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Our clients include Johns Hopkins University Press, Georgetown University Press, University of Washington Press, The University Press of Kentucky, Catholic University of America Press, Indiana University Press, University of New Orleans Press, The Maryland Center for History and Culture, University of South Carolina Press, Wesleyan University Press, Modern Language Association of America, Northeastern University Press, Family Development Press, Central European University Press, and University of Alberta Press.

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A Calabash of Cowries

Luisah Teish
A Calabash of Cowries: Ancient Wisdom for Modern Times is a collection of tales featuring the Orishas and the wonders of the natural world. Suitable for adults and children, artists and teachers, readers of all cultures will discover in these retellings of traditional tales a resource that illuminates the mythic and the real, the ancient past and the emerging present. An offering of spiritual wisdom and cultural celebration through stories that have and will continue to endure the...

Al-Qata'i

Reem Bassiouney, translated by Roger Allen
An award-winning novelist's vibrant portrayal of the struggle to create a more unified society in medieval Egypt and how this has shaped Egypt today. Brimming with intrigue, adventure, and romance, Al-Qata'i: Ibn Tulun's City Without Walls tells the epic story of visionary Egyptian leader Ahmad Ibn Tulun who built Al-Qata'i (now Cairo) into a thriving multicultural empire. The novel begins with the rediscovery of the Ibn Tulun Mosque in 1918 and recounts Ibn...

At the Crossroads of Music and Social Justice

edited by Brenda M. Romero, Susan M. Asai, David A. McDonald, Andrew G. Snyder, Katelyn E. Best, with contributions by Kyra D. Gaunt, Steven Loza, Charlotte W. Heth, Paul Austerlitz, Katie J. Graber, Darci Sprengel, Ho Chak Law, Alexandria Carrico
Music is powerful and transformational, but can it spur actual social change? A strong collection of essays, At the Crossroads of Music and Social Justice studies the meaning of music within a community to investigate the intersections of sound and...

The Grim Years

John J. Navin
The Grim Years: Settling South Carolina, 1670-1720 is a graphic account of South Carolina's tumultuous beginnings, when calamity, violence, and ruthless exploitation were commonplace. With extraordinary detail and analysis, John J. Navin reveals the hardships that were experienced by people of all ethnicities and all stations in life during the first half-century of South Carolina's existence—years of misery caused by nature, pathogens, greed, and recklessness. From South Carolina's...

Chinese Autobiographical Writing

edited by Patricia Buckley Ebrey, Cong Ellen Zhang, Ping Yao
Personal accounts help us understand notions of self, interpersonal relations, and historical events. Chinese Autobiographical Writing contains full translations of works by fifty individuals that illuminate the history and conventions of writing about oneself in the Chinese tradition. From poetry, letters, and diaries to statements in legal proceedings, these engaging and readable works draw us into the past and...

Walking Together, Working Together

edited by Leslie Main Johnson, Janelle Marie Baker
This collection takes a holistic view of well-being, seeking complementarities between Indigenous approaches to healing and Western biomedicine. Topics include traditional healers and approaches to treatment of disease and illness; traditional knowledge and intellectual property around medicinal plant knowledge; the role of diet and traditional foods in health promotion; culturally sensitive approaches to healing...

Engineering the Lower Danube

Luminita Gatejel
The Lower Danube—the stretch of Europe's second longest river between the Romanian-Serbian border and the confluence to the Black Sea—was effectively transformed during the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. In describing this lengthy undertaking, Luminita Gatejel proposes that remaking two key stretches—the Iron Gates and the delta—not only physically altered the river but also redefined...

suddenly we

Evie Shockley
Evie Shockley's new poems invite us to dream—and work—toward a more capacious "we" In her new poetry collection, Evie Shockley mobilizes visual art, sound, and multilayered language to chart routes towards openings for the collective dreaming of a more capacious "we." How do we navigate between the urgency of our own becoming and the imperative insight that whoever we are, we are in relation to each other? Beginning with the visionary art of Black women like Alison Saar and Alma Thomas, Shockley's poems draw and forge a...

Drinking from Graveyard Wells

Yvette Lisa Ndlovu
"Even in death, who has ownership over Black women's bodies?" Questions like this lurk between the lines of this stunning collection of stories that engage with African women's histories, both personal and generational. Their history is not just one thing: there is heartbreak and pain, and joy, and flying and magic, so much magic. An avenging spirit takes on the patriarchy from beyond the grave. An immigrant woman undergoes a naturalization ceremony in an imagined American state that...

Transforming Hispanic-Serving Institutions for Equity and Justice

Gina Ann Garcia
Beyond having over a quarter of their undergraduate students be Hispanic, what makes Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) uniquely Latinx? And how can university leaders, faculty, and staff transform these institutions into spaces that promote racial equity, social justice, and collective liberation? In Transforming Hispanic-Serving Institutions for Equity and Justice, Gina Ann Garcia argues that in order to serve Latinx students and other students of...

Forbidden

edited by Drew Christiansen, Carole Sargent
Moral theologians, defense analysts, conflict scholars, and nuclear experts imagine a world free from nuclear weapons At a 2017 Vatican conference, Pope Francis condemned nuclear weapons. This volume, issued after the 60th anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis, presents essays from moral theologians, defense analysts, conflict transformation scholars, and nuclear arms control experts, with testimonies from witnesses. It is a companion...

Grassroots Leviathan

Ariel Ron
In this sweeping look at rural society from the American Revolution to the Civil War, Ariel Ron argues that agricultural history is central to understanding the nation's formative period. Upending the myth that the Civil War pitted an industrial North against an agrarian South, Grassroots Leviathan traces the rise of a powerful agricultural reform movement spurred by northern farmers. Ron shows that farming dominated the lives of most Americans...

Reinventing the Supply Chain

Jack Buffington
An original vision for using technology to transform supply chains into value chains in order to revitalize American communities When the COVID-19 pandemic led to a global economic "shutdown" in March 2020, our supply chains began to fail, and out-of-stocks and delivery delays became the new norm. Contrary to public perception, the pandemic strain did not break the current system of supply chains; it merely exposed weaknesses and fault lines that were decades in...

