land and water routes, a strategic point of access to maritime resources, and, in many ways, a natural impediment to the...

Cops on Campus

edited by Yalile Suriel, Grace Watkins, Christa G. Watkins, Jude Paul Matias Dizon, John Joseph Sloan, III, series edited by Michael R. Hames-García, Micol Seigel
Over the last five years, headlines have thrust campus police departments from relative obscurity into the national spotlight. Campus constituents have called for campus police, as a tangible manifestation of the War on Crime within the sphere of higher education, to be disarmed, defunded, and abolished. Using a...

Sugar

Edward Narain, Tarryn Phillips
In Suva, the bustling capital of Fiji, a tropical cyclone is looming. In this city of dazzling contradictions, three strangers are living worlds apart. Hannah is a young Australian expat who volunteers at a local health organization while leading a heady life of house parties and weekend getaways. Isikeli is a teenager from the informal settlement who has given up on his childhood dream of playing professional rugby and cares for his diabetic grandmother. Rishika is an Indo-Fijian historian...

The Disappeared

Adam Braver
The Disappeared traces a pair of casualties who emerge from the ashes of separate acts of political violence: a woman whose husband is missing in a terrorist attack, and a man who believes his sister was an unidentified victim of the '93 World Trade Center bombing. As the survivors face their own private terrors under the demanding watch of the public eye, each moves forward while working to uncover mysteries that may never be solved. Addressing conspiracies, cataclysm, and the fragile yet resilient nature of the human psyche,...

Only Wanna Be with You

Tim Sommer
Experience the exclusive, behind-the-scenes story of one of the biggest bands of the nineties In 1985, Mark Bryan heard Darius Rucker singing in a dorm shower at the University of South Carolina and asked him to form a band. For the next eight years, Hootie & the Blowfish—completed by bassist Dean Felber and drummer Soni Sonefeld—played every frat house, roadhouse, and rock club in the mid-Atlantic and Southeast, becoming one of the biggest independent acts in the...

Teaching the Literature of Climate Change

edited by Debra J. Rosenthal
Essays on teaching the global climate crisis through cli-fi Over the past several decades, writers such as Margaret Atwood, Paolo Bacigalupi, Octavia E. Butler, and Kathy Jetn̄il-Kijiner have explored climate change through literature, reflecting current anxieties about humans' impact on the planet. Emphasizing the importance of interdisciplinarity, this volume embraces literature as a means to cultivate students' understanding of the ongoing climate crisis, ethics in...

A Front Row Seat

Nancy Olson Livingston
From her idyllic childhood in the American Midwest to her Oscar–nominated performance in Sunset Boulevard (1950) and the social circles of New York and Los Angeles, actress Nancy Olson Livingston has lived abundantly. In her memoir, A Front Row Seat, Livingston treats readers to an intimate, charming chronicle of her life as an actress, wife, and mother, and her memories of many of the most notable figures and moments of her time. Livingston...

Math in Drag

Kyne Santos
Unleash your inner math diva. Join sensational drag queen Kyne Santos on an extraordinary journey through the glamorous world of... math? This sassy book is your VIP pass, taking you behind the scenes with a TikTok superstar who shatters stereotypes and proves that math can be fascinating and fun, even for people who think they aren't good at it. With her irreverent style and unique perspective, Kyne investigates mathematical mysteries while educating us about the art of drag. She explores surprising connections, such as the...

Tales from the Vaults

Louis Pelletier and Rachael Stoeltje
Cinema's multiple lives as an art, a form of entertainment, an industry, or a tool for education and propaganda all share one thing: they rely on machines and technical objects. For more than a century, this essential fact has shaped the life cycle of moving images, from their production and exhibition to their eventual preservation. The tales told by these pieces of cinemachinery, from the iconic to the seemingly mundane, are consequently...

The Christology of Erasmus

Terence J. Martin
Nothing is more central to the religious thinking of Erasmus of Rotterdam than the reality of Christ—in his eyes, that supreme revelation of divine mercy embodied in the life of Jesus of Nazareth to which Christian scriptures variously testify, but also the divine presence undergirding that life-centering ethic of love and peace, what Erasmus calls the "philosophy of Christ." The purpose of this book is to distill the Christological elements from his vast corpus in a manner that...

State Anti-Intellectualism and the Politics of Gender and Race

Éric Fassin
Eric Fassin examines the trend of State anti-intellectualism in France using the nation as a case study to demonstrate that this tendency is not limited to ostensibly illiberal regimes. He argues that today's world requires an examination of this phenomenon beyond Cold War geopolitical divisions and highlights a global shift towards authoritarian neoliberalism. His book is a plea for the political urgency of intellectual work in a...

Empire, Colonialism, and Famine in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

edited by Bohdan Klid
The essays in this volume examine the often-overlooked connection between empire building, imperial rule, and mass starvation. While droughts and other natural disasters can lead to serious food shortages, a decline in food availability need not result in wide-scale starvation. Mass starvation in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries has almost always been linked to political decisions about food distribution. Some of the worst cases...

A Library of Light

Danielle Vogel
Incantation and elegy shine through one another in this extraordinary poetic memoir When poet Danielle Vogel began writing meditations on the syntax of earthen and astral light, she had no idea that her mother's tragic death would eclipse the writing of that book, turning her attention to grief's syntax and quiet fields of cellular light in the form of memory. Written in elegant, crystalline prose poems, A Library of Light is a memoir that begins and ends in an incantatory space, one in which light speaks. At the...

Body Sculpture

edited by Russell Storer
Artist Jordan Wolfson is emblematic of the time in which we live. As we grapple with our relationship to technology, our immersion in internet culture, and social issues of racial and gender inequality, alienation, and violence, Wolfson confronts us with their images, actions, and effects. His works act as witnesses on the world we are in right now rather than taking a moral position or articulating a particular point of view. They are therefore often uncomfortable to experience, as well as...

What Works, What Doesn't (and When)

edited by Dilip Soman
How well do behavioral science interventions translate and scale in the real world? Consider a practitioner who is looking to create behavior change through an intervention – perhaps it involves getting people to conserve energy, increase compliance with a medication regime, reduce misinformation, or improve tax collection. The behavioral science practitioner will typically draw inspiration from a previous study or intervention to translate...

Supporting Transgender Students, Second Edition, second edition

Alex Myers
Supporting Transgender Students is a roadmap to what gender is and why gender inclusivity matters in education, a resource for teachers, administrators, and families alike. Drawing on the author's nearly three decades of working with schools to create more gender-expansive environments for students, this book considers how to equitably handle gender in the classroom, on the playing field, and more. Now in a fully...

War Is Not Just for Heroes

Linda M. Canup Keaton-Lima. Foreword by Keith Oliver.
Firsthand accounts of war in the Pacific theater from a premier chronicler of the real world of World War II combat. War Is Not Just for Heroes rescues the incredible true stories of US Marine Corps. Written by one marine, Claude R. "Red" Canup, a combat correspondent in the Pacific during World War II, these dispatches and private letters provide insight...

