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You Look Good for Your Age

edited by Rona Altrows
"I returned to the same respiratory therapist for my annual checkup. I told her that her words to me, 'You look good for your age,' had inspired a book. 'Wow!' she said. 'You wrote a whole book about that?' 'Twenty-nine kick-ass writers wrote it,' I said. She gave me a thumbs up." From the Preface This is a book about women and ageism. There are twenty-nine contributing writers, ranging in age from their forties to their nineties. Through essays, short stories, and poetry, they share...

Beyoncé in the World

edited by Christina Baade, Kristin A. McGee
Essays investigate Beyoncé's global impact From Destiny's Child to Lemonade, Homecoming, and The Gift, Beyoncé Knowles-Carter has redefined global stardom, feminism, Black representation, and celebrity activism. This book brings together new work from sixteen international scholars to explore Beyonce's impact as an artist and public figure from the perspectives of critical race studies, gender and women's studies, queer and cultural...

Habits and Holiness

Ezra Sullivan
The topic of habitus is one of Thomas Aquinas's greatest contributions to moral theology, but it has been generally neglected in theological scholarship until now. Habits and Holiness is the first work in English to explore Aquinas's rich theology of habit in all of its grandeur and depth. Habits and Holiness shows that most facets of human life and behavior are greatly influenced by habits, which Thomas appraises as an analogous concept that is much broader than previous...

Why Read Pascal?

Paul J. Griffiths
Blaise Pascal (1623-1662) is known in the English-speaking world principally for the wager (an argument that it is rational to do what will affect belief in God and irrational not to), and, more generally, for the Pensées, a collection of philosophical and theological fragments of unusual emotional and intellectual intensity collected and published after his death. He thought and wrote, however, about much more than this: mathematics; physics; grace, freedom, and predestination; the nature of the church; the...

On the Six Days of Creation

St. Gregory of Nyssa, translated by Robin Orton
The first volume of our new series, Fathers of the Church: Shorter Works, will be available in the summer of 2021. This series, to be printed only in paperback format, will offer English translations of treatises, homilies, poems, and letters of the Church Fathers in slim, easily affordable volumes. In this way a multitude of important writings will become accessible to scholars and students as well as the reading public. This is the first complete English translation of...

Metaphysical Themes in Thomas Aquinas III

John F. Wippel
Metaphysical Themes in Thomas Aquinas III is Msgr. John Wippel's third volume dedicated to the metaphysical thought of Thomas Aquinas. After an introduction, this volume of collected essays begins with Wippel's interpretation of the discovery of the subject of metaphysics by a special kind of judgment ("separation"). In subsequent chapters, Wippel turns to the relationship between faith and reason, exploring what are known as the preambles of faith. This is followed by two chapters on...

Person and Act and Related Essays

Karol Wojtyla, Wojtyła Karol, translated by Grzegorz Ignatik, foreword by Carl A Anderson
The Catholic University of America Press is honored to publish the first volume of the English Critical Edition of the Works of Karol Wojtyła/John Paul II. Under the auspices of an international editorial board, the English Critical Edition will comprise more than 20 volumes, covering all of John Paul's writings and correspondence in the years before and during his papacy. This collection is essential for several reasons.

Hiking Washington's History, second edition

Judith M. Bentley, Judy Bentley, Craig Romano
For thousands of years people have traveled across Washington's spectacular terrain, establishing footpaths and roads to reach hunting grounds and coal mines high in the mountains, fishing sites and trade emporiums on the rivers, forests of old growth, and homesteads and towns on prairies. These traditional routes have been preserved in national parks, restored by cities and towns, salvaged from old railroad tracks, and opened to hikers by Indigenous communities. In this...

A Body in Fukushima

Eiko Otake, William Johnston
A photographic account of an extended solo performance in irradiated Fukushima between 2014 and 2019 On March 11, 2011 one of the most powerful earthquakes in recorded history devastated Japan, triggering a massive tsunami and nuclear meltdowns at three reactors in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant complex in a triple disaster known as 3.11. On five separate journeys, Japanese-born performer and dancer Eiko Otake and historian and photographer William Johnston visited multiple locations across...

The Rise of Comparative History

edited by Balázs Trencsényi, Constantin Iordachi, Péter Apor
This book—the first of a three-volume overview of comparative and transnational historiography in Europe—focuses on the complex engagement of various comparative methodological approaches with different transnational and supranational frameworks. It considers scales from universal history to meso-regional (i.e. Balkans, Central Europe, etc.) perspectives. In the form of a reader, it displays 18 historical studies written between 1900 and 1943. The collection...

Protected Children, Regulated Mothers

Eszter Varsa
Protected Children, Regulated Mothers examines child protection in Stalinist Hungary as a part of twentieth-century (East Central, Eastern, and Southeastern) European history. Across the communist bloc, the increase of residential homes was preferred to the prewar system of foster care. The study challenges the transformation of state care into a tool of totalitarian power. Rather than political repression,...

The Tsar, The Empire, and The Nation

edited by Darius Staliūnas, Yoko Aoshima
This collection of essays addresses the challenge of modern nationalism to the tsarist Russian Empire. First appearing on the empire's western periphery this challenge, was most prevalent in twelve provinces extending from Ukrainian lands in the south to the Baltic provinces in the north, as well as to the Kingdom of Poland. At issue is whether the late Russian Empire entered World War I as a...

Making Muslim Women European

Fabio Giomi
This social, cultural, and political history of Slavic Muslim women of the Yugoslav region in the first decades of the post-Ottoman era is the first to provide a comprehensive overview of the issues confronting these women. It is based on a study of voluntary associations (philanthropic, cultural, Islamic-traditionalist, and feminist) of the period. It is broadly held that Muslim women were silent and...

Making and Breaking the Yugoslav Working Class

Goran Musić
Workers' self-management was one of the unique features of communist Yugoslavia. Goran Musić has investigated the changing ways in which blue-collar workers perceived the recurring crises of the regime. Two self-managed metal enterprises, one in Serbia another in Slovenia, provide the frame of the analysis in the time span between 1945 and 1989. These two factories became famous for strikes in 1988 that evoked echoes in popular discourses...

Reassessing Communism

edited by Katarzyna Chmielewska, Agnieszka Mrozik, Grzegorz Wołowiec
The thirteen authors of this collective work undertook to articulate matter-of-fact critiques of the dominant narrative about communism in Poland while offering new analyses of the concept, and also examining the manifestations of anticommunism. Approaching communist ideas and practices, programs and their implementations, as an inseparable whole, they examine the issues of emancipation, upward social...

My Good Son

Yang Huang
From award-winning author Yang Huang, My Good Son explores the power-and the cost-of parental love. A tailor in post-Tiananmen China, Mr. Cai has one ambition: for his son, Feng, to make something of himself. With harsh discipline and relentless pressure, Mr. Cai succeeds in getting Feng ready to attend a U.S. college, but Feng needs a sponsor. When Mr. Cai meets a closeted American art student named Jude, they hatch a plan to benefit them both: get Feng to the US and help Jude come out to his conservative father. Their...

Off the Grid

Wilfried Raussert
Looking at three historically distinct conjunctures of artistic practice, this book claims public space for renegotiating art and community, art and politics, art and economy. This book investigates the changing relations between art practice and public space, between art and community, and between art and resistance in the Americas in the 1920s, 1960s, and the contemporary period. The book explores new visions of culture, community, and public space in the U.S. and Latin America as they...

Appealing Because He Is Appalling

edited by Tamari Kitossa, foreword by Tommy J. Curry, with contributions by Katerina Deliovsky, Delroy Hall, Dennis O. Howard, Dennis O. Howard, Elishma Khokhar, Kemar McIntosh, Leroy F. Moore, Watufani M. Poe, Satwinder Rehal, John G. Russell, Mohan Siddi, Elishma Noel, Tamari Kitossa, Leroy F. Moore, Jr., Watufani M. Poe, John G. Russell
This collection invites us to think about how African-descended men are seen as both appealing and appalling, and...

Teaching Modernist Women's Writing in English

edited by Janine Utell
As authors and publishers, individuals and collectives, women significantly shaped the modernist movement. While figures such as Virginia Woolf and Gertrude Stein have received acclaim, authors from marginalized communities and those who wrote for mass, middlebrow audiences also created experimental and groundbreaking work. The essays in this volume explore formal aspects and thematic concerns of modernism while also challenging rigid notions of what constitutes literary...

Cardinal Rafael Merry del Val

Philippe Roy-Lysencourt
Rafael Merry del Val (1865-1930) was a cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church who had one of the most dazzling careers in ecclesiastical history: he was a secret supernumerary chamberlain at the age of 21, a secret participating chamberlain at the age of 26, an apostolic delegate to Canada at age 31, president of the Academy of Ecclesiastical Nobles and archbishop at age 34, secretary of state for Pius X (1903-1914) and cardinal at age 38, archpriest of St. Peter's Basilica...