The COVID-19 Intelligence Failure

Erik J. Dahl
An in-depth analysis of why COVID-19 warnings failed and how to avert the next disaster Epidemiologists and national security agencies warned for years about the potential for a deadly pandemic, but in the end global surveillance and warning systems were not enough to avert the COVID-19 disaster. In The COVID-19 Intelligence Failure, Erik J. Dahl demonstrates that understanding how intelligence warnings work — and how they fail — shows why the years of predictions were not...

Beyond Fitting In

edited by Kelly Ritter
Guidance on teaching writing to first-generation college students. Beyond Fitting In interrogates how the cultural capital and lived experiences of first-generation college students inform literacy studies and the writing-centered classroom. Essays, written by scholar-teachers in the field of rhetoric and composition, discuss best practices for teaching first-generation students in writing classrooms, centers, programs, and other environments.

America's Path Forward

edited by Konstanze Frischen, Michael Zakaras
Critiques and solutions offered by social changemakers from all walks of life The United States is living through a period of polarization and upheaval. We hunger for answers, yet too often turn to the same people and institutions, expecting different outcomes. How can this be? This book takes a different angle. It features award-winning social innovators from all walks of life with decades of...

Junk Food Politics

Eduardo J. Gómez
An interesting public health paradox has emerged in some developing nations. Despite government commitment to eradicating noncommunicable diseases and innovative prevention programs aimed at reducing obesity and type 2 diabetes, sugary beverage and fast food industries are thriving. But political leaders in countries such as Mexico, Brazil, India, China, and Indonesia are reluctant to introduce policies regulating the marketing and sale...

Resource Handbook for Academic Deans, fourth edition

edited by Andrew Adams
The new edition of the Resource Handbook for Academic Deans, one of the most important offerings to the academic community by the American Conference of Academic Deans, is written by and for academic leaders to address the expanding, multifaceted role of college and university administrators. Each chapter explores a topic related to how higher education leaders are influenced by national events, local partnerships, or...

Growing in Virtue

William C. Mattison, III
A compelling analysis tying the work of Aquinas to contemporary literature on virtue Despite heightened attention to virtue, contemporary philosophical and theological literature has failed to offer detailed analysis of how people attain and grow in the good habits we know as the virtues. Though popular literature provides instruction on attaining and growing in virtue, it lacks careful scholarly analysis of what exactly these good habits are in which we grow. Growing in Virtue is the...

Lucky Medicine

Lester W. Thompson
A remarkable, personal glimpse of Black student life at Indiana University in the early 1960s.   In 1961, a skinny African American boy from Indianapolis arrived at Indiana University Bloomington determined to become a doctor. For the next three years, Lester Thompson kept a detailed, intimate diary of his journey to graduation. In Lucky Medicine, Lester returns to his long-ago journal and, with honesty, humor, and a healthy dose of rueful self-reflection, shares stories from...

The Colosseum Critical Introduction to David Mason

Gregory Dowling
"We learn a good deal about David Mason's life through his poetry: we learn of his family life and troubles, his travels, his loves, and his losses, but we never have the impression of being buttonholed by a man who is self-centered or egotistical. Partly this is because we are convinced of the numerous ways in which the life he recounts is connected to other lives, to places and to historical events. But it is mainly because we always sense how closely what he recounts is...

The Richmond Group Artists

Shaun Thomas Dingwerth
This is the untold story of a group of artists whose interest in fostering art in their community made an authentic contribution to the history of art in America. Taking for their subjects the local people, flora, and landscapes, they developed a distinctive impressionistic style, uninfluenced by other art movements in Indiana. Richmond, Indiana, became an important center for art in the Midwest, a place that nourished and inspired the artists whose work this book celebrates.

Understanding Jonathan Franzen

Timothy W. Galow
The first comprehensive study to address Franzen's work to date Jonathan Franzen is a critical darling, commercial success, and magnet for controversy. His third novel, The Corrections (2000), was selected for Oprah's book club, nominated for the Pulitzer Prize, and won the National Book Award. Love him or hate him, the publication of each new novel is a literary event. In Understanding Jonathan Franzen, Timothy W. Galow studies Franzen's first five novels plus his most recent, Crossroads, which...

Parental Rights in Peril

edited by Stephen M Krason
Parental Rights in Peril details the many reasons parental rights - one of the most basic of natural rights grounded in the very relationship of parents and their children - have come under considerable attack in recent times. The contributors to this volume lay out the different areas and ways in which those attacks have occurred and what has led to them. Their exploring of the nature and seriousness of the problem is a prerequisite to knowing how to respond to the attacks and restoring respect...

Fixing American Cybersecurity

edited by Larry Clinton, foreword by Kiersten Todt, with contributions by Anthony Shapella, Lou DeSorbo, Jeffrey C. Brown, J.R. Williamson, Michael Higgins, Michael Gordon, Josh Higgins, Greg Montana, Gary McAlum, Kenneth Huh, Ryan Boulais, Jamison Gardner, Andy Kirkland, Alex Green, Richard Spearman, Carter Zheng, Tarun Krishnakumar, Larry Clinton

Aswat Muasira

Jonas Elbousty, foreword by Roger Allen
An engaging collection of contemporary short stories from various Arabic countries develops students' mastery of literary analysis and cultural awareness Aswat Mu'asira introduces advanced level students to contemporary short stories from across the Middle East. Fifty-five stories in Arabic from twenty countries engage students with current topics and literary approaches that open the door to discovering both established and emerging authors and literary...

The Spingarn Brothers

Katherine Reynolds Chaddock
In the late nineteenth century, Joel and Arthur Spingarn grew up in New York City as brothers with very different personalities, interests, and professional goals. Joel was impetuous and high-spirited; Arthur was reasoned and studious. Yet together they would become essential leaders in the struggle for racial justice and equality, serving as presidents of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, exposing...

Building a City

edited by Sheila E. Jelen, Jeffrey Saks, Wendy Zierler
The fiction of Nobel Laureate Shmuel Yosef Agnon is the foundation of the array of scholarly essays as seen through the career of Alan Mintz, visionary scholar and professor of Jewish literature at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. Mintz introduced Agnon's posthumously published Ir Umeloah (A City in Its Fullness)—a series of linked stories set in the 17th century and focused on Agnon's hometown, Buczacz, a town in...

