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Since 1977 Hopkins Fulfillment Services has provided distribution services for a distinguished list of university presses and nonprofit institutions.

Our clients include Johns Hopkins University Press, Georgetown University Press, University of Washington Press, The University Press of Kentucky, Catholic University of America Press, University of Massachusetts Press, University of New Orleans PressMaryland Historical Society, University of South Carolina Press, Wesleyan University Press, Northeastern University Press, Family Development Press, and Central European University Press.

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Fishes of the Salish Sea

Theodore W. Pietsch, James Wilder Orr, illustrated by Joseph R. Tomelleri
Fishes of the Salish Sea is the definitive guide to the identification and history of the marine and anadromous fishes of Puget Sound and the Straits of Georgia and Juan de Fuca. This comprehensive three-volume set, featuring striking illustrations of the Salish Sea's 260 fish species by noted illustrator Joseph Tomelleri, details the ecology and life history of each species and recounts...

Resisting Disappearance

Ather Zia, series edited byPiya Chatterjee
In Kashmir's frigid winter a woman leaves her door cracked open, waiting for the return of her only son. Every month in a public park in Srinagar, a child remembers her father as she joins her mother in collective mourning. The activist women who form the Association of the Parents of the Disappeared Persons (APDP) keep public attention focused on the 8,000 to 10,000 Kashmiri men disappeared by the Indian government forces...

Continental Divide

Alex Myers
Go West, Young Man. Isn't that the advice every east coast boy has considered at least once in his life? At nineteen, almost twenty, Ron Bancroft thinks those words sound pretty good. Newly out as transgender, Ron finds himself adrift: kicked out by his family, jilted by his girlfriend, unable to afford to return to college in the fall. So he heads out to Wyoming for a new start, a chance to prove that—even though he was raised as a girl, even though everyone in Boston thinks of him as transgender—he can live as a...

In Mad Love and War

Joy Harjo
Winner of the Before Columbus Foundation American Book Award (1990) Winner of the William Carlos Williams Award (1991) 2019 United States Poet Laureate Joy Harjo is a powerful voice for her Creek (Muscogee) tribe ("a stolen people in a stolen land"), for other oppressed people, and for herself. Her poems, both sacred ad secular, are written with the passions of anger, grief, and love, at once tender and furious. They are rooted in the land; they are one with the deer and the fox, the hawk and the eagle, the sun,...

The Power of the Plan

Richard F. Galehouse
State universities are more than just places of higher learning, more indeed than just campuses or buildings, and more than just students scurrying from class to class. They are a symbol of the future of the nation and a statement about the commitment the sponsoring state has made to its people. In turn each city or town that hosts, develops, and nurtures these institutions recognizes that it holds within the...

Improvised City

Cole Roskam
For nearly one hundred years, Shanghai was an international treaty port in which the extraterritorial rights of foreign governments shaped both architecture and infrastructure, and it merits examination as one of the most complex and influential urban environments of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Improvised City illuminates the interplay between the city's commercial nature and the architectural forms and practices designed to manage it in...

Unruly Figures

Navaneetha Mokkil, series edited byPiya Chatterjee
The vibrant media landscape in the southern Indian state of Kerala, where kiosks overflow with magazines and colorful film posters line roadside walls, creates a sexually charged public sphere that has a long history of political protests. The 2014 "Kiss of Love" campaign garnered national attention, sparking controversy as images of activists kissing in public and dragged into police vans flooded the media. In Unruly...

Holy Science

Banu Subramaniam, hD, series edited byBanu Subramaniam, hD, Rebecca Herzig
Behind the euphoric narrative of India as an emerging world power lies a complex and evolving relationship between science and religion. Evoking the rich mythology of comingled worlds where humans, animals, and gods transform each other and ancient history, Banu Subramaniam demonstrates how Hindu nationalism sutures an ideal past to technologies of the present to make bold claims about the Vedic Sciences and the scientific...

The Nuosu Book of Origins

translated by Mark Bender, Qingchun Luo, with Jjivot Zopqu, series edited byStevan Harrell
The Nuosu people, who were once overlords of vast tracts of farmland and forest in the uplands of southern Sichuan and neighboring provinces, are the largest division of the Yi ethnic group in southwest China. Their creation epic plots the origins of the cosmos, the sky and earth, and the living beings of land and water. This translation is a rare example in English of Indigenous ethnic literature...

The Political Career of W. Kerr Scott

Julian M. Pleasants
When W. Kerr Scott (1896–1958) began his campaign for the North Carolina gubernatorial seat in 1948, his opponents derided his candidacy as a farce. However, the plainspoken dairy farmer quickly gathered loyal supporters and mobilized a grassroots attack on the entrenched interests that had long controlled the state government, winning the race in a historic upset. In this meticulously researched book, Julian Pleasants provides readers with a close look at the man...

Guadalupe Mountains National Park

Jeffrey P. Shepherd
The Guadalupe Mountains stand nearly 9,000 feet tall, spanning the far western fringe of Texas, the border of New Mexico, and the meeting point of the Southern Plains and Chihuahuan Desert. Long an iconic landmark of the Trans-Pecos region, the Guadalupe Mountains have played a critical role for the people in this beautiful corner of the Southwest borderlands. In the late 1960s, the area was finally designated a national park. ...

The Conspiracy of Capital

Michael Mark Cohen
Between the 1880s and 1920s, a broad coalition of American dissidents, which included rabble-rousing cartoonists, civil liberties lawyers, socialist detectives, union organizers, and revolutionary martyrs, forged a culture of popular radicalism that directly challenged an emergent corporate capitalism. Monopoly capitalists and their allies in government responded by expanding conspiracy laws and promoting conspiracy theories in an...

Our Suffering Brethren

David J. Dzurec, III
In October 1785, American statesman John Jay acknowledged that the more his countrymen "are treated ill abroad, the more we shall unite and consolidate at home." Behind this simple statement lies a complicated history. From the British impressment of patriots during the Revolution to the capture of American sailors by Algerian corsairs and Barbary pirates at the dawn of the nineteenth century, stories of Americans imprisoned abroad helped...

Food for Dissent

Maria McGrath
In the 1960s and early 1970s, countercultural rebels decided that, rather than confront the system, they would create the world they wanted. The natural foods movement grew out of this contrarian spirit. Through a politics of principled shopping, eating, and entrepreneurship, food revolutionaries dissented from corporate capitalism and mainstream America. In Food for Dissent, Maria McGrath traces the growth of the natural foods movement from its...

Konnakkol Manual

David P. Nelson
David Nelson wrote and compiled Konnakkol Manual to assist teaching an advanced course in the rhythmic compositions of Karnatak (South Indian) music. This new instructional book picks up where his previous book, Solkau Manual, left off. It includes advanced exercises for developing control of odd pulse divisions, such as three and five notes per beat. There is a chapter on the sources of Karnatak tāas (meters), and another on the evolution of rhythmic compositions—told through the...

Alternatives to Democracy in Twentieth-Century

Sabrina P. Ramet
An original work of historical synthesis by an esteemed international scholar, this book offers the first comparative analysis of the four different types of collectivism (communism, Fascism; Nazism; anarchism) in twentieth-century Europe which aspired to create an 'alternative modernity'. The author presents not only the authoritarian alternatives to democracy of the past century, but also the experiment with anarchism...

Ideological Storms

Vladimir Tismaneanu
This volume gathers authors who wrote important works in the fields of the history of ideologies, the comparative study of dictatorships, and intellectual history. The book is a state of the art reassessment and analysis of the ideological commitments of intellectuals and their relationships with dictatorships during the twentieth century. The contributions focus on turning points or moments of breakage as well as on the continuities. Though its...

Explaining Economic Backwardness

Anna Sosnowska
This monograph is about an exciting and valuable string in the intellectual history of Eastern Europe: the debate of leading Polish historians on the origins of the economic divisions within Europe. The work covers nearly fifty years that span between the publication of two pivotal works in 1947 and 1994. The author focuses on the works of four leading participants in the debate, Kula, Małowist, Topolski and Wyczański. The analysis provides an...

Being Hungarian in Cleveland

Endre Szentkiralyi
Cleveland, Ohio, has been the U.S. hub for all things related to Hungary and Hungarians since the nineteenth century. Today, Cleveland's Hungarian community remains vibrant and continues to value and preserve its heritage despite the ongoing impact of economic, social and cultural changes, demographic shifts and gentrification. In this work, historian Endre Szentkiralyi examines the concept of "being Hungarian in Cleveland," using a variety of...

Times of Upheaval

Pavlína Rychterová
The volume unites conversations with four masters of Medieval Studies from east-central Europe: János Bak from Hungary, Jerzy Kłoczowski from Poland, František Šmahel from the Czech Republic, and Herwig Wolfram from Austria. The interviews made by younger colleagues revealed their engaging life stories. The four academics grew up before and during the war,...

Social Sciences in the "Other Europe" since 1945

Victor Karady
In recent years, a remarkable flourishing of works on the postwar history of social science and humanities disciplines led to the growing configuration of a field of "Cold War social science" research. Yet in spite of its thematic diversity, and with few exceptions, the geography of the field remains overwhelmingly North American and Western European. This volume brings in the perspective of the "other Europe." It contributes a series of observations, on and from the margins of...

The Poetry Witch Little Book of Spells

Annie Finch
East Wings choose the wind; sing us aware; Muse; spin; weave; spell; create in air In this micro-book, acclaimed "Poetry-Witch" Annie Finch harvests her Spells, spun at the intersection of magic, word, and world. These ritual poems invite readers to experience words not just in the mind, but also in the body and spirit. Celebrated for her extraordinary love and knowledge of poetic craft and commitment to female, earth-centered spirituality, Finch has created a haunting innovative voice and...

Regionalism without Regions

Ulrich Schmied
This collective volume shows how Ukraine can best be understood through its regions and how the regions must be considered against the background of the nation. The overarching objective of the book is to challenge the dominance of the nation-state paradigm in the analyses of Ukraine by illustrating the interrelationship between national and regional dynamics of change. The authors—historians, sociologists, anthropologists, economists, literary critics and...

