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Abraham Lincoln's Wilderness Years

J. Edward Murr, edited by Joshua Claybourn
Abraham Lincoln spent a quarter of his life—from 1816 to 1830, ages 7 to 21—learning and growing in southwestern Indiana. Despite the importance of these formative years, Lincoln rarely discussed this period, and with his sudden, untimely death in 1865, mysterious gaps appear in recorded history. In Abraham Lincoln's Wilderness Years, Joshua Claybourn collects and annotates the most significant scholarship from J. Edward Murr,...

George Tsutakawa

David F. Martin
Nov 2022 - Cascadia Art Museum
One of the leading Northwest artists of his generation, George Tsutakawa (1910–97) is internationally known for his sculpture and fountain designs. However, a lesser-known aspect of his career was the production of blockprints, watercolors, and works on paper that began in the 1930s and continued throughout his career. Born in Seattle and educated in Japan, Tsutakawa had early success while still in high school. He attended the University of Washington, where he received an MFA in sculpture in...

Unsettling the University

Sharon Stein
Shifts the narrative around the history of US higher education to examine its colonial past. Over the past several decades, higher education in the United States has been shaped by marketization and privatization. Efforts to critique these developments often rely on a contrast between a bleak present and a romanticized past. In Unsettling the University, Sharon Stein offers a different entry point—one informed by decolonial theories and...

A Primer of Pastoral Spanish

Michael J. McGrath
A Primer of Pastoral Spanish is designed to provide clergy, religious and laity alike with the tools to be pastoral among Spanish-speaking people. This primer is modeled after Madrigal's Magic Key to Spanish (1953), whose author, Margarita Madrigal, bases her methodology on creating with the language instead of memorizing it. Previous knowledge of Spanish is not necessary, although, as you will discover, you already know thousands of words in Spanish. The vocabulary you know in English is the...

A Front Row Seat

Nancy Olson Livingston
From her idyllic childhood in the American Midwest to her Oscar–nominated performance in Sunset Boulevard (1950) and the social circles of New York and Los Angeles, actress Nancy Olson Livingston has lived abundantly. In her memoir, A Front Row Seat, Livingston treats readers to an intimate, charming chronicle of her life as an actress, wife, and mother, and her memories of many of the most notable figures and moments of her time. Livingston...

Aline MacMahon

John Stangeland
American actress Aline MacMahon's youth was spent honing her talents while performing at local events in New York City. After popular stage success on Broadway, she headlined a touring company in Los Angeles, where she was discovered by legendary Hollywood director Mervyn LeRoy and put under contract to Warner Brothers. During the 1930s and 1940s, MacMahon starred in countless films and was among the most influential actors of the era, her talent revered as...

Buffalo Dance, expanded edition

Frank X Walker
When Frank X Walker's compelling collection of personal poems was first released in 2004, it told the story of the infamous Lewis and Clark expedition from the point of view of York, who was enslaved to Clark and became the first African American man to traverse the continent. The fictionalized poems in Buffalo Dance form a narrative of York's inner journey before, during, and after the expedition—a journey from slavery to freedom, from the plantation to the great Northwest, from servant to soul...

Charleston to Phnom Penh

John Martin Taylor, foreword by Jessica B. Harris
A journey through the lands of boiled peanuts, pesto, and pickled peppercorns—with thirty recipes Foodies, travel enthusiasts, culinary historians, fans of fine writing, and cookbook collectors will feast on John Martin Taylor's Charleston to Phnom Penh. A unique vision of a joyous and peripatetic life, these essays take readers on a journey across three continents, from the South Carolina Lowcountry of Taylor's upbringing to the Caribbean, Italy, France,...

Finding Francis

Elizabeth J. West
Finding Francis, finding family, freeing history Francis is found. Beyond Francis, a family is found—in archival material that barely deigned to notice their existence. This is the story of Francis Sistrunk and her children, from enslavement into forced migration across South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi. It spans decades before the Civil War and continues into post-emancipation America. A family story full of twists and turns, Finding Francis reclaims...

From Educational Experiment to Standard Bearer

edited by Daniel B. Friedman, Tracy L. Skipper, Catherine S. Greene, foreword by John N. Gardner
An exploration of the University of South Carolina's trailblazing approach to the first-year experience As an innovative educational experiment, University 101 was designed to support students' transition to and success in college. Now, fifty years after its inception, the program continues to bring national recognition to the University of...

House of Champions

Kevin Cook
The stories and accounts of Kentucky basketball's players, iconic coaches, and epic games have been told and retold, but lesser known are the stories of the arenas and venues that have been home to the Wildcats—buildings that have witnessed the sights, sounds, and shared spirit of the Big Blue Nation for over a century. In House of Champions: The Story of Kentucky Basketball's Home Courts, author Kevin Cook combines archival research and numerous interviews with...

The Cultivated Forest

edited by Ian M. Miller, Bradley Camp Davis, Brian Lander, John S. Lee
Forests have histories that need to be told. This examination of wood and woodlands in East and Southeast Asia brings together case studies from China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and Sumatra to explore continuities in the history of forest management across these regions as well as the distinctive qualities of human-forest relations within each context. With a general introduction to forest histories in East and Southeast Asia...

Building Bridges between Chan Buddhism and Confucianism

Diana Arghirescu
In Building Bridges between Chan Buddhism and Confucianism, Diana Arghirescu explores the close connections between Buddhism and Confucianism during China's Song period (960–1279). Drawing on In Essays on Assisting the Teaching written by Chan monk-scholar Qisong (1007–1072), Arghirescu examines the influences between the two traditions. In his writings, Qisong made the first substantial...

Mastering Spanish through Global Debate

Nieves Knapp, Krishauna Hines-Gaither, Morella Ruscitti-Tovar
Building superior Spanish language proficiency through critical engagement with global challenges Mastering Spanish through Global Debate is a one-semester textbook designed for students with Advanced-level Spanish language skills, moving toward Superior. Over the course of each chapter, students gain linguistic and rhetorical skills as they prepare to debate on broad, timely topics, including environmental consciousness, immigration, wealth...

Fantasmic Objects

Kirsten L. Scheid
In Lebanon, the study of modern art—rather than power or hierarchy—has compelled citizens to confront how they define themselves as a postcolonial nation. In Fantasmic Objects, Kirsten L. Scheid offers a striking study of both modern art in Lebanon and modern Lebanon through art. By focusing on the careers of Moustapha Farrouk and Omar Onsi, forefathers of an iconic national repertoire, and their rebellious student Saloua Raouda Choucair, founder of an...

Art Fallen from Heaven

Koos van Brakel
Nov 2022 - LM Publishers
Art Fallen from Heaven offers a new perspective on the origin of modern Balinese sculpture in the 1930s and an overview of its evolution from 1932 to 1973. Thoroughly illustrated with photos of traditional and modern sculpture as well as historic photos, this exhibition volume provides an overview of the artists association Pita Maha (1936–39) and many of its members. After Bali was subjugated by Dutch colonial rule, patronage shifted from the ruling monarchs to tourists and the...

Black Lives in Alaska

Ian C. Hartman, David Reamer, foreword by Calvin E. Williams
The history of Black Alaskans runs deep and spans generations. Decades before statehood and earlier even than the Klondike gold rush of the 1890s, Black men and women participated in Alaska's politics and culture. They hunted whales, patrolled the seas, built roads, served in the military, and opened businesses, even as they endured racism and fought injustices. Into the twentieth century, Alaska's Black...

Parental Rights in Peril

edited by Stephen M Krason
Parental Rights in Peril details the many reasons parental rights - one of the most basic of natural rights grounded in the very relationship of parents and their children - have come under considerable attack in recent times. The contributors to this volume lay out the different areas and ways in which those attacks have occurred and what has led to them. Their exploring of the nature and seriousness of the problem is a prerequisite to knowing how to respond to the attacks and restoring respect...

Rejoice the Head of Paul McCartney

Adam Braver
From the author of November 22, 2963 and Mr. Lincoln's Wars "Sophisticated, subtle, nuanced, and very moving." —Rick Moody "Fierce and true, his fiction is unforgettable." —Claire Messud "A moving, illuminating, relevant book." —Joanna Scott In the fall of 1969, on Sunset Boulevard, a giant billboard advertised the newly released album, Abbey Road. Shortly after it appeared, Paul McCartney's head was cut off the display, mysteriously disappearing. Set against that backdrop, Rejoice the Head of...

Re-visualizing Slavery

edited by Nancy Jouwe, Wim Manuhutu, Matthias van Rossum, Merve Tosun
May 2021 - LM Publishers
In Re-visualizing Slavery, historians, heritage specialists, and cultural scientists shed new light on the history of slavery in Asia by centering visual sources—specifically, Dutch paintings, watercolors and drawings from the seventeenth through nineteenth centuries. The traditional image of slavery in Asia is shaped and dominated by terms such as 'mild,' 'debt,' and 'household,' but new historical research that...