Divine Speech in Human Words

Emmanuel Durand
Is the portrait of God revealed in Scripture fundamentally intelligible? The biblical accounts of God reveal seemingly contradictory themes: God's holiness and narratives telling of his anger; the Divine Omnipotence faced with the Impossible; the suffering Christ upon the Cross and the transcendent Trinity of Persons in God; the unique Savior and the universality of God's salvific will; and so forth. How are we to hold together all of this data without denying...

New Charter for Health Care Workers, English edition

Pontifical Council for Pastoral Assistance to Health Care Workers
The New Charter for Health Care Workers is a revision and updating of the earlier 1994 edition, also produced by the Pontifical Council for Health Care Workers. The work is divided into three major sections: "Procreating," "Living," and "Dying," each of which lays out authoritative teachings in medical ethics grounded in the traditional resources of the Church

Preaching to Latinos

Michael Kueber
There is a wide and growing gap in the Catholic Church in the United States between the clergy, who are mostly of European descent, and the large percentages of Catholics who identify as Latinos. While the US Church has made a concerted effort to build Hispanic ministries, many clergy and lay ministers are still ill-equipped to understand the cultural background of their parishioners, especially the large numbers who are foreign born. Because of this...

Spirituality in Architectural Education

edited by Julio Bermudez
How does spirituality enter the education of an architect? Should it? What do we mean by 'spirituality' in the first place? Isn't architectural education a training ground for professional practice and, therefore, technically and secularly oriented? Is there even room to add something as esoteric if not controversial as spirituality to an already packed university curriculum? The humanistic...

The Eucharist in Modern Philosophy

Xavier Tilliette, translated by Jonathan Martin Ciraulo
The Eucharist in Modern Philosophy is one of the last books written by the renowned Jesuit philosopher Xavier Tilliette (1921-2018), and the first to be translated into English. Jonathan Martin Ciraulo, the translator, also provides an introduction to the thought of Tilliette and the content of this book, while Cyril O'Regan provides the foreword, noting the particular intellectual characteristics of Tilliette and his analysis of eucharistic philosophies. In...

Civil Movements in an Illiberal Regime

Dániel Mikecz
Dániel Mikecz addresses in this study the tensions between oppositional civil society and party-political actors. As successive elections demonstrate the increasing confidence of the illiberal regime of Viktor Orbán, left and liberal parties of the opposition have faced a prolonged crisis in credibility. At the same time, the civil society has not been immobile, and bottom-up initiatives, social and political movements, and non-governmental organizations have...

Mastering Italian through Global Debate

Marie Bertola, Sandra Carletti
Critical engagement with complex global issues that provides an effective approach to promoting linguistic proficiency and social responsibility Mastering Italian through Global Debate is a one-semester textbook designed for students with Advanced-level Italian language skills, moving toward Superior and above. Over the course of each chapter, students gain linguistic and rhetorical skills as they prepare to debate on broad, timely topics, including environmental...

A Is for Affrilachia

Frank X Walker, illustrated by Ronald W. Davis
The people and places in Appalachia make it a rich, multifaceted, and diverse region. When author Frank X Walker first coined the phrase "Affrilachia," he wanted to ensure that the voices and accomplishments of African Americans in that region were recognized and exalted. A Is for Affrilachia not only brings awareness of notable African Americans from this region, but this inspired children's alphabet book is also an exuberant celebration of the people, physical spaces, and historical...

Building Inclusive Communities in Rural Canada

edited by Clark Banack, Dionne Pohler
This collection challenges misconceptions that rural Canada is a bastion of intolerance. While examining the extent and nature of contemporary cultural and religious discrimination in rural Canadian communities, the editors and contributors explore the many efforts by rural citizens, community groups, and municipalities to counter intolerance, build inclusive communities, and become better neighbours. Throughout, scholars and community leaders focus on...

Ends of Painting

edited by David Homewood, Paris Lettau
Contemporary art begins where painting ends, or so goes one of recent art history's most dominant narratives. This book is a postmortem of the supposed death of painting in the period following World War II. In eleven essays by a global array of leading scholars, Ends of Painting offers a counter-history, showing how the practice and discourse of painting remained integral to art throughout the 1960s and 1970s. Written by art historians from Australia, Asia, Europe,...

Land and Liberty

Christopher William England
In 1912, Sun Yat-sen announced the birth of the Chinese Republic and promised that it would be devoted to the economic welfare of all its people. In shaping his plans for wealth redistribution, he looked to an American now largely forgotten in the United States: Henry George. In Land and Liberty, Christopher William England excavates the lost history of one of America's most influential radicals and explains why so many activists were once inspired by...

Making Wonderful

Martin Tweedale
In Making Wonderful, Martin M. Tweedale tells how an ideology in the West energized an economic expansion that has led to ecological disaster. He takes us back to the rise of cities and autocratic rulers, analyzing how respect for custom and tradition gave way to the dominance of top-down rational planning and organization. Then in response came a highly attractive myth of an eventual future rid of all of humankind's ills, one in which life would be "made wonderful."...

Mercantile Mobility

Helen Kwan Yee Cheung
This exhibition catalogue traces a group of dynamic Chinese merchants and their business activities in big cities and small towns in Western Canada after they arrived from China, covering the mid-nineteenth century into the millennium. Their movements are illustrated on various maps and chronicled in many written accounts. By managing the flow of people, products, and money at the municipal, provincial, and global levels, these individuals added to the growth of the...

Never Too Late

Shannon Dowler, MD
In Never Too Late, Shannon Dowler, MD, a family physician who is also an expert on sexually transmitted diseases (STD), provides a refreshing overview of sexual education for people over 55. With the advent of dating apps, vibrant 55+ retirement communities, and sexual enhancement drugs, adults are sexually active well into their golden years. Unfortunately, the rates of STDs are dramatically increasing in older adults. In entertaining, accessible language, Dr. Dowler presents...