Piroska and the Pantokrator

Marianne Saghy
This book is about the Christ Pantokrator, an imposing monumental complex serving monastic, dynastic, medical and social purposes in Constantinople, founded by Emperor John II Komnenos and Empress Piroska-Eirene in 1118. Now called Zeyrek Mosque, the second largest Byzantine religious edifice after Hagia Sophia still standing in Istanbul represents the most remarkable architectural and the most ambitious social project of the...

Democracy in Austria

Günter Bischof
The essays in this volume are dedicated to the ups and downs of 100 years of Austrian democracy. On the occasion of the founding of the First Austrian Republic on November 12, 1918, Austrians celebrated the 100th anniversary of this event in recent Austrian history. Due to the deep divisions of the Austrian political camps (parties) democratic governance was troubled in the 1920s and ended in authoritarian rule in 1933. After World War II, the two principal political parties ÖVP (Christian conservatives) and SPÖ...

Boonesborough Unearthed

Nancy O'Malley
Throughout the Revolutionary War, Fort Boonesborough was one of the most important and defensively crucial sites on the western frontier. It served not only as a stronghold against the British but also as a sanctuary, land office, and a potential seat of government. Originally meant to be the capital of a new American colony, Fort Boonesborough was thrust into a defensive role by the onset of the Revolutionary War. Post-Revolutionary attempts to develop a town...

A Brief History of Northern Kentucky

Robert D. Webster
Thousands of years ago, the land that would become Northern Kentucky emerged above sea level when a large portion of the continental plate bulged upward. Today, the region rests on the crest of that uplift, known as the Cincinnati Arch. And just like the fascinating geology of this region, Northern Kentucky continues to grow and develop. From the arrival of the Native Americans, to the first European settlers in the late 1700s, to the building of Ark Encounter at Williamstown in 2016,...

The Social Documentary Photography of Milton Rogovin

edited by Christopher Fulton, foreword by Michael Frisch, with contributions by Elizabeth E. Reilly, Cynthia Negrey, Catherine Fosl, Peter S. Fosl, John T. Cumbler, Karen Christopher, Joy Gleason Carew, Thomas B. Byers, Tracy E. K'Meyer, Ph.D.
Milton Rogovin (1909–2011) dedicated his photographic career to capturing the humanity of working-class people around the world—coal miners, factory workers, the urban poor, the residents of Appalachia, and other marginalized groups. He worked to...

BodyStories

Andrea Olsen
BodyStories is a book that engages the general reader as well as the serious student of anatomy. Thirty-one days of learning sessions heighten awareness about each bone and body system and provide self-guided studies. The book draws on Ms. Olsen's thirty years as a dancer and teacher of anatomy to show how our attitudes and approaches to our body affect us day to day. Amusing and insightful personal stories enliven the text and provide ways of working with the body for efficiency and for...

For a Voice and the Vote

Lisa Anderson Todd
During the summer of 1964, hundreds of American college students descended on Mississippi to help the state's African American citizens register to vote. Student organizers, volunteers, and community members canvassed black neighborhoods to organize the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP), a group that sought to give a voice to black Mississippians and demonstrate their will to vote in the face of terror and intimidation. In For a...

The Fathers of the Church in Christian Theology

Michel Fédou
The main purpose of The Fathers of the Church in Christian Theology is to argue that Patristic studies still has much to contribute to theological reflections in our time. Throughout history, the reading of the Fathers of the Church has made major contributions to Christian thinking. This fecundity was notably verified in the 20th century through the work of theologians like Henri de Lubac and Hans Urs von Balthasar. It was as well manifested broadly in the life of the church that,...

Humanae Vitae: 50 Years Later

Theresa Notare
In the life of the Catholic Church, the papal encyclical Humanae vitae represents a deepening of understanding regarding the nature of married love and the transmission of life. Despite fifty years (1968-2018) since it's promulgation, many Catholics have yet to discover the treasure of these rich teachings. This volume therefore seeks to elucidate the encyclical's reaffirmation of the divine plan. It does this in a unique way by...

Alif Baa (HC), Third Edition

Kristen Brustad
Alif Baa, Third Edition is the first book in the bestselling Al-Kitaab Arabic Language Program. Together with its Companion Website, Alif Baa uses an integrated approach to develop skills in formal and colloquial Arabic, introducing students to letters and sounds. This comprehensive program is designed for students in the beginning stage of learning Arabic. FEATURES of Alif Baa with Companion Website • Students receive an access code for the Companion Website...

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya Part One (HC), Third Edition

Kristen Brustad
Al-Kitaab Part One, Third Edition is the second book in the bestselling Al-Kitaab Arabic Language Program. Together with its Companion Website, Part One uses an integrated approach to develop skills in formal and colloquial Arabic, including reading, listening, speaking, writing, and cultural knowledge. This comprehensive program is designed for students in the early stages of learning Arabic. FEATURES of Al-Kitaab Part One,...

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya Part One (PB), Third Edition

Kristen Brustad
Al-Kitaab Part One, Third Edition is the second book in the bestselling Al-Kitaab Arabic Language Program. Together with its Companion Website, Part One uses an integrated approach to develop skills in formal and colloquial Arabic, including reading, listening, speaking, writing, and cultural knowledge. This comprehensive program is designed for students in the early stages of learning Arabic. FEATURES of Al-Kitaab Part One,...

JFK and de Gaulle

Sean J. McLaughlin
Despite French President Charles de Gaulle's persistent efforts to constructively share French experience and use his resources to help engineer an American exit from Vietnam, the Kennedy administration responded to de Gaulle's peace initiatives with bitter silence and inaction. The administration's response ignited a series of events that dealt a massive blow to American prestige across the globe, resulting in the deaths of over fifty-eight thousand...

A True Likeness, With a New Afterword by Thomas L. Johnson

Thomas L. Johnson
A True Likeness showcases the extraordinary photography of Richard Samuel Roberts (1880–1935), who operated a studio in Columbia, South Carolina, from 1920 to 1935. He was one of the few major African American commercial photographers working in the region during the first half of the twentieth century, and his images reveal the social, economic, and cultural realities of the black South and document the rise of a small but significant southern black middle...

Shapes of Native Nonfiction

edited by Elissa Washuta, Theresa Warburton
Just as a basket's purpose determines its materials, weave, and shape, so too is the purpose of the essay related to its material, weave, and shape. Editors Elissa Washuta and Theresa Warburton ground this anthology of essays by Native writers in the formal art of basket weaving. Using weaving techniques such as coiling and plaiting as organizing themes, the editors have curated an exciting collection of imaginative, world-making...

Chromatic Homes: The Design and Coloring Book

John I. Gilderbloom
This coloring book is like no other on the market. It's a celebration of chromatic homes, the alluring and ornate structures that grace our most charming and beautiful cities, such as Louisville, Cincinnati, San Francisco, New Orleans, and Miami, and have been around for centuries in far-flung places such as Havana, Venice, Amsterdam, Brazil, and Moscow. This captivating collection also teaches and explores the art and science of the use of color in historic preservation,...

Working with the Ancestors

Emily C. Donaldson, series edited byK. Sivaramakrishnan
Throughout the Marquesas Islands of French Polynesia, forest spirits share space with ancestral ruins and active agricultural plots, affecting land use and heritage preservation. As Marquesans continue their efforts to establish UNESCO World Heritage status, they grapple with questions about when sites should be preserved intact, when neglect is an appropriate option, and when deterioration resulting from local livelihoods...

Tea and Solidarity

Mythri Jegathesan, series edited byPiya Chatterjee
Beyond nostalgic tea industry ads romanticizing colonial Ceylon and the impoverished conditions that beleaguer Tamil tea workers are the stories of the women, men, and children who have built their families and lives in line houses on tea plantations since the nineteenth century. The tea industry's economic crisis and Sri Lanka's twenty-six year long civil war have ushered in changes to life and work on the plantations, where family...

Conversations with Legendary Television Stars

James Bawden
During television's first fifty years—long before cable networks, Hulu, Netflix, and the like—families would gather around their television sets nightly to watch entertaining shows such as I Love Lucy, Gunsmoke, M*A*S*H, The Beverly Hillbillies, Fantasy Island, and The Rockford Files. Many of the stars of these beloved shows have passed away, but their presence remains intact—not only through their television show performances, which are still...

The Legacy of J. William Fulbright

Alessandro Brogi
This insightful collection of essays details the political life of one of the most prominent and gifted American statesmen of the twentieth century. From his early training in international law to his five terms in the US Senate, J. William Fulbright (1905–1995) had a profound influence on US foreign policy, and his vision for mutual understanding shaped the extraordinary exchange program bearing his name. As a senator for Arkansas for thirty years and the longest...

The Rise of Reptiles

Hans-Dieter Sues
Over 300 million years ago, an early land vertebrate developed an egg that contained the embryo in an amnion, allowing it to be deposited on land. This moment marked the first step in the fascinating and complex evolutionary journey of the reptiles. In The Rise of Reptiles, paleontologist Hans-Dieter Sues explores the diversity of reptilian lineages, discussing the relationships among turtles, crocodylians, lizards and snakes, and many extinct groups. Reflecting the tremendous...

The Secret History of the Jersey Devil

Brian Regal and Frank J. Esposito
Legend has it that in 1735, a witch named Mother Leeds gave birth to a horrifying monster—a deformed flying horse with glowing red eyes—that flew up the chimney of her New Jersey home and disappeared into the Pine Barrens. Ever since, this nightmarish beast has haunted those woods, presaging catastrophe and frightening innocent passersby—or so the story goes. In The Secret History of the Jersey Devil, Brian...