Byzantium after the Nation

Dimitris Stamatopoulos
Dimitris Stamatopoulos undertakes the first systematic comparison of the dominant ethnic historiographic models and divergences elaborated by Greek, Bulgarian, Serbian, Albanian, Romanian, Turkish, and Russian intellectuals with reference to the ambiguous inheritance of Byzantium. The title alludes to the seminal work of Nicolae Iorga in the 1930s, Byzantium after Byzantium, that argued for the continuity between the Byzantine and the...

Man Kind

Zachary Gerdes, PhD, Creator of the LIFT Model
A ground-breaking guide that provides men with tools to improve their mental health and well-being. Masculinity requires a redesign. Men exhibit higher rates of suicide, lower rates of help-seeking, higher rates of substance use and abuse, and higher rates of anger and violence. How can this change? In Man Kind, counseling psychologist Zachary Gerdes, PhD, provides a framework for improving men's mental health and well-being...

The Future of Sustainability Education at North American Universities

edited by Naomi Krogman, with Apryl Bergstrom, foreword by Thomas E. Lovejoy
From engineering to sociology, sustainability has, in recent years, become a key concept across academic disciplines. This collection explores sustainability education in the North American academy. The editors and contributors advocate for a more integrated approach to teaching sustainability in order to help students address the most pressing problems of the world, embrace experimentation, and...

Why Wellness Sells

Colleen Derkatch
How and why the idea of wellness holds such rhetorical—and harmful—power. In Why Wellness Sells, Colleen Derkatch examines why the concept of wellness holds such rhetorical power in contemporary culture. Public interest in wellness is driven by two opposing philosophies of health that cycle into and amplify each other: restoration, where people use natural health products to restore themselves to prior states of wellness; and enhancement, where people strive for...

Lawrence Tierney

Burt Kearns
Lawrence Tierney (1919–2002) was the kind of actor whose natural swagger and gruff disposition made him the perfect fit for the Hollywood "tough guy" archetype. Known for his erratic and oftentimes violent nature, Tierney drew upon his bellicose reputation throughout his career—a reputation that made him one of the most feared and mythologized characters in the industry. Born in Brooklyn to Irish American parents, Tierney worked in theater productions in New York before moving to...

Ends of Painting

edited by David Homewood, Paris Lettau
Contemporary art begins where painting ends, or so goes one of recent art history's most dominant narratives. This book is a postmortem of the supposed death of painting in the period following World War II. In eleven essays by a global array of leading scholars, Ends of Painting offers a counter-history, showing how the practice and discourse of painting remained integral to art throughout the 1960s and 1970s. Written by art historians from Australia, Asia, Europe,...

New Charter for Health Care Workers, English edition

Pontifical Council for Pastoral Assistance to Health Care Workers
The New Charter for Health Care Workers is a revision and updating of the earlier 1994 edition, also produced by the Pontifical Council for Health Care Workers. The work is divided into three major sections: "Procreating," "Living," and "Dying," each of which lays out authoritative teachings in medical ethics grounded in the traditional resources of the Church

UnAustralian Art

Rex Butler, A. D. S. Donaldson
UnAustralian Art: Ten Essays on Transnational Art History proposes a radical rethinking of Australian art. Rex Butler and ADS Donaldson do not seek to identify a distinctive national sensibility; instead, they demonstrate that Australian art and artists have always been engaged in struggles and creative exchanges with the rest of the world. Examining Australian art as much from the outside in as the inside out, Butler and Donaldson's methodology opens...

Vivienne Binns

edited by Anneke Jaspers, Hannah Mathews
Vivienne Binns is an important and singular figure in the history of Australian visual art. Her groundbreaking and experimental work has tested the philosophical underpinnings of art itself, both preempting and participating in the most significant cultural discourses of our times: from women's social and sexual liberation to Australia's regional identity. Her outstanding, multifaceted, and sustained contribution to Australian art was recognized in 2021 with an...

John J. Pershing and the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I, 1917-1919

edited by John T. Greenwood
General of the Armies John J. Pershing (1860–1948) had a long and distinguished military career, but he is most famous for leading the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I. He published a memoir, My Experiences in the World War, and has been the subject of numerous biographies, but the literature regarding this towering figure and his enormous role in the First World War deserves to be...

Animal Truth and Other Stories

Sharona Muir
Animal Truth and Other Stories is a collection of eco-fabulist tales in which adventures with fantastic animals and real science lead to metamorphoses of the heart. Familiar legends, from Faust and Oedipus to werewolves and time travel, appear in radically new ways: An artist obsessed with species extinction unwittingly summons a demonic double when he creates a "banquet" featuring a baked mermaid. A brilliant woman studying a rare fish makes a soul-shattering discovery about motherhood. A...

Cave Biodiversity

edited by J. Judson Wynne
A deep-dive into the evolutionary biology, biogeography, and conservation of the most elusive subterranean creatures in the world. Far from the austere, sparsely populated ecosystems often conjured in the imagination, caves host some of the most mysterious and biodiverse natural systems in the world. Subterranean environments, however, are the least explored terrestrial habitats, contributing to misconceptions about their inhabitants. Edited by cave...

How Colleges Use Data

Jonathan S. Gagliardi
What does a culture of evidence really look like in higher education? The use of big data and the rapid acceleration of storage and analytics tools have led to a revolution of data use in higher education. Institutions have moved from relying largely on historical trends and descriptive data to the more widespread adoption of predictive and prescriptive analytics. Despite this rapid evolution of data technology and analytics tools, universities and colleges still face a number of obstacles in their data...

How to Become an American

Daniel Wolff
An odyssey from pre–Civil War Charleston to post–World War II Minneapolis through Jewish immigrants' eyes The histories of US immigrants do not always begin and end in Ellis Island and northeastern cities. Many arrived earlier and some migrated south and west, fanning out into their vast new country. They sought a renewed life, fresh prospects, and a safe harbor, despite a nation that was not always welcoming and not always tolerant. How to Become...

Between the Tides in Washington and Oregon

Ryan P. Kelly, Terrie Klinger, John J. Meyer
A spectacular variety of life flourishes between the ebb and flow of high and low tide. Anemones talk to each other through chemical signaling, clingfish grip rocks and resist the surging tide, and bioluminescent dinoflagellates—single-celled algae—light up disturbances in the shallow water like glowing fingerprints. This guidebook helps readers uncover the hidden workings of the natural world of the shoreline. Richly...

The Art of Ceremony

Rebecca J. Dobkins
The practice of ceremony offers ways to build relationships between the land and its beings, reflecting change while drawing upon deep relationships going back millennia. Ceremony may involve intricate and spectacular regalia but may also involve simple tools, such as a plastic bucket for harvesting huckleberries or a river rock that holds heat for sweat. The Art of Ceremony provides a contemporary and historical overview of the nine federally recognized tribes in Oregon,...

Heritage Drinks of Myanmar

Luke J. Corbin, photographs by Shwe Paw Mya Tin
Nov 2022 - Silkworm Books
Heritage Drinks of Myanmar takes the reader on an anthropological journey through emerald mountains and rust-red valleys to showcase some of the myriad alcoholic drinks made in this unique and fascinating country. In Myanmar, freshly brewed and distilled beers, wines, and spirits are integral parts of village economies, providing health, communal, and financial benefits. Rice whiskeys infused with insects and fresh beers made from a cornucopia of grains await eager...

Material Contradictions in Mao's China

edited by Jennifer Altehenger, Denise Y. Ho
The growth of markets and consumerism in China's post-Mao era of political and economic reform is a story familiar to many. By contrast, the Mao period (1949–1976)—rightly framed as a time of scarcity—initially appears to have had little material culture to speak of. Yet people attributed great meaning to materials and objects often precisely because they were rare and difficult to obtain. This first volume devoted to the material history of the period explores...

Inheriting the Bomb

Mariana Budjeryn
The collapse of the Soviet Union unleashed the specter of the largest wave of nuclear proliferation in history. Why did Ukraine ultimately choose the path of nuclear disarmament? The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 left its nearly 30,000 nuclear weapons spread over the territories of four newly sovereign states: Belarus, Kazakhstan, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine. This collapse cast a shadow of profound ambiguity over the fate of the...

Engineering European Unity

Éva Bóka
Which European and non-European ideas and practices facilitated the shaping of European unity? Or rather, which pursuits led to deadlocks in the cooperation between states? The book seeks answers to these questions by surveying the historical attempts at realizing supranational patterns of governance in Europe since the Middle Ages. The main focus is on the nineteenth and twentieth century organizational models of European unification. The analysis draws...

Ida Lupino

William Donati
British-born actress, singer, director, and producer Ida Lupino (1918-1995) cut one of the most alluring profiles of any Hollywood persona during the forties and fifties. The star of classic films such as They Drive by Night (1940), High Sierra (1941), and Road House (1948), she was a stalwart of the screen throughout her early career and frequently received top billing ahead of stars such as Humphrey Bogart. While her talent was undeniable, her insistence on taking only roles she felt would challenge her...