Sacred Engagements

Alison Conway
Bringing together feminist theory, novel criticism, and religious studies, Alison Conway's Sacred Engagements advances a postsecular reading of the novel that links religious tolerance and the eighteenth-century marriage plot. Conway explores the historical roots of the vexed questions that interfaith marriage continues to raise today. She argues that narrative wields the power to imagine conjugal and religious relations that support...

UnAustralian Art

Rex Butler, A. D. S. Donaldson
UnAustralian Art: Ten Essays on Transnational Art History proposes a radical rethinking of Australian art. Rex Butler and ADS Donaldson do not seek to identify a distinctive national sensibility; instead, they demonstrate that Australian art and artists have always been engaged in struggles and creative exchanges with the rest of the world. Examining Australian art as much from the outside in as the inside out, Butler and Donaldson's methodology opens...

Well Connected

Tessa Farmer
Who is responsible for ensuring access to clean potable water? In an urbanizing planet beset by climate change, cities are facing increasingly arid conditions and a precarious water future. In Well Connected, anthropologist Tessa Farmer details how one community in Cairo, Egypt, has worked collaboratively to adapt the many systems required to facilitate clean water in their homes and neighborhoods. As a community that was originally not included in Cairo's municipal systems, the...

Literacies in Language Education

Kate Paesani, Mandy Menke
A practical and innovative guide to emphasizing literacies development when teaching world languages Literacies in Language Education introduces multiliteracies pedagogy, which focuses on critical engagement with texts, intercultural understanding, and language proficiency development. Kate Paesani and Mandy Menke, seasoned workshop leaders and multiliteracies scholars, define what the approach is, its benefits, and how to create curricula...

Lowcountry at High Tide

Christina Rae Butler
The signs are there: our coastal cities are increasingly susceptible to flooding as the climate changes. Charleston, South Carolina, is no exception, and is one of the American cities most vulnerable to rising sea levels. Lowcountry at High Tide is the first book to deal with the topographic evolution of Charleston, its history of flooding from the seventeenth century to the present, and the efforts made to keep its...

The Mysterious Island

Jules Verne
First new unabridged translation since 1876 of one of Verne's best-known novels At a time when Verne is making a comeback in the US as a mainstream literary figure, Wesleyan is pleased to publish a new translation of one of his best-known novels, The Mysterious Island. Although several editions under the same title are in print, most reproduce a bowdlerized nineteenth-century translation which changes the names of the characters, omits several important scenes, and ideologically censors Verne's original text. The...

Even As We Breathe

Annette Saunooke Clapsaddle
Nineteen-year-old Cowney Sequoyah yearns to escape his hometown of Cherokee, North Carolina, in the heart of the Smoky Mountains. When a summer job at Asheville's luxurious Grove Park Inn and Resort brings him one step closer to escaping the hills that both cradle and suffocate him, he sees it as an opportunity. The experience introduces him to the beautiful and enigmatic Essie Stamper—a young Cherokee woman who is also working at the inn and dreaming of a better life. With World War II raging...

Harvard, Hollywood, Hitmen, and Holy Men

Paul W. Williams
The movie director Paul Williams is a real-life Forrest Gump. Williams' experiences form a unique and often wild constellation of encounters with star power, political power, and spiritual power—a life cycle that led to fame and fortune and to integrity and anonymity.     In a mad childhood created by an autocratic English teacher father and an infantilizing mother, he develops a precocious visual acuity to avoid wallops and a writing ability that mollified his father. This...

Metaphysical Disputation II

Francisco Suarez, edited by Shane Duarte
Francisco Suárez (1548-1617) was one of the most important philosophers and theologians of early modern Aristotelian scholasticism. Although Suárez spent most of his academic career as a professor of theology, he is better known today for his Metaphysical Disputations (Salamanca, 1597). The present volume contains a facing-page English translation of Metaphysical Disputation II, which is devoted to the nature of real being, the...

Reading Aristotle with Thomas Aquinas

Leo J. Elders, edited by Jörgen Vijgen
Reading Aristotle with Thomas Aquinas: His Commentaries on Aristotle's Major Works offers an original and decisive work for the understanding of the thought of Thomas Aquinas. For decades his commentaries on the major works of Aristotle have been the subject of lively discussions. Are his commentaries faithful and reliable expositions of the Stagirite's thought or do they contain Thomas's own philosophy and are they read...

Selected Works of Abbot Suger of Saint-Denis

Suger, translated by Richard C. Cusimano, Eric Whitmore
Translated with Introduction and Notes by Richard Cusimano and Eric Whitmore Suger, the twelfth century abbot of Saint-Denis, has not received the respect and attention that he deserves. Bernard of Clairvaux and Peter the Venerable have garnered more attention, and students of medieval history know their names well. In one respect, however, Suger has earned due praise, for his architectural innovations to the church of Saint-Denis made it...

The Christian Structure of Politics

William McCormick
The Christian Structure of Politics, the first full-length monograph on Thomas Aquinas's De Regno in decades, offers an authoritative interpretation of De Regno as a contribution to our understanding of Aquinas's politics, particularly on the relationship between Church and State. William McCormick argues that Aquinas takes up a via media between Augustine and Aristotle in De Regno, invoking human nature to ground politics as rational, but also Christian...

The Glorious Revolution and the Continuity of Law

Richard S. Kay
The Glorious Revolution and the Continuity of Law explores the relationship between law and revolution. Revolt - armed or not - is often viewed as the overthrow of legitimate rulers. Historical experience, however, shows that revolutions are frequently accompanied by the invocation rather than the repudiation of law. No example is clearer than that of the Glorious Revolution of 1688-89. At that time the unpopular but lawful Catholic king, James II, lost his throne and was replaced...

Intelligibility of Nature

William A. Wallace, edited by John P. Hittinger
The intelligibility of nature was a persistent theme of William A. Wallace, OP, one of the most prolific Catholic scholars of the late twentieth century. This Reader aims to make available a representative selection of his work in the history of science, natural philosophy, and theology illustrating his defense and development of this central theme. Wallace is among the most important Galileo scholars of the past fifty years and a key figure in...