Sculpture on a Grand Scale

Tyler Sprague
The Kingdome, John ("Jack") Christiansen's best-known work, was the largest freestanding concrete dome in the world. Built amid public controversy, the multipurpose arena was designed to stand for a thousand years but was demolished in a great cloud of dust after less than a quarter century. Many know the fate of Seattle's iconic dome, but fewer are familiar with its innovative structural engineer, Jack Christensen (1927–2017), and his significant contribution...

Writing South Carolina

Aida Rogers
Founded in 2013 by Steven Lynn, dean of the South Carolina Honors College, this annual writing contest was designed to engage the state's future leaders and thinkers. Each year the Honors College invited South Carolina high school juniors and seniors to respond to the question "How can we make South Carolina better?" in 750 words or fewer, in the genre of their choice. The finalists, selected by a panel of preliminary judges, were invited to the...

Towards the American Century

Gunter Bischof
The present volume chronicles Austrian immigration to the United States against the backdrop of bilateral relations between the two countries, across the centuries. While it shows the larger themes and epochs in the ongoing relationship, the individuals that came to America and made their contributions over time are also highlighted. The book is accompanied by a website that provides additional information and multimedia content, allowing for a more complete picture of...

The Last Wilderness

Murray Morgan, introduction by Tim McNulty
Murray Morgan's classic history of the Olympic Peninsula, originally published in 1955, evokes a remote American wilderness "as large as the state of Massachusetts, more rugged than the Rockies, its lowlands blanketed by a cool jungle of fir and pine and cedar, its peaks bearing hundreds of miles of living ice that gave rise to swift rivers alive with giant salmon." Drawing on historical research and personal tales collected from docks, forest trails, and waterways, Morgan recounts vivid...

Reclaiming the Reservation

Alexandra Harmon
In the 1970s the Quinault and Suquamish, like dozens of Indigenous nations across the United States, asserted their sovereignty by applying their laws to everyone on their reservations. This included arresting non-Indians for minor offenses, and two of those arrests triggered federal litigation that had big implications for Indian tribes' place in the American political system. Tribal governments had long sought to manage affairs in their...

Stormy Isles

Vitorino Nemesio, edited by Francisco Cota Fagundes, translated by Francisco Cota Fagundes
Jul 2019 - Tagus Press
Stormy Isles, originally published in Portuguese in 1944 and set in the Azores between 1917 and 1919, focuses on the vivacious and sharp Margarida, who, at twenty years of age, is a model of feminist aspirations and the paragon of her generation. A member of the elite, she foregoes some of the entitlements of her class and struggles with the morals of the bourgeois society in which her life unfolds. Narrated in realist and poetic...

What's the Point of College?

Johann N. Neem
In our current age of reform, there are countless ideas about how to "fix" higher education. But before we can reconceptualize the college experience, we need to remember why we have these institutions in the first place—and what we want from them. In What's the Point of College?, historian Johann N. Neem offers a new way to think about the major questions facing higher education today, from online education to disruptive innovation to how students really learn.

The Crisis of US Hospice Care

Harold Braswell
Hospice is the dominant form of end-of-life care in the United States. But while the US hospice system provides many forms of treatment that are beneficial to dying people and their families, it does not encompass what is commonly referred to as long-term care, which includes help with the activities of daily living: feeding, bathing, general safety, and routine hygienic maintenance. Frequently, such care is carried out by an informal network of unpaid caregivers,...

Kentucky's Cookbook Heritage

John van Willigen
Food is a significant part of our daily lives and can be one of the most telling records of a time and place. Our meals—from what we eat, to how we prepare it, to how we consume it—illuminate our culture and history. As a result, cookbooks present a unique opportunity to analyze changing foodways and can yield surprising discoveries about society's tastes and priorities. In Kentucky's Cookbook Heritage, John van Willigen explores the state's...

The Sea Island's Secret

Susan Diamond Riley
A fistful of bones and a mysterious treasure hunt—not quite what twelve-year-old Chicagoan Delta Wells is expecting when she arrives on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, to visit her grandparents for the summer! But when Pops tells her that his beloved Island History Museum may be demolished to make room for a golf resort, Delta visits the museum property and discovers a skeleton hidden in the marsh. The bones and a long-secret message from the past send Delta and her younger brother,...

Solitary Pagans

Helen A. Berger
Solitary Pagans is the first book to explore the growing phenomenon of contemporary Pagans who practice alone. Although the majority of Pagans in the United States have abandoned the tradition of practicing in groups, little is known about these individuals or their way of practice. Helen A. Berger fills that gap by building on a massive survey of contemporary practitioners. By examining the data, Berger describes solitary practitioners demographically...

Climate Change and the Art of Devotion

Sugata Ray
In the enchanted world of Braj, the primary pilgrimage center in north India for worshippers of Krishna, each stone, river, and tree is considered sacred. In Climate Change and the Art of Devotion, Sugata Ray shows how this place-centered theology emerged in the wake of the Little Ice Age (ca. 1550–1850), an epoch marked by climatic catastrophes across the globe. Using the frame of geoaesthetics, he compares early modern conceptions of the...

Repatriating Polanyi

Chris Hann
Karl Polanyi's "substantivist" critique of market society has renewed topicality in the era of neoliberal globalization. Polanyi (1886–1964) is popular among critical theorists and radical political economists, but also with ecological activists, anti-globalization campaigners and all who sense that ongoing financial turmoil is symptomatic of a deeper crisis threatening the compatibility of capitalism and democracy. The author reclaims the polymath Karl Polanyi for...

Strengthening Bodies, Building a Nation

Vassiliki Theodorou
Stimulated by the development of both childhood studies and the social history of medicine, this book contextualizes the historical circumstances that led to the medicalization of childhood in Greece from the end of the nineteenth century until World War II. By examining this issue in the span of fifty years, the authors explore how the national question was entwined with concerns raised about the health of...

Civic and Uncivic Values in Poland

Sabrina P. Ramet
Poland, like many societies across the world, is becoming more polarized in diverse areas of life, as contending forces seek to advance incompatible agendas. The polarization over values in Polish politics was evident already before communism collapsed but became more obvious in the following years and reached a crescendo after the October 2015 parliamentary elections, which brought a right-wing party into power. This volume focuses on the years...

Diagnosing Madness

Christina Hanganu-Bresch
Madness and Identity is a study of the linguistic negotiations at the heart of mental illness identification and patient diagnosis. Through an examination of individual psychiatric case records from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Cristina Hanganu-Bresch and Carol Berkenkotter show how the work of psychiatry was navigated by patients, families, doctors, the general public, and the legal system. The results of...

Thomistic Existentialism and Cosmological Reasoning

John F. X. Knasas
Cosmological reasoning is an important facet of classical arguments for the existence of God, but these arguments have been subject to may criticisms. The thesis of this book is that Thomas Aquinas can dodge many of the classic objections brought against cosmological reasoning. These objections criticize cosmological reasoning for its use of the Principle of Sufficient Reason; its notion of existence as a predicate; its use of ontological reasoning; its reliance on sense...

Getting Out

Keith Morton
For eight years Keith Morton codirected a safe-space program for youth involved in gang or street violence in Providence, Rhode Island. Getting Out is a result of the innovative perspectives he developed as he worked alongside staff from a local nonviolence institute to help these young people make life-affirming choices. Rather than view their violence as pathological, Morton explains that gang members are victims of violence, and the trauma they have experienced leads them to...

In Sullivan's Shadow

Aimee Edmondson
For many years, the far right has sown public distrust in the media as a political strategy, weaponizing libel law in an effort to stifle free speech and silence African American dissent. In Sullivan's Shadow demonstrates that this strategy was pursued throughout the civil rights era and beyond, as southern officials continued to bring lawsuits in their attempts to intimidate journalists who published accounts of police brutality against...

Stripped and Script

Kacy Dowd Tillman
Female loyalists occupied a nearly impossible position during the American Revolution. Unlike their male counterparts, loyalist women were effectively silenced—unable to officially align themselves with either side or avoid being persecuted for their family ties. In this book, Kacy Dowd Tillman argues that women's letters and journals are the key to recovering these voices, as these private writings were used as vehicles for public engagement. Through a...

The House of the Lord

Stephen C. Smith
The House of the Lord invites readers to participate in a unique journey: a deep exploration of the Old and New Testaments that searches out and contemplates the reality of God's presence with his people, with a particular focus on investigating God's self-revelation in and through the biblical temple. The journey represents a tour de force of biblical theology, guided by author Steven Smith, a Catholic biblical scholar,...

Health Disparities in the United States, third edition

Donald A. Barr, MD, PhD
The health care system in the United States has been called the best in the world. Yet wide disparities persist between social groups, and many Americans suffer from poorer health than people in other developed countries. In this revised edition of Health Disparities in the United States, Donald A. Barr provides extensive new data about the ways low socioeconomic status, race, and ethnicity interact to...

Teaching Public Health

edited by Lisa M. Sullivan and Sandro Galea
As more students are drawn to public health as a field of study and a profession, bringing varied backgrounds and experiences with them, the number of public health programs and schools of public health has grown substantially. How can teachers meet the changing needs of incoming students—and ensure that graduates have the knowledge, skills, and attributes to pursue further education and forge successful careers in public health? Aimed at experienced and new teachers alike, this...

Vestige of Eden, Image of Eternity

Daniel Toma
Three great cosmological worldviews—of the Latin West, ancient Greece, and the Hebrew/Syriac world—arose from a union of ancient and medieval thought. Each had origins in the ancient world and reached a synthesis under scholastic medieval thinkers. This synthesis was incorporated into Catholic tradition, becoming identified as a cosmological worldview of the Catholic Church. This worldview maintains a correspondence to and...

The Power of Less

Samuel Hazo
These essays focus on the absence of the poetic imagination in much contemporary poetry and criticism. The retreat of poets into craft, gender, race, and so on has made poetry seem more like soiciology than literature. Such lack of insight can be attributed to forces in American society that place undue emphasis on technique and identity rather than talent and vision, currently evident as well in contemporary popular music, dance, and art. There is a similar imaginative deficiency in the...