Approaches to Teaching Austen's Persuasion

edited by Marcia M. Folsom, Marcia McClintock Folsom, John Wiltshire
Jane Austen is a favorite with many students, whether they've read her novels or viewed popular film adaptations. But Persuasion, completed at the end of her life, can be challenging for students to approach. They are surprised to meet a heroine so subdued and self-sacrificing, and the novel's setting during the Napoleonic wars may be unfamiliar. This volume provides teachers with avenues to explore the depths and richness of the...

Remainders of the American Century

Brent Ryan Bellamy
Understanding US culture through the post-apocalyptic novel This book explores the post-apocalyptic novel in American literature from the 1940s to the present as reflections of a growing anxiety about the decline of US hegemony. Post-apocalyptic novels imagine human responses to the aftermath of catastrophe. The shape of the future they imagine is defined by "the remainder," when what is left behind expresses itself in storytelling...

Stalin's Italian Prisoners of War

Maria Teresa Giusti, translated by Riccardo James Vargiu
This book reconstructs the fate of Italian prisoners of war captured by the Red Army between August 1941 and the winter of 1942-43. On 230.000 Italians left on the Eastern front almost 100.000 did not come back home. Testimonies and memoirs from surviving veterans complement the author's intensive work in Russian and Italian archives.  The study examines Italian war crimes against the Soviet civilian population and describes the particularly grim fate of...

MLA Handbook, ninth edition

The Modern Language Association of America
Relied on by generations of writers, the MLA Handbook is published by the Modern Language Association and is the only official, authorized book on MLA style. The new, ninth edition builds on the MLA's unique approach to documenting sources using a template of core elements—facts, common to most sources, like author, title, and publication date—that allows writers to cite any type of work, from books, e-books, and journal articles in databases to song lyrics, online images, social media posts,...

Sharks in the Shallows

W. Clay Creswell,
Powerful and mysterious, sharks inspire both fascination and fear. Worldwide, oceans are home to some five-hundred species, and of those, fifty-six are known to reside in or pass through the waters off the coast of both North and South Carolina. At any given time, waders, swimmers, and surfers enjoying these waters are frequently within just one-hundred feet of a shark. While it's unnerving to know that sharks often swim just below the surface in the shallows, W. Clay...

The Complementarity of Women and Men

edited by Paul C. Vitz
The Complementarity of Women and Men provides a Catholic Christian case that men and women are in certain respects quite different but also have a positive, synergistic complementary relationship. Although differences and their mutually supporting relationships are focused on throughout the volume, men and women are assumed to have equal dignity and value. This underlying interpretation comes from the familiar, basic theological position in...

Salvation through Temptation

Benjamin E. Heidgerken
Salvation through Temptation describes the development of predominant Greek and Latin Christian conceptions of temptation and of the work of Christ to heal and restore humankind in the context of that temptation, focusing on Maximus the Confessor and Thomas Aquinas as well-developed examples of Greek and Latin thought on these matters. Maximus and Thomas represent two trajectories concerning the woundedness of...

The Revelation of Your Words

edited by Kevin Zilverberg, Kevin Zilverberg, Scott Carl
The Revelation of Your Words, a collection of essays, treats the role of the seminary professor of sacred Scripture within the context of the New Evangelization. Some of the essays concern principally the imparting of knowledge and best practices to accomplish this; others concern the fostering of delight in the sacred page and spiritual encounter with God. Although these essays...

History of Ukraine-Rus'

Mykhailo Hrushevsky, edited by Christian Raffensperger, Frank E. Sysyn, Tania Plawuszczak-Stech, translated by Ian Press
Volumes 1 through 3 of Mykhailo Hrushevsky's ten-volume magnum opus, History of Ukraine-Rus', form a foundational unit for the history of the Ukrainian lands and people wherein the eminent historian explores the history of the Ukrainian lands from antiquity up until the dissolution of the Rus' state on western Ukrainian territories in the fourteenth...

Immigration as a Process

Barbara Frank-Job
In their weblogs, immigrants from Latin America to Quebéc discuss the migration process in narrative reconstructions of personal experiences with the blogger community. During this collective work of meaning construction, various concepts of temporality play an essential role. Based on a large corpus of weblog posts and discussions and within the methodological frameworks of discourse analysis and interactional linguistics, this...

Communist Gourmet

Albena Shkodrova
Communist Gourmet presents a lively, detailed account of how the communist regime in Bulgaria determined people's everyday food experience between 1944 and 1989. It examines the daily routines of acquiring food, cooking it, and eating out at restaurants through the memories of Bulgarians and foreigners, during communism. In looking back on a wide array of issues and events, Albena Shkodrova attempts to explain the paradoxes of daily existence. She...

Imagined Empires

edited by Dimitris Stamatopoulos
The Balkans offer classic examples of how empires imagine they can transform themselves into national states (Ottomanism) and how nation-states project themselves into future empires (as with the Greek "Great Idea" and the Serbian "Načertaniye"). By examining the interaction between these two aspirations this volume sheds light on the ideological prerequisites for the emergence of Balkan nationalisms. With a balance between...

One Hundred Years of Communist Experiments

edited by Vladimir Tismaneanu, Jordan Luber
Why has communism's humanist quest for freedom and social justice without exception resulted in the reign of terror and lies? The authors of this collective volume address this urgent question covering the one hundred years since Lenin's coup brought the first communist regime to power in St. Petersburg, Russia in November 1917. The first part of the volume is dedicated to the varieties of communist fantasies of salvation, and the remaining three consider...

Up in the Air?

edited by Tarik Jusić, Manuel Puppis, Laia Castro Herrero, Davor Marko
The agenda for transition after the demise of communism in the Western Balkans made the conversion of state radio and television into public service broadcasters a priority, converting mouthpieces of the regime into public forums in which various interests and standpoints could be shared and deliberated. There is general agreement that this endeavor has not been a success. Formally, the countries adopted...

Two Hundred Years of Charleston Cooking, second edition

compiled by Blanche S. Rhett, edited by Lettie Gay, introduction by Helen Woodward, foreword by Elizabeth Hamilton, Nathalie Dupree, Rebecca Sharpless
First published in 1930 as 200 Years of Charleston Cooking, this collection of more than three hundred recipes was gathered by Blanche S. Rhett from housewives and their African American cooks in Charleston, South Carolina. From enduring favorites like she-crab soup and Hopping John to forgotten delicacies like cooter (turtle) stew, the recipes Rhett...

Democracy in Austria

Günter Bischof
The essays in this volume are dedicated to the ups and downs of 100 years of Austrian democracy. On the occasion of the founding of the First Austrian Republic on November 12, 1918, Austrians celebrated the 100th anniversary of this event in recent Austrian history. Due to the deep divisions of the Austrian political camps (parties) democratic governance was troubled in the 1920s and ended in authoritarian rule in 1933. After World War II, the two principal political parties ÖVP (Christian conservatives) and SPÖ...

I Am New Orleans

Kalamu ya Salaam
NOLA Is A myth. A reality. A port. A place.  An opening. A dead end. A womb. A grave. Audubon Zoo and Monkey Hill uptown. Mardi Gras Fountain with the colored lights downtown.   Above ground crypts at St. Louis Cemeteries 1, 2, and 3. Football fields. Parade grounds. Picnic areas. Citywide. Lake front. River front.  Fishing hole. Bayou swamp.  Raw oysters. Fried chicken.  Front-liners. Second-liners.  Storefront churches. A sacred cathedral. Superdome. Shotgun...

This Train is Not Bound for Glory

Paola Ravasio
This book explores how spatial displacement correlates to social immobility narratologically by carrying out a hermeneutic of literary trainscapes. Understood as the arrangement of the social and the mobile in the literary representation of movement of people and goods by the railway system across inter-American economies, the book focuses on narratives based at the Panama Canal Zone, across the Central American banana republics, and on the human caravan...

Thomas Aquinas and the Crisis of Christology

edited by Michael A Dauphinais, Michael Dauphinais, Andrew Hofer, OP, Roger W. Nutt, Andrew Hofer, OP, Roger W Nutt
"But who do you say that I am?" asks Jesus at the decisive turning point in the Gospel. Simon Peter answers correctly at first but is soon corrected when he protests the revelation of the Cross. Christians in every age are called to confess the right faith in Jesus, who suffered, died, and rose for our salvation. Our own period is beset by a crisis of faith in Jesus, which has had...