Teaching Film from the People's Republic of China

edited by Zhuoyi Wang, Emily Wilcox, and Hongmei Yu
Essays for teaching Chinese film, history, and society This volume brings a diverse range of voices—from anthropology, communication studies, ethnomusicology, film, history, literature, linguistics, sociology, theater, and urban geography—into the conversation about film from the People's Republic of China. Essays seek to answer what films can reveal or obscure about Chinese history and society and demonstrate how studying films from the...

No Son of Mine

Jonathan Corcoran
Born and raised in rural West Virginia, Jonathan Corcoran was the youngest and only son of three siblings in a family balanced on the precipice of poverty. His mother, a traditional, evangelical, and insular woman who had survived abuse and abandonment, was often his only ally. Together they navigated a strained homelife dominated by his distant, gambling-addicted father and shared a seemingly unbreakable bond. When Corcoran left home to attend Brown University, a chasm between his upbringing and his...

The Struggle for Public Health

Fred C. Pampel
The fascinating stories of public health innovators who overcame immense obstacles to improve the health of millions. In the nineteenth century, the scourge of deadly infectious diseases permanently receded for the first time in human history while longevity steadily improved. This progress was due in large part to advances in the public health field, including improved sanitation and cleaner water. Progress in health and...

Share That Knowledge!

edited by Nadja Sicarov and Janneke Van Dalen
Share That Knowledge! A Road Map for Sharing Knowledge across Generations of Audiovisual Archivists is the result of a four-year research project into the methods and strategies of sharing knowledge within audiovisual archives, which was initiated by the Austrian Film Museum and the Slovenian Cinematheque, joined by colleagues from 11 other audiovisual archives, and supported by the Austrian...

Enlightened Self-Interest

Thomas J. Bussen, Henry Biggs, Timothy Bono
Insights into a compassionate alternative to a ruthlessly self-interested capitalist culture Societally sanctioned competition for money, power, and fame promotes selfishness, personal alienation, and widespread inequality, especially in market-oriented economies. Yet many of those engaging in this competitive individualism—the competition for rewards and limited resources—yearn to act directly to promote a more civil,...

Humanae Vitae and Catholic Sexual Morality

Edited by Robert L. Fastiggi and Matthew Levering
In December 2022, a group of Catholic scholars gathered in Rome to take part in a conference titled "A Response to the Pontifical Academy for Life's Publication, Etica teologica della Vita. Scrittura, tradizione, sfide pratiche." The conference attempted to pursue in more depth the certain questions touched on in Etica teologica. Among these questions were: (1) the...

The Soviet Nuclear Archipelago

Per Högselius, Achim Klüppelberg
The war in Ukraine, with the exposure of nuclear power stations and the danger of atomic warfare, has made the legacy of the Soviet nuclear sector of critical importance. The two authors map the Soviet nuclear industry in a shifting historical context, making sense of a complex socio-technical and environmental history. Taking an innovative approach, this book explores the history of atomic power in the former Soviet Union using the...

Indigenous Legalities, Pipeline Viscosities

Tyler McCreary
Indigenous Legalities, Pipeline Viscosities examines the relationship between the Wet'suwet'en nation and pipeline development, showing how colonial governments and corporations seek to control Indigenous claims, and how the Wet'suwet'en resist. Tyler McCreary offers historical context for the unfolding relationship between Indigenous peoples and colonialism and explores pipeline regulatory review processes, attempts to reconcile...

Living Space

Michael E. Veal
Examines John Coltrane's "late period" and Miles Davis's "Lost Quintet" through the prisms of digital architecture and experimental photography Living Space: John Coltrane, Miles Davis, and Free Jazz, from Analog to Digital fuses biography and style history in order to illuminate the music of two jazz icons, while drawing on the discourses of photography and digital architecture to fashion musical insights that may not be available through the...

Holy Ghost Key

Joshua Myers
Joshua Myers's Holy Ghost Key celebrates the essential role of African music in the continuity and sustenance of African Diasporic life and culture. Myers weaves his broad knowledge of African and African American music practices, genres and instruments with his memory of gospel lyrics and symbols evoking African spirituality, showing us the ways in which this music has been both the light on our path and the grounding of our historic journey. Though many of the poems pay tribute to the genius of contemporary musicians who...

Skidegate House Models

Robin K. Wright, foreword by Nika Collison, series edited by Kathryn Bunn-Marcuse
In 1892 seventeen Haida artists were commissioned to carve a model of HlGaagilda Llnagaay (the village of Skidegate on Haida Gwaii, British Columbia) for the 1893 World's Fair in Chicago. The Skidegate model, featuring twenty-nine large houses and forty-two poles, is the only known model village in North America carved by nineteenth-century Indigenous residents of the village it...

Precision Retailing

edited by Laurette Dubé, Maxime Cohen, Nathan Yang, Bassem Monla
Without a doubt, the COVID-19 era has forced the retail sector to rethink the way it conducts business. Customer experience has largely shifted into the digital realm, and questions have emerged about how to best optimize and evolve business operations in light of this change. Drawing on a host of expert contributors, Precision Retailing takes a broad perspective of precision retailing as the...

The Presence of Absence

Desiree Richter
"When I laid down the dogma, I picked up wonder for the world." And that wonder, Desiree Richter has found, is as much about embracing pleasure as it is about granting grief the stewardship that it requires. In 2000, Richter's two-year-old son Elijah died in a tragic domestic accident. The world as she knew it was dismantled along with her understanding of her place in it, leaving her to figure...

Southern Strategies

Michael Odom
A study of how literary strategies illuminate the evangelical foundation of Southern culture. In Southern Strategies: Narrative Negotiation in an Evangelical Region, Michael Odom argues that through the narrative strategies of resistance, satire, and negotiation, a multigenerational group of twentieth-century white Southern writers provides unique insight into the central role evangelical religion has played in shaping the sociopolitical culture of the American...

Teaching South Asian Anglophone Diasporic Literature

edited by Nalini Iyer and Pallavi Rastogi
Essays on teaching anglophone literature of the South Asian diaspora from around the world Migration from the Indian subcontinent began on a large scale over 150 years ago, and today there are diasporic communities around the world. The identities of South Asians in the diaspora are informed by roots in the subcontinent and the complex experiences of race, religion, nation, class, caste, gender, sexuality, language, trauma, and geography. The...

Sky Watch

Emma Hudelson
Horse shows used to draw crowds by the thousands to state fairs and venues such as Madison Square Garden. And in the 1980s, no performance horse filled more arena seats than the American Saddlebred Sky Watch. He pushed the saddle seat industry to a peak that hasn't been seen since. An athlete through and through, the stallion dominated the sport with the same power and intensity as a Kentucky Derby winner. With unmatched talent, Sky Watch earned four World Grand Championships and twelve...