Vestige of Eden, Image of Eternity

Daniel Toma
Three great cosmological worldviews—of the Latin West, ancient Greece, and the Hebrew/Syriac world—arose from a union of ancient and medieval thought. Each had origins in the ancient world and reached a synthesis under scholastic medieval thinkers. This synthesis was incorporated into Catholic tradition, becoming identified as a cosmological worldview of the Catholic Church. This worldview maintains a correspondence to and...

Changing the World One Book at a Time

James W. Parkinson
The education system is in crisis. In a recent survey, the United States was ranked sixteenth in literacy among a group of twenty-three developed nations. The numbers reveal a vicious cycle: a lack of education and literacy reduces a person's chances of economic prosperity, which can ultimately lead to a life of poverty and crime. Yet there is still so much that is good and effective about the American educational system and the way our children learn. Changing the World One Book at a...

The Dream Is Lost

Julian Maxwell Hayter
Once the capital of the Confederacy and the industrial hub of slave-based tobacco production, Richmond, Virginia has been largely overlooked in the context of twentieth century urban and political history. By the early 1960s, the city served as an important center for integrated politics, as African Americans fought for fair representation and mobilized voters in order to overcome discriminatory policies. Richmond's African Americans struggled to...

Market Affect and the Rhetoric of Political Economic Debates

Catherine Chaput
What explains the "triumph of capitalism"? Why do people so often respond positively to discussions favoring it while shutting down arguments against it? Overwhelmingly theories regarding capitalism's resilience have focused on individual choice bolstered by careful rhetorical argumentation. In this penetrating study, however, Catherine Chaput shows that something more than choice is at work in capitalism's ability to thrive in public practice and...

Social Justice and Subsidiarity

Thomas C. Behr
Luigi Taparelli, SJ, 1793-1862, in his Theoretical Treatise of Natural Right Based on Fact, 1840-43, presents a neo-Thomistic approach to social, economic, and political sciences grounded in an integral conception of the human person as social animal but also as rational truth seeker. His conceptions of social justice and of subsidiarity are fundamental to modern Catholic social teaching (CST). His work moves away from...

The Hibernensis

Roy Flechner
The Hibernensis is the longest and most comprehensive canon-law text to have circulated in Carolingian Europe. Compiled in Ireland in the late seventh or early eight century, it exerted a strong and long-lasting influence on the development of European canon law. The present edition offers—for the first time—a complete text of the Hibernensis combining the two main branches of its manuscript transmission. This is accompanied by an English translation and a commentary that is both historical and...

Hearing Revelation 1-3

Jerome Neyrey
Recipients of Revelation listened to it, and heard it like other oral performances. Greek recipients knew not only Greek, but conventional ways of rhetorical presentation typical of Greek culture. They knew how works began (with a proemium, but with focus on speaker's ethos). Ethos of speaker was the first proof of persuading, and so audiences knew what one sounded like. They heard Revelation 1 as a continuous presentation, not like scholars pausing to examine each...

Engineering Corporate Success

James Hardymon
From growing up on the banks of the Ohio River during the Great Depression to acquiring executive management roles at large international companies, James Hardymon's life has been full of twists, turns, hard work, and achievement. During his career, Hardymon helped build corporations as a CEO, learned the ropes of Wall Street, and interacted with US presidents and congressional leaders. As a result, he acquired a keen, first-hand understanding of corporate America, which propelled his...

Before Queer Theory

Dustin Friedman
Late Victorian aesthetes were dedicated to the belief that an artwork's value derived solely from its beauty, rather than any moral or utilitarian purpose. Works by these queer artists have rarely been taken seriously as contributions to the theories of sexuality or aesthetics. But in Before Queer Theory, Dustin Friedman argues that aestheticism deploys its "art for art's sake" rhetoric to establish a nascent sense of sexual identity and community. Friedman makes the case for...

The Collectors of Lost Souls, updated edition

Warwick Anderson
Winner, William H. Welch Medal, American Association for the History of Medicine Winner, Ludwik Fleck Prize, Society for Social Studies of Science Winner, General History Award, New South Wales Premier's History Awards When whites first encountered the Fore people in the isolated highlands of colonial New Guinea during the 1940s and 1950s, they found a people in the grip of a bizarre epidemic. Women and children succumbed to muscle weakness, uncontrollable tremors,...

The Lady of Cofitachequi

James H. Palmer, Jr.
More than 500 years ago, a tribe of Native Americans lived peacefully next to a river in an area called Cofitachequi, near what is now Camden, South Carolina. A kind and generous woman, who was a member of the Otter Clan, ruled this tribe. She became known as the Lady of Cofitachequi. All the people of the tribe and animals in the area loved the Lady. An adoring otter tells this true historical account of what happened to the Lady and her kin when Spanish...

To Count Our Days

Erskine Clarke
Columbia Theological Seminary's rich history provides a window into the social and intellectual life of the American South. Founded in 1828 as a Presbyterian seminary for the preparation of well-educated, mannerly ministers, it was located during its first one hundred years in Columbia, South Carolina. During the antebellum period, it was known for its affluent and intellectually sophisticated board, faculty, and students. Its leaders sought to follow a middle way on the...

Blood, Guts, and Grease

Jon B. Mikolashek
George S. Patton is one of the most controversial, celebrated, and popular military leaders in American history, and his accomplishments and victories have been greatly documented. Yet Patton spent years in the Army before garnering national attention and becoming a highly-regarded and respected military leader. This work explores Patton's beginnings as a driven and intrepid soldier and his battles leading up to the Great War—military experiences which would be influential...

Building Ho's Army

Xiaobing Li
Built upon a solid foundation of sources, memoirs, and interviews, this study sheds new light on China's efforts in the Vietnam War. Utilizing secondary works in Chinese, Vietnamese, and Western languages, and the author's own familiarity as a former member of the Chinese People's Liberation Army, this examination expands the knowledge of China's relations with the North Vietnamese Army (NVA) during the 1950s and 1960s. As a communist state bordering Vietnam, China...

Wonderful Wasteland and other natural disasters

Elidio La Torre Lagares
When Hurricane María unleashed its devastation onto Puerto Rico, thousands of lives were lost to the storm in what was the island's worst natural disaster on record. With so much of the recovery still underway and the scars still fresh, its citizens continue to contend with the reality that life on the island has fundamentally changed. In his first collection of poems written in English, La Torre Lagares journeys through his memory in an effort to recompose his...

The Christian Moses

Philip Rousseau
As it developed an increasingly distinctive character of its own during the first six centuries of the common era, Christianity was constantly forced to reassess and adapt its relationship with the Jewish tradition. The process involved a number of preoccupations and challenges: the status of biblical and parabiblical texts (several of them already debatable in Jewish eyes), the nature and purposes of God, patterns of prayer (both personal and liturgical), ritual practices, ethical norms, the...

Spectacular Bid

Peter Lee
A safety pin was all that kept Spectacular Bid from becoming the eleventh Thoroughbred to take the Triple Crown. This work examines Spectacular Bid from his humble beginnings—he was born in a mud puddle on a horse farm in Versailles, Kentucky—to his recognition as one of the greatest American racehorses. On the morning of the 1979 Belmont Stakes, Spectacular Bid stepped on a safety pin in his stall, injuring his foot. He had impressively won the first two races—the Kentucky...

The Truth about College Admission

Brennan Barnard and Rick Clark
Is your family just starting to think about visiting colleges? Maybe you are in the throes of the experience, feeling stressed out and overwhelmed. Did we miss a deadline? Should we be looking in-state or out-of-state, big school or small school? And what is a "FAFSA" anyway? The Truth about College Admission is the easy-to-follow, comprehensive, go-to guide for families. The expert authors—with inside knowledge from both the high...

A Monument to Dynasty and Death

Nathan T. Elkins
Early one morning in 80 CE, the Colosseum roared to life with the deafening cheers of tens of thousands of spectators as the emperor, Titus, inaugurated the new amphitheater with one hundred days of bloody spectacles. These games were much anticipated, for the new amphitheater had been under construction for a decade. Home to spectacles involving exotic beasts, elaborate executions of criminals, gladiatorial combats, and even—when...

Water Resources

George M. Hornberger and Debra Perrone
The fair allocation and wise use of fresh water presents significant challenges across the world. To avoid unresolvable crises in the future, judiciously managing water resources in the twenty-first century is fundamentally important. Integrating the underlying science of hydrology with real-world usage scenarios, Water Resources offers a nuanced, modern treatment of contemporary water resource management issues. In this ground-breaking new text, renowned environmental...

The Algiers Motel Incident, revised edition

John Hersey
foreword by Danielle L. McGuire
On the evening of July 25, 1967, on the third night of the 12th Street Riot, Detroit police raided the Algiers Motel. Acting on a report of gunfire, officers rounded up the occupants of the motel's annex—several black men and two white women—and proceeded to beat them and repeatedly threaten to kill them. By the end of the night, three of the men were dead. Three police officers and a private security guard were tried for their deaths; none were convicted. In The Algiers Motel...

The Second Seminole War and the Limits of American Aggression

C. S. Monaco
The Second Seminole War (1835–1842) was the last major conflict fought on American soil before the Civil War. The early battlefield success of the Seminoles unnerved US generals, who worried it would spark a rebellion among Indians newly displaced by President Andrew Jackson's removal policies. The presence of black warriors among the Seminoles also agitated southerners wary of slave revolt. A lack of decisive victories and a series of bad decisions—among them the...

Cosmas of Prague

Janos M. Bak
The Latin-English bilingual volume presents the text of The Chronicle of the Czechs by Cosmas of Prague. Cosmas was born around 1045, educated in Liège, upon his return to Bohemia, he got married as well as became a priest. In 1086 he was appointed prebendary, a senior member of clergy in Prague. He completed the first book of the Chronicle in 1119, starting with the creation of the world and the earliest deeds of the Czechs up to Saint Adalbert. In...