The Child in the Electric Chair

Eli Faber
At 7:30 a.m. on June 16, 1944, George Junius Stinney Jr. was escorted by four guards to the death chamber. Wearing socks but no shoes, the 14-year-old Black boy walked with his Bible tucked under his arm. The guards strapped his slight, five-foot-one-inch frame into the electric chair. His small size made it difficult to affix the electrode to his right leg and the face mask, which was clearly too large, fell...

Ancient Egypt and Early China

Anthony J. Barbieri-Low, with contributions by Marissa A. Stevens
Although they existed more than a millennium apart, the great civilizations of New Kingdom Egypt (ca. 1548–1086 BCE) and Han dynasty China (206 BCE–220 CE) shared intriguing similarities. Both were centered around major, flood-prone rivers—the Nile and the Yellow River—and established complex hydraulic systems to manage their power. Both spread their territories across vast empires that were controlled through warfare and...

Wetlands in a Dry Land

Emily O'Gorman, series edited by Paul S. Sutter, foreword by Paul S. Sutter
In the name of agriculture, urban growth, and disease control, humans have drained, filled, or otherwise destroyed nearly 87 percent of the world's wetlands over the past three centuries. Unintended consequences include biodiversity loss, poor water quality, and the erosion of cultural sites, and only in the past few decades have wetlands been widely recognized as worth preserving.

Transforming Markets

Andrew Kilpatrick, Anthony Williams
The second volume of the history of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) takes up the story of how the Bank has become an indispensable part of the international financial architecture. It tracks the rollercoaster ride during this period, including the Bank's crucial coordinating role in response to global and regional crises, the calls for its presence as an investor in Turkey, the Middle...

The Borders of AIDS

Karma R. Chávez, series edited by Piya Chatterjee
As soon as US media and politicians became aware of AIDS in the early 1980s, fingers were pointed not only at the gay community but also at other countries and migrant communities, particularly Haitians, as responsible for spreading the virus. Evangelical leaders, public health officials, and the Reagan administration quickly capitalized on widespread fear of the new disease to call for quarantines, immigration bans, and deportations, scapegoating...

Racial Erotics

C. Winter Han
Sexual desire, often understood as personal erotic preference, is frequently seen as neutral, natural, or inevitable. Countering these commonplace assumptions, Racial Erotics shows how sexual partnering within communities of gay men is deeply embedded within larger social structures that define whiteness as desirable and normative while othering men of color. In queer erotic economies this othering may take the form of sexual rejection or fetishization of...

Love for Liberation

Robin J. Hayes
During the height of the Cold War, passionate idealists across the US and Africa came together to fight for Black self-determination and the antiracist remaking of society. Beginning with the 1957 Ghanaian independence celebration, the optimism and challenges of African independence leaders were publicized to African Americans through community-based newspapers and Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Inspired by African independence—and...

Biomedicine and Beatitude, second edition

Nicanor Pier Giorgio Austriaco
This timely and up to date new edition of Biomedicine and Beatitude features an entirely new chapter on the ethics of bodily modification. It is also updated throughout to reflect the pontificate of Pope Francis, recent concerns including ethical issues raised by the COVID-19 pandemic, and feedback from the many instructors who used the first edition in the classroom.

Black Catholic Studies Reader

edited by David J Endres, David J. Endres, foreword by Wilton Cardinal Gregory
This first-ever Black Catholic Studies Reader offers an introduction to the theology and history of the Black Catholic experience from those who know it best: Black Catholic scholars, teachers, activists, and ministers. The reader offers a multi-faceted, interdisciplinary approach that illuminates what it means to be Black and Catholic in the United States. This collection of essays from prominent scholars, both...

Gullah Spirituals

Eric Sean Crawford
In Gullah Spirituals musicologist Eric Crawford traces Gullah Geechee songs from their beginnings in West Africa to their height as songs for social change and Black identity in the twentieth century American South. While much has been done to study, preserve, and interpret Gullah culture in the lowcountry and sea islands of South Carolina and Georgia, some traditions like the shouting and rowing songs have been all but forgotten. This work,...

Painful Beauty

Megan A. Smetzer, hD
For over 150 years, Tlingit women artists have beaded colorful, intricately beautiful designs on moccasins, dolls, octopus bags, tunics, and other garments. Painful Beauty suggests that at a time when Indigenous cultural practices were actively being repressed, beading supported cultural continuity, demonstrating Tlingit women's resilience, strength, and power. Beadwork served many uses, from the ceremonial to the economic, as women created beaded pieces for...

Jayne Mansfield

Eve Golden
Jayne Mansfield (19331967) was driven not just to be an actress but to be a star. One of the most influential sex symbols of her time, she was known for her platinum blonde hair, hourglass figure, outrageously low necklines, and flamboyant lifestyle. Hardworking and ambitious, Mansfield proved early in her career that she was adept in both comic and dramatic roles, but her tenacious search for the spotlight and her risqué promotional stunts caused her to be increasingly snubbed in Hollywood. In...

A Spectrum of Unfreedom

Leslie Peirce
Without the labor of the captives and slaves, the Ottoman empire could not have attained and maintained its strength in early modern times. With Anatolia as the geographic focus, Leslie Peirce searches for the voices of the unfree, drawing on archives, histories written at the time, and legal texts. Unfree persons comprised two general populations: slaves and captives. Mostly household workers, slaves lived in a variety of circumstances, from squalor to luxury. Their...

To Catch a Spy

James M. Olson
How the US is losing the counterintelligence war and what the country should do to better protect our national security and trade secrets The United States is losing the counterintelligence war. Foreign intelligence services, particularly those of China, Russia, and Cuba, are recruiting spies in our midst and stealing our secrets and cutting-edge technologies. In To Catch a Spy: The Art of Counterintelligence, James M. Olson, former chief of CIA counterintelligence, offers a wake-up call...

Silas House

edited by Sylvia Shurbutt, Sylvia Bailey Shurbutt, with contributions byAdam Booth, foreword by Denise Giardina, with contributions byDavid O. Hoffman, Maurice Manning, Jennifer Adkins Reynolds, Donna Summerlin, Natalie Sypolt, Marianne Worthington, Jacqueline Yahn
Bestselling author, journalist, playwright, and activist Silas House has focused nearly all of his work on Appalachia. His acclaimed and diverse body of work includes the novels Clay's Quilt, A Parchment of Leaves, The Coal Tattoo, Eli...

Challenging History

edited by Leah Worthington, Rachel Clare Donaldson, John W. White
For decades racism and social inequity have stayed at the center of the national conversation in the United States, sustaining the debate around public historic places and monuments and what they represent. These conversations are a reminder of the crucial role that public history professionals play in engaging public audiences on subjects of race and slavery. This "difficult history" has often remained un- or...

C'est ce qu'on dit with website PB (Lingco)

Claude Grangier, Nadine O'Connor Di Vito, Marie Berg

Online World Language Instruction Training and Assessment

Carmen King Ramírez, Barbara A. Lafford, James E. Wermers
A new approach to training and evaluating world languages online instructors The rapid growth in online world language programs in the United States coupled with the widespread implementation of virtual teaching in response to COVID-19 have pushed the field to reconceive instruction. Virtual learning creates unique challenges for instructors, who need to ensure that their students have adequate...

Separated

William D. Lopez
foreword by Ruth Behar, author of The Vulnerable Observer
new foreword by Former US Secretary of HUD Julián Castro
William D. Lopez details the incredible strain that immigration raids place on Latino communities—and the families and friends who must recover from their aftermath. 2020 International Latino Book Awards Winner First Place, Mariposa Award for Best First Book - Nonfiction Honorable Mention, Best Political / Current Affairs Book On a...

Voices from the Peace Corps

Angene Wilson, Jack Wilson, foreword by Glenn Blumhorst
President John F. Kennedy established the Peace Corps on March 1, 1961. In the fifty years since, nearly 200,000 Americans have served in 139 countries, providing technical assistance, promoting a better understanding of American culture, and bringing the world back to the United States. In Voices from the Peace Corps: Fifty Years of Kentucky Volunteers, Angene Wilson and Jack Wilson, who served in Liberia from 1962 to 1964,...

Dogs of March

Ernest Hebert
Life, love, death, and laughs in a small American town His life had come to this: save a few deer from the jaws of dogs. He was a small man sent to perform a small task. Howard Elman is a man whose internal landscape is as disordered as his front yard, where native New Hampshire birches and maples mingle with a bullet-riddled washer, abandoned bathroom fixtures, and several junk cars. Howard, anti-hero of this first novel in Ernest Hebert's highly acclaimed Darby Chronicles, is a man who is tough...