The Spirit of God

Yves Congar, translated by Susan Mader Brown, Mark E. Ginter, Joseph G. Mueller, Catherine E. Clifford
Yves Congar was the most significant voice in Catholic pneumatology in the twentieth century. This new collection of short pieces makes his thought accessible to a broad range of readers – scholars, teachers, ecumenists and laity – and thus helps to ensure that an important theological voice, one that influenced many of the documents of the Second Vatican Council, continues to be heard. The Spirit...

Thomistic Existentialism and Cosmological Reasoning

John F. X. Knasas
Cosmological reasoning is an important facet of classical arguments for the existence of God, but these arguments have been subject to may criticisms. The thesis of this book is that Thomas Aquinas can dodge many of the classic objections brought against cosmological reasoning. These objections criticize cosmological reasoning for its use of the Principle of Sufficient Reason; its notion of existence as a predicate; its use of ontological reasoning; its reliance on sense...

Care and Covenant

Jason Weiner
A bioethic of obligations and responsibilities, based on the Jewish tradition The Jewish tradition has important perspectives, history, and wisdom that can contribute significantly to crucial contemporary healthcare deliberations. Care and Covenant: A Jewish Bioethic of Responsibility demonstrates how numerous classic Jewish texts can add new ideas to the world of medicine today. Rabbi Jason Weiner draws on fifteen years of experience working in a hospital as a practitioner to...

Emily Carr

Lisa Baldissera
Emily Carr (1871–1945) gained prominence when female painters were not recognized internationally. Her work reveals a fascination with questions inspired by the Canadian sea, landscapes, and people, reflecting a profound commitment to the land she knew and loved. Along with the Group of Seven, Carr became a leading figure in Canadian modern art. Although more than half a century has passed since her death, her paintings continue to challenge and inspire. Emily Carr: Life & Work traces Carr's trajectory from...

From Socialism to Capitalism

Janos Kornai
Eight essays connected by various common strands. The most important one is the community of the main subject-matter: socialism, capitalism, democracy, change of system. These four expressions cover four phenomena of great and comprehensive importance. Each piece in the book deals with these and the connections between them. One of the Leitmotifs is the "capitalism/socialism" pair of opposites. Capitalism has a history of several hundred years, while the socialist regime existed only for a...

Iljuwas Bill Reid

Gerald McMaster
Few twentieth-century artists were catalysts for the reclamation of a culture, but Iljuwas Bill Reid (1920–1998) was among them. The first book on Reid by an Indigenous scholar details his incredible journey to becoming one of the most significant Northwest Coast artists of our time. Born in British Columbia and denied his mother's Haida heritage in his youth, Iljuwas Bill Reid lived the reality of colonialism yet tenaciously forged a creative practice that celebrated Haida ways of seeing and...

Skid Road

Josephine Ensign
Affluent Seattle has one of the highest numbers of unhoused people in the United States. In 2021 an estimated 40,800 people experienced homelessness in Seattle and King County during the year, not counting the significant number of "hidden" homeless people doubled up with friends or living in and out of cheap hotels. In Skid Road Josephine Ensign uncovers the stories of overlooked and long-silenced people who have lived on the margins of society throughout Seattle's...

Ten Years After

edited by Iulius Rostas
The volume presents the results collated in the frames of the fact finding project led by the editor. The analysis includes the examination of a large number of legal documents and policy statements issued by national authorities and the international community on the matter. A critical overview is also made about the various Roma-specific political campaigns on national and European scale. The second half of the book contains interviews...

Toxic Exposure

Chadi Nabhan, MD, MBA
A behind-the-scenes look inside three key trials involving Monsanto's weed killer Roundup, cancer, and the search for justice—written by an expert witness medical oncologist who lived it all. For years, Monsanto declared that their product Roundup, the world's most widely used weed killer, was safe. But that all changed in 2015, when the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) analyzed data from scientific studies and concluded...

Traveler, Scholar, Political Adventurer

Franz Nopcsa, edited by Robert Elsie
The Austro-Hungarian aristocrat of Transylvanian origin, Baron Franz Nopcsa (1877-1933), was one of the most adventuresome travelers and scholars of Southeast Europe in the early decades of the twentieth century. He was also a paleontologist of renown and a noted geologist of the Balkan Peninsula : many of his assumptions have been confirmed by science. The Memoirs of...

Voices in the Shadows

Celia Hawkesworth
Women are conspicuously absent from traditional cultural histories of south-east Europe. This book addresses that imbalance by describing the contribution of women to literary culture in the Orthodox/ Ottoman areas of Serbia and Bosnia. The first complete literary history in relation to women's writing in south-east Europe. The author provides a broad chronological account of this contribution, dividing the book into two main parts; the earlier period up until the...

Icelight

Ranjit Hoskote
Set in an age of ecological catastrophe, Icelight eloquently accepts transience yet asserts the robustness of hope Icelight, Ranjit Hoskote's eighth collection of poems, enacts the experience of standing at the edge—of a life, a landscape, a world assuming new contours or going up in flames. Yet, the protagonists of these poems also stand at the edge of epiphany. In the title poem, we meet the Neolithic cave-dweller who, dazzled by a shapeshifting nature, crafts the first icon. The 'I' of these poems is not a sovereign 'I'. A...

In Springtime

Sarah Blake
Lost in the woods with a horse, a mouse, and the ghost of a dead bird, you will discover if you're meant to live In Sarah Blake's epic poem of survival, we follow a nameless main character lost in the woods. There, they discover the world anew, negotiating their place among the trees and the rain and the animals. Something brought them to the woods that nearly killed them, and they're not sure they want to live through this experience either. But the world surprises them again and again with beauty and intrigue. They come...

Open Society Unresolved

edited by Liviu Matei, Christof Royer
Is the concept of open society still relevant in the 21st century? Do the current social, moral, and political realities call for a drastic revision of this concept? Here fifteen essays address real-world contemporary challenges to open society from a variety of perspectives. What unites the individual authors and chapters is an interest in open society's continuing usefulness and relevance to address current problems. And what...