Longing for Connection

Andrew Burstein
Untangling the private feelings, ambitions, and fears of early Americans through their personal writings from the Revolution to the Civil War. Modern readers of history and biography unite around a seemingly straightforward question: What did it feel like to live in the past? In Longing for Connection, historian Andrew Burstein attempts to answer this question with a vigorous, nuanced emotional history of the United States from its founding to the...

Rolling

edited by Alfred L. Martin, Jr.
Since slavery, African and African American humor has baffled, intrigued, angered, and entertained the masses. Rolling centers Blackness in comedy, especially on television, and observing that it is often relegated to biopics, slave narratives, and the comedic. But like W. E. B. DuBois's ideas about double consciousness and Racquel Gates's extension of his theories, we know that Blackness resonates for Black viewers in ways often entirely different than for white viewers.

Default

Gregory Makoff, foreword by Lee C. Buchheit
The dramatic inside story of the most important case in the history of sovereign debt law Unlike individuals or corporations that become insolvent, nations do not have access to bankruptcy protection from their creditors. When a country defaults on its debt, the international financial system is ill equipped to manage the crisis. Decisions by key individuals—from national leaders to those at the International Monetary...

A Sourcebook for Classical Rhetoric

John Tomarchio
This Sourcebook is intended for students of liberal arts and great books. It treats such books as primary sources for inquiring into the nature of human speech because they clarify the terms and stakes of perennial questions thinking human beings ask themselves about persuasive speaking. By crystallizing viable claims about the nature of what we confront in politics and society—live claims for us to confront in our own, with the stakes of that confrontation being live as well—they originate a...

The Political Brain

Matt Qvortrup
We have politics on our mind—or, rather, we have politics in different parts of our brains. In this path-breaking study, Matt Qvortrup takes the reader on a whistle stop tour through the fascinating, and sometimes frightening, world of neuropolitics; the discipline that combines neuroscience and politics, and is even being used to win elections. Putting the 'science' back into political science, The Political Brain shows how fMRI-scans can identify differences between Liberals and...

Toward an Anti-Racist Poetics

Wayde Compton
Toward an Anti-Racist Poetics seeks to dislodge the often unspoken white universalism that underpins literary production and reception today. In this personal and thoughtful book, award-winning author Wayde Compton explores how we might collectively develop a poetic approach that makes space for diversity by doing away with universalism in both lyric and avant-garde verse. Poignant and contemporary examples reveal how white authors often forget that their whiteness is a racial position. In the...

Sounds of Other Shores

Andrew J. Eisenberg
A study of transoceanic musical appropriation and Swahili ethnic subjectivity on the Kenyan coast Sounds of Other Shores takes an ethnographic ear to the history of transoceanic stylistic appropriation in the Swahili taarab music of the Kenyan coast. Swahili taarab, a form of sung poetry that emerged as East Africa's first mass-mediated popular music in the 1930s, is a famously cosmopolitan form, rich in audible influences from across the...

Queer Jews, Queer Muslims

edited by Adi Saleem, with contributions by Katrina Daly Thompson, Edwige Crucifix, Amr Kamal, Shanon Shah, Robert Phillips, Elizabeth Johnstone, David M. Halperin, Matthew Richardson, Adi Saleem
Through a curated selection of scholarship, Adi Saleem demonstrates that representations of Muslim and Jewish sexuality are often racialized and gendered in parallel ways as non-Western, deviant, and dangerous within Euro-American modernity. Contributors reckon with the intertwined past and...

Emily Kam Kngwarray

edited by Kelli Cole, Hetti Perkins, Jenny Green
Emily Kam Kngwarray, an Anmatyerr woman from Central Australia, devoted the last decades of her life to new artistic pursuits, creating works that encapsulate the experience and authority she gained throughout an extraordinary life. This book offers new insights into Emily Kam Kngwarray's life and work, featuring original research and reflections from the artist's community, curators, and academics. Generously illustrated, the publication brings together Kngwarray's most...

Solved

David Miller, foreword by Bill McKibben, afterword by Anne Hidalgo
If our planet is going to survive the climate crisis, we need to act rapidly. Taking cues from progressive cities around the world, including Los Angeles, New York, Toronto, Oslo, Shenzhen, and Sydney, this book is a summons to every city to make small but significant changes that can drastically reduce our carbon footprint. We cannot wait for national governments to agree on how to reduce greenhouse gas emissions...

Charras

Hernán Lara Zavala
Charras is the true story of Efraín "El Charras" Calderón Lara, a twenty-six-year-old union leader and student activist, and the Yucatean government's successful plot to kidnap and murder him. Acclaimed Mexican novelist Hernán Lara Zavala combines real-life newspaper articles and interviews with renderings of key events, laying the state-sanctioned narrative of Charras's death beside the actual experiences of those involved. To kaleidoscopic effect, Zavala enters...

Carolina Currents, Studies in South Carolina Culture

edited by Christopher D. Johnson
Introducing an annual collection of essays devoted to South Carolina history and culture. From the Piedmont to the Lowcountry, South Carolina is the site of countless engaging stories. The contributors to Carolina Currents share those stories, broadening our understanding of the state's unique and diverse histories and cultures. A venue for public-facing interdisciplinary scholarship, each volume presents a collection of essays...

My Mother, My Teacher, critical edition

Bahia Mahmud Awah. Edited and translated by Dorothy Odartey-Wellington.
A memoir of traditional and postcolonial life in North Africa Separated from his family in the aftermath of the failed decolonization process in Western Sahara, Bahia Mahmud Awah was sustained by recollections of his mother. In this memoir, he describes her sacrifices, her optimism, and her deep love. His family's experiences exemplify the larger story of loss and displacement in the region even as his story shows how shared...

Deviant Hollers

Edited by Zane McNeill and Rebecca Scott. Foreword by Stephanie Foote.
Deviant Hollers: Queering Appalachian Ecologies for a Sustainable Future uses the lens of queer ecologies to explore environmental destruction in Appalachia while mapping out alternative futures that follow from critical queer perspectives on the United States' exploitation of the land. With essays by Lis Regula, Jessica Cory, Chet Pancake, Tijah Bumgarner, MJ Eckhouse, and other essential thinkers, this...

What Do Bees Think About?

Mathieu Lihoreau
translated by Alison Duncan
Explore the mind of a bee and learn what drives its behavior. Have you ever observed a bee up close and wondered what was going on inside its head? Like ours, insects' brains take up most of the space in their heads, but their brains are smaller than a grain of rice, only 0.0002% as large as ours. But what purpose does the insect brain serve, and how does that drive their creativity, morality, and emotions? Bees in particular exhibit unexpected and fascinating cognitive...

Midwest Bedrock

Kevin J. Koch
To know a place deeply means to understand it on several levels, layered almost as if from bedrock to topsoil. Midwest Bedrock: The Search for Nature's Soul in America's Heartland takes readers on a journey across all twelve Midwest states to natural settings that defy typical stereotypes of the Midwest landscape. Each chapter focuses on one focal region or locality within each state, often seeking out lesser-known landscapes steeped in beauty and story. Author...