A Little More than Kin

Ernest Hebert
Life, love, death, and laughs in a small American town The second novel of the Darby Chronicles follows Ollie Jordan, a man with no education, no mentors, and a serious Freudian hang-up. A family history of poverty, stubborn pride, and a culture that runs contrary to mainstream society have robbed Ollie and his people of opportunity, even hope. They live by a culture of "succor and ascendancy." When Ollie is evicted from his shack, he breaks his drinking rules and heads out into the...

Whisper My Name

Ernest Hebert
Life, love, death, and laughs in a small American town The institution of town meeting, the beauty of the landscape, and the enduring qualities of the architecture all give the New England town the power to shape the identity of its inhabitants—in a good way. This premise is put on trial—and to a vote—in Whisper My Name, the third novel in Hebert's Darby Chronicles. The story unfolds as seen through the eyes of three men: the reporter Roland LaChance, the farmer Avalon Hillary, and the founder...

The Passion of Estelle Jordan

Ernest Hebert
Life, love, death, and laughs in a small American town A major character in earlier Darby novels, Estelle takes center stage in The Passion of Estelle Jordan. Presently she is sliding into late middle age, drawn to two lovers who could not be more different: the widowed farmer Avalon Hillary and a mysterious young punk Estelle calls Trans Am in honor of the car he drives. And there's a threat, not to Estelle—she can take care of herself—but to Noreen Cook, a younger woman Estelle...

Live Free or Die

Ernest Hebert
Life, love, death, and laughs in a small American town The struggle between the rural working class and the upper crust intensifies in this turning-point novel of the Darby Chronicles as Freddy Elman, son of the town trash collector, and Lilith Salmon, daughter of a prestigious family, embark on their ill-fated love affair. Seeing Darby through new eyes, Freddy comes to realize that "the kind of people who hunkered down among these tree-infested, rock-strewn hills" is "dying out, replaced by...

Spoonwood

Ernest Hebert
Life, love, death, and laughs in a small American town After almost fifteen years, Hebert has returned to this rich literary landscape for a new novel of the changing economic and social character of New England. Hebert's previous Darby book, Live Free or Die, recounted the ill-fated love between Freddie Elman, son of the town trash collector, and Lilith Salmon, child of Upper Darby gentility. At its conclusion, Lilith died giving birth to their son. As Spoonwood opens, Freddie, consumed by grief and...

Howard Elman's Farewell

Ernest Hebert
Life, love, death, and laughs in a small American town Part Falstaff, part King Lear, but all American, Howard Elman was a fifty-something workingman when he burst onto the literary scene in The Dogs of March, the first novel of the Darby Chronicles. Now in this, its seventh installment, the Darby constable is an eighty-something widower who wants to do "a great thing" before he motors off into the sunset. Maybe Howard achieves this goal, but he manages it in strange, wonderful, and...

Brothers of Coweta

Bryan C. Rindfleisch
In Brothers of Coweta Bryan C. Rindfleisch explores how family and clan served as the structural foundation of the Muscogee (Creek) Indian world through the lens of two brothers, who emerged from the historical shadows to shape the forces of empire, colonialism, and revolution that transformed the American South during the eighteenth century. Although much of the historical record left by European settlers was fairly robust, it...

Introduction to Sacramental Theology

José Granados, foreword by David W. Fagerberg
Introduction to Sacramental Theology presents a complete overview of sacramental theology from the viewpoint of the body. This viewpoint is supported, in the first place, by Revelation, for which the sacraments are the place where we enter into contact with the body of the risen Jesus. It is a viewpoint, secondly, which is firmly rooted in our concrete human bodily experience, thus allowing for a strong connection between faith and...

Ossa Ostensa

Laura Pooley
OSSA OSTENSA is the world's first comprehensive example of how to teach and learn the Latin language using the unique teaching system of the internationally recognized authority Reginald Foster. Laura Pooley – prize-winning graduate of the University of Oxford and currently a supervisor at the University of Cambridge, brings to life the year she spent in Rome studying Latin with Reginaldus. His inspiring and transformative method of teaching combines with Laura's twenty...

Footprints of War

David Andrew Biggs, foreword by Paul S. Sutter, series edited by Paul S. Sutter
When American forces arrived in Vietnam, they found themselves embedded in historic village and frontier spaces already shaped by many past conflicts. American bases and bombing targets followed spatial and political logics influenced by the footprints of past wars in central Vietnam. The militarized landscapes here, like many in the world's historic conflict zones, continue to shape post-war land-use politics. ...

The 36-Hour Day, seventh edition

Nancy L. Mace, MA, and Peter V. Rabins, MD, MPH
With over 3.5 million copies sold, the bestselling guide to understanding and caring for people with dementia is now completely revised and updated! For 40 years, The 36-Hour Day has been the leading work in the field for caregivers of those with dementia. Written by experts with decades of experience caring for individuals with memory loss, Alzheimer's, and other dementias, the book is widely known for...

The Blue Split Compartments

Andrea Brady
An innovative suite of poems for the drone age The Blue Split Compartments is a complex and powerful sequence of lyric poems exploring the relationships between military drone operators and their victims. Drawing on chatroom logs, military policy manuals, pattern of life archives, and accounts by witnesses around the world, these poems document the consequences of the perpetual and 'everywhere war.' With its sophisticated interplay of diction, rhetoric, syntax, positioning, allusion, and sonic quality, this...

Signs of Home

Barbara Johns, foreword by Stephen H. Sumida
This beautiful and poignant biography of Issei artist Kamekichi Tokita uses his paintings and wartime diary to vividly illustrate the experiences, uncertainties, joys, and anxieties of Japanese Americans during the World War II internment and the more optimistic times that preceded it. Tokita emigrated from Japan in the early twentieth century and settled in Seattle's Japanese American immigrant community. By the 1930s, he was...

Light the Road of Freedom

Sahbaa Al-Barbari, edited by Ghada Ageel, Barbara Bill, foreword by Ramzy Baroud
Sahbaa Al-Barbari's story provides a unique perspective on Palestinian experience before and after the 1948 Nakba. Born in Gaza, Al-Barbari began her career as a school teacher and was an activist in her community. When Israel occupied the Gaza Strip in 1967, Al-Barbari was exiled from Palestine, continuing her activism as she lived in Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Cyprus, Kuwait, Tunis, Libya, and Europe. Al-Barbari returned to Gaza in 1996. This...

In the Service of God and Humanity

Tunde Adeleke
Martin R. Delany (1812–1885) was one of the leading and most influential Black activists and nationalists in American history. His ideas have inspired generations of activists and movements, including Booker T. Washington in the late nineteenth century, Marcus Garvey in the early 1920s, Malcolm X and Black Power in 1960s, and even today's Black Lives Matter. Extant scholarship on Delany has focused largely on his Black nationalist and...

Piercing the Clouds

edited by Kevin Zilverberg, Kevin Zilverberg, Scott Carl
This book's six essays pertain to the "piercing of the clouds," or the experience of heavenly mysteries, which characterizes lectio divina practiced well. Moreover, these peer-reviewed essays give special attention to the practice of lectio divina during preparation for ministry, especially the ministry of Catholic priests. That being said, any current or prospective Bible-reader may profit from this book; most of its content...

Teaching French Neoclassical Tragedy

edited by Hélène Bilis, Hélène E. Bilis, Ellen McClure, with contributions by Faith E. Beasley
Tragedy has been reborn many times since antiquity. Seventeenth-century French playwrights composed tragedies marked by neoclassical aesthetics and the divine-right absolutism of the Grand Siècle. But their works also speak to the modern imagination, inspiring reactions from Barthes, Derrida, and Foucault; adaptations and reworkings by Césaire and Kushner; and new productions by francophone and anglophone...

The Long Civil War

edited by John David Smith, Ph.D., Raymond Arsenault, with contributions byMichael J. Birkner, Paul A. Cimbala, Stanley Harrold, James R. Hedtke, James Oliver Horton, Lois E. Horton, Daniel Kilbride, Diane Miller Sommerville, Stephen J. Whitfield
In this wide-ranging volume, eminent historians John David Smith and Raymond Arsenault assemble a distinguished group of scholars to build on the growing body of work on the "Long Civil War" and break new ground. They cover a variety of...

Teaching Anglophone South Asian Women Writers

edited by Deepika Bahri, Filippo Menozzi
Global and cosmopolitan since the late nineteenth century, anglophone South Asian women's writing has flourished in many genres and locations, encompassing diverse works linked by issues of language, geography, history, culture, gender, and literary tradition. Whether writing in the homeland or in the diaspora, authors offer representations of social struggle and inequality while articulating possibilities for resistance. In this volume experienced...

Chinese Village Life Today

Gonçalo Santos
China has undergone a remarkable process of urbanization, but a significant portion of its citizens still live in rural villages. To gain better access to jobs, health care, and consumer goods, villagers often travel or migrate to cities, and that cyclical transit and engagement with new technoscientific and medical practices is transforming village life. In this thoughtful ethnography, Gonçalo Santos paints a richly detailed portrait of one rural township in...