The Sanctity of the Leaders

edited by Gábor Klaniczay
The latest title in the Central European Medieval Texts series contains the lives of saints who were canonized in the eleventh through thirteenth centuries in the newly Christianized countries of Central and Eastern Europe (Bohemia, Poland, Hungary, and Dalmatia). A rejoinder to the earlier volume in the series, the Saints of the Christianization Age of Central Europe (CEMT, Vol. 6), containing hermits,...

Waiting for Wovoka

Gerald Vizenor
Native puppeteers from the White Earth Reservation travel to the 1962 World's Fair In the summer of 1962, a group of young Native American puppeteers travel in a converted school bus from the White Earth Reservation to the Century 21 Exposition, World's Fair in Seattle, Washington. The five Natives, three young men and two young women, have endured abandonment, abuse, poverty, and find solace, humor, and courage with a mute puppeteer—a Native woman in her seventies who writes...

Nothing Is Beyond Our Reach

Kristie Macrakis
An eye-opening account of the perils of America's techno-spy empire Ever since the earliest days of the Cold War, American intelligence agencies have launched spies in the sky, implanted spies in the ether, burrowed spies underground, sunk spies in the ocean, and even tried to control spies' minds by chemical means. But these weren't human spies. Instead, the United States expanded its reach around the globe through techno-spies. Nothing Is Beyond Our Reach investigates...

39 Berne Street

Max Lobe, translated by Johanna McCalmont
"My mother says that there are things in life that she can't forgive . . ." At age 16, Dipita's mother, Mbila, arrived in Switzerland from Cameroon. Trafficked into Europe, she supported herself and her son as a prostitute in Geneva. Dipita, now a young, black, gay man serving a five-year sentence in a Swiss prison, shares their story and his own search for purpose. He intertwines their stories with the life of Uncle Démoney, a former civil servant in Cameroon, who staked everything on...

Cherokee Earth Dwellers

Christopher B. Teuton, with Loretta Shade, Hastings Shade, with Larry Shade, illustrated by MaryBeth Timothy
Ayetli gadogv—to "stand in the middle"—is at the heart of a Cherokee perspective of the natural world. From this stance, Cherokee Earth Dwellers offers a rich understanding of nature grounded in Cherokee creature names, oral traditional stories, and reflections of knowledge holders. During his lifetime, elder Hastings Shade created booklets with over six hundred Cherokee...

Everything Is Sampled

Akinwumi Adesokan
Everything Is Sampled examines the shifting modes of production and circulation of African artistic forms since the 1980s, focusing on digital culture as the most currently decisive setting for these changes. Drawing on works of cinema, literature, music, and visual art, Akin Adesokan. addresses two main questions. First, given the various changes that the institutions producing African arts and letters have undergone in the past four decades,...

French B Movies

David A. Pettersen
In the impoverished outskirts of French cities, known as the banlieues, minority communities are turning to American culture, history, and theory to make their own voices, cultures, and histories visible. Filmmakers have followed suit, turning to Hollywood genre conventions to challenge notions of identity, belonging, and marginalization in mainstream French film. French B Movies proposes that French banlieue films, far from being a fringe genre,...

Richard McNemar

Christian Goodwillie
The first biography of a key and complex American religious figure of the nineteenth century, considered by many to be the "father of Shaker literature." Richard McNemar (1770–1839) led a remarkable life, replete with twists and turns that influenced American religions in many ways during the early nineteenth century. Beginning as a Presbyterian minister in the Midwest, he took his preaching and the practice of his congregation in a radically different, evangelical "free...

Spatial Dunhuang

Wu Hung
Constructed over a millennium from the fourth to fourteenth centuries CE near Dunhuang, an ancient border town along the Silk Road in northwest China, the Mogao Caves comprise the largest, most continuously created, and best-preserved treasure trove of Buddhist art in the world. Previous overviews of the art of Dunhuang have traced the caves' unilinear history. This book examines the caves from the perspective of space, treating them as physical and historical sites that can be approached,...

What Things Cost

edited by Rebecca Gayle Howell, Ashley M. Jones, Emily J. Jalloul
What Things Cost: an anthology for the people is the first major anthology of labor writing in nearly a century. Here, editors Rebecca Gayle Howell & Ashley M. Jones bring together more than one hundred contemporary writers singing out from the corners of the 99 Percent, each telling their own truth of today's economy. In his final days, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. called for a "multiracial coalition of the working poor." King hoped...

When We Collide

Rebecca J. Epstein-Levi
When We Collide is a landmark reassessment of the significance of sex in contemporary Jewish ethics. Rebecca Epstein-Levi offers a fresh and vital exploration of sexual ethics and virtue ethics in conversation with rabbinic texts and feminist and queer theory.   Epstein-Levi explores how sex is not a special or particular form of social interaction but one that is entangled with all other forms of social interaction. The activities of sex—doing it, talking about it,...

Railroads, Art, and American Life

J. Craig Thorpe
Explore the past, present, and future of rail travel through 30 years of one artist's work. Once a common part of the American landscape, trains are increasingly fading from public view. Though photographs can accurately convey the details of "what, where, and when," sometimes paintings can better convey the deeper truths of an era. Collecting more than thirty years of paintings and renderings, Railroads, Art, and American Life tells the story of rail transportation in...

On Imposture

Serge Margel, translated by Eva Yampolsky, OtherLes Editions Galilee
Imposture is an abuse of power. It is the act of lying for one's own benefit, of disguising the truth in order to mislead. For Jean-Jacques Rousseau, however, imposture is first and foremost power itself. In On Imposture, French philosopher Serge Margel explores imposture within Rousseau's Discourses, Confessions, and Emile. For Rousseau, taking power, using it, or abusing it are ultimately one and the...

A Life for Belarus

Stanislau Shushkevich
This memoir of the first president of an independent Belarus (1991-1994) tells about the revival of independent Belarus, the difficulties in establishing a democracy and a market economy, a hardened Soviet mentality, and the political immaturity of the intelligentsia and obduracy of the old nomenklatura. Stanislau Shushkevich, born in 1934, narrates his path from a son of an "enemy of the people" to a doctorate in physics, and then to be the first head of independent...