Ishiro Honda

Steve Ryfle, Ed Godziszewski, OtherYuuko Honda-Yun, Martin Scorsese
The first comprehensive biography of the director behind Godzilla and other Japanese sci-fi classics Ishiro Honda was arguably the most internationally successful Japanese director of his generation, with an unmatched succession of science fiction films that were commercial hits worldwide. From the atomic allegory of Godzilla and the beguiling charms of Mothra to the tragic mystery of Matango and the disaster and spectacle of...

Mao's Army Goes to Sea

Toshi Yoshihara
New details about the founding of China's Navy reveals critical historical context and insight into future strategy From 1949 to 1950, the People's Liberation Army (PLA) made crucial decisions to establish a navy and secure China's periphery. The civil war had been fought with a peasant army, yet in order to capture key offshore islands from the Nationalist rival, Mao Zedong needed to develop maritime capabilities. Mao's Army Goes to Sea is a...

Mastering Italian through Global Debate

Marie Bertola, Sandra Carletti
Critical engagement with complex global issues that provides an effective approach to promoting linguistic proficiency and social responsibility Mastering Italian through Global Debate is a one-semester textbook designed for students with Advanced-level Italian language skills, moving toward Superior and above. Over the course of each chapter, students gain linguistic and rhetorical skills as they prepare to debate on broad, timely topics, including environmental...

The COVID-19 Intelligence Failure

Erik J. Dahl
An in-depth analysis of why COVID-19 warnings failed and how to avert the next disaster Epidemiologists and national security agencies warned for years about the potential for a deadly pandemic, but in the end global surveillance and warning systems were not enough to avert the COVID-19 disaster. In The COVID-19 Intelligence Failure, Erik J. Dahl demonstrates that understanding how intelligence warnings work — and how they fail — shows why the years of predictions were not...

Divine Speech in Human Words

Emmanuel Durand
Is the portrait of God revealed in Scripture fundamentally intelligible? The biblical accounts of God reveal seemingly contradictory themes: God's holiness and narratives telling of his anger; the Divine Omnipotence faced with the Impossible; the suffering Christ upon the Cross and the transcendent Trinity of Persons in God; the unique Savior and the universality of God's salvific will; and so forth. How are we to hold together all of this data without denying...

God's Knowledge of the World

Carl A. Vater
A theory of divine ideas was the standard Scholastic response to the question how does God know and produce the world? A theory was deemed to be successful only if it simultaneously upheld that God has perfect knowledge and that he is supremely simple and one. In articulating a theory of divine ideas, Carl Vater answers two sorts of questions. First, what is an idea? Does God have ideas? Are there many divine ideas? What sort of existence...

Matter and Mathematics

Andrew Younan
To borrow a phrase from Galileo: What does it mean that the story of the creation is "written in the language of mathematics?" This book is an attempt to understand the natural world, its consistency, and the ontology of what we call laws of nature, with a special focus on their mathematical expression. It does this by arguing in favor of the Essentialist interpretation over that of the Humean and Anti-Humean accounts. It re-examines and critiques Descartes' notion...

Saint Thomas Aquinas, third edition

Jean-Pierre Torrell, translated by Matthew K. Minerd, Robert Royal
The presentation of the life and work of any great thinker is a formidable task, even for a renowned scholar. This is all the more the case when such a historical figure is a saint and mystic, such as Friar Thomas Aquinas. In this volume, Fr. Jean-Pierre Torrell, OP, masterfully takes up the strenuous task of presenting such a biography, providing readers with a detailed, scholarly, and profound account of the thirteenth-century...

The Key to Unlocking the Door to the Truth

William Daniel
Father Ignacio Gordon, SJ, taught canon law (the Catholic Church's law) from 1960 until 1985 at the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome, with a concentration on procedural law, or the laws on trials. By all testimonies, he was outstanding for the clarity of his teaching, his humble affection for his students, his indefatigable and hidden service to the Apostolic See, and his priestly...

Park Dae Sung

edited by Sunglim Kim, with contributions by Sunglim Kim, Jinyoung A. Jin, Jungsil Jenny Lee, Jiyeon Kim, Young Ji Lee, Suzie Kim
Contemporary Korean artist Park Dae Sung (b. 1945) works in the traditional medium of ink painting while transforming familiar Korean landscapes with his modern and imaginative interpretations of the natural world. Park, who lost his left arm and both parents at the age of five and is entirely self-taught, has said, "Nature is my teacher." He devoted sixty years to mastering traditional brush...

An Introduction to Black Studies

Eric R. Jackson
For hundreds of years, the American public education system has neglected to fully examine, discuss, and acknowledge the vast and rich history of people of African descent who have played a pivotal role in the transformation of the United States. The establishment of Black studies departments and programs represented a major victory for higher education and a vindication of Black scholars such as W. E. B. Du Bois and Nathan Huggins. This emerging field of study sought to address omissions from...

Emily Carr

Lisa Baldissera
Emily Carr (1871–1945) gained prominence when female painters were not recognized internationally. Her work reveals a fascination with questions inspired by the Canadian sea, landscapes, and people, reflecting a profound commitment to the land she knew and loved. Along with the Group of Seven, Carr became a leading figure in Canadian modern art. Although more than half a century has passed since her death, her paintings continue to challenge and inspire. Emily Carr: Life & Work traces Carr's trajectory from...

Iljuwas Bill Reid

Gerald McMaster
Few twentieth-century artists were catalysts for the reclamation of a culture, but Iljuwas Bill Reid (1920–1998) was among them. The first book on Reid by an Indigenous scholar details his incredible journey to becoming one of the most significant Northwest Coast artists of our time. Born in British Columbia and denied his mother's Haida heritage in his youth, Iljuwas Bill Reid lived the reality of colonialism yet tenaciously forged a creative practice that celebrated Haida ways of seeing and...

Seizures and Epilepsy in Children, fourth edition

Eileen P. G. Vining, MD, Sarah C. Doerrer, MS, CPNP, Christa W. Habela, MD, PhD, Adam L. Hartman, MD, Sarah A. Kelley, MD, Eric H. Kossoff, MD, Cynthia F. Salorio, PhD, Samata Singhi, MD, MSc, and Carl E. Stafstrom, MD, PhD
The most comprehensive and practical guide available for caregivers of children who have seizures and epilepsy, now completely updated. For more than 30 years, parents, caregivers, and health care providers have trusted Seizures and Epilepsy in Children to provide...

The Glaucoma Guidebook

Constance Okeke, MD, MSCE
An easy-to-read yet thorough guide to understanding and managing glaucoma and taking care of your vision. When you receive a glaucoma diagnosis, knowing where to turn and how to understand treatment options can be overwhelming. Fifty percent of people with glaucoma do not even know they have the disease, and those who do may still struggle with managing it. If left untreated, glaucoma can lead to irreversible blindness. The Glaucoma Guidebook is an...

Israeli Bourekas Films

Deborah Starr
A genre of comic melodramas produced in the 1960s and '70s, Bourekas films are among the most popular films ever made in Israel. In Israeli Bourekas Films, author and filmmaker Rami Kimchi sets out a history of Bourekas films and discusses their origin. Kimchi considers the representation of Sephardi or Mizrahi Jews in the films, noting that the material culture reflected in the the films presented a culture that was closer to the European Yiddish culture than to the Middle Eastern...

Seeing the Unseen

Susan Elizabeth Gagliardi
How do arts convey the existence of potent knowledge without revealing details of that knowledge? In Seeing the Unseen, art historian Susan Elizabeth Gagliardi examines tensions between the seen and unseen that makers, patrons, and audiences of arts in western West Africa negotiate through objects, assemblages, and performances. Gagliardi examines how ambiguity anchors design of the arts, and she shows that attempts to determine...

Suitable Strangers

Vera Sheridan
In 1956, a group of 548 refugees escaping the violence of the Hungarian Revolution arrived on the shores of Ireland. With its own history shaped by waves of emigration to escape war, famine, and religious persecution, Ireland responded by creating its first international refugee settlement. Suitable Strangers reveals the firsthand experiences of the men, women, and children who lived in the Knockalisheen refugee camp near Limerick.

They Got Daddy

Sharon Tubbs
An unforgettable journey through racism and faith across the generations. January 15, 1959—a day that changed one family forever. White supremacists kidnapped and severely beat rural Alabama preacher Israel Page, nearly killing him because he had sued a White sheriff's deputy for injuries suffered in a car crash. After "they" "got Daddy," Israel Page's children began leaving the Jim Crow South, the event leaving an indelible mark on the family and its future. Decades...

Walking the Land

Shay Rabineau
Israel has one of the most extensive and highly developed hiking trail systems of any country in the world. Millions of hikers use the trails every year during holiday breaks, on mandatory school trips, and for recreational hikes. Walking the Land offers the first scholarly exploration of this unique trail system. Featuring more than ten thousand kilometers of trails, marked with hundreds of thousands of colored blazes, the trail system crisscrosses Israeli-controlled territory,...