The Weather of the Pacific Northwest, second edition

Cliff Mass
Powerful Pacific storms strike the region. Otherworldly lenticular clouds often cap Mount Rainier. Rain shadows create sunny skies while torrential rain falls a few miles away. The Pineapple Express brings tropical moisture and warmth during Northwest winters. The Pacific Northwest produces some of the most distinctive and variable weather in North America, which is described with colorful and evocative language in this book. Atmospheric scientist and blogger Cliff Mass, known for his ability to make...

Sherman and the Burning of Columbia

Marion B. Lucas, foreword by Anne Sarah Rubin
Who burned South Carolina's capital city on February 17, 1865? Even before the embers had finished smoldering, Confederates and Federals accused each other of starting the blaze, igniting a controversy that has raged for more than a century. Marion B. Lucas sifts through official reports, newspapers, and eyewitness accounts, and the evidence he amasses debunks many of the myths surrounding the tragedy. Rather than writing a melodrama with clear heroes and...

Fear No Man

Mike Gastineau, foreword by Nick Saban
In 1984 the University of Washington Huskies won every game but one, ranking second in national polls. For most coaches, such a season would be a career pinnacle. But for Don James second place motivated him to set aside what he knew about football and rethink the game. James made radical changes to his coaching philosophy, from recruitment to becoming one of the first college teams willing to blitz on...

Arms Control for the Third Nuclear Age

David A. Cooper
A reappraisal of classic arms control theory that advocates for reprioritizing deterrence over disarmament in a new era of nuclear multipolarity The United States faces a new era of nuclear arms racing for which it is conceptually unprepared. Great power nuclear competition is seemingly returning with a vengeance as the post—Cold War international order morphs into something more uncertain, complicated, and dangerous. In this unstable third nuclear...

Renewable Energy

Stephen Peake
An expert introduction to the fascinating world of renewable energy and the transition from fossil fuels to clean energy that lies at the heart of a brighter climate future. In Renewable Energy: Ten Short Lessons, Stephen Peake distills the key issues of this timely subject, examining how we can harness the power of a range of groundbreaking energy technologies most effectively to achieve a sustainable energy future. Renewable energy is central to managing climate change and our transition to a...

Time Travel

Brian Clegg
During times like these, who hasn't daydreamed about traveling forward or backward in time? In Time Travel: Ten Short Lessons, popular-science master Brian Clegg gives a grand tour of the essential lessons in this game-changing area of physics, from the imagination of novelists to current research. Einstein's special theory of relativity told us that time travel to the future was possible, and later his general theory of relativity showed us that loops in spacetime could exist, meaning that we might be able...

Contemporary Public Health, second edition

edited by James W. Holsinger, Jr., foreword by Eli Capiluto, Eli I. Capilouto, Eli Capilouto, introduction by F. Douglas Scutchfield, with contributions by Steven H. Woolf, edited by F. Douglas Scutchfield, with contributions by Julia F. Costich, Richard C. Ingram, Samuel Matheny, David Mathews, Richard Ingram, Paula Braveman, Kaye Bender, Kate Beatty, Melissa White, F. Douglas Scutchfield, Michelle Lofwall, Robert McCool, Angela Beck, Emily Youatt, Roosa Tikkanen, Debra J. Perez, Robin Osborn,...
...

Cecil B. DeMille's Hollywood

Robert S. Birchard, foreword by Cecilia DeMille Presley
In Cecil B. DeMille's Hollywood, Robert S. Birchard offers a detailed and definitive chronicle of the most successful filmmaker in early Hollywood history, going behind studio gates and beyond DeMille's legendary persona. In his forty-five-year career, DeMille's box-office record was unsurpassed, and his swaggering style established the public image for movie directors. DeMille had a profound impact on the way movies tell stories and brought greater attention to...

Head to Head

Lenny Shulman
In Head to Head, award-winning writer Lenny Shulman offers highlights from the best interviews he has conducted throughout his twenty-year career covering Thoroughbred horse racing. In that time, he has coaxed the innermost thoughts out of the sport's most notable headline-makers. It was to Shulman that Helen "Penny" Chenery, owner of Secretariat, publicly revealed for the first time the mistakes she made with her superstar colt. Arthur Hancock III shared with him...

John J. Pershing and the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I, 1917-1919

edited by John T. Greenwood, Ph.D.
General of the Armies John J. Pershing (1860–1948) had a long and distinguished military career, but he is most famous for leading the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I. He published a memoir, My Experiences in the World War, and has been the subject of numerous biographies, but the literature regarding this towering figure and his enormous role in the First World War deserves...

The Most Hated Man in Kentucky

Brad Asher
For the last third of the nineteenth century, Union General Stephen Gano Burbridge enjoyed the unenviable distinction of being the most hated man in Kentucky. From mid-1864, just months into his reign as the military commander of the state, until his death in December 1894, the mere mention of his name triggered a firestorm of curses from editorialists and politicians. By the end of Burbridge's tenure, Governor Thomas E. Bramlette concluded...

Business Arabic, Second Edition

Mai Zaki, John Mace
An essential reference of contemporary Arabic terms for successful business communication Business Arabic: A Comprehensive Vocabulary contains the key terms professionals and learners need for successful business communication. Useful for translating both from Arabic to English and English to Arabic, this book is packed with more than 2,000 expressions and coinages commonly used in the workplace, including 700 new words for this edition and both American and British terms and...

U.S. Naval Gunfire Support in the Pacific War

Donald K. Mitchener
On November 20, 1943, the U.S. military invaded the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands as part of the first American offensive in the Central Pacific region during World War II. This invasion marked more than one first, as it was also the introductory test of a doctrine developed during the interwar years to address problems inherent in situations in which amphibious assaults required support by naval gunfire rather...

Understanding Alice Walker

Thadious M. Davis
Understanding Alice Walker serves both as an introduction to the Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award winner's large body of work and as a critical analysis of her multifaceted canon. Thadious M. Davis begins with Walker's biography and her formative experiences in the South and then presents ways of accessing and reading Walker's complex, interconnected, and sociopolitically invested career in writing fiction, poetry, critical essays, and meditations. Although best known for her novel The Color...

The PhD Parenthood Trap

Kerry F. Crawford, Leah C. Windsor, with contributions by Amanda Murdie, Whitney Pirtle, Nancy Rower, Erin Olsen-Telles, Sara McLaughlin Mitchell, Kathleen J. Hancock, Courtney Burns, David Andersen-Rodgers, Sarah Shair-Rosenfield, Reed M. Wood, Sahar Shafqat, Krista E. Wiegand, Susan Hannah Allen, Anonymous, Christina Fattore, Kelly Baker, Jael Goldsmith Weil, Susan Sell, Kelly Kadera, Lily Moloney, Madeleine Moloney, Maxwell Moloney
What it's really like to be a parent in the world...

Perfect Black

Crystal Wilkinson, foreword by Nikky Finney, illustrated by Ronald W. Davis
Crystal Wilkinson combines a deep love for her rural roots with a passion for language and storytelling in this compelling collection of poetry and prose about girlhood, racism, and political awakening, imbued with vivid imagery of growing up in Southern Appalachia. In Perfect Black, the acclaimed writer muses on such topics as motherhood, the politics of her Black body, lost fathers, mental illness, sexual abuse, and religion. It is a captivating conversation...

Changing the Game

Jim Host, with Eric A. Moyen, Ph.D.
Many Kentuckians and fans of intercollegiate athletics are familiar with the name Jim Host. As founder and CEO of Host Communications, he was the pioneer in college sports marketing. Host's prevailing innovation in collegiate sports was the concept of bundled licensing, which encouraged corporate partners to become official sponsors of athletic programs across media formats. Host and his team developed the NCAA Radio Network and introduced what became...

The Black Civil War Soldiers of Illinois

Edward A. Miller, Jr.
The Black Civil War Soldiers of Illinois tells the story of the Twenty-ninth United States Colored Infantry, one of almost 150 African American regiments to fight in the Civil War and the only such unit assembled by the state of Illinois. The Twenty-ninth took part in the famous Battle of the Crater at Petersburg, joined Grant's forces in the siege of Richmond, and stood on the battlefield when Lee surrendered at Appomattox. In...

The Jewish Confederates

Robert N. Rosen
In The Jewish Confederates, Robert N. Rosen introduces readers to the community of Southern Jews of the 1860s, revealing the remarkable breadth of Southern Jewry's participation in the war and their commitment to the Confederacy. Intrigued by the apparent irony of their story, Rosen weaves a complex chronicle that outlines how Southern Jews—many of them recently arrived immigrants from Bavaria, Prussia, Hungary, and Russia who had fled European revolutions and anti-Semitic governments—attempted to navigate the...