Jewish Cuisine in Hungary

Andras Koerner
András Koerner refuses to accept that the vanished world of preShoah Hungarian Jewry and its cuisine should disappear virtually without a trace and feels compelled to reconstruct its culinary culture. His book presents eating habits not as isolated things, divorced from their social and religious contexts, but as organic parts of one's way of life. In the extraordinarily diverse world of Jews, what can and cannot be eaten is determined by not only absolute...

Writing Cities

James Amelang
Only one out of every ten early modern Europeans lived in cities. Yet cities were crucial nodes, joining together producers and consumers, rulers and ruled, and believers in diverse faiths and futures. They also generated an enormous amount of writing, much of which focused on civic life itself. Yet despite its obvious importance, historians have paid surprisingly little attention to urban discourse; its forms, themes, emphases and silences all invite further study. This book...

Eden-Brazil

Moacyr Scliar, translated by Malcolm McNee
Sep 2019 - Tagus Press
Eden-Brazil is an ecotourism destination and nature reserve in a stunning swath of beach-lined, coastal rainforest. Inspired by the paradisiacal setting and the idea of providing visitors with the ultimate return to nature, they decide to stage the biblical story of the Garden of Eden, complete with Adam, Eve, the snake, the apple, the works. However, re-creating an earthly paradise as something beyond a roadside attraction is no easy feat. In this charming, tragicomic tale of compromised...

Understanding Bharati Mukherjee

Ruth Maxey
Bharati Mukherjee was the first major South Asian American writer and the first naturalized American citizen to win the National Book Critics Circle Award. Born in Kolkata, India, she immigrated to the United States in 1961 and went on to publish eight novels, two short story collections, two long works of nonfiction, and numerous essays, book reviews, and newspaper articles. She was professor emerita in the Department of English at the University of California, Berkeley, until her death in 2017. In...

Looking for Betty MacDonald

Paula Becker
Betty Bard MacDonald (1907–1958), the best-selling author of The Egg and I and the classic Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle children's books, burst onto the literary scene shortly after the end of World War II. Readers embraced her memoir of her years as a young bride operating a chicken ranch on Washington's Olympic Peninsula, and The Egg and I sold its first million copies in less than a year. The public was drawn to MacDonald's vivacity, her offbeat humor, and her...

Gertrude Stein Has Arrived

Roy Morris Jr.
In 1933, experimental writer and longtime expatriate Gertrude Stein skyrocketed to overnight fame with the publication of an unlikely best seller, The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas. Pantomiming the voice of her partner Alice, The Autobiography was actually Gertrude's work. But whoever the real author was, the uncharacteristically lucid and readable book won over the hearts of thousands of Americans, whose clamor to meet Gertrude and Alice in person convinced them...

Nightmare Factories

Troy Rondinone
Madhouse, funny farm, psychiatric hospital, loony bin, nuthouse, mental institution: no matter what you call it, the asylum has a powerful hold on the American imagination. Stark and foreboding, they symbolize mistreatment, fear, and imprisonment, standing as castles of despair and tyranny across the countryside. In the "asylum" of American fiction and film, treatments are torture, attendants are thugs, and psychiatrists are despots. In Nightmare Factories, Troy Rondinone...

Quantitative Analyses in Wildlife Science

edited by Leonard A. Brennan, Andrew N. Tri, and Bruce G. Marcot
Over the past fifty years, wildlife science has become increasingly quantitative. But to wildlife scientists, many of whom have not been formally trained as biometricians, computer modelers, or mathematicians, the wide array of available techniques for analyzing wildlife populations and habitats can be overwhelming. This practical book aims to help students and professionals alike understand how to use quantitative methods to inform...

Renewable Energy and Wildlife Conservation

edited by Christopher E. Moorman, Steven M. Grodsky, and Susan P. Rupp
Renewable energy is often termed simply "green energy," but its effects on wildlife and other forms of biodiversity can be quite complex. While capturing renewable resources like wind, solar, and energy from biomass can require more land than fossil fuel production, potentially displacing wildlife habitat, renewable energy infrastructure can also create habitat and promote species health when thoughtfully implemented. The authors...

International Wildlife Management

edited by John L. Koprowski and Paul R. Krausman
Habitat loss, disease management, predator-human conflict, illegal trade—these are among the many conservation challenges faced by wildlife experts around the world. But how wildlife professionals approach these issues has historically been geographically fragmented. By providing a broad perspective on issues faced by wildlife on an international scale, the authors of International Wildlife Management make vital...

The North American Model of Wildlife Conservation

edited by Shane P. Mahoney and Valerius Geist
At the end of the nineteenth century, North America suffered a catastrophic loss of wildlife driven by unbridled resource extraction, market hunting, and unrelenting subsistence killing. This crisis led powerful political forces in the United States and Canada to collaborate in the hopes of reversing the process, not merely halting the extinctions but returning wildlife to abundance. While there was great understanding of how to manage wildlife in...

Killing for the Republic

Steele Brand
"For who is so worthless or indolent as not to wish to know by what means and under what system of polity the Romans... succeeded in subjecting nearly the whole inhabited world to their sole government—a thing unique in history?"—Polybius The year 146 BC marked the brutal end to the Roman Republic's 118-year struggle for the western Mediterranean. Breaching the walls of their great enemy, Carthage, Roman troops slaughtered countless citizens, enslaved those who...

Fragile Earth

Jennifer Stettler Parsons
Just as artists of the 19th and 20th centuries participated in forging an American natural history as explorers, cataloguers, collectors, and early environmentalists, contemporary artists continue to incorporate and comment on the natural world in their art. Motivated by the inexorable rise of urban-industrial development and the subsequent deterioration of our planet, artists confront the vulnerability of our environment and the effects of global climate change to...

To Stir a Restless Heart

Jacob W. Wood
To Stir a Restless Heart tells for the first time the story of how Thomas Aquinas conversed with his contemporaries about the dynamics of human nature's longing for God, and documents how he deliberately utilized Greek, Arabic, Hebrew, and Latin sources to develop a version of Aristotelian natural desire that was uniquely Augustinian: natural desire seeks the complete fulfillment of human nature "insofar as is possible," and so...

On the Motive of the Incarnation

The Salmanticenses (Discalced Carmelites of Salamanca)
The Catholic University of America Press is pleased to announce a new series, Early Modern Catholic Sources, edited by Ulrich L. Lehner and Trent Pomplun. This series – the only one of its kind – will provide translations of early modern Catholic texts of theological interest written between 1450 and 1800. The first volume in this series is On the Motive of the Incarnation, the first English translation of the seventeenth-century Discalced Carmelites at...

The eQuality Toolkit

Laura Weingartner
Every individual is entitled to quality health care, but medical professionals are not always equipped with the training and knowledge to provide the necessary care to patients—especially when it comes to the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) communities and individuals with differences of sex development (DSD). For this reason, the University of Louisville School of Medicine established eQuality...

Flight Calls

John R. Nelson
The paths of different birds look like double helixes, flowing strands of hair, and migrating serpents, and they beckon with calls that have definite meanings. These mysterious creatures inspire growing numbers of birders in their passionate pursuit of new species, and writer John R. Nelson is no exception. In Flight Calls, he takes readers on explorations to watch, hear, and know Massachusetts's hummingbirds, hawks, and herons along the coasts and in the woodlands, meadows, and...

Separated

William D. Lopez
On a Thursday in November of 2013, Guadalupe Morales waited anxiously with her sister-in-law and their four small children. Every Latino man who drove away from their shared apartment above a small auto repair shop that day had failed to return—arrested, one by one, by ICE agents and local police. As the two women discussed what to do next, a SWAT team clad in body armor and carrying assault rifles stormed the room. As Guadalupe remembers it, "The soldiers...

The Discovery of Being and Thomas Aquinas

Christopher M. Cullen
While there has been agreement among followers of Aquinas that being insofar as it is being (being qua being) is the subject of metaphysics, there is not agreement on how this being qua being is to be understood, nor on how we come to know the being that is the object of metaphysical investigation. The topic of what being is, as the object of the science of metaphysics, and how to account for the "discovery" of the being of metaphysics...

In Search of Harmony

James G. Hanink
Two of Jacques Maritain's enduring classics are Existence and the Existent and The Person and the Common Good. In the first he explores the key themes of his constructive Thomism while engaging broad currents of existentialist thought. In the second he proposes a personalist-communitarian vision that illuminates the common good. Maritain's paired concerns of metaphysics and politics, and their often-surprising connections, set the stage for this new volume. In Search of Harmony:...

Meet Me at the Rocket

Rodger E. Stroup, Sr.
Who doesn't love the bustle and jangle, the smells, the sounds, the energy, and the tastes of a lively state fair? In this fast-changing world, keeping any endeavor alive and thriving for 150 years is an accomplishment, but the South Carolina State Fair has met any challenges with doggedness, determination, and flair. In the early 1700s South Carolinians were gathering to exchange information about crops and livestock, and small rural fairs were held,...

Before Virtue

Jonathan J Sanford
Classical virtue ethics, exemplified by Aristotle (d. 322 BC), asked: what can we know of human nature and the virtues by which it is perfected in order to live well? Dominant ethical theories today generally avoid the question of human nature, taking deontological (non-metaphysical) or utilitarian (maximizing perceived social benefit) approaches. Elizabeth Anscombe's 1958 article "Modern Moral Philosophy," sparked a revival of virtue ethics. She critiqued contemporary ethical...

Europe (c. 1400-1458)

Aeneas Silvius Piccolomini
Shortly before his election in 1458 as Pope Pius II, Aeneas Silvius Piccolomini produced a history of recent events in Europe. Europe (c. 1400-1458) provides students and scholars alike with a rich array of famous and lesser known figures and events spanning from Scandinavia to Italy and Iberia, and from Scotland to Lithuania and Greece. Aeneas focused on the reign of Holy Roman Emperor Frederick III, who began his rule in...