A Companion to Margaret More Roper Studies

Elizabeth McCutcheon, William Gentrup
This volume is an important contribution to the field of Margaret More Roper studies, early modern women's writing, as well as Erasmian piety, Renaissance humanism, and historical and cultural studies more generally. Margaret More Roper is the learned daughter of St. Thomas More, the Catholic martyr; their lives are closely linked to each other and to early sixteenth-century changes in politics and religion...

A Guide to John Henry Newman

edited by Juan R. Velez
John Henry Newman (1801-1890), renowned thinker and writer, Anglican clergyman and later Roman Catholic priest and cardinal, has had a lasting influence on both Anglicans and Catholics, in the fields of literature, education, and theology. On October 13, 2019, Pope Francis declared him a saint in Rome. Appealing to both the student and the scholar, A Guide to John Henry Newman provides a wide range of subjects on Newman's life and thought relevant for our times and...

An Evangelical Adrift

Geertjan Zuijdwegt
An Evangelical Adrift is a theological biography of John Henry Newman (1801-1890) that reconstructs the most formative period in his development: the years between his teenage conversion to evangelicalism in 1816 and the beginning of the Tractarian Movement in 1833. By the early 1830s, Newman had explicitly rejected much of the theology he espoused in the late 1810s and early 1820s, and developed a highly original, deeply personal, and quite radical alternative,...

Catholicism and Liberal Democracy

James Martin Carr
Catholicism and Liberal Democracy seeks to clarify if there is a place for Catholicism in the public discourse of modern liberal democracy, bringing secular liberalism, as articulated by Jürgen Habermas, into conversation with the Catholic tradition. James Martin Carr explores three aspects of the Catholic tradition relevant to this debate: the Church's response to democracy from the nineteenth century up until the eve of the Second Vatican Council; the...

Reading Aristotle with Thomas Aquinas

Leo J. Elders, edited by Jörgen Vijgen
Reading Aristotle with Thomas Aquinas: His Commentaries on Aristotle's Major Works offers an original and decisive work for the understanding of the thought of Thomas Aquinas. For decades his commentaries on the major works of Aristotle have been the subject of lively discussions. Are his commentaries faithful and reliable expositions of the Stagirite's thought or do they contain Thomas's own philosophy and are they read...

Wide-Open Desert

Jordan Biro Walters
Throughout the twentieth century, New Mexico's LGBTQ+ residents inhabited a wide spectrum of spaces, from Santa Fe's nascent bohemian art scene to the secretive military developments at Los Alamos. Shifting focus away from the urban gay meccas that many out queer people called home, Wide-Open Desert brings to life a vibrant milieu of two-spirit, Chicana lesbian, and white queer cultural producers in the heart of the US Southwest. Jordan Biro Walters draws on oral histories,...

Honest Aging

Rosanne M. Leipzig, MD, PhD
Your indispensable guide to taking charge of the second half of your life. From Dr. Rosanne M. Leipzig, a top doctor with more than 35 years of experience caring for older people, Honest Aging is an indispensable guide to the second half of life, describing what to expect physically, psychologically, functionally, and emotionally as you age. Leipzig, an expert in evidence-based geriatrics, highlights how 80-year-olds differ from 60-year-olds and why knowing this...

Precarious Workers

Eloisa Betti
The recent vast upsurge in social science scholarship on job precarity has generally little to say about earlier forms of this phenomenon. Eloisa Betti's monograph convincingly demonstrates on the example of Italy that even in the post-war phase of Keynesian stability and welfare state, precarious labor was an underlying feature of economic development. She examines how in this short period exceptional politics of labor stability prevailed. The volume...

Seattle from the Margins

Megan Asaka
From the origins of the city in the mid-nineteenth century to the beginning of World War II, Seattle's urban workforce consisted overwhelmingly of migrant laborers who powered the seasonal, extractive economy of the Pacific Northwest. Though the city benefitted from this mobile labor force—consisting largely of Indigenous peoples and Asian migrants—municipal authorities, elites, and reformers continually depicted these workers and the spaces they...

The Academic Avant-Garde

Kimberly Quiogue Andrews
The surprising story of the relationship between experimental poetry and literary studies. In The Academic Avant-Garde, Kimberly Quiogue Andrews makes a provocative case for the radical poetic possibilities of the work of literary scholarship and lays out a foundational theory of literary production in the context of the university. In her examination of the cross-pollination between the analytic humanities and the craft of poetry writing, Andrews tells a bold story...

Embracing Vocation

Dianne C. Luce
Revelations on craft from a foundational scholar of Cormac McCarthy Devotees of Cormac McCarthy's novels are legion, and deservedly so. Embracing Vocation, which tells the tale of his journey to become one of America's greatest living writers, will be invaluable to scholars and literary critics—and to the many fans—interested in his work. Dianne C. Luce, a foundational scholar of McCarthy's writing, through extensive archival research, examines the first fifteen years...

Traditions of Natural Law in Medieval Philosophy

edited by Dominic Farrell
Reflection on natural law reaches a highpoint during the Middle Ages. Not only do Christian thinkers work out the first systematic accounts of natural law and articulate the framework for subsequent reflection, the Jewish and Islamic traditions also develop their own canonical statements on the moral authority of reason vis-à-vis divine law. In the view of some, they thereby articulate their own theories of natural law. These various traditions of medieval...

Jean Gabin

Joseph Harriss
When one thinks of the quintessential Frenchman, one likely pictures Jean Gabin (1904-1976). The son of music hall performers, the Paris-born actor grew up in the entertainment business. His onscreen debut in the 1930's marked the beginning of many memorable roles in films such as La Grande Illusion (1937) and Émile Zola's La Bête Humaine (1938). His performances would earn him international recognition and establish his reputation as one of the greatest stars of film noir. Pausing his performances...

Pensées

Blaire Pascal, Blaise Pascal, translated by Pierre Zoberman, introduction by David Wetsel
Blaise Pascal (1623-1662) was a French mathematician, physicist, and religious philosopher, who laid the foundation for the modern theory of probabilities. The Pensées are made up of some 800 fragments, that have proven to be an enduring masterpiece since their initial publication in 1670. This volume is a translation of Philippe Sellier's edition of Pascal's Pensées, in addition to two shorter texts, the Exchange with M. de Sacy and The Life of Monsieur...

Songs for the Fast and Pascha

St Ephrem The Syrian
Among the writers of the Syriac Christian tradition, none is as renowned as St. Ephrem of Nisibis (ca. 307–373), known to much of the later Christian world simply as "the Syrian." The great majority of Ephrem's works are poetry, with the madrāšē ("teaching songs") especially prominent. This volume presents English translations of four complete madrāšē cycles of Ephrem: On the Fast, On the Unleavened Bread, On the Crucifixion, and On the Resurrection. These collections include some of the most...

Engineering the Lower Danube

Luminita Gatejel
The Lower Danube—the stretch of Europe's second longest river between the Romanian-Serbian border and the confluence to the Black Sea—was effectively transformed during the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. In describing this lengthy undertaking, Luminita Gatejel proposes that remaking two key stretches—the Iron Gates and the delta—not only physically altered the river but also redefined...

Immeasurable Outcomes

Gayle Greene
What is the purpose of education? The answer might be found in a Shakespeare class at a small liberal arts college. In this engaging account of teaching a Shakespeare class at a small liberal arts college, Gayle Greene illustrates what is so vital and urgent about the humanities. Follow along with Greene as she introduces us to her students and showcases their strengths, needs, and vulnerabilities, so we can experience the magic of her classroom. In Immeasurable...

Ink

Angela Woodward
"We have extensive accounts, typed out neatly: 'They took me into a dark room and started hitting me on the head and stomach and legs. I stayed in this room for 5 days, naked, with no clothes.'" Angela Woodward's novel Ink tells the story of the two women who spend their days doing that neat typing. Sylvia and Marina, both single mothers, work in a suburban office building, transcribing tape recordings of witness statements describing detainee abuse at Abu Ghraib. Their ordinary preoccupations—problems with the soap in the...

Omega Balance

Anthony John Hulbert
Learn how to live a happier and healthier life by finding the right balance of omega fatty acids in your diet. Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are essential in the human diet. In Omega Balance, noted scientist Anthony J. Hulbert explains how the balance between these fatty acids in the human food chain has changed over the last half-century and the very serious negative health impacts this imbalance has created. An imbalance of these omega fats contributes to...

Teaching Postwar Japanese Fiction

edited by Alex Bates
Essays about teaching postwar Japanese fiction in its cultural and historical contexts. As Japan moved from the devastation of 1945 to the economic security that survived even the boom and bust of the 1980s and 1990s, its literature came to embrace new subjects and styles and to reflect on the nation's changing relationship to other Asian countries and to the West. This volume will help instructors introduce students to novels, short stories, and manga that confront postwar Japanese...

Nietzsche's Voices

John Sallis, edited by Richard Rojcewicz
Nietzsche's Voices, a much-anticipated volume of the Collected Writings of John Sallis, presents his two-semester lecture course on Nietzsche offered in the Philosophy Department of Duquesne University during the school year 1971–72. "Nietzsche is easy to read; his is apparently the easiest of all the great philosophies. Yet the easy intelligibility is deceptive. Nietzsche's writings make us believe we have understood when in fact we have not. His philosophy is actually the exact opposite...