America's Original Sin

John Rhodehamel
Finally, a compelling narrative history of the Lincoln assassination that refuses to ignore John Wilkes Booth's motivation: his growing, obsessive commitment to white supremacy. On April 14, 1865, after nearly a year of conspiring, John Wilkes Booth shot Abraham Lincoln as the president watched a production of Our American Cousin at Ford's Theatre. Lincoln died the next morning. Twelve days later, Booth himself was fatally shot by a Union...

American Dementia

Daniel R. George, PhD, MSc, and Peter J. Whitehouse, MD, PhD
Have the social safety nets, environmental protections, and policies to redress wealth and income inequality enacted after World War II contributed to declining rates of dementia today—and how do we improve brain health in the future? For decades, researchers have chased a pharmaceutical cure for memory loss. But despite the fact that no disease-modifying biotech treatments have emerged, new research suggests that dementia rates...

Finding the Right Words

Cindy Weinstein
with Bruce L. Miller, MD
The moving story of an English professor studying neurology in order to understand and come to terms with her father's death from Alzheimer's. In 1985, when Cindy Weinstein was a graduate student at UC Berkeley, her beloved father, Jerry, was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease. He was fifty-eight years old. Twelve years later, at age seventy, he died having lost all of his memories—along with his ability to read, write,...

The Past

Wendy Xu
Elegiac and searching, poems written in the long shadow of immigration The poems in Wendy Xu's third collection, The Past, fantasize uneasily about becoming a palatable lyric record of their namesake, while ultimately working to disrupt this Westernized desire. Born in Shandong, China, in 1987, Wendy Xu immigrated to the United States in 1989, three days ahead of the events of Tian'anmen Square. The Past probes the multi-generational binds of family, displacement, and immigration as an ongoing psychic experience without end. Moving...

Ethics for the Practice of Psychology in Canada, Third Edition, third edition

Derek Truscott, Kenneth H. Crook
Since its initial release in 2004, Ethics for the Practice of Psychology in Canada has filled a vital need for a single source on professional ethics and law relevant to Canadian psychologists. Focussing on the most pertinent ethical and legal issues, including decision making, obtaining consent, protecting confidentiality, helping without harming, maintaining professional boundaries, cultural diversity, and being socially responsible, it is...

On Foot to Canterbury

Ken Haigh
Setting off on foot from Winchester, Ken Haigh hikes across southern England, retracing one of the traditional routes that medieval pilgrims followed to the shrine of Saint Thomas Becket at Canterbury Cathedral. Walking in honour of his father, a staunch Anglican who passed away before they could begin their trip together, Haigh wonders: Is there a place in the modern secular world for pilgrimage? On his journey, he sorts through his own spiritual aimlessness while crossing paths with writers like...

The Slaveholders' Dilemma

Eugene D. Genovese, foreword by Douglas Ambrose
In The Slaveholders' Dilemma, Eugene D. Genovese explores the efforts of American slaveholders to reconcile the intellectual dilemma in which they found themselves as supporters of freedom but defenders of slavery. In the American South slaveholders perceived themselves as thoroughly modern, moral men who protected human progress against the perversions of the Enlightenment and the French Revolution.

Arranged Companions

Weijing Lu
Although commonly associated with patriarchal oppression, arranged marriages have adapted over the centuries to changing cultural norms and the lived experiences of men and women. In Arranged Companions, historian Weijing Lu chronicles how marital behaviors during the early and High Qing (mid-seventeenth through mid-nineteenth centuries) were informed by rich and complex traditions and mediated by the historical conditions of the period, during which marital affection was...

Radical Innocence

Bernard F. Dick
On October 30, 1947, the House Committee on Un-American Activities concluded the first round of hearings on the alleged Communist infiltration of the motion picture industry. Hollywood was ordered to "clean its own house," and ten witnesses who had refused to answer questions about their membership in the Screen Writers Guild and the Communist party eventually received contempt citations. By 1950, the Hollywood Ten (as they quickly became known), which included writers,...

South Carolina Scalawags

Hyman Rubin, III
South Carolina Scalawags tells the familiar story of Reconstruction from a mostly unfamiliar vantage point, that of white southerners who broke ranks and supported the newly recognized rights and freedoms of their black neighbors. The end of the Civil War turned South Carolina's political hierarchy upside down by calling into existence what had not existed before, a South Carolina Republican Party, and putting its members at the helm of state government from 1868 to 1876. Composed primarily of former...

A Visual History of Austria (Contemporary Austrian Studies, vol. 30)

edited by Günter Bischof, Martin Kofler, Hans Petchar
Visual histories in 19th and 20th century Austria are documented here, from court photography and nature photography to political photography. A single photo studio will be analyzed documenting lives in Western Austria as well as a photo archive and its special collections regarding mountains. Imperial Austria is present in the pictures of court photographer Ludwig Angerer. Photos of wars figure heavily in this...

The Breast Cancer Book

Kenneth D. Miller, MD, and Melissa Camp, MD, MPH
with Kathy Steligo
A comprehensive, down-to-earth guide for anyone diagnosed with breast cancer. Being diagnosed with breast cancer can be scary and confusing. There are medical terms to learn, options to consider, and important decisions to make, all while trying to carry on with work, family, and life. The Breast Cancer Book can't reverse a diagnosis or make breast cancer disappear, but every page can inform and empower you or...

The Truth about College Admission Workbook

Brennan Barnard and Rick Clark
Finally! A workbook that guides you—and your family—through a positive college admission experience. College admission has always been complicated—and COVID-19 has changed the college search and selection process in profound and challenging ways. But the authors behind the best-selling The Truth about College Admission are here to help with a new college admission workbook that puts the complex process into the hands of students...

Ancestors

Sarah Carter, Inez Lightning
This exhibition catalogue introduces historic photographs of Indigenous peoples of Western Canada from a collection housed at the University of Alberta's Bruce Peel Special Collections. The publication focuses on the ancestors represented in the collection and how their images continue to generate stories and meanings in the present. The selected photographs contribute to a richer, deeper understanding of the past. There is strength, character,...

The $16 Taco

Pascale Joassart-Marcelli
Having "discovered" the flavors of barbacoa, bibimbap, bánh mi, sambusas, and pupusas, white middle-class eaters are increasingly venturing into historically segregated neighborhoods in search of "authentic" eateries run by—and for—immigrants and people of color. This interest in "ethnic" food and places, fueled by media attention and capitalized on by developers, contributes to gentrification, and the very people who produced these vibrant...

Bourbon's Backroads

Karl Raitz
Kentucky's landscape is punctuated by landmark structures that signpost bourbon's venerable story: distilleries long-standing, relict, razed, and brand new, the grand nineteenth-century homes of renowned distillers, villages and neighborhoods where distillery laborers lived, Whiskey Row storage warehouses, river landings and railroad yards, and factories where copper distilling vessels and charred white oak barrels are made. During the nineteenth century,...

Artisans in Early Imperial China

Anthony J. Barbieri-Low
Early China is best known for the dazzling material artifacts it has left behind. These terracotta figures, gilt-bronze lamps, and other material remnants of the Chinese past unearthed by archaeological excavations are often viewed without regard to the social context of their creation, yet they were made by individuals who contributed greatly to the foundations of early Chinese culture. With Artisans in Early Imperial China, Anthony Barbieri-Low combines historical, epigraphic, and...

Baring Unbearable Sensualities

Rosemarie A. Roberts
Theorizing the experiences of Black and Brown bodies in Hip Hop dance Baring Unbearable Sensualities brings together a bold methodology, an interdisciplinary perspective and a rich array of primary sources to deepen and complicate mainstream understandings of Hip Hop dance, an Afro-diasporic dance form, which have generally reduced the style to a set of techniques divorced from social contexts. Drawing on close observation and interviews with Hip Hop...

Ways of Voice

Matthew Rahaim
An exploration of vocal change and ethical dynamism Ways of Voice explores techniques of voice production in North India, from Bollywood to raga music to ghazal to devotional hymns and Sufi song. The voices in play here are not merely given, but achieved. Singers consciously train themselves to cultivate characteristic vocal gaits, sonorities, and poetic attunements; they adopt postures of the vocal apparatus; they build habits of listening,...

Living from Music in Salvador

Jeff Packman
An ethnography about local working musicians in Brazil's "most African" city Living from Music in Salvador examines the labor of musicians in Salvador da Bahia, widely regarded as Brazil's most African city. Drawing on fieldwork that spans sixteen years, the book explores local musicians' lives as members of a flexible work force, emphasizing questions of race, social class, and cultural politics in relation to professional music making. From...