The Russian FSB

Kevin P. Riehle
An introduction to Putin's formidable intelligence and security organization Since its founding in 1995, the FSB, Russia's Federal Security Service, has regained the majority of the domestic security functions of the Soviet-era KGB. Under Vladimir Putin, who served as FSB director just before becoming president, the agency has grown to be one of the most powerful and favored organizations in Russia. The FSB not only conducts internal security but also has primacy in...

Free Markets with Sustainability and Solidarity

edited by Martin Schlag and Juan Andres Mercado
We live in times of economic change and challenges, as reports of the increasing concentration of wealth with "the 1%" and stagnating wages compete for headlines with new and contentious politics of austerity. Public discourse has become fractured not only along class lines but ideologically, with advocates of "economic freedom" and "sustainability" locked in seemingly intractable conflict. Managers, business people, and...

Exhibiting Jewish Culinary Culture

András Koerner
András Koerner is the author of a number of critically acclaimed, award-winning CEU Press titles on the cultural history of Hungarian Jews and Jewish cuisine. This volume continues that tradition by discussing the phenomenon of exhibits on Jewish culinary culture in museums and galleries around the world. The first part of the book provides an overview of the cultural history of "foodism" and the proliferation of Jewish museums. In addition, it examines the role of cuisine in Jewish identity. It...

Deviant

Patrick Grace
Deviant traces a trajectory of queer self-discovery from childhood to adulthood, examining love, fear, grief, and the violence that men are capable of in intimate same-sex relationships. Richly engaged with the tangible and experiential, Patrick Grace's confessional poetry captures profound, sharp emotions, tracking a journey impacted equally by beauty and by brutality. Coming-of-age identity struggles are recalled with wry wit, and dreamlike poems embrace adolescent queer love and connections as a way to cope with the fear and...

Fraught Balance

Shayna M. Silverstein
A vivid and intricate study of dance music traditions that reveals the many contradictions of being Syrian in the 21st century Dabke, one of Syria's most beloved dance music traditions, is at the center of the country's war and the social tensions that preceded conflict. Drawing on almost two decades of ethnographic, archival, and digital research, Shayna M. Silverstein shows how dabke dance music embodies the fraught dynamics of gender, class, ethnicity,...

The Salmon Capital of Michigan

Carson Prichard
Weaving together the stories and voices of residents, anglers, community leaders, and environmental workers and researchers, this ethnographic account details the lives and livelihoods impacted by a once-unrivaled Michigan salmon fishery. From the introduction of Chinook salmon to the Great Lakes in the late 1960s, a thriving recreational fishery industry arose in Northern Michigan, attracting thousands of anglers to small towns like Rogers City each week at...

Seeds of Control

David Fedman, foreword by Paul S. Sutter, series edited by Paul S. Sutter
Japanese colonial rule in Korea (1905–1945) ushered in natural resource management programs that profoundly altered access to and ownership of the peninsula's extensive mountains and forests. Under the banner of "forest love," the colonial government set out to restructure the rhythms and routines of agrarian life, targeting everything from home heating to food preparation. Timber industrialists, meanwhile,...

Voices from Nepal

Dan Archer
How can we better protect survivors? How can we learn from their stories without causing further harm? With a pen in one hand and watercolours in the other, graphic journalist Dan Archer embarks on an investigation into human trafficking and how comics can be used to empower survivors and raise awareness of human rights issues. Based on years of research and reporting, the book holds a mirror up to the ways that international and local NGOs study and combat...

Understanding Barbara Kingsolver

Ian Tan
The most up-to-date and unified study of critically acclaimed and best-selling author Barbara Kingsolver In Understanding Barbara Kingsolver, Ian Tan situates Kingsolver's oeuvre in an ecocritical and ecofeminist context and argues that her work puts forward an ethics of difference that informs a more egalitarian vision of the world. Following a brief biography, Tan explores ecocriticism as a literary strategy and analyzes Kingsolver's early nonfiction book, Holding the Line: Women in the Great Arizona...

Mi madre, mi maestra, critical edition

Bahia Mahmud Awah. Edited by Dorothy Odartey-Wellington.
A memoir of traditional and postcolonial life in North Africa Separated from his family in the aftermath of the failed decolonization process in Western Sahara, Bahia Mahmud Awah was sustained by recollections of his mother. In this memoir, he describes her sacrifices, her optimism, and her deep love. His family's experiences exemplify the larger story of loss and displacement in the region even as his story shows how shared memories can...

Foraging Kentucky

George Barnett
With rich soils, thousands of creeks, and twelve major river basins, the state of Kentucky is abundant with wild edibles that not only are delicious but also can be useful for medicinal purposes. Various species of wildflowers such as spring beauty, edible fungi like chanterelles, and tree crops such as hickory nuts may be foraged and pickled, steamed, candied, or stir-fried to create an enticing, healthy, and substantial meal. ...

What If Fungi Win?

Arturo Casadevall, MD, PhD
with Stephanie Desmon, MA
Could fungal pathogens outsmart us before we find ways to combat them? Humans and fungi share nearly 50 percent of the same DNA. Because we're related, designing drugs to combat the varieties that attack us is a challenge. Meanwhile, in an ever hotter, wetter world, fungi may be finding new ways to thrive, queueing up global outbreak potentials for which no vaccine and woefully few medications exist; some fungi are already beginning to resist treatment. Among other lifeforms,...

The Road Past Monchy

Terence Loveridge
Terence Loveridge offers a unique look at the land and air operations around the strategic village of Monchy-le-Preux at the center of the western front during World War I. The story of the Great War is usually one of condemnation or rehabilitation of strategists and consecration of the common soldier, while the story of those who planned, directed, and led operations on the ground has generally been overlooked. Loveridge uses experiences of junior leaders...

Ecological Moral Character

Nancy M. Rourke
An ecological model through which we can imagine Aquinas' vision of moral character The images we use to think about moral character are powerful. They inform our understanding of the moral virtues and the ways in which moral character develops. However, this aspect of virtue ethics is rarely discussed. In Ecological Moral Character, Nancy M. Rourke creates an ecological model through which we can form images of moral character. She integrates concepts of ecology with Aquinas' vision...

Handbook on Critical Life Issues, fourth edition

Edited by Arland K. Nichols
Handbook on Critical Life Issues is a comprehensive textbook evaluating major life issues and health care ethics from the standpoint of the teaching of the Catholic Church. It is meant in a special way for use in university courses and adult religious education. This classic work on Catholic bioethics began with texts compiled by Rev. Donald McCarthy and Rev. Edward Bayer in 1982 and was revised twice by the Marianist Rev. John Leies, most recently in 2010. This fourth edition, by...

Political Justice in Budapest after World War II

Andrea Pető, Ildikó Barna
In Hungary, which fell under Soviet influence at the end of World War II, those who had participated in the wartime atrocities were tried by so called people's courts. This book analyses this process in an objective, quantitative way, contributing to the present timely discussion on the Hungarian war guilt. The authors apply a special focus on the gender aspect of the trials. Political justice had a specific nature in Hungary. War criminals began to be brought to...