Multicultural Cities of the Habsburg Empire, 1880–1914

Catherine Horel
Catherine Horel has undertaken a comparative analysis of the societal, ethnic, and cultural diversity in the last decades of the Habsburg Monarchy as represented in twelve cities: Arad, Bratislava, Brno, Chernivtsi, Lviv, Oradea, Rijeka, Sarajevo, Subotica, Timioara, Trieste, and Zagreb. By purposely selecting these cities, the author aims to counter the disproportionate attention that the largest cities in the empire...

Brother Poem

Will Harris
A speculative-poetic work from the Forward Prize-winning, T.S. Eliot shortlisted author of RENDANG At the heart of Brother Poem is a sequence addressed to a fictional brother. Through these fragments, Will Harris attempts to reckon with the past while mourning what never existed. The text moves, cloud-like, through states of consciousness, beings and geographies, to create a moving portrait of contemporary anxieties around language and the need to communicate. With pronominal shifts, broken dialogisms, and obsessive...

Governing Divided Societies

Philip Howe, Thomas Lorman, Daniel Miller
The authors of this volume challenge conventional notions about Habsburg and Czechoslovak politics, arguing that they were more democratic than they often appear. At combining political science and history, the authors' guiding principle and means of analysis is the consociational model of democracy. This theory, linked best to Arend Lijphart, asserts that consociationalism guarantees minorities a...

Liberals, Conservatives, and Mavericks

edited by Frank Cibulka, Zachary T. Irwin
No Church is monolithic—this is the preliminary premise of this volume on the public place of religion in a representative number of post-communist countries. The studies confirm that within any religious organization we can expect to find fissures, factions, theological or ideological quarrels, and perhaps even competing interest groups, such as missionary workers,...

Sugarland

Artan R. Hoxha
In this historical monograph on non-urban communist Albania, Artan Hoxha discusses the ambitious development project that turned a swampland into a site of sugar production after 1945. The author seeks to free the history of Albanian communism from the stereotypes that still circulate about it with stigmas of an aberration, paranoia, extreme nationalism, and xenophobia. This micro-history of the agricultural and industrial transformation of a zone in southeastern...

An Anthology of Monsters

Cherie Dimaline
An Anthology of Monsters by Cherie Dimaline, award-winning author of The Marrow Thieves, is the tale of an intricate dance with life-long anxiety. It is about how the stories we tell ourselves can help reshape the ways in which we think, cope, and ultimately survive. Using examples from her books, from her mère, and from her own late night worry sessions, Dimaline choreographs a deeply personal narrative about all the ways in which we tell stories. She reveals how to...

Indie Rock

Joe Bishop
Indie Rock candidly focuses on a queer poet/musician's life in Newfoundland, and his personal struggles with addiction, OCD, and trauma. This intelligent and punchy collection is steeped in musicality and the geographies and cadences of Newfoundland. With an astute attention to form, rhythm, and aesthetics, Joe Bishop tells an honest and contemporary coming-of-age story about an artist alienated from, but fascinated by, the world he inhabits. Readers dealing with grief and living through recovery will find solace in these poems,...

Monitoring Station

Sonja Ruth Greckol
Sonja Ruth Greckol's Monitoring Station enters a slipstream of space and planetary language, circling time, embodying loss and longing, generating and regenerating in a faltering climate. Orbiting through a mother's death, a grandbaby's birth, and a pandemic summer, these poems loop and fragment in expansive and empathetic ways. The title poem locates a settler voice revisiting Treaties 6 and 7 and the Métis lands of her Alberta childhood, while the overall collection is tethered to Toronto shadowed by northland...

Half-Life of a Secret

Emily Strasser
In 1942, the US government began construction on a sixty-thousand-acre planned community named Oak Ridge in a rural area west of Knoxville, Tennessee. Unmarked on regional maps, Oak Ridge attracted more than seventy thousand people eager for high-paying wartime jobs. Among them was author Emily Strasser's grandfather George, a chemist. All employees—from scientists to secretaries, from military personnel to construction workers—were restricted by the tightest security. They were...

Brilliance in Exile

István Hargittai, Balazs Hargittai
By addressing the enigma of the exceptional success of Hungarian emigrant scientists and telling their life stories, Brilliance in Exile combines scholarly analysis with fascinating portrayals of uncommon personalities. István and Balazs Hargittai discuss the conditions that led to five different waves of emigration of scientists from the early twentieth century to the present. Although these exodes were driven...

Approaches to Teaching the Romance of the Rose

edited by Daisy Delogu, Anne-Hélène Miller
Essays on teaching love, ethics, and medieval allegory. One of the most influential texts of its time, the Romance of the Rose offers readers a window into the world view of the late Middle Ages in Europe, including notions of moral philosophy and courtly love. Yet the Rose also explores topics that remain relevant to readers today, such as gender, desire, and the power of speech. Students, however, can find the work challenging because of its dual...

Black Health in the South

edited by Steven S. Coughlin, Lovoria B. Williams, and Tabia Henry Akintobi
A collection of important essays on the health and well-being of African Americans in the southern United States. For African Americans in the southern United States, the social determinants of health are influenced by a unique history that encompasses hundreds of years of slavery, injustices during the Jim Crow era, the Great Migration, the civil rights era, and contemporary experiences like the Black Lives Matter movement. In Black Health in the...

Porcelain for the Emperor

Kai Jun Chen
The exquisite ceramic ware produced at the Imperial Porcelain Manufactory at Jingdezhen in southern China functioned as a kind of visual propaganda for the Qing dynasty (1644–1911) court. Porcelain for the Emperor charts the career of bannerman Tang Ying, a technocrat in the porcelain industry, through the first half of the eighteenth century to uncover the wider role of specialist officials in producing the technological knowledge and distinctive artistic forms...

Subversion

Andreas Krieg
A penetrating analysis of weaponized information—one of the most pressing dangers to open societies Now more than ever, communities across the world are integrated into a complex, global information ecosystem that shapes the nature of social, political, and economic life. The ripple effects of actors trying to manipulate or disrupt this information ecosystem are far more severe than the primary effects that are merely being felt in the information space. In fact, the weaponization...