The Evolution of Brazil

Manoel de Oliveira Lima
Manoel de Oliveira Lima's The Evolution of Brazil was first published in 1914 as the result of a series of lectures given by the Brazilian historian at Stanford University in the Fall of 1912. A world-renowned scholar of Latin American history, Oliveira Lima taught and lectured at the most prestigious European universities, including the Sorbonne. He was a pioneer in the field in the United States, having inaugurated the Chair in Latin American History at Harvard University and later becoming a Professor...

Cusanus

Peter J. Casarella
The thought of Nicholas of Cusa (1401-1464) draws upon a rich heritage of ancient, medieval, and Renaissance traditions and ties these traditions together into a synthesis that continues to evoke new ideas in philosophy, theology, aesthetics, history, political theory, and the philosophy of science. This volume offers a detailed historical background to Cusanus's thinking while also assaying his significance for the present. It brings together major contributions from the English-speaking...

Your God is a Devouring Fire

Michael Simone
In the ancient Near East, the distinction between the divine realm and the material world was not always clear. In Mesopotamia, statues, kings, and even cultic utensils could become "gods" in their own right. Certain biblical traditions show this idea as well. Yhwh appears as a human during visitations to Abraham and Jacob (Gen 18:1-2 and 32:25-31). Yhwh also can act through objects (Gen 15:17; 1 Sam 5:1-5). This suggests that, in...

Black Lives, Native Lands, White Worlds

Jared Ross Hardesty
Shortly after the first Europeans arrived in seventeenth-century New England, they began to import Africans and capture the area's indigenous peoples as slaves. By the eve of the American Revolution, enslaved people comprised only about 4 percent of the population, but slavery had become instrumental to the region's economy and had shaped its cultural traditions. This story of slavery in New England has been little told. In this concise yet...

Ocean Crossings

Andre Novoa
Sep 2019 - Tagus Press
The theme of the seas has long been a central topic in scholarship on the Lusophone world, but more recent research has invested ocean crossings with new relevance and urgency. This special issue brings together a diversity of approaches, paying close attention to sea mobilities, what they entailed, and how they were practiced, and what meanings have been associated with them. Scholars also consider the performance or practice of movement in itself, from the efforts of ocean crossing to the subtleties of moving and the...

Luso-American Literatures and Cultures Today

Christopher Larkosh
Sep 2019 - Tagus Press
This issue of PLCS takes a transnational approach to contemporary Luso-American literatures and cultures from across the United States, Canada and the Caribbean, incorporating perspectives from both within and beyond the current set of canonical reference points. This issue also features literary contributions from urban centers such as Toronto, San Francisco, and Vancouver as well as authors whose work can be said to be "in transit" between North America and disparate points...

Understanding Marsha Norman

Lisa Tyler
Best known for her Pulitzer Prize–winning play 'night, Mother and her acclaimed adaptations of The Secret Garden and The Color Purple for musical theater, Marsha Norman has produced an impressive oeuvre that includes not only works for the stage but also a novel and several television screenplays. The first book on the Louisville-born writer in twenty years, Understanding Marsha Norman introduces readers to her life and work while making a persuasive case for her preeminence among America's leading dramatic...

The Rise of Populist Nationalism

Margit Feischmidt
The authors of this book approach the emergence and endurance of the populist nationalism in post-socialist Eastern Europe, with special emphasis on Hungary. They attempt to understand the reasons behind public discourses that increasingly reframe politics in terms of nationhood and nationalism. Overall, the volume attempts to explain how the new nationalism is rooted in recent political, economic and social processes. The contributors...

Times of Mobility

Jasmina Lukic
In an era of increased mobility and globalisation, a fast growing body of writing originates from authors who live in-between languages and cultures. In response to this challenge, transnational perspective offers a new approach to the growing body of cultural texts with an emphasis on experiences of migration, transculturation, bilingualism and (cultural) translation. The introductory analysis and the fifteen essays in this collection critically interrogate...

A Task for Sisyphus

Iulius Rostas
Despite an increase in the number of EU and government initiatives in their favor, the situation of Roma in Europe has only worsened. This book explores the many miscalculations, misconceptions, and blunders that have led to this failure. For Hungary, the Czech Republic, and Romania, Rostas shows how policy makers in each country mishandled already confused EU policy, from failing to define "Roma" to not having a way to evaluate their own progress. Rostas further argues that the...

The Three C-s of Higher Education

Rosalind Pritchard
The thirteen papers in this collection address three aspects of higher education, primarily in Europe but also in the United States. These aspects are competition, collaboration, and complementarity, both on the level of policy and on the practical level of impact on students and staff. Competition, especially for funding, occurs between and within institutions. Collaboration, more than a basic code of conduct, has become a political principle...

Seeking the Best Master

Miklos Szanyi
The economic crisis of 2008–2009 signaled the end of the Post-Washington Consensus on restricting the role of the state in economic and development policy. Since then, state ownership and state intervention have increased worldwide. This volume offers a comparative analysis of the evolution of direct state intervention in the economy through state-owned companies in Austria, Brazil, France, Germany, Hungary, Poland, Turkey, Singapore, and Slovenia. Each case...

Interpretazioni

Cristina Pausini
Interpretazioni is an intermediate- to advanced-level Italian textbook that aims to teach language through film, focusing on Italian movies from 2010 to 2017. Teaching language through cinema is a widespread and proven practice that engages all four main language skills (speaking, listening, reading, writing), and Interpretazioni does so via the proven format and pedagogy of Pausini and Antonello Borra's previous book, Italian Through Film (Yale UP, 2003), which has...

Georgetown Journal of International Affairs

Dane Alivarius
The Georgetown Journal of International Affairs is the official publication of the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. Each issue of the journal provides readers with a diverse array of timely, peer-reviewed content penned by top policymakers, business leaders, and academic luminaries. The Journal takes a holistic approach to international affairs and features a Forum that offers focused analysis on a key topic with each new issue. This...

Edward M. Almond and the US Army

Michael E. Lynch
This study presents a comprehensive look at a complex man who exhibited an unfaltering commitment to the military and to his soldiers but whose career was marked by controversy. As a senior Army officer in World Wars I and II, Lt. Gen. Edward M. Almond lived by the adage that "units don't fail, leaders do." He was chosen to command the 92nd Infantry Division—one of only two African American divisions to see combat during WWII—but when the...

Conquer the Clutter

Elaine Birchall and Suzanne Cronkwright
Why does Cliff, a successful lawyer who regularly wins landmark cases, step over two-foot piles of paper whenever he opens his front door? Why do Joan and Paul ask Children's Services to take their three children instead of decluttering their home? Why does Lucinda feel intense pressure to hold onto her family's heirlooms even though she has no room for them? They have hoarding disorder, which an estimated 2% to 6% of the adult...

College Made Whole

Chris W. Gallagher
American higher education is being torn apart. Institutions, curricula, courses, and faculty roles are being "unbundled"—broken into constituent parts in the name of efficiency and cost savings. As a result, the college learning experience is fragmented and incoherent, leaving graduates less and less equipped to confront the dire social problems that cause those divisions in the first place. In College Made Whole, Chris W. Gallagher lays bare the dangers of the...

The Lost Books of Jane Austen

Janine Barchas
In the nineteenth century, inexpensive editions of Jane Austen's novels targeted to Britain's working classes were sold at railway stations, traded for soap wrappers, and awarded as school prizes. At just pennies a copy, these reprints were some of the earliest mass-market paperbacks, with Austen's beloved stories squeezed into tight columns on thin, cheap paper. Few of these hard-lived bargain books survive, yet they made a substantial difference to Austen's early readership. These were the books bought...

Field Guide to Freshwater Fishes of Virginia

Paul E. Bugas, Jr., Corbin D. Hilling, Val Kells, Michael J. Pinder, Derek A. Wheaton, and Donald J. Orth
illustrated by Val Kells and Joseph R. Tomelleri
In Field Guide to Freshwater Fishes of Virginia, the foremost experts on Commonwealth fishes bring their decades of field experience to readers, offering a complete reference to the fishes of the entire state of Virginia. Gathering information that until now could only be found scattered across numerous reference works and online databases,...

Queering Romantic Engagement in the Postal Age

Pamela VanHaitsma
Romantic letters are central to understanding same-sex romantic relationships from the past, with debates about so-called romantic friendship turning on conflicting interpretations of letters. Too often, however, these letters are treated simply as unstudied expressions of heartfelt feeling. In Queering Romantic Engagement in the Postal Age: A Rhetorical Education, Pamela VanHaitsma nuances such approaches to reading letters, showing how the genre...

Contested Ground

Mike Conway
In 1962, an innovative documentary on a Berlin Wall tunnel escape brought condemnation from both sides of the Iron Curtain during one of the most volatile periods of the Cold War. The Tunnel, produced by NBC's Reuven Frank, clocked in at ninety minutes and prompted a range of strong reactions. While the television industry ultimately awarded the program three Emmys, the U.S. Department of State pressured NBC to cancel the program, and print...

Understanding John Rechy

Maria DeGuzmán
In this first book-length monograph on the Mexican American novelist, essayist, and playwright John Rechy, best known for his debut novel City of Night, María DeGuzmán offers a conceptually clear yet aesthetically, philosophically, and socio-politically fine-grained analysis of the spectrum of his writing. Recipient of PEN Center USA's Lifetime Achievement Award, a National Endowment for the Arts Grant, ONE Magazine's National Gay and Lesbian Cultural Hero Award, the William Whitehead Award for Lifetime...

Golden Rice

Ed Regis
Ordinary white rice is nutrient poor; it consists of carbohydrates and little else. About one million people who subsist on rice become blind or die each year from vitamin A deficiency. Golden Rice, which was developed in the hopes of combatting that problem by a team of European scientists in the late '90s, was genetically modified to provide an essential nutrient that white rice lacks: beta-carotene, which is converted into vitamin A in the body. But twenty years later, this potentially...