Grace and Freedom in a Secular Age

Philip J. Rossi
In the course of a long and distinguished academic and civic career, the Canadian philosopher Charles Taylor has been, for articulate atheists and learned believers alike, an incisive, insightful, gracious, and challenging conversation partner on issues that arise at the intersection and interaction of religion, society, and culture. Grace and Freedom in a Secular Age offers a concise exposition of key ideas – contingency, otherness, freedom,...

Brilliance in Exile

István Hargittai, Balazs Hargittai
By addressing the enigma of the exceptional success of Hungarian emigrant scientists and telling their life stories, Brilliance in Exile combines scholarly analysis with fascinating portrayals of uncommon personalities. István and Balazs Hargittai discuss the conditions that led to five different waves of emigration of scientists from the early twentieth century to the present. Although these exodes were driven...

The Camphor Tree and the Elephant

Faizah Zakaria, series edited by K. Sivaramakrishnan, foreword by K. Sivaramakrishnan
What is the role of religion in shaping interactions and relations between the human and nonhuman in nature? Why are Muslim and Christian organizations generally not a potent force in Southeast Asian environmental movements? The Camphor Tree and the Elephant brings these questions into the history of ecological change in the region, centering the roles of religion and...

Al-Qata'i

Reem Bassiouney, translated by Roger Allen
An award-winning novelist's vibrant portrayal of the struggle to create a more unified society in medieval Egypt and how this has shaped Egypt today. Brimming with intrigue, adventure, and romance, Al-Qata'i: Ibn Tulun's City Without Walls tells the epic story of visionary Egyptian leader Ahmad Ibn Tulun who built Al-Qata'i (now Cairo) into a thriving multicultural empire. The novel begins with the rediscovery of the Ibn Tulun Mosque in 1918 and recounts Ibn...

America's Path Forward

edited by Konstanze Frischen, Michael Zakaras
Critiques and solutions offered by social changemakers from all walks of life The United States is living through a period of polarization and upheaval. We hunger for answers, yet too often turn to the same people and institutions, expecting different outcomes. How can this be? This book takes a different angle. It features award-winning social innovators from all walks of life with decades of...

Fixing American Cybersecurity

edited by Larry Clinton, foreword by Kiersten Todt, with contributions by Anthony Shapella, Lou DeSorbo, Jeffrey C. Brown, J.R. Williamson, Michael Higgins, Michael Gordon, Josh Higgins, Greg Montana, Gary McAlum, Kenneth Huh, Ryan Boulais, Jamison Gardner, Andy Kirkland, Alex Green, Richard Spearman, Carter Zheng, Tarun Krishnakumar, Larry Clinton

Forbidden

edited by Drew Christiansen, Carole Sargent
Moral theologians, defense analysts, conflict scholars, and nuclear experts imagine a world free from nuclear weapons At a 2017 Vatican conference, Pope Francis condemned nuclear weapons. This volume, issued after the 60th anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis, presents essays from moral theologians, defense analysts, conflict transformation scholars, and nuclear arms control experts, with testimonies from witnesses. It is a companion...

Pro-dvizhenie

Alyssa DeBlasio, Izolda Savenkova
An advanced, student-centered textbook that uses popular media to explore diverse perspectives from across Russian-speaking cultures Pro-dvizhenie is a student-centered, inquiry-based textbook designed to build Advanced-level Russian proficiency through engagement with timely topics that encourage reflection and examination. Whether exploring the role of technology in relationships, learning about indigenous communities of Russia, or reflecting on what it...

Reinventing the Supply Chain

Jack Buffington
An original vision for using technology to transform supply chains into value chains in order to revitalize American communities When the COVID-19 pandemic led to a global economic "shutdown" in March 2020, our supply chains began to fail, and out-of-stocks and delivery delays became the new norm. Contrary to public perception, the pandemic strain did not break the current system of supply chains; it merely exposed weaknesses and fault lines that were decades in...

American Higher Education in the Twenty-First Century, fifth edition

edited by Michael N. Bastedo, Philip G. Altbach, and Patricia J. Gumport
Now in its fifth edition! An indispensable reference for anyone concerned with the future of American colleges and universities. Whether it is advances in information technology, organized social movements, or racial inequality and social class stratification, higher education serves as a lens for examining significant issues within American society. First published in...

At the Crossroads of Music and Social Justice

edited by Brenda M. Romero, Susan M. Asai, David A. McDonald, Andrew G. Snyder, Katelyn E. Best, with contributions by Kyra D. Gaunt, Steven Loza, Charlotte W. Heth, Paul Austerlitz, Katie J. Graber, Darci Sprengel, Ho Chak Law, Alexandria Carrico
Music is powerful and transformational, but can it spur actual social change? A strong collection of essays, At the Crossroads of Music and Social Justice studies the meaning of music within a community to investigate the intersections of sound and...

Because Data Can't Speak for Itself

David Chrisinger and Lauren Brodsky
A guide for how to tell clear, data-driven stories that will make an impact. People with important evidence-based ideas often struggle to translate data into stories their readers can relate to and understand. And if leaders can't communicate well to their audience, they will not be able to make important changes in the world. Why do some evidence-based ideas thrive while others die? And how do we improve the...

Chinese Autobiographical Writing

edited by Patricia Buckley Ebrey, Cong Ellen Zhang, Ping Yao
Personal accounts help us understand notions of self, interpersonal relations, and historical events. Chinese Autobiographical Writing contains full translations of works by fifty individuals that illuminate the history and conventions of writing about oneself in the Chinese tradition. From poetry, letters, and diaries to statements in legal proceedings, these engaging and readable works draw us into the past and...

Grassroots Leviathan

Ariel Ron
How a massive agricultural reform movement led by northern farmers before the Civil War recast Americans' relationships to market forces and the state. Recipient of The Center for Civil War Research's 2021 Wiley-Silver Book Prize, Winner of the Theodore Saloutos Memorial Award by the Agricultural History Society In this sweeping look at rural society from the American Revolution to the Civil War, Ariel Ron argues that agricultural history is...

Junk Food Politics

Eduardo J. Gómez
Why do sugary beverage and fast food industries thrive in the emerging world? An interesting public health paradox has emerged in some developing nations. Despite government commitment to eradicating noncommunicable diseases and innovative prevention programs aimed at reducing obesity and type 2 diabetes, sugary beverage and fast food industries are thriving. But political leaders in countries such as Mexico, Brazil, India, China, and...

Madness at the Movies

James Charney, MD
A unique exploration of how mental illness is portrayed in classic and contemporary films. The study of classic and contemporary films can provide a powerful avenue to understand the experience of mental illness. In Madness at the Movies, James Charney, MD, a practicing psychiatrist and long-time cinephile, examines films that delve deeply into characters' inner worlds, and he analyzes moments that help define their particular mental illness. Based on the highly...

Resource Handbook for Academic Deans, fourth edition

edited by Andrew Adams
This essential guide addresses the expanding, multifaceted role of college and university academic leaders. The new edition of the Resource Handbook for Academic Deans, one of the most important offerings to the academic community by the American Conference of Academic Deans, is written by and for academic leaders to address the expanding, multifaceted role of college and university administrators. Each chapter explores a...

The Brave New World, third edition

Peter Charles Hoffer
A lively synthesis of early American history, now in its third edition. The Brave New World covers the entire span of early American history, from 30,000 years before Europeans landed on North American shores to the Revolutionary War. With its exploration of the places and peoples of early America, this comprehensive new edition of a classic textbook brings together the most recent scholarship on the colonial and revolutionary eras, Native Americans, slavery and the slave trade,...

The Present Illness

Martin F. Shapiro, MD, PhD, MPH
Beyond political posturing and industry quick-fixes, why is the American health care system so difficult to reform? Health care reform efforts are difficult to achieve and have been historically undermined by their narrow scope. In The Present Illness, Martin F. Shapiro, MD, PhD, MPH, weaves together history, sociology, extensive research, and his own experiences as a physician to explore the broad range of afflictions impairing US health care and explains why...

Beyond Fitting In

edited by Kelly Ritter
Guidance on teaching writing to first-generation college students. Beyond Fitting In interrogates how the cultural capital and lived experiences of first-generation college students inform literacy studies and the writing-centered classroom. Essays, written by scholar-teachers in the field of rhetoric and composition, discuss best practices for teaching first-generation students in writing classrooms, centers, programs, and other environments.

The Intelligibility of Nature

William A. Wallace, edited by John P. Hittinger
The intelligibility of nature was a persistent theme of William A. Wallace, OP, one of the most prolific Catholic scholars of the late twentieth century. This Reader aims to make available a representative selection of his work in the history of science, natural philosophy, and theology illustrating his defense and development of this central theme. Wallace is among the most important Galileo scholars of the past fifty years and a key figure in...