Funding Bodies

Sarah Wilbur
How NEA funding policies have shaped the field of dance Funding Bodies is the first scholarly study of the National Endowment for the Arts to focus specifically on dance. It departs from a choreographic question: How have federal grant guidelines rewarded specific patterns of dance practice and production? Drawing upon archival documentation of NEA narratives, program eligibility guidelines, and standards of evaluation as well as testimony from past...

Be Brave to Things

Jack Spicer, edited by Daniel Katz
Indispensable volume of previously unavailable poetry by an American master Be Brave to Things shows legendary San Francisco Renaissance poet Jack Spicer at the top of his form, with his blistering intelligence, painful double-edged wit, and devastating will to truth everywhere on display. Much of the poetry here has never before been published, but the volume also includes much out-of-print or hard to find work, as well as Spicer's three major...

The Woman with the Wolf

Renée Vivien, edited by Melanie Hawthorne, translated by Karla Jay, Yvonne Klein, Yvonne M. Klein
Although Renée Vivien led a life of wealth and privilege in belle epoque Paris, she often felt like an outsider because she was attracted to other women. Financially secure, she wrote books to suit her own taste rather than that of the literary market. The Woman with the Wolf (La dame à la louve), from 1904, shows her at the height of her powers. These fierce, surprising stories challenge moral hypocrisy and normative views about...

La dame à la louve

Renée Vivien, edited by Melanie Hawthorne
Although Renée Vivien led a life of wealth and privilege in belle epoque Paris, she often felt like an outsider because she was attracted to other women. Financially secure, she wrote books to suit her own taste rather than that of the literary market. The Woman with the Wolf (La dame à la louve), from 1904, shows her at the height of her powers. These fierce, surprising stories challenge moral hypocrisy and normative views about gender, beginning with the title work, which offers a coded...

The Hubris of an Empty Hand

Mahyar A. Amouzegar
In eight ethereal stories, The Hubris in an Empty Hand encompasses the frailty and complexity of being human. When some divine gifts fall into decidedly earthly hands, the results are almost beyond reckoning for humans and gods both. Through its wide cast of characters and fascinating settings, terrestrial, divine, or somewhere in-between, Mayhar A. Amouzegar's fourth book of fiction takes on timeless questions of love and its permanence, sacrifice, and the human desire to be remembered and known.

101 People and Places That Shaped the American Revolution in South Carolina

edited by Walter Edgar
Paul Revere's midnight ride; the Battles at Lexington, Concord, and Bunker Hill; and the people and places associated with the early days of the American Revolution hold a special place in America's collective memory. Often lost in this narrative is the pivotal role that South Carolina played in the Revolutionary conflict, especially when the war moved south after 1780. Drawing upon the entries in the award-winning South Carolina...

The Black President

Claude A. Clegg III
The first sweeping, legacy-defining history of the entire Obama presidency. In The Black President, the first interpretative, grand-narrative history of Barack Obama's presidency in its entirety, Claude A. Clegg III situates the former president in his dynamic, inspirational, yet contentious political context. He captures the America that made Obama's White House years possible, while insightfully rendering the America that resolutely resisted the idea of a Black chief...

Public Values Leadership

Barry Bozeman and Michael M. Crow
Instead of private gain or corporate profits, what if we set public values as the goal of leadership? Leadership means many things and takes many forms. But most studies of the topic give little attention to why people lead or to where they are leading us. In Public Values Leadership, Barry Bozeman and Michael M. Crow explore leadership that serves public values—that is to say, values that are focused on the collective good and fundamental rights...

Film's First Family

Terry Chester Shulman
Scandal, adultery, secret marriages, divorce, custody battles, suicide attempts, and alcoholism—the trials and tribulations of the Costellos were as riveting as any Hollywood feature film. This eccentric and talented clan was one of the twentieth century's most famous families of actors, until their achievements were eclipsed by their own immutable penchant for self-destruction. Patriarch Maurice Costello was considered the first screen idol until his career, marked by...

Impact

edited by E. D. Morin, Jane Cawthorne, with contributions by Adèle Barclay, Tracy Wai de Boer, Stephanie Everett, Mary-Jo Fetterly, Rayanne Haines, Jane Harris, Kyla Jamieson, Alexis Kienlen, Claire Lacey, Julia Nunes, Shelley Pacholok, Chiedza Pasipanodya, Judy Rebick, Julie Sedivy, Dianah Smith, Carrie Snyder, Kinnie Starr, Amy Stuart, Anna Swanson
In Impact, 21 women writers consider the ramifications of concussion on their personal and professional lives. The anthology bears witness to the painstaking work...

Indigenous Women and Street Gangs

Amber, Bev, Chantel, Jazmyne, Faith, Jorgina, Robert Henry
Amber, Bev, Chantel, Jazmyne, Faith, and Jorgina are six Indigenous women previously involved in street gangs or street lifestyles. In Indigenous Women and Street Gangs they collaborate with Robert Henry (Métis) to share an emancipatory expression of their lives through photovoice. Each author shares a narrative that begins with her earliest memory and continues to the present. This is followed by a selection of photographs the...

Love Your Asian Body

Eric C. Wat
The AIDS crisis reshaped life in Los Angeles in the 1980s and 90s and radicalized a new generation of queer Asian Americans with a broad vision of health equity and sexual freedom. Even amid the fear and grief, Asian American AIDS activists created an infrastructure of care that centered the most stigmatized and provided diverse immigrant communities with the health resources and information they needed. Without a formal blueprint, these young organizers often had to be creative and...

The Papers of Thomas A. Edison, Volume 9

Thomas A. Edison
edited by Paul B. Israel, Louis Carlat, Theresa M. Collins, Alexandra R. Rimer, and Daniel J. Weeks
This richly illustrated volume explores Edison's inventive and personal pursuits from 1888 to 1889, documenting his responses to technological, organizational, and economic challenges. Thomas A. Edison was received at the 1889 Paris Exposition Universelle—the World's Fair—as a conquering hero. Extravagantly fêted and besieged by well-wishers, he was...

What's Public about Public Higher Ed?

Stephen M. Gavazzi and E. Gordon Gee
Exploring the current state of relationships between public universities, government leaders, and the citizens who elect them, this book offers insight into how to repair the growing rift between higher education and its public. Higher education gets a bad rap these days. The public perception is that there is a growing rift between public universities and the elected officials who support them. In...

Suspended

Charles Bell
The disturbing truth: school suspension does more than impede Black students' academic achievement—it also impacts their parents' employment and can violate state and federal laws. Decades of urban disinvestment and poverty have made educational attainment for Black youth more vital than at any time in recent history. Yet in their pursuit of quality education, many Black families are burdened by challenging barriers to success, most notably the frequency and severity of...

Taste the State

Kevin Mitchell, David S. Shields
From the influence of 1920s fashion on asparagus growers to an heirloom watermelon lost and found, Taste the State abounds with surprising stories from South Carolina's singularly rich food tradition. Here, Kevin Mitchell and David S. Shields present engaging profiles of eighty-two of the state's most distinctive ingredients, such as Carolina Gold rice, Sea Island White Flint corn, and the cone-shaped Charleston Wakefield cabbage, and...

From Survive to Thrive

Margaret S. Chisolm, MD
with John Hanc
foreword by Cal Ripken Jr.
illustrated by Natasha Chugh
What's holding you back? Learn how to take the steps needed to get to a place where you are happier, more productive, and more at peace. Are you struggling with personal problems, a mental health condition, or addiction? Are you looking to permanently improve your well-being and happiness? If you'd like to lead a fuller, more satisfying life—or help a mentally ill loved one—this...

What the Amish Teach Us

Donald B. Kraybill
What do the traditional plain-living Amish have to teach twenty-first-century Americans in our hyper-everything world? As it turns out, quite a lot! It sounds audacious, but it's true: the Amish have much to teach us. It may seem surreal to turn to one of America's most traditional groups for lessons about living in a hyper-tech world—especially a horse-driving people who resist "progress" by snubbing cars, public grid power, and high school education. Still, their wisdom...

Approaches to Teaching the Works of Karen Tei Yamashita

edited by Ruth Y. Hsu, Pamela Thoma
Structurally innovative and culturally expansive, the works of Karen Tei Yamashita invite readers to rethink conventional paradigms of genres and national traditions. Her novels, plays, and other texts refashion forms like the immigrant tale, the postmodern novel, magical realism, apocalyptic literature, and the picaresque and suggest new transnational, hemispheric, and global frameworks for interpreting Asian American literature. Addressing...