Northerny

Dawn Macdonald
Fresh, funny, and imbued with infectious energy, Northerny tells a much-needed and compelling story of growing up and living in the North. Here are no tidy tales of aurora borealis and adventures in snow. For Dawn Macdonald, the North is not an escape, a pathway to enlightenment, or a lifestyle choice. It's a messy, beautiful, and painful point of origin. People from the North see the North differently and want to tell their own stories in their own way, including about their experiences growing up on the land, getting an...

Go Figure

Rae Armantrout
Keen, pithy meditations on a world that continues to surprise us The poems in Pulitzer Prize-winner Rae Armantrout's new book are concerned with "this ongoing attempt/ to catalog the world" in a time of escalating disasters. From the bird who "check-marks morning/once more//like someone who gets up/to make sure// the door is locked" to bat-faced orchids, raising petals like light sails as if about to take flight, these poems make keen visual and psychological observations. The title Go Figure speaks to the book's focus on the...

Fir and Empire

Ian M. Miller, foreword by Paul S. Sutter, series edited by Paul S. Sutter
A CHOICE OUTSTANDING ACADEMIC TITLE The disappearance of China's naturally occurring forests is one of the most significant environmental shifts in the country's history, one often blamed on imperial demand for lumber. China's early modern forest history is typically viewed as a centuries-long process of environmental decline, culminating in a nineteenth-century social and ecological crisis. Pushing back...

Breaking Canadians

Nili Kaplan-Myrth, foreword by Brian Goldman, afterword by Sue Robins
The COVID-19 pandemic has wreaked havoc on people worldwide. The death tolls, the economic disruptions, the impact on our children's education, and the extended periods of social and physical distancing have left us feeling demoralized, exhausted, angry, and burned out. Breaking Canadians brings together health care experts, community advocates, and average citizens from across Canada to offer a unique analysis...

Hungry Roots

Ashli Quesinberry Stokes and Wendy Atkins-Sayre
A journey through Southern Appalachia to explore the complex messages food communicates about the region. Depictions of Appalachian food culture and practices often romanticize people in the region as good, simple, and, often, white. These stereotypes are harmful to the actual people they are meant to describe as well as to those they exclude. In Hungry Roots: How Food Communicates Appalachia's Search for Resilience, Ashli...

Le sacrifice des vaches noires, critical edition

Moha Layid. Edited by Paul A. Silverstein.
An acclaimed Moroccan novel about resisting colonialism and environmental destruction An oasis community in Morocco hopes to stop a devastating drought by sacrificing black cows to satisfy the spirits. But the wise elder Bassou secretly plans a different solution: to sabotage the motorized pumps that have lowered the water table and nearly destroyed the subsistence farming and herding that support the local way of life. The young newlywed Yidir...

Strengthening South Korea–Japan Relations

Dennis Patterson and Jangsup Choi
At the conclusion of WWII, no part of the world experienced a more dramatic transformation than East Asia. The region's political stability throughout the postwar period prompted exponential economic growth that ultimately established South Korea, Japan, and China as East Asia's most important powers. While many citizens of these nations now live in a time of unprecedented prosperity, the arrangement that...

Chessie

Eric A. Cheezum
The incredible true story of the mysterious sea creature who captured hearts and imaginations during the turbulent 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. In the summer of 1978, residents along the Virginia side of the Potomac River were startled by sightings of a strange creature lurking in the water. Eventually dubbed Chessie, this elusive sea serpent tantalized reporters and the public alike, always slipping away just out of reach. In this, the first comprehensive history of the...

Big Time

Murry R. Nelson
For some of us, Big Ten basketball will always mean the original ten great teams that comprised the league. But for all fans, the teams during this time period bring back memories of some of the best teams and players that have ever played basketball.   In the sweeping history of two decades of Big Ten basketball, Murry Nelson chronicles the conference when it was the most successful of any basketball conference in the nation. Coaches such as Lute Olson, Lou Henson, Johnny Orr,...

Law from Below

Elisabeth Rain Kincaid
A constructive model of engagement with unjust laws from the ground up The current political atmosphere would suggest that law is imposed only from above, specifically by the chief executive acting upon some sort of perceived populist mandate. In Law from Below, Elisabeth Rain Kincaid argues that the theology of the early modern legal theorist and theologian, Francisco Suárez, SJ may be successfully retrieved to provide a...

Baptism of Desire and Christian Salvation

Anthony R. Lusvardi, SJ
Belief in the necessity of baptism for salvation is rooted in the New Testament and was forcefully affirmed by the Church Fathers, yet today this belief is treated with unease if not ignored altogether. Over the course of centuries, Catholic theology has wrestled with a doctrine—baptism of desire—that both preserves this fundamental principle and allows for salvation in hard cases, such as catechumens dying unexpectedly. Baptism of Desire and Christian Salvation traces this...

The Roma - A Minority in Europe

edited by Roni Stauber, Raphael Vago, foreword by Yehuda Bauer
The main issues arising from the encounter between Roma people and surrounding European society since the time of their arrival in Medieval Europe until today are discussed in this work. The history of their persecution and genocide during the Nazi era, in particular, is central to the present volume. Significantly, some authors sought to emphasize the continuing history of prejudice and persecution, which...

That Audible Slippage

Margaret Christakos
That Audible Slippage invokes a poetics of active listening and environmental sound to investigate the ways in which we interact with the world, balancing perception and embodiment alongside a hypnagogic terrain of grief and mortality. Audibility is a primary theme of this collection—what can be heard, what is obstacled, and what remains unheard. Many of the poems included in the collection try to hold spaces open for the slipperiness of the heard and unheard and the not-yet heard and their associated...

DEED

torrin a. greathouse
A lyrically and formally innovative exploration of desire and its cost DEED, the follow-up to torrin a. greathouse's 2022 Kate Tufts Discovery Award winning debut, Wound from the Mouth of a Wound, is a formally and lyrically innovative exploration of queer sex and desire, and what it can cost. Sprawling across art, eros, survival, myth, etymology, and musical touchstones from Bruce Springsteen to Against Me!, this new book both subverts and pays homage to the poetic canon, examining an artistic lineage that doesn't always love...

Invisible Ink

Guy Stern
Invisible Ink is the story of Guy Stern's remarkable life. This is not a Holocaust memoir; however, Stern makes it clear that the horrors of the Holocaust and his remarkable escape from Nazi Germany created the central driving force for the rest of his life. Stern gives much credit to his father's profound cautionary words, "You have to be like invisible ink. You will leave traces of your existence when, in better times, we can emerge again and show ourselves as the individuals we are." Stern carried these words and their...

Exiled to Motown

Scott Kurashige
Mar 2024 - Jacobs Gal
During World War II, Detroit emerged as a relative space of freedom for Nisei permitted by the War Relocation Authority to leave sites of incarceration but banned from returning to their homes in the exclusion zones. These Nisei connected with an existing Japanese American community that had been formed by immigrant trailblazers who came to Detroit in the early twentieth century to be part of the booming auto industry. While many of the wartime migrants later...