Baltimore

Matthew A. Crenson
Charm City or Mobtown? People from Baltimore glory in its eccentric charm, small-town character, and North-cum-South culture. But for much of the nineteenth century, violence and disorder plagued the city. More recently, the 2015 death of Freddie Gray in police custody has prompted Baltimoreans—and the entire nation—to focus critically on the rich and tangled narrative of black–white relations in Baltimore, where slavery once existed alongside the largest community of free blacks in the United States.

Frayed Light

Yonatan Berg
Unity We travel the silk road of evening, tobacco and desire flickering between our hands. We are warm travelers, our eyes unfurled, traveling in psalms, in Rumi, in the sayings of the man from the Galilee. We break bread under the pistachio tree, under the Banyan tree, under the dark of the Samaritan fig tree. Songs of offering rise up in our throats, wandering along the wall of night. We travel in the openness of warm eternity. Heavenly voices announce a coupling as the quiet horse gallops heavenward. We travel...

Playing It Dangerously

Ian MacMillen
Playing It Dangerously questions what happens when feelings attached to popular music conflict with expressions of the dominant socio-cultural order, and how this tension enters into the politics of popular culture at various levels of human interaction. Tambura is a genre-crossing performance practice centered on an eponymous stringed instrument, part of the mandolin family, that Roma, Croats, and Serbs adopted from Ottoman forces. The...

Celluloid Classicism

Hari Krishnan
Celluloid Classicism provides a rich and detailed history of two important modern South Indian cultural forms: Tamil Cinema and Bharatanatyam dance. It addresses representations of dance in the cinema from an interdisciplinary, critical-historical perspective. The intertwined and symbiotic histories of these forms have never received serious scholarly attention. For the most part, historians of South Indian cinema have noted the presence of song and...

Drawing the Surface of Dance

Annie-B Parson
Soloing on the page, choreographer Annie-B Parson rethinks choreography as dance on paper. Parson draws her dances into new graphic structures calling attention to the visual facts of the materiality of each dance work she has made. These drawings serve as both maps of her pieces in the aftermath of performance, and a consideration of the elements of dance itself. Divided into three chapters, the book opens with diagrams of the objects in each of her pieces grouped into...

The Case of the Slave-Child, Med

Karen Woods Weierman
In 1836, an enslaved six-year-old girl named Med was brought to Boston by a woman from New Orleans who claimed her as property. Learning of the girl's arrival in the city, the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society (BFASS) waged a legal fight to secure her freedom and affirm the free soil of Massachusetts. While Chief Justice Lemuel Shaw ruled quite narrowly in the case that enslaved people brought to Massachusetts could not be held against their will, BFASS claimed a...

Two Centuries of Manchu Women Poets

Wilt L. Idema, hD
This anthology presents substantial selections from the work of twenty Manchu women poets of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The poems, inspired by their daily life and reflections, provide fascinating insights into the experiences and emotions of these women, most of whom belonged to the elite families of Manchu society. Each selection is accompanied by biographical material that illuminates the life stories of the poets. The volume's introduction describes the...

Baltimore Lives

John Clark Mayden
Baltimore native John Clark Mayden's photographs are distinctive to the city and specific to black life there, lingering on the front stoops and in the postage-stamp backyards of Charm City row houses. But these pictures are far from nostalgic. Informed by the photographer's deep commitment to both social justice and storytelling, they strip Baltimore of pretense and illusion and show the city's veins. Baltimore Lives gathers 101 of Mayden's best photographs in print for the...

Mad Dogs and Other New Yorkers

Jessica Wang
Rabies enjoys a fearsome and lurid reputation. Throughout the decades of spiraling growth that defined New York City from the 1840s to the 1910s, the bone-chilling cry of "Mad dog!" possessed the power to upend the ordinary routines and rhythms of urban life. In Mad Dogs and Other New Yorkers, Jessica Wang examines the history of this rare but dreaded affliction during a time of rapid urbanization. Focusing on a transformative...

Republic of Numbers

David Lindsay Roberts
Once upon a time in America, few knew or cared about math. In Republic of Numbers, David Lindsay Roberts tells the story of how all that changed, as America transformed into a powerhouse of mathematical thinkers. Covering more than 200 years of American history, Roberts recounts the life stories of twenty-three Americans integral to the evolution of mathematics in this country. Beginning with self-taught Salem mathematician Nathaniel...

Maria Baldwin's Worlds

Kathleen Weiler
Maria Baldwin (1856–1922) held a special place in the racially divided society of her time, as a highly respected educator at a largely white New England school and an activist who carried on the radical spirit of the Boston area's internationally renowned abolitionists from a generation earlier. African American sociologist Adelaide Cromwell called Baldwin "the lone symbol of Negro progress in education in the greater Boston area" during her...

At Home

Beth Luey
With its rich history of prominent families, Massachusetts is home to some of the most historic residences in the country. In the central and western half of the Commonwealth, these include Edith Wharton's The Mount, the Salisbury Mansion in Worcester, Herman Melville's Arrowhead in Pittsfield, and the Dickinson Homestead and the Evergreens in Amherst. In At Home: Historic Houses of Central and Western Massachusetts, Beth Luey examines the lives and homes of acclaimed poets and...

Campuses of Consent

Theresa A. Kulbaga
This new book for scholars and university administrators offers a provocative critique of sexual justice language and policy in higher education around the concept of consent. Complicating the idea that consent is plain common sense, Campuses of Consent shows how normative and inaccurate concepts about gender, gender identity, and sexuality erase queer or trans students' experiences and perpetuate narrow, regressive gender norms and individualist frameworks for...

The Kongs of Qufu

Christopher S. Agnew
The city of Qufu, in north China's Shandong Province, is famous as the hometown of Kong Qiu (551–479 BCE)—known as Confucius in English and as Kongzi or Kong Fuzi in Chinese. In The Kongs of Qufu, Christopher Agnew chronicles the history of the sage's direct descendants from the inception of the hereditary title Duke for Fulfilling the Sage in 1055 CE through its dissolution in 1935, after the fall of China's dynastic system in 1911. Drawing on archival...

The Radiance of Small Things in Ron Rash's Writing

Frédérique Spill
The Radiance of Small Things in Ron Rash's Writing examines how the poet's language bristles with a variety of carefully registered sensory perceptions detailing minute objects, some of which, Frédérique Spill argues, less poetic minds than his might consider insignificant. Through its eleven chapters, each devoted to a different book in order of publication, Spill's study shows how prone Rash is to making violence cohabit with beauty, thus imbuing the dreariest situations with...

South Carolina Ghosts

Nancy Roberts
Nancy Roberts has often been described to as the "First Lady of American Folklore" and the title is well deserved. Throughout her decades-long career, Roberts documented supernatural experiences and interviewed hundreds of people about their recollections of encounters with the supernatural. This nationally renowned writer began her undertaking in this ghostly realm as a freelance writer for the Charlotte Observer. Encouraged by Carl Sandburg, who enjoyed her stories and...

Civil War Ghost Stories & Legends

Nancy Roberts
Nancy Roberts has often been described to as the "First Lady of American Folklore" and the title is well deserved. Throughout her decades-long career, Roberts documented supernatural experiences and interviewed hundreds of people about their recollections of encounters with the supernatural. This nationally renowned writer began her undertaking in this ghostly realm as a freelance writer for the Charlotte Observer. Encouraged by Carl Sandburg, who enjoyed her stories and articles, Roberts wrote...

Ghosts of the Carolinas

Nancy Roberts
Nancy Roberts has often been described to as the "First Lady of American Folklore" and the title is well deserved. Throughout her decades-long career, Roberts documented supernatural experiences and interviewed hundreds of people about their recollections of encounters with the supernatural. This nationally renowned writer began her undertaking in this ghostly realm as a freelance writer for the Charlotte Observer. Encouraged by Carl Sandburg, who enjoyed her stories and articles, Roberts wrote her first book...

Ghosts of the Southern Mountains and Appalachia

Nancy Roberts
Nancy Roberts has often been described to as the "First Lady of American Folklore" and the title is well deserved. Throughout her decades-long career, Roberts documented supernatural experiences and interviewed hundreds of people about their recollections of encounters with the supernatural. This nationally renowned writer began her undertaking in this ghostly realm as a freelance writer for the Charlotte Observer. Encouraged by Carl Sandburg, who enjoyed her stories and...

The Haunted South

Nancy Roberts
Nancy Roberts has often been described to as the "First Lady of American Folklore" and the title is well deserved. Throughout her decades-long career, Roberts documented supernatural experiences and interviewed hundreds of people about their recollections of encounters with the supernatural. This nationally renowned writer began her undertaking in this ghostly realm as a freelance writer for the Charlotte Observer. Encouraged by Carl Sandburg, who enjoyed her stories and articles, Roberts wrote...

North Carolina Ghosts and Legends

Nancy Roberts
Nancy Roberts has often been described to as the "First Lady of American Folklore" and the title is well deserved. Throughout her decades-long career, Roberts documented supernatural experiences and interviewed hundreds of people about their recollections of encounters with the supernatural. This nationally renowned writer began her undertaking in this ghostly realm as a freelance writer for the Charlotte Observer. Encouraged by Carl Sandburg, who enjoyed her stories and articles, Roberts wrote...

Tasting Paradise on Earth

Jin Feng
Preparing and consuming food is an integral part of identity formation, which in contemporary China embodies tension between fast-forward modernization and cultural nostalgia. Jin Feng's wide-ranging exploration of cities in the Lower Yangzi Delta—or Jiangnan, a region known for its paradisiacal beauty and abundant resources—illustrates how people preserve culinary inheritance while also revamping it for the new millennium. Throughout Chinese history, food nostalgia has generated cultural...

Creole Feast

Nathaniel Burton, Rudy Lombard, foreword by Leah Chase
Before there were celebrity gourmands, Creole Feast brought together the stories and knowledge of New Orleans top chefs. These masters of modern Creole cuisine share the recipes, tips, and tricks from the kitchens of New Orleans' most famous restaurants, including Dooky Chase, Commander's Palace, Broussard's, and Galatoire's. Today, Creole Feast still stands as the most comprehensive collection of Creole recipes assembled...