De/Colonization in the Americas

edited by Heidrun Mörtl, Olaf Kaltmeier, Josef Raab
In the Americas, colonialism informs nearly all aspects of life. From European invasion onward it established a durable matrix of power based on gender relations, racism and ethnic classifications that defined white and criollo male superiority over the indigenous and 'Afro American' as well as over Asian, Jewish, Arabic, Muslim and Hindu populations, peoples and nations, in spite of the ambiguity of ethnic and racial frontiers. Moreover,...

Contemporary Indigenous Cosmologies and Pragmatics

edited by Françoise Dussart, Sylvie Poirier, with contributions byAnne-Marie Colpron, Robert R. Crépeau, Ingrid Hall, Laurent Jérôme, Frédéric Laugrand, James MacKenzie, Caroline Nepton Hotte, Ksenia Pimenova, Kathryn Rountree, Antonella Tassinari, Petronella Vaarzon-Morel
In this timely collection, the authors examine Indigenous peoples' negotiations with different cosmologies in a globalized world. Dussart and Poirier outline a sophisticated theory of change that accounts for the...

Overcoming the Neutral Zone Trap

edited by Cheryl A. MacDonald, Jonathon R.J. Edwards, with contributions by Angie Abdou, Kieran Block, Cam Braes, William Bridel, Judy Davidson, Catherine Houston, afterword by Colin D. Howell, with contributions by Chelsey H. Leahy, Roger G. LeBlanc, Fred Mason, Brock McGillis, Vicky Paraschak, Brett Pardy, Ann Pegoraro, Kyle A. Rich, Tavis Smith, Noah Underwood
This engaging interdisciplinary collection seeks to shed light on narratives and research that challenge hockey's norms,...

Disorder

Amy Crider
Amy Crider's debut psychological thriller is an endlessly satisfying page turner that will forever change the way you look at storytelling and mental illness. Graduate student Wendy Zemansky was hoping for a normal semester at an isolated university in upstate New York. Since coming off disability and starting medication for bipolar disorder, Wendy longs to feel like a "real" functioning adult, a respected colleague in her writing program. But when her roommate goes missing, Wendy plunges into an investigation that is roadblocked...

Because I Have To

Jewher Ilham, edited by Adam Braver
When Jewher Ilham's father, Ilham Tohti, an internationally known advocate for peaceful dialogue between his Uyghur people and Han Chinese, was detained at the Beijing airport in February 2013 on charges of "separatism," and later sentenced to life in prison, Jewher was forced to begin a new life apart from her family in a new country. There, she found her voice as an advocate for her father, and for Uyghur people being forced into concentration camps...

Approaches to Teaching the Works of Cormac McCarthy

edited by Stacey Peebles, Benjamin West
In the decades since his 1992 breakout novel, All the Pretty Horses, Cormac McCarthy has gained a reputation as one of the greatest contemporary American authors. Experimenting with genres such as the crime thriller, the post-apocalyptic novel, and the western, his work also engages with the aesthetics of cinema, and several of his novels have been adapted for the screen. While timely and relevant, his works' idiosyncratic language and intense,...

Vida y hechos del famoso caballero don Catrín de la Fachenda

José Joaquín Fernández de Lizardi, edited by John Ochoa, John A. Ochoa
Don Catrín de la Fachenda is a picaresque novel by the Mexican writer José Joaquín Fernández de Lizardi (1776-1827), best known as the author of El periquillo sarniento (The Itching Parrot), often called the first Latin American novel. Don Catrín is three things at once: a rakish pícaro in the tradition of the picaresque; a catrín, a dandy or fop; and a criollo, a person born in the New World and belonging...

Life and Deeds of the Famous Gentleman Don Catrín de la Fachenda

José Joaquín Fernández de Lizardi, edited by John Ochoa, John A. Ochoa, translated by Bonnie Loder
Don Catrín de la Fachenda, here translated into English for the first time, is a picaresque novel by the Mexican writer José Joaquín Fernández de Lizardi (1776-1827), best known as the author of El periquillo sarniento (The Itching Parrot), often called the first Latin American novel. Don Catrín is three things at once: a rakish pícaro in the tradition of the picaresque; a...

On The Trail of the Catahoula

Walter LeBon
Descended from ancient European hounds and used for hunting, herding, and even as a stalker of feral swamp pigs, the history of the Catahoula Leopard Dog has a history that sheds light on the interdependent relationship Louisiana has with its natural environment. Today these energetic and loyal Catahoula is are beloved, serving as the official state dog of Louisiana. This full-color, illustrated reference guide by Walter LeBon synthesizes geography, history, and anthropology to provide a delightful and...

Gullah Spirit

Jonathan Green, foreword by Angela D. Mack, with contributions by Walter B. Edgar, Kim Cliett Long, Kevin Grogan
Jonathan Green is best known for his vibrant depictions of Gullah culture and life. For decades, his vividly colored paintings and prints have captured and preserved the daily rituals and Gullah traditions of his childhood in the Lowcountry marshes of South Carolina. While Green's art continues to capture the same energy, color, and deep respect for his ancestors, his techniques have evolved to...

The Right to Be Rural

edited by Karen R. Foster, Jennifer Jarman, with contributions byRay Bollman, Clement Chipenda, Innocent Chirisa, Logan Cochrane, Pallavi Das, Laura Domingo-Peñafiel, Laura Farré-Riera, Jens Kaae Fisker, Lesley Frank, Greg Hadley, Stacey Haugen, Kathleen Kevany, Eshetayehu Kinfu, Al Lauzon, Katie MacLeod, Jeofrey Matai, Ilona Matysiak, Kayla McCarney, Rachel McLay, Egon Noe, Howard Ramos, Katja Rinne-Koski, Sulevi Riukulehto, Sarah Rudrum, Ario Seto, Nuria Simo-Gil, Peggy Smith, Sara Teitelbaum,...
In this collection, researchers...

Situating Design in Alberta

edited by Isabel Prochner, Tim Antoniuk, foreword by Douglas J. Cardinal, with contributions by Ken Bautista, Carlos Fiorentino, Maria Goncharova, Andrea Hirji, Mark Iantkow, Barry Johns, Lyubava Kroll, Courtenay Ruth McKay, Skye Oleson-Cormack, Janice Rieger, Elizabeth Schowalter, Megan Strickfaden, Tyler Vreeling, Ron Wickman
Situating Design in Alberta makes the case that design has the potential to drive economic growth, improve quality of life, and promote sustainability in the province and across the country.

Administering Writing Programs in the Twenty-First Century

Tiffany Bourelle, Beth L. Hewett, Scott Warnock
This book is a comprehensive guide to administering writing programs at a moment when communication, and thus the teaching of writing, is always changing. A companion to Teaching Writing in the Twenty-First Century, which considers how writing instructors can successfully adapt to new challenges, this volume addresses the concerns of both novice and experienced writing program administrators. It includes guidance on building and...

Résistance

Édith Thomas, edited by Michelle Chilcoat, introduction by Lori Marso, foreword by Dorothy Kaufmann, introduction by Lori J. Marso
Based on real events of the French Resistance during World War II, Édith Thomas's stories explore how ordinary people respond to the extraordinary conditions of political occupation. The stories, first published under the title Contes d'Auxois by an underground press in 1943, were written to oppose Vichy-Nazi propaganda and to offer encouragement to civilians...

Resistance

Édith Thomas, translated by Michelle Chilcoat, introduction by Lori Marso, foreword by Dorothy Kaufmann, introduction by Lori J. Marso
Based on real events of the French Resistance during World War II, Édith Thomas's stories explore how ordinary people respond to the extraordinary conditions of political occupation. The stories, first published under the title Contes d'Auxois (Auxois Stories) by an underground press in 1943, were written to oppose Vichy-Nazi propaganda and to offer encouragement to...

We Know This Place

Sunni Patterson
When Sunni Patterson asserts that We Know This Place, she means every word. Should we break it down further? WE, the poet's collective, live in the sovereign wisdom of KNOWing THIS PLACE: post-Katrina New Orleans, where the poet's activism converges with her joyous celebration and impelling interrogations of class, gender, race, and place. In this collection, Sunni Patterson renews the timeless work of poetry, summoning all who are ready to listen up.

Teaching Writing in the Twenty-First Century

Beth L. Hewett, Tiffany Bourelle, Scott Warnock
Teaching Writing in the Twenty-First Century is a comprehensive introduction to writing instruction in an increasingly digital world. It provides both a theoretical background and detailed practical guidance to writing instructors faced with new and ever-changing digital learning technologies, access needs and usability design, increasing student diversity, and the multiliteracies of reading, alphabetic writing, and multimodal composition. A...

The Horses Pulled Me Back To Them

Aubrey Dawne Edwards
An exploration of living and working at Fair Grounds Race Course in New Orleans comprising photography, interviews, and personal correspondence of jockeys, horse groomers, trainers, and other key backside players.