The Spirit of the Oxford Movement

Christopher Dawson, edited by Kenneth L. Parker
"This is the book we have been waiting for a permanent enrichment of our understanding of the Oxford Movement" proclaimed The Downside Review upon the publication of Christopher Dawson's masterwork in 1933, exactly 100 years after John Keble's sermon "National Apostasy" stirred a nation. Dawson himself regarded the book as one of his two greatest intellectual accomplishments. Dawson and John Henry Newman were Oxonians and both were converts to Catholicism; both stood...

Aswat Muasira

Jonas Elbousty, foreword by Roger Allen
An engaging collection of contemporary short stories from various Arabic countries develops students' mastery of literary analysis and cultural awareness Aswat Mu'asira introduces advanced level students to contemporary short stories from across the Middle East. Fifty-five stories in Arabic from twenty countries engage students with current topics and literary approaches that open the door to discovering both established and emerging authors and literary...

Katherine Jackson French

Elizabeth DiSavino, OtherCentenary College of Louisiana Archives and Special Collections, Berea College Special Collections and Archives, Hindman Settlement School, A.J. Bodnar
The second woman to earn a PhD from Columbia University—and the first from south of the Mason-Dixon Line to do so—Kentucky native Katherine Jackson French broke boundaries. Her research kick-started a resurgence of Appalachian music that continues to this day, but French's collection of traditional Kentucky...

Lucky Medicine

Lester W. Thompson
A remarkable, personal glimpse of Black student life at Indiana University in the early 1960s.   In 1961, a skinny African American boy from Indianapolis arrived at Indiana University Bloomington determined to become a doctor. For the next three years, Lester Thompson kept a detailed, intimate diary of his journey to graduation. In Lucky Medicine, Lester returns to his long-ago journal and, with honesty, humor, and a healthy dose of rueful self-reflection, shares stories from...

Animated Film and Disability

Slava Greenberg
While many live-action films portray disability as a spectacle, "crip animation" (a genre of animated films that celebrates disabled people's lived experiences) uses a variety of techniques like clay animation, puppets, pixilation, and computer-generated animation to represent the inner worlds of people with disabilities. Crip animation has the potential to challenge the ableist gaze and immerse viewers in an alternative bodily experience. In Animated Film and Disability,...

Building a City

edited by Sheila E. Jelen, Jeffrey Saks, Wendy Zierler
The fiction of Nobel Laureate Shmuel Yosef Agnon is the foundation of the array of scholarly essays as seen through the career of Alan Mintz, visionary scholar and professor of Jewish literature at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. Singer introduced Agnon's posthumously published Ir Umeloah (A City in Its Fullness)—a series of linked stories set in the 17th century and focused on Agnon's hometown, Buczacz, a town...

Harvard, Hollywood, Hitmen, and Holy Men

Paul W. Williams
The movie director Paul Williams is a real-life Forrest Gump. Williams' experiences form a unique and often wild constellation of encounters with star power, political power, and spiritual power—a life cycle that led to fame and fortune and to integrity and anonymity.     In a mad childhood created by an autocratic English teacher father and an infantilizing mother, he develops a precocious visual acuity to avoid wallops and a writing ability that mollified his father. This...

Civil Movements in an Illiberal Regime

Dániel Mikecz
Dániel Mikecz addresses in this study the tensions between oppositional civil society and party-political actors. As successive elections demonstrate the increasing confidence of the illiberal regime of Viktor Orbán, left and liberal parties of the opposition have faced a prolonged crisis in credibility. At the same time, the civil society has not been immobile, and bottom-up initiatives, social and political movements, and non-governmental organizations have...

Sugarland

Artan R. Hoxha
In this historical monograph on non-urban communist Albania, Artan Hoxha discusses the ambitious development project that turned a swampland into a site of sugar production after 1945. The author seeks to free the history of Albanian communism from the stereotypes that still circulate about it with stigmas of an aberration, paranoia, extreme nationalism, and xenophobia. This micro-history of the agricultural and industrial transformation of a zone in southeastern...

A Is for Affrilachia

Frank X Walker, illustrated by Ronald W. Davis
The people and places in Appalachia make it a rich, multifaceted, and diverse region. When author Frank X Walker first coined the phrase "Affrilachia," he wanted to ensure that the voices and accomplishments of African Americans in that region were recognized and exalted. A Is for Affrilachia not only brings awareness of notable African Americans from this region, but this inspired children's alphabet book is also an exuberant celebration of the people, physical spaces, and historical...

Building Inclusive Communities in Rural Canada

edited by Clark Banack, Dionne Pohler
This collection challenges misconceptions that rural Canada is a bastion of intolerance. While examining the extent and nature of contemporary cultural and religious discrimination in rural Canadian communities, the editors and contributors explore the many efforts by rural citizens, community groups, and municipalities to counter intolerance, build inclusive communities, and become better neighbours. Throughout, scholars and community leaders focus on...

Making Wonderful

Martin Tweedale
In Making Wonderful, Martin M. Tweedale tells how an ideology arose in the West that energized the economic expansion that has led to ecological disaster. He takes us back to the rise of cities and autocratic rulers, and analyzes how respect for custom and tradition gave way to the dominance of top-down rational planning and organization. Then came a highly attractive myth of an eventual future in which all of humankind's material and spiritual ills would be banished and...

Mercantile Mobility

Helen Kwan Yee Cheung
This exhibition catalogue traces a group of dynamic Chinese merchants and their business activities in big cities and small towns in Western Canada after they arrived from China, covering the mid-nineteenth century into the millennium. Their movements are illustrated on various maps and chronicled in many written accounts. By managing the flow of people, products, and money at the municipal, provincial, and global levels, these individuals added to the growth of the...

Slavery and Freedom in the Bluegrass State

edited by Gerald L. Smith
Stephen Foster's "My Old Kentucky Home" has been designated as the official state song and performed at the Kentucky Derby for decades. In light of the ongoing social justice movement to end racial inequality, many have questioned whether the song should be played at public events, given its inaccurate depiction of slavery in the state. In Slavery and Freedom in the Bluegrass State, editor Gerald L. Smith presents a collection of powerful...

What Things Cost

edited by Rebecca Gayle Howell, Ashley M. Jones, Emily J. Jalloul
What Things Cost: an anthology for the people is the first major anthology of labor writing in nearly a century. Here, editors Rebecca Gayle Howell & Ashley M. Jones bring together more than one hundred contemporary writers singing out from the corners of the 99 Percent, each telling their own truth of today's economy. In his final days, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. called for a "multiracial coalition of the working poor." King hoped...

The Richmond Group Artists

Shaun Thomas Dingwerth
This is the untold story of a group of artists whose interest in fostering art in their community made an authentic contribution to the history of art in America. Taking for their subjects the local people, flora, and landscapes, they developed a distinctive impressionistic style, uninfluenced by other art movements in Indiana. Richmond, Indiana, became an important center for art in the Midwest, a place that nourished and inspired the artists whose work this book celebrates.

Icelight

Ranjit Hoskote
Set in an age of ecological catastrophe, Icelight eloquently accepts transience yet asserts the robustness of hope Icelight, Ranjit Hoskote's eighth collection of poems, enacts the experience of standing at the edge—of a life, a landscape, a world assuming new contours or going up in flames. Yet, the protagonists of these poems also stand at the edge of epiphany. In the title poem, we meet the Neolithic cave-dweller who, dazzled by a shapeshifting nature, crafts the first icon. The 'I' of these poems is not a sovereign 'I'. A...

In Springtime

Sarah Blake
Lost in the woods with a horse, a mouse, and the ghost of a dead bird, you will discover if you're meant to live In Sarah Blake's epic poem of survival, we follow a nameless main character lost in the woods. There, they discover the world anew, negotiating their place among the trees and the rain and the animals. Something brought them to the woods that nearly killed them, and they're not sure they want to live through this experience either. But the world surprises them again and again with beauty and intrigue. They come...

Open Society Unresolved

edited by Liviu Matei, Christof Royer
Is the concept of open society still relevant in the 21st century? Do the current social, moral, and political realities call for a drastic revision of this concept? Here fifteen essays address real-world contemporary challenges to open society from a variety of perspectives. What unites the individual authors and chapters is an interest in open society's continuing usefulness and relevance to address current problems. And what...

suddenly we

Evie Shockley
Evie Shockley's new poems invite us to dream—and work—toward a more capacious "we" In her new poetry collection, Evie Shockley mobilizes visual art, sound, and multilayered language to chart routes towards openings for the collective dreaming of a more capacious "we." How do we navigate between the urgency of our own becoming and the imperative insight that whoever we are, we are in relation to each other? Beginning with the visionary art of Black women like Alison Saar and Alma Thomas, Shockley's poems draw and forge a...

The Sanctity of the Leaders

edited by Gábor Klaniczay
The latest title in the Central European Medieval Texts series contains the lives of saints who were canonized in the eleventh through thirteenth centuries in the newly Christianized countries of Central and Eastern Europe (Bohemia, Poland, Hungary, and Dalmatia). A rejoinder to the earlier volume in the series, the Saints of the Christianization Age of Central Europe (CEMT, Vol. 6), containing hermits,...