Psychology and Politics

Anna Borgos
Psy-sciences (psychology, psychiatry, psychoanalysis, pedagogy, criminology, special education, etc.) have been connected to politics in different ways since the early twentieth century. Here in twenty-two essays scholars address a variety of these intersections from a historical perspective. The chapters include such diverse topics as the cultural history of psychoanalysis, the complicated relationship between psychoanalysis and the...

Researching National Security Intelligence

Stephen Coulthart
Researchers in the rapidly growing field of intelligence studies face unique and difficult challenges ranging from finding and accessing data on secret activities, to sorting through the politics of intelligence successes and failures, to making sense of complex socio-organizational or psychological phenomena. The contributing authors to Researching National Security Intelligence survey the state of the field and demonstrate how incorporating multiple...

The Russian Understanding of War

Oscar Jonsson
This book analyzes the evolution of Russian military thought and how Russia's current thinking about war is reflected in recent crises. While other books describe current Russian practice, Oscar Jonsson provides the long view to show how Russian military strategic thinking has developed from the Bolshevik Revolution to the present. He closely examines Russian primary sources including security doctrines and the writings and statements of Russian military...

The Capital of Basketball

John McNamara
The celebration of Washington D.C. basketball is long overdue. The D.C. metro area stands second to none in its contributions to the game. Countless figures who have had a significant impact on the sport over the years have roots in the region, including E.B. Henderson, the first African-American certified to teach public school physical education, and Earl Lloyd, the first African-American to take the court in an actual NBA game. The city's Spingarn High School produced...

"And there will be singing"

Jim Hicks
In celebration of its landmark sixtieth anniversary, the Massachusetts Review presents a collection of the best contemporary and emerging international writers and writers in translation, from MR's last decade. At a time when English-only readers too often know little about the rest of the world, this volume is a classroom in itself. This timely and essential anthology features fiction, essays, and poetry by Mia Couto, Tabish Khair, Menekşe Toprak, Olga...

Shaker Vision

Joseph Manca
The Shakers are known for self-denial and austerity in everyday living and their material world, as embodied by the heavenly simplicity and purity of their chairs and blanket chests. Yet the believers also enjoyed a diversity of visual pleasures, from flowers, sunsets, rainbows, and the northern lights as seen at home to waterfalls, ocean waves, and dramatic cliffs viewed while traveling across America. In Shaker Vision, Joseph Manca explores original texts, especially diaries and travel...

The Shaman's Wages

Kyoim Yun, series edited byClark W. Sorensen
Breaking from previous scholarship on Korean shamanism, which focuses on mansin of mainland Korea, The Shaman's Wages offers the first in-depth study of simbang, hereditary shamans on Cheju Island off the peninsula's southwest coast. In this engaging ethnography enriched by extensive historical research, Kyoim Yun explores the prevalent and persistent ambivalence toward practitioners, whose services have long been sought out yet derided as wasteful by...

The Way of the Barbarians

Shao-yun Yang
Shao-yun Yang challenges assumptions that the cultural and socioeconomic watershed of the Tang-Song transition (800–1127 CE) was marked by a xenophobic or nationalist hardening of ethnocultural boundaries in response to growing foreign threats. In that period, reinterpretations of Chineseness and its supposed antithesis, "barbarism," were not straightforward products of political change but had their own developmental logic based in two interrelated...

Forever Seeing New Beauties

Eve M. Kahn
Revolutionary artist Mary Rogers Williams (1857—1907), a baker's daughter from Hartford, Connecticut, biked and hiked from the Arctic Circle to Naples, exhibited from Paris to Indianapolis, trained at the Art Students League, chafed against art world rules that favored men, wrote thousands of pages about her travels and work, taught at Smith College for nearly two decades, but sadly ended up almost totally obscure. The book reproduces her...

Wild Music

Maria Sonevytsky
What are the uses of musical exoticism? In Wild Music, Maria Sonevytsky tracks vernacular Ukrainian discourses of "wildness" as they manifested in popular music during a volatile decade of Ukrainian political history bracketed by two revolutions. From the Eurovision Song Contest to reality TV, from Indigenous radio to the revolution stage, Sonevytsky assesses how these practices exhibit and re-imagine Ukrainian tradition and culture. As the rise of global populism forces us to confront the...

Atopia

Sandra Simonds
Tallahassee. Tallahassee. Tallahassee. Your mist today is incredible as it settles on this rose garden! When the largest rose shook off its dew and looked at me like a cartoon, I smiled back and promised not to break his neck. And here we are together again, walking in a park that honors dead children. A tree planted for each child on such a mild day in December. And how the dead children stream through me, scrolls of them: Lily! Rose! Bobby! Kierkegaard says anyone who follows through on an idea becomes unpopular. And also that...

Forgotten Voices

Carolyn Wakeman
The history inscribed in New England's meetinghouses waits to be told. There, colonists gathered for required worship on the Sabbath, for town meetings, and for court hearings. There, ministers and local officials, many of them slave owners, spoke about salvation, liberty, and justice. There, women before the Civil War found a role and a purpose outside their households. This innovative exploration of a coastal Connecticut town, birthplace of two governors and a...

Smiling in the Darkness

Adelaide Freitas
Oct 2019 - Tagus Press
Many people of Portuguese descent take pride in claiming that the word "saudade" is untranslatable. In reality, we come close with a melding of bittersweet nostalgia, bone-deep longing, and an endless yearning for what one can never have again—or indeed may never have had. Adelaide Freitas dipped her pen in saudade to tell of family separation and bonds that never loosen. In her authentic Azorean voice, she recounts the immigrant experience and centrifugal impulses that force people apart in spite of their...

Outriders

Rebecca Scofield
Rodeo is a dangerous and painful performance in which only the strongest and most skilled riders succeed. In the popular imagination, the western rodeo hero is often a stoic white man who embodies the toughness and independence of America's frontier past. However, marginalized people have starred in rodeos since the very beginning. Cast out of popular western mythology and pushed to the fringes in everyday life, these cowboys and cowgirls found belonging and meaning at the rodeo,...

All God's Animals

Christopher Steck
The book is the first of its kind to draw together into conversation the views of the early Church, contemporary biblical and theological scholarship, and post-conciliar teachings in order to develop a comprehensive, Catholic theology of animals based on an in-depth exploration of its fundamental doctrines — i.e., trinitarian theology, Christology, pneumatology, eschatology, and soteriology.   The book makes two central claims.  First, it challenges the...

From Quills to Tweets

Andrea J. Dew
While today's presidential tweets may seem a light year apart from the scratch of quill pens during the era of the American Revolution, the importance of political communication is eternal. This book explores the roles that political narratives, media coverage, and evolving communication technologies have played in precipitating, shaping, and concluding or prolonging wars and revolutions over the course of US history. The case studies begin with the Sons of...

Everyday Ethics

Michael Lamb
What might we learn if the study of ethics focused less on hard cases and more on the practices of everyday life? In Everyday Ethics, Michael Lamb and Brian Williams gather some of the world's leading scholars and practitioners of moral theology (including some GUP authors) to explore that question in dialogue with anthropology and the social sciences. Inspired by the work of Michael Banner, these scholars cross disciplinary boundaries to analyze the ethics of ordinary...

The Collected Poems of Lorenzo Thomas

Lorenzo Thomas
Song You asked me to sing Then you seemed not To hear; to have gone out From the edge of my voice And I was singing There I was singing In a heathen voice You could not hear Though you requested The song—it was for them. Although they refuse you And the song I made for you Tangled in their tongue They wd mire themselves in the spring Rains, as I sit here folding and Unfolding my nose in your gardens I wouldn't mind it so bad Each word is cheapened In the air, sounding like Language...

With Extreme Prejudice

Fredrick Barton
One year after his wife dies in a car accident, film critic Mike Barnett discovers his house ransacked in an apparent robbery. However, only his wife's private files have been stolen. Mike then finds himself pulled into a seedy world of local government corruption when he starts to believe that his wife's death was no accident. A captivating legal thriller about greed, graft, and convoluted schemes, a man's search for truth to reconcile the loss of a loving marriage uncovers deeper trauma in the beauty of New...

Humanity in Crisis

David Hollenbach
The major humanitarian crises of recent years are well known: the Shoah, the killing fields of Cambodia, the Rwandan genocide, the massacre in Bosnia, and the tsunami in Southeast Asia, not to mention bloody conflicts in South Sudan, Syria, and Afghanistan. Millions have been killed and many millions more have been driven from their homes; the number of refugees and internally displaced persons has reached record levels. Could these crises have been prevented? Why do...

Power: Divine and Human

Lucinda Mosher
This is the next volume of the Building Bridges Seminar. As is always the case, Power — Divine and Human: Christian and Muslim Perspectives comprises pairs of essays by Christians and Muslims which introduce texts for dialogical study, plus the actual text-excerpts themselves. This new book goes far beyond mere reporting on a dialogical seminar; rather, it provides guidance and materials for constructing a similar dialogical experience on a particular topic. As a resource...

Using the Sky

Deborah Hay
Deborah Hay is an internationally renowned dance artist whose unique approach to bodily practice has had lasting impact on American choreography. Her commitment to dance as a process is as exquisite as it is provoking. Rooted in NYC's 1960s experimental Judson Dance Theater in New York, Hay's work has evolved through experimentation with a use of language that is unique to dance. This book is an exploration and articulation of Hay's process, focusing on several of her most recent works.

A New and Concise History of Rock and R&B through the Early 1990s

Eric Charry
Ethnomusicologist Eric Charry's innovative and road-tested textbook is an introduction to Rock and R&B suitable for general education courses in music and also accessible for general readers interested in a novel approach to gaining a historically rich, yet concise understanding of these genres. The book is organized around a series of timelines, tables, and figures created by the author, and provides fresh perspectives that bring readers into the heart of the...