Toxic

Amelia Fiske, Jonas Fischer
Over the past decade, people have learned about oil contamination in the Ecuadorian Amazon through "Toxic Tours" in which a guide brings participants – students, lawyers, environmental activists, journalists, or foreign tourists – to visit contaminated sites. These toxic tours combine personal experience and local knowledge to convince visitors of the immediacy of environmental issues. Drawing on extensive research and fieldwork, Toxic takes the reader on a visual toxic tour through...

Liberty Street

Jason K. Friedman
Purchasing a historic Savannah home unlocks the sweeping story of a Southern Jewish family As Jason K. Friedman renovated his flat in a grand 1875 town house in his hometown of Savannah, he discovered a portal to the past. Liberty Street takes the reader on Friedman's personal journey to understand the history of the family who built the home. At the center of the story is a sensitive young man pulled between love and duty, a close-knit family straining under...

The Sacrifice of Black Cows, critical edition

Moha Layid. Edited and translated by Paul A. Silverstein.
An acclaimed Moroccan novel about resisting colonialism and environmental destruction An oasis community in Morocco hopes to stop a devastating drought by sacrificing black cows to satisfy the spirits. But the wise elder Bassou secretly plans a different solution: to sabotage the motorized pumps that have lowered the water table and nearly destroyed the subsistence farming and herding that support the local way of life. The young newlywed Yidir...

Marshall's Great Captain

Kathy Wilson
On May 3, 1943, dozens of airplanes could be seen flying in and out of Royal Air Force Bovingdon Airfield near London, England. Among the aircraft seen that day was a B-24D bomber named Hot Stuff, which carried the Commanding General of US Forces in Europe, Lieutenant General Frank M. Andrews—the officer charged with formulating a plan to invade the European continent. Speculation was that General George C. Marshall had called Andrews...

Beating Melanoma, second edition

Steven Q. Wang, MD
Now completely updated! The essential guide for people with melanoma. In Beating Melanoma, world-renowned skin cancer expert Dr. Steven Q. Wang provides an indispensable guide for those diagnosed with melanoma. Now in its second edition and completely revised, this practical guide offers up-to-date research on the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of melanoma, and a readable narrative that demystifies everything from the pathology report to the stages of cancer. This new edition...

Good Business

Lilly Tench
Good Business: An Entrepreneur's Guide to Creating a Better World is an illustrated guide that takes readers through the complicated but exhilarating landscape of social enterprise businesses that are changing the world. A social enterprise is a different kind of business, one that uses a market-driven approach to address a social or environmental problem such as poverty, environmental damage, or resource scarcity, with the dual goals of helping humanity and building a...

Blacks and Jews in America

Terrence L. Johnson, Jacques Berlinerblau, with contributions by Yvonne Chireau, Susannah Heschel
A Black-Jewish dialogue lifts a veil on these groups' unspoken history, shedding light on the challenges and promises facing American democracy from its inception to the present In this uniquely structured conversational work, two scholars—one of African American politics and religion, and one of contemporary American Jewish culture—explore a mystery: Why aren't Blacks and Jews presently united...

Guiding to a Blessed End

Eugenia Constantinou
Apocalyptic fervor gripped the Eastern Roman Empire as late antiquity drew to a close. The empire confronted bubonic plague, civil war, famine, and catastrophic Persian invasions. Meanwhile, Andrew, archbishop of Caesarea, was tasked with writing what would become the first Greek patristic commentary on the Apocalypse and the single most influential commentary on any biblical book. Andrew preserved existing Eastern Apocalypse...

Through the Window

Keith Doubt
This book is not about war crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide, evil, or the killing of a society. It is about a cultural heritage, something vital to a society as a society, something that was not killed in the previous war, something that is resilient.  Through the Window brings an original perspective to folklore of Bosnians at a certain period of time and the differences and similarities of the three main ethnic groups in Bosnia and Herzegovina. It examines the...

The Riel Problem

Albert Braz
Tracing Louis Riel's metamorphosis from traitor to hero, Braz argues that, through his writing, Riel resists his portrayal as both a Canadian patriot and a pan-Indigenous leader. After being hanged for high treason in 1885, the Métis politician, poet, and mystic has emerged as a quintessential Canadian champion. The Riel Problem maps this representational shift by examining a series of cultural and scholarly commemorations of Riel since 1967, from a large-scale opera about his life,...

Dance History(s)

edited by Annie-B Parson and Thomas DeFrantz
A multivoiced dance history book, authored by twelve diverse choreographers In an effort to deepen our understanding of what dance is and how it has functioned throughout human history, this prismatic book project is dedicated to an artist-centric perception of dance history. Diverse dance artists from the American dance field contribute personal views of how dance has unfolded over time, answering the question: "Who is in your imaginary dance family...

When Detroit Played the Numbers

Felicia B. George
A testament to the tenacious spirit embodied in Detroit culture and history, this account reveals how numbers gambling, initially an illegal enterprise, became a community resource and institution of solidarity for Black communities through times of racial disenfranchisement and labor instability. Author Felicia B. George sheds light on the lives of Detroit's numbers operators—many self-made entrepreneurs who overcame poverty and...

Taiwan Lives

Niki J. P. Alsford, series edited by James Lin, William Lavely, Madeleine Yue Dong
From a cradle of Austronesian expansion to the dynamic economic powerhouse and successful democracy it is today, Taiwan is layered in colonial histories. In Taiwan Lives, Niki J. P. Alsford presents a comprehensive examination of the island nation's rich and complex past, told through the life stories of those who have lived it. A merchant, an exile, an activist, a pop star, a doctor, and a president are just some of the...

Post-Soviet Graffiti

Alexis Lerner
For more than a decade, Alexis Lerner combed the alleyways, underpasses, and public squares of cities once under communist rule, from Berlin in the west to Vladivostok in the east, recording thousands of cases of critical and satirical political street art and cataloging these artworks linguistically and thematically across space and time. Complemented by first-hand interviews with leading artists, activists, and politicians from across the region, Post-Soviet Graffiti...

Another Sojourner Looking for Truth

Millicent E. Brown
Memories and insights of a lifelong social justice advocate as she searches for freedom as an African American woman Millicent E. Brown's family home at 270 Ashley Avenue in Charleston, South Carolina, was a center of civil rights activity. There Brown gained intimate knowledge of the struggle for racial justice, and those experiences set her on a life course dedicated to the civil rights struggle. Best known as the named...

Approaches to Teaching Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, second edition

edited by Joseph M. Ortiz
New approaches to teaching a familiar work By the time they encounter Romeo and Juliet in the classroom, many students have already been exposed to various, and sometimes incongruous, manifestations of Shakespeare's work. This volume makes a virtue of students' familiarity with the preconceptions, anachronisms, and appropriations that shape experiences of the work, finding innovative pedagogical possibilities in the play's adaptations and in new technologies...