The Wild Hunt Divinations

Trevor Ketner
Shakespeare's 154 sonnets anagrammed into wildly new poems about queer desire and kink The Wild Hunt Divinations: A Grimoire is a stunning second collection from National Poetry Series winner, Trevor Ketner. Comprised of 154 sonnets, each anagrammed line-by-line from Shakespeare's sonnets, the book refracts these lines through the thematic lens of transness, queer desire, kink, and British paganism. The sonnets come together to form a grimoire that casts a trancelike and intense spell on the reader.

Waiting for Wovoka

Gerald Vizenor
Native puppeteers from the White Earth Reservation travel to the 1962 World's Fair In the summer of 1962, a group of young Native American puppeteers travel in a converted school bus from the White Earth Reservation to the Century 21 Exposition, World's Fair in Seattle, Washington. The five Natives, three young men and two young women, have endured abandonment, abuse, poverty, and find solace, humor, and courage with a mute puppeteer—a Native woman in her seventies who writes...

Engaging Appalachia

edited by Rebecca Adkins Fletcher, Rebecca-Eli Long, William Schumann
Inclusive campus-community collaborations provide critical opportunities to build community capacity—defined as a community's ability to jointly respond to challenges and opportunities—and sustainability. Through case studies from across all three subregions of Appalachia from Georgia to Pennsylvania, Engaging Appalachia: A Guidebook for Building Capacity and Sustainability offers diverse perspectives...

Even As We Breathe

Annette Saunooke Clapsaddle
Nineteen-year-old Cowney Sequoyah yearns to escape his hometown of Cherokee, North Carolina, in the heart of the Smoky Mountains. When a summer job at Asheville's luxurious Grove Park Inn and Resort brings him one step closer to escaping the hills that both cradle and suffocate him, he sees it as an opportunity. The experience introduces him to the beautiful and enigmatic Essie Stamper—a young Cherokee woman who is also working at the inn and dreaming of a better life. With World War II raging...

Making Bourbon

Karl Raitz
While other industries chase after the new and improved, bourbon makers celebrate traditions that hearken back to an authentic frontier craft. Distillers enshrine local history in their branding and time-tested recipes, and rightfully so. Kentucky's unique geography shaped the whiskeys its settlers produced, and for more than two centuries, distilling bourbon fundamentally altered every aspect of Kentucky's landscape and culture. Making Bourbon: A...

The Woman Who Dared

William M. Drew
In the early days of motion pictures—before superstars, before studio conglomerates, before even the advent of sound—there was a woman named Pearl White (1889–1938). A quintessential beauty of the time, with her perfectly tousled bob and come-hither stare, White's rise to stardom was swift; her assumption of the title of queen of American motion picture serials equally deserved. Born the youngest of five children in a small, rural Missouri farm town, White...

Drinking from Graveyard Wells

Yvette Lisa Ndlovu
"Even in death, who has ownership over Black women's bodies?" Questions like this lurk between the lines of this stunning collection of stories that engage with African women's histories, both personal and generational. Their history is not just one thing: there is heartbreak and pain, and joy, and flying and magic, so much magic. An avenging spirit takes on the patriarchy from beyond the grave. An immigrant woman undergoes a naturalization ceremony in an imagined American state that...

Everything Is Sampled

Akinwumi Adesokan
Everything Is Sampled examines the shifting modes of production and circulation of African artistic forms since the 1980s, focusing on digital culture as the most currently decisive setting for these changes. Drawing on works of cinema, literature, music, and visual art, Akin Adekan. addresses two main questions. First, given the various changes that the institutions producing African arts and letters have undergone in the past four decades, how...

Little Ohio

Jane Simon Ammeson
Where can you travel the Erie Canal on a boat pulled by a horse? What is Wapakoneta, and what does it have to do with Neil Armstrong? Where can you eat ice cream at a stop on the Underground Railroad? Find these answers and more in Little Ohio: Small-Town Destinations. Author and blogger Jane Simon Ammeson traveled across the state to discover where to eat, stay, play, and shop in more than 90 charming small towns. Organized by region, Little Ohio offers fellow road trippers an easy-to-use...

Railroads, Art, and American Life

J. Craig Thorpe
Explore the past, present, and future of rail travel through 30 years of one artist's work. Once a common part of the American landscape, trains are increasingly fading from public view. Though photographs can accurately convey the details of "what, where, and when," sometimes paintings can better convey the deeper truths of an era. Collecting more than thirty years of paintings and renderings, Railroads, Art, and American Life tells the story of rail transportation in...

Richard McNemar

Christian Goodwillie
The first biography of a key and complex American religious figure of the nineteenth century, considered by many to be the "father of Shaker literature." Richard McNemar (1770–1839) led a remarkable life, replete with twists and turns that influenced American religions in many ways during the early nineteenth century. Beginning as a Presbyterian minister in the Midwest, he took his preaching and the practice of his congregation in a radically different, evangelical "free...

39 Berne Street

Max Lobe, translated by Johanna McCalmont
"My mother says that there are things in life that she can't forgive . . ." At age 16, Dipita's mother, Mbila, arrived in Switzerland from Cameroon. Trafficked into Europe, she supported herself and her son as a prostitute in Geneva. Dipita, now a young, black, gay man serving a five-year sentence in a Swiss prison, shares their story and his own search for purpose. He intertwines their stories with the life of Uncle Démoney, a former civil servant in Cameroon, who staked everything on...

French B Movies

David A. Pettersen
In the impoverished outskirts of French cities, known as the banlieues, minority communities are turning to American culture, history, and theory to make their own voices, cultures, and histories visible. Filmmakers have followed suit, turning to Hollywood genre conventions to challenge notions of identity, belonging, and marginalization in mainstream French film. French B Movies proposes that French banlieue films, far from being a fringe genre,...

A Life for Belarus

Stanislau Shushkevich
This memoir of the first president of an independent Belarus (1991-1994) tells about the revival of independent Belarus, the difficulties in establishing a democracy and a market economy, a hardened Soviet mentality, and the political immaturity of the intelligentsia and obduracy of the old nomenklatura. Stanislau Shushkevich, born in 1934, narrates his path from a son of an "enemy of the people" to a doctorate in physics, and then to be the first head of independent...

Multicultural Cities of the Habsburg Empire, 1880–1914

Catherine Horel
Catherine Horel has undertaken a comparative analysis of the societal, ethnic, and cultural diversity in the last decades of the Habsburg Monarchy as represented in twelve cities: Arad, Bratislava, Brno, Chernivtsi, Lviv, Oradea, Rijeka, Sarajevo, Subotica, Timioara, Trieste, and Zagreb. By purposely selecting these cities, the author aims to counter the disproportionate attention that the largest cities in the empire...

Brother Poem

Will Harris
A speculative-poetic work from the Forward Prize-winning, T.S. Eliot shortlisted author of RENDANG 4 million years ago, a tiny branch in the multiverse led to the formation of Brother Poem, a book from a dimension uncannily like our own but intuited through signs, whispers, glitches, and echoes, shadowed by the loss of what can't be seen. Brother Poem tells stories of bizarre familial reckonings and difficult relationships, about love and living with others; it is a shifting portrait of the personas which define us. At the...

Governing Divided Societies

Philip J. Howe, Thomas A. Lorman, Daniel E. Miller
The authors of this volume challenge conventional notions about Habsburg and Czechoslovak politics, arguing that they were more democratic than they often appear. At combining political science and history, the authors' guiding principle and means of analysis is the consociational model of democracy. This theory, linked best to Arend Lijphart, asserts that consociationalism guarantees...

Liberals, Conservatives, and Mavericks

edited by Frank Cibulka, Zachary T. Irwin
No Church is monolithic—this is the preliminary premise of this volume on the public place of religion in a representative number of post-communist countries. The studies confirm that within any religious organization we can expect to find fissures, factions, theological or ideological quarrels, and perhaps even competing interest groups, such as missionary workers,...

An Anthology of Monsters

Cherie Dimaline
An Anthology of Monsters by Cherie Dimaline, award-winning Métis author of The Marrow Thieves, is the tale of an intricate dance with life-long anxiety. It is about how the stories we tell ourselves—both the excellent and the horrible—can help reshape the ways in which we think, cope, and ultimately survive. Using examples from her published and forthcoming books, from her mère, and from her own late night worry sessions, Dimaline choreographs a deeply personal narrative...

Indie Rock

Joe Bishop
Indie Rock candidly focuses on a queer poet/musician's life in Newfoundland, and his personal struggles with addiction, OCD, and trauma. This intelligent and punchy collection is steeped in musicality and the geographies and cadences of Newfoundland. With an astute attention to form, rhythm, and aesthetics, Joe Bishop tells an honest and contemporary coming-of-age story about an artist alienated from, but fascinated by, the world he inhabits. Readers dealing with grief and living through recovery will find solace in these poems,...