The Kentucky Oaks

Avalyn Hunter
No Thoroughbred race in the state of Kentucky holds a more hallowed place in the national and international consciousness than the Kentucky Derby. Its fame is richly deserved, yet there are other equally important and historic races whose significance deserves a larger share of the spotlight—none more so than the Derby's sister race, the Kentucky Oaks. Inaugurated on May 19, 1875—just two days after the first Kentucky Derby—and run annually at Churchill Downs since then, the Kentucky...

Spanning the Gilded Age

John K. Brown
The fascinating history of the St. Louis Bridge, the first steel structure in the world. In Spanning the Gilded Age, John K. Brown tells the daring, improbable story of the construction of the St. Louis Bridge, known popularly as the Eads Bridge. Completed in 1874, it was the first structure of any kind—anywhere in the world—built of steel. This history details the origins, design, construction, and enduring impact of a unique feat of engineering, and it illustrates how...

Willkie Sprint

Kerry Hellmuth
In the triumphal spirit of Breaking Away comes the unforgettable true story of the first women's Little 500 race at Indiana University. In 1987 four young women from different walks of life enrolled at Indiana University. No one knew that these four freshmen would defy the odds and go down in history as the underdog team to win the first ever women's Little 500 bicycle race the following spring. Willkie Sprint is the inspiring true story...

Cathonomics

Anthony M. Annett, foreword by Jeffrey D. Sachs
Inequality is skyrocketing. In this world of vast riches, millions of people live in extreme poverty, barely surviving from day to day. All over the world, the wealthy's increasing political power is biasing policy away from the public interest and toward the financial interests of the rich. At the same time, many countries are facing financial fragility and diminished well-being. On top of it all, the global economy, driven by fossil...

Salvation through Temptation

Benjamin E. Heidgerken. Foreword by Paul M. Blowers.
Salvation through Temptation describes the development of predominant Greek and Latin Christian conceptions of temptation and of the work of Christ to heal and restore humankind in the context of that temptation, focusing on Maximus the Confessor and Thomas Aquinas as well-developed examples of Greek and Latin thought on these matters. Maximus and Thomas represent two trajectories...

Under the Radar

R. Eugene Parta
Western democracy is currently under attack by a resurgent Russia, weaponizing new technologies and social media. How to respond? During the Cold War, the West fought off similar Soviet propaganda assaults with shortwave radio broadcasts. Founded in 1949, the US-funded Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty broadcast uncensored information to the Soviet republics in their own languages. About one-third of Soviet urban adults listened to Western radio. The broadcasts...

For the Public Good

Loleen Berdahl, Jonathan Malloy, Lisa Young
Arts graduate education is uniquely positioned to deliver many of the public good needs of contemporary Canada. For the Public Good argues, however, that graduate programs must fundamentally change if they are to achieve this potential. Drawing on deep experience and research, the authors outline how reformed programs that equip graduates with advanced skills can address Canada's most vexing challenges and seek action on...

Dybbuk Americana

Joshua Gottlieb-Miller
Inventive poetry explores Jewish identity in America "How can I teach a prayer / I only know how to recite?" "America, whose death / didn't you come from?" These are some of the questions that poet Joshua Gottlieb-Miller wrestles with in his beautiful, gripping new collection. By turns experimental and documentary, Dybbuk Americana draws out the questions around Jewish identity in the United States, and what it means to pass on Jewish identity to one's child. This hybrid text draws on art, mysticism, and...

Ma Lineal

Faith S. Holsaert
Through her childhood spent in 1940s New York being raised by two mothers, her work with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee during the Civil Rights Movement, and raising her own children in the coalfields of West Virginia, Faith S. Holsaert has been defined by the intertwined forces of race, activism, and family. As a young woman on the front line of the Civil Rights Movement, she learned the power of contested narratives and came to understand her whiteness, her...

Cold War Deceptions

David H. Price
During the early Cold War, the Central Intelligence Agency created dozens of funding fronts to support work that aligned with CIA goals, from clandestine operations and research to liberal anticommunist programs. While investigative journalists and congressional inquiries exposed many of these fronts, little is known about their daily internal workings. With a specific focus on the 1950s and 1960s Asia Foundation, Cold War Deceptions provides a rare view into the bureaucratic...

Sticky, Sexy, Sad

Treena Orchard, foreword by Wednesday Martin
Lifelong luddite Treena Orchard was a newly sober woman coming off a much-needed break from relationships, reluctantly taking the digital plunge by downloading a dating app. Instead of the fun, easy experiences advertised on swiping platforms, she discovered endless upkeep, ghosting, fleeting moments of sexual connection, and a steady flow of misogyny. In Sticky, Sexy, Sad, Orchard uses her skills as both an anthropologist who studies...

A Deeper South

Pete Candler. Foreword by Rosanne Cash.
The author's road trips through the American South lead to a personal confrontation with history In A Deeper South: The Beauty, Mystery, and Sorrow of the Southern Road, Pete Candler offers a travel narrative drawn from twenty-five years of road-tripping through the backroads of the American South. Featuring Candler's own photography, the book taps into the public imagination and the process of both remembering and forgetting that define...

Approaches to Teaching Jacobs's Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

edited by Lynn Domina
Strategies for teaching a classic abolitionist text One of the most commonly taught slave narratives, Harriet Jacobs's Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl is rightly celebrated for its progressive and distinctive appeals to dismantle the dehumanizing system of American slavery. Depicting the abuse Jacobs experienced, her years in hiding, and her escape to the North, the work evokes sympathy for Jacobs as a woman and a mother. Today, it...

Simplicity and Excellence

Deirdre A. Scaggs and Evalina Kremer Settle. Foreword by Ouita Michel. Afterword by sara bradley.
Born at the turn of the twentieth century in Cynthiana, Kentucky, Elizabeth Cromwell Kremer was a woman who strove for excellence in all things. Ever resistant to the constraints of social conventions, at a time when roughly 20 percent of the US workforce was female, Kremer worked her way up the ranks of the service industry. From the home economics classrooms of...

In These Streets

Josiah Bates
A groundbreaking expose on the rise of gun violence in recent years. Journalist Josiah Bates pulls back the curtain on a crisis that continues to plague the United States in this gripping narrative. Fueled by the convergence of the COVID-19 pandemic and social unrest, gun violence has surged to unprecedented levels, devastating marginalized communities and urban areas across the nation. Bates embarks on a heart-wrenching journey, crisscrossing the country to...

101 Trees of Indiana, New edition

Marion T. Jackson. Illustrations by Katherine Harrington. Photographs by Ron Rathfon.
For decades, 101 Trees of Indiana has provided all you need to identify a tree in the Hoosier State, whatever the season. This revised edition includes over 100 species of trees, mostly native to the state but also others that are widely naturalized or planted extensively, plus a bevy of updated facts, statistics, and photos to provide even clearer and more accurate botanical details. Each listing features illustrations to...