Monitoring Station

Sonja Ruth Greckol
Sonja Ruth Greckol's Monitoring Station enters a slipstream of space and planetary language, circling time, embodying loss and longing, generating and regenerating in a faltering climate. Orbiting through a mother's death, a grandbaby's birth, and a pandemic summer, these poems loop and fragment in expansive and empathetic ways. The title poem locates a settler voice revisiting Treaties 6 and 7 and the Métis lands of her Alberta childhood, while the overall collection is tethered to Toronto shadowed by northland...

Approaches to Teaching the Romance of the Rose

edited by Daisy Delogu, Anne-Hélène Miller
Essays on teaching love, ethics, and medieval allegory. One of the most influential texts of its time, the Romance of the Rose offers readers a window into the world view of the late Middle Ages in Europe, including notions of moral philosophy and courtly love. Yet the Rose also explores topics that remain relevant to readers today, such as gender, desire, and the power of speech. Students, however, can find the work challenging because of its dual...

A Calabash of Cowries

Luisah Teish
A Calabash of Cowries: Ancient Wisdom for Modern Times is a collection of tales featuring the Orishas and the wonders of the natural world. Suitable for adults and children, artists and teachers, readers of all cultures will discover in these retellings of traditional tales a resource that illuminates the mythic and the real, the ancient past and the emerging present. An offering of spiritual wisdom and cultural celebration through stories that have and will continue to endure the...

Dance Works

Allison Orr, foreword by Liz Lerman
Ride along with choreographer Allison Orr and her civic collaborators as they reflect on their dances together In 2001, Allison Orr made a dance with 13 City of Austin firefighters. Over the next 20 years, her unique practice of collaborating with city employees flowered into civic storytelling through movement at public pools, tableaus of power line workers shimmying up 40' poles in front of 5000 people, and intricate choreography of trash trucks on a misty tarmac.

Piety in Practice

Judit Majorossy
This study of religion in the everyday life of late medieval Pressburg (historical Posonium/Pozsony, present-day Bratislava) shows what bequests for the souls of the dead can tell about the religious thinking of fifteenth- and early sixteenth-century inhabitants, and how overlapping religious and secular communities were active in memorial activities. Due to its geographical position, Pressburg was always an important cultural...

Stone Breaker

Kathleen L. Housley
Percival probed the volcanic origins of rock via geology and the seething nature of his psyche via poetry Stone Breaker is an in-depth, accessible biography of a true American polymath, James Gates Percival. A poet, linguist, and unstable savant Percival was also a brilliant geologist who walked thousands of miles crisscrossing first Connecticut and then Wisconsin to lay the foundation for the work of generations of Earth scientists.

Underground Streams

edited by János M. Rainer
The authors of this edited volume address the hidden attraction that existed between the extremes of left and right, and of internationalism and nationalism under the decades of communist dictatorship in Eastern Europe. One might suppose that under the suppressive regimes based on leftist ideology and internationalism their right-wing opponents would have been defeated and ultimately removed. These essays, on the...

Down by Law

Mária M. Kovács, Mária M. Kovács
The Nazi 1933 Civil Service Law and the 1935 Nuremberg Laws are generally considered the first anti-Jewish decrees in Europe. Mária Kovács convincingly argues that Act XXV of 1920 concerning university enrollment in Hungary can instead be considered one of the first pieces of twentieth century anti-Jewish legislation – if not the very first. This act, known as the "numerus clausus law," specified that members of a single "nationality" or "people's race" could not...

there's more

Uchechukwu Peter Umezurike
In there's more, Uchechukwu Peter Umezurike takes on the rich concepts of home and belonging: home lost and regained, home created with others and with the land, home as "anywhere we find something to love." Giving voice to the experiences of migrant and other marginalized citizens whose lives society tends to overlook, this collection challenges the oppressive systems that alienate us from one another and the land. Carefully built lyric meditations combine beauty and ugliness, engaging with violence, and...

Humanism, Empire, and Nation, critical edition

edited by Travis Workman, translated by Travis Workman
Essays featuring twentieth-century Korean thought on literature and culture. Faced with dramatic social and political changes, Korean writers of the twentieth century—writing in the context of Japanese imperialism, World War II, the Korean War, and the Cold War era—explored many pressing questions about modern life: What is the relationship between literature and society? How can intellectual concepts be used politically,...

Hyumŏnijŭm, cheguk, minjok, critical edition

edited by Travis Workman
Essays featuring twentieth-century Korean thought on literature and culture. Faced with dramatic social and political changes, Korean writers of the twentieth century—writing in the context of Japanese imperialism, World War II, the Korean War, and the Cold War era—explored many pressing questions about modern life: What is the relationship between literature and society? How can intellectual concepts be used politically, for good or ill? What are the...

Lost Texts in Rhetoric and Composition

edited by Deborah H. Holdstein
Rediscovered texts for teaching composition and rhetoric. A project of recovery and reanimation, Lost Texts in Rhetoric and Composition foregrounds a broad range of publications that deserve renewed attention. Contributors to this volume reclaim these lost texts to reenvision the rhetorical tradition itself. Authors discussed include not only twentieth-century American compositionists but also a linguist, a poet, a philosopher, a painter, a Renaissance rhetorician, and a...

Texts and Contexts from the History of Feminism and Women's Rights

edited by Zsófia Lóránd, Adela Hîncu, Jovana Mihajlović Trbovc, Katarzyna Stańczak-Wiślicz
A compendium of one hundred sources, preceded by a short author's bio and an introduction, this volume offers an English language selection of the most representative texts on feminism and women's rights from East Central Europe between the end of the Second World War and the early 1990s. While communist era is the...

Leaving Other People Alone

Aaron Kreuter
Leaving Other People Alone reads contemporary North American Jewish fiction about Israel/Palestine through an anti-Zionist, diasporic lens. Aaron Kreuter argues that since Jewish diasporic fiction played a major role in establishing the centroperipheral relationship between Israel and the diaspora, it therefore also has the potential to challenge, trouble, and ultimately rework this relationship. Kreuter suggests that any fictional work...

Globalization, Nationalism, and Imperialism

edited by Jacek Lubecki, James W. Peterson
The authors of this book retell the political and economic history of East-Central Europe, the post-communist Balkans, and the Baltic states and speculate about their future from the vantage point of three competing forces operating in the region: territorial imperialism, globalization, and nationalism. Exposed to imperial aspirations, the geographic area from the Baltic Sea to the Black Sea has in the past 150 years been...

The Perils of Race-Thinking

Mark A. Brandon
Eugenics and scientific racism are experiencing a resurgence, and only by understanding the work of Aleš Hrdlička and others will we be able to combat them. In our age of rapid advances of genetic studies within historical research the racial science of the early twentieth century is treated with contempt. This book is about an arch figure of that period: Aleš Hrdlička served as Curator of Physical Anthropology at the prestigious Smithsonian Institution from 1910 to 1941.

Black Creole Chronicles

Mona Lisa Saloy
Who are Black Creoles? Saloy's new poems address ancestral connections to contemporary life, traditions celebrated, New Orleans Black life today, Louisiana Black life today, enduring and surviving hurricanes, romance, #BlackLivesMatter, #wematter, as well as poems of the pandemic lockdown from New Orleans. Saloy's new collection of verse advances and updates narratives of Black life to now, including day-to-day Black speech, the lives of culture keepers, and family tales. These poems detail cultural and...

Seeking a Research-Ethics Covenant in the Social Sciences

Will C. van den Hoonaard
In Seeking a Research-Ethics Covenant in the Social Sciences, Will C. van den Hoonaard chronicles the negative influence that medical research-ethics frameworks have had on social science research-ethics policies. He argues that the root causes of the current ethics disorder in the social sciences are the aggressive audit culture in universities and the privilege accorded to medical research ethics, which overrides ethical issues in all other disciplines.

Dissonant Landscapes

Tore Storvøld
Listening to the dissonances of nature and nationhood in modern Iceland During the past three decades, Iceland has attained a strong presence in the world through its musical culture, with images of the nation being packaged and shipped out in melodies, harmonies, and rhythms. What 'Iceland' means for people, both at home and abroad, is conditioned by music and its ability to animate notions of nature and nationality. In six chapters that range from discussions of...

How to Clean a Fish

Esmeralda Cabral
"Perhaps it is saudade that pulls me back to visit my other country as often as possible. When the opportunity arose for our family to live in Costa da Caparica for an extended period, it took only minutes to decide. We were going." How To Clean a Fish is an inviting family travel story about an extended stay in Portugal, full of food and cooking adventures, language barriers and bureaucracy, and that irresistible need to connect with the culture of our birth. After immigrating...

Engagement, Enlargement, and Confrontation

Graham Timmins
Engagement, Enlargement, and Confrontation provides a holistic view of the European Union's eastern relations explored in an historical context following the end of the Cold War. The author draws out the key achievements and failures of this strategic exercise. The focus is on the institutional adaptation of the European Union as well as on the dynamics of its policies towards the East. Graham...