Under the Dome

Alan M. Hantman, foreword by Senator Harry M. Reid, Jr.
An inside account of politics, crisis, and architecture on Capitol Hill The domed US Capitol Building is recognized around the world as America's most iconic symbol, the forum for representative democracy, and the physical stage for the transfer of executive power. As the United States grew in size and complexity, the Capitol was built, rebuilt, enlarged, and extended many times under the direction of the few...

A Guide to John Henry Newman

edited by Juan R. Velez
John Henry Newman (1801-1890), renowned thinker and writer, Anglican clergyman and later Roman Catholic priest and cardinal, has had a lasting influence on both Anglicans and Catholics, in the fields of literature, education, and theology. On October 13, 2019, Pope Francis declared him a saint in Rome. Appealing to both the student and the scholar, A Guide to John Henry Newman provides a wide range of subjects on Newman's life and thought relevant for our times and...

Escaping Kakania

Jan Mrázek, edited by Jan Mrázek
Escaping Kakania is about fascinating characters—soldiers, doctors, scientists, writers, painters—who traveled from their eastern European homelands to colonial Southeast Asia. Their stories are told by experts on different countries in the two regions, who bring diverse approaches into a conversation that crosses disciplinary and national borders. The 14 chapters deal with the diverse encounters of eastern Europeans with the many faces of...

Contemporary Vulnerabilities

edited by Claire Carter, Chelsea Temple Jones, Caitlin Janzen
Contemporary Vulnerabilities centres on critical reflections about vulnerable moments in research committed to social change. Exploring the many vulnerabilities within social science research, this interdisciplinary collection gathers critical stories, reflections, and analyses about innovative methodologies that engage with unconventional and unexpected spaces of research that scholars inhabit and share. The...

Preservation in Action

Anne Crofoot Kuckro. Photographs by Peter R. Brown.
A one-of-a-kind tour through exquisitely preserved, chronicled and illustrated historic buildings Preservation in Action is the first publication that tells the compelling story of Old Wethersfield, Connecticut's largest and oldest historic district in its oldest town. Based on original research, with stunning photography and handsome design, through ten examples of...

Between the Tides in California

Ryan P. Kelly, Terrie Klinger, Patrick J. Krug, John J. Meyer
The vast and diverse California coast is an awe-inspiring place of exploration and discovery, full of life forms that are shockingly unfamiliar. Intertidal fish that can breathe in air, worms that build entire reefs, and seaweeds that can be mistaken for tar spots—these are as common as the more familiar barnacles that eat with their feet. Unicorn snails lie still on the rocks as they drill into the shells of their...

Constructing Health

Tye Farrow
How do buildings make us feel? How can they make us feel better? Through research at the emerging intersection of neuroscience and architecture, Constructing Health explores how our mind – and its various sensory systems – interacts with our built environment to enhance or harm our health and well-being. Globally renowned architect Tye Farrow bridges the gap in knowledge between the therapeutic medical world and the design community to reveal how the...

A Short History of Greenville

Judith T. Bainbridge
A concise and engaging history that traces Greenville's development from frontier settlement to one of America's best small cities Today, Greenville, South Carolina, is regularly included on lists of the best cities and best places to live in the United States. The present-day site of technological innovation nestled in the Piedmont of America's Southeast, Greenville is promoted as a future-oriented city and a weekend getaway for tourists interested in art, culture, nature, and cuisine. In this...

Approaches to Teaching the Works of Ralph Ellison

edited by Tracy Floreani
Unsparingly honest writings about America and race One of the most important American authors and public intellectuals of the twentieth century, Ralph Ellison had a keen and unsentimental understanding of the relationship between race, art, and activism in American life. He contended with other writers of his day in his examination of the entrenched racism in society, and his writing continues to inform national conversations in letters and culture. The essays in...

Sweet Tooth and Other Stories

Serkan Görkemli
Queerness, labels, and allyship are central themes in this moving collection of stories set in Turkey, where Middle Eastern and Euro-American expressions of identity collide and naming one's orientation is a fraught endeavor. An eleven-year-old undergoes hand surgery that will allow him to wear a wedding ring in adulthood. Two college roommates reach an erotic understanding as they indulge in dessert. A sex worker travels with an American same-sex marriage activist through the Aegean countryside. A...

Love

Anne Marie Pahuus
A brief but engaging look at love. In Love, researcher Anne Marie Pahuus explores the fascinating dimensions of this complicated and alluring feeling. Defining love as a mixture of warm emotions fueled by our wish to be with another person, Pahuus illustrates how love frames and influences our eventful lives, plans, and goals. But we haven't always viewed love in the romantic way that we see it now—the idea of love has changed and evolved throughout history, from Plato to Kierkegaard and Milan...

Folklore of Lake Erie

Judith S. Neulander
Welcome to a very different Lake Erie—where ghost ships sail silently, a Black Dog brings doom to sailors who see it, and sea monsters swirl in the murky depths above a UFO base. In Folklore of Lake Erie, Judith S. Neulander presents these captivating tales and many more from the smallest, yet arguably the most peculiar, of the Great Lakes in North America. Whether you are embarking on a discovery of the vampire crypt that lurks in the shadows while Lincoln's ghost train speeds past on its eternal journey...

Musician in the Clouds

Ali Bader, translated by Ikram Masmoudi
A translation of an award-winning Iraqi novelist's story exploring global migration in a postcolonial world, extremism, and what it means to belong somewhere The talented classical cellist Nabil always imagined a world where music and art govern everyday life. After being attacked in his hometown in Iraq and not being able to play music, Nabil decides to emigrate to Europe, where he thinks he can fit into society better. He muses about music, the Utopian City as envisioned by...

On Slavery and the Slave Trade

Luis de Molina
In his monumental On Justice and Rights, the Jesuit Luis de Molina (1535-1600) discussed the legal and ethical aspects of the Portuguese trade in African and Asian enslaved persons. Molina surveys, develops, and problematizes the criteria necessary for the legitimate possession, sale, and purchase of human freedom. He insists that, even under legally valid slavery, persons who have sold or lost their freedom have inalienable rights as...

Royal Fraud

Robert Austin
Beginning its narrative in 1961, when Albanian King Zog I died in a Paris hospital after 22 years in exile, this book tells the colourful story of this Balkan country's first and only monarch. The road to becoming Europe's youngest president in 1925 and then king of Albania in 1928 was paved with feuds and assassinations, a political career-path common in the region. He craved the throne for several reasons; the Balkans were mostly run by kings, and Zog wanted to impress his...

Feministing in Political Science

edited by Alana Cattapan, Ethel Tungohan, Nisha Nath, Fiona MacDonald, Stephanie Paterson
Focusing on the discipline of political science, this collection examines what is at stake in contesting the boundaries of the contemporary university. As the study of politics and political life, the mainstream of the discipline has examined power in the institutions and processes of government. But if the personal is political, political science is about much more than what happens in those institutions. This collection...