Stomp and Shout

Peter Blecha
Long before the world discovered grunge, the Pacific Northwest was already home to a singular music culture. In the late 1950s, locals had codified a distinct offshoot of rockin' R&B, and many would skyrocket to success, including the Wailers, Ron Holden, Paul Revere & the Raiders, the Kingsmen, Merrilee Rush, and the Sonics. With entertaining accounts gleaned from hundreds of interviews, Peter Blecha tells the story of music in the region from the 1940s to the 1960s, a...

Myrlande Constant

edited by Katherine Smith, Jerry Philogene
Myrlande Constant: The Work of Radiance is the first museum retrospective of a contemporary Haitian female artist who has been creating groundbreaking work for thirty years. Constant's panels build on the drapo Vodou tradition, depicting the lwa as well as scenes of everyday life conducted in their company, unabashedly visualizing the permeable boundaries between spirits and humans. Few drapo artists have been as influential or ambitious as Constant. Her introduction...

Athens on the Frontier

Patrick Lee Lucas
In 1811, architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe spurred American builders into action when he called for them to reject "the corrupt Age of Dioclesian, or the still more absurd and debased taste of Louis the XIV," and to emulate instead the ancient temples of Greece. In response, people in the antebellum trans-Appalachian region embraced the clean lines, intricate details, and stately symmetry of the Grecian style. On newly built...

Imago

poems by Brian Swann
An exuberant collection of poems celebrating art, nature, and humanity. This various and vital poetry collection, in rich language and sharp detail, spans the rural and urban, country and town, and foreign and domestic. Tracing the vagaries of the self, these poems record and transmute biography from an English youth to the trials and challenges of aging in America. Memorable for its exuberant voice and exacting eye, Brian Swann's Imago is awake to the natural world as well as the world within. From the half-page title poem to...

On Nixon's Madness

Zachary Jonathan Jacobson
Was Richard Nixon actually a madman, or did he just play one? When Richard Nixon battled for the presidency in 1968, he did so with the knowledge that, should he win, he would face the looming question of how to extract the United States from its disastrous war in Vietnam. It was on a beach that summer that Nixon disclosed to his chief aide, H. R. Haldeman, one of his most notorious, risky gambits: the madman theory. In On Nixon's Madness, Zachary Jonathan Jacobson examines the...

Unsettling

Gilberto Rosas
Documents the cruel immigration policies and treatment toward border crossers on the US-Mexico border. On August 3, 2019, a far-right extremist committed a deadly mass shooting at a major shopping center in El Paso, Texas, a city on the border of the United States and Mexico. In Unsettling, Gilberto Rosas situates this devastating shooting as the latest unsettling consequence of our border crisis and currents of deeply rooted white nationalism...

Dance Works

Allison Orr, foreword by Liz Lerman
Ride along with choreographer Allison Orr and her civic collaborators as they reflect on their dances together In 2001, Allison Orr made a dance with 13 City of Austin firefighters. Over the next 20 years, her unique practice of collaborating with city employees flowered into civic storytelling through movement at public pools, tableaus of power line workers shimmying up 40' poles in front of 5000 people, and intricate choreography of trash trucks on a misty tarmac.

Disability Ethics and Preferential Justice

Mary Jo Iozzio
A primer on disability ethics from a Catholic perspective offers practical strategies for inclusion Persons with disability make up at least 15 percent of the global population, yet disability is widely unacknowledged and unexplored in theology. Moreover, many people join this minority community in their lifetimes through compromises to their health due to aging or accident. However, too few people without immediate experience of persons with disability remain...

Piety in Practice

Judit Majorossy
This study of religion in the everyday life of late medieval Pressburg (historical Posonium/Pozsony, present-day Bratislava) shows what bequests for the souls of the dead can tell about the religious thinking of fifteenth- and early sixteenth-century inhabitants, and how overlapping religious and secular communities were active in memorial activities. Due to its geographical position, Pressburg was always an important cultural...

Rowinataworu Luhchi Yoroni / Tunica Language Textbook

Kuhpani Yoyani Luhchi Yoroni / The Tunica Language Working Group, OtherRaina Heaton
The essential guide for learning the Tunica language. For many years, the Tunica-Biloxi Tribe of Louisiana collaborated with students and faculty at Tulane University on a project to revitalize the Tunica language. Tunica had not been spoken or used regularly in the community since the last known speaker, Sesostrie Youchigant, passed away in 1948. The center of the revitalization of the Tunica language...

Stone Breaker

Kathleen L. Housley
Percival probed the volcanic origins of rock via geology and the seething nature of his psyche via poetry Stone Breaker is an in-depth, accessible biography of a true American polymath, James Gates Percival. A poet, linguist, and unstable savant Percival was also a brilliant geologist who walked thousands of miles crisscrossing first Connecticut and then Wisconsin to lay the foundation for the work of generations of Earth scientists.

Get the Damn Story

Thomas W. Lippman
The captivating story of an influential journalist demonstrates the value of a free press to democratic society In the decades between the Great Depression and the advent of cable television, when daily newspapers set the conversational agenda in the United States, the best reporter in the business was a rumpled, hard-drinking figure named Homer Bigart. Despite two Pulitzers and a host of other prizes, he quickly faded from public view after retirement.

Indigenous DC

Elizabeth Rule
The first and fullest account of the suppressed history and continuing presence of Native Americans in Washington, DC Washington, DC, is Indian land, but Indigenous peoples are often left out of the national narrative of the United States and erased in the capital city. To redress this myth of invisibility, Indigenous DC shines a light upon the oft-overlooked contributions of tribal leaders and politicians, artists and activists to the rich history of the District of Columbia,...

Jesintel

Children of the Setting Sun Productions, edited by Darrell Hillaire, Natasha Frey, photographs by Fay "Beau" Garreau, Jr., with contributions by Lynda V. Mapes, Nicole Brown, afterword by Danita Washington
Dynamic and diverse, Coast Salish culture is bound together by shared values and relations that generate a resilient worldview. Jesintel—"to learn and grow together"—characterizes the spirit of this book, which brings the cultural teachings of nineteen elders to new generations. Featuring interviews...

Living Well with a Serious Illness

Robin Bennett Kanarek
A practical guide for understanding how palliative care can improve quality of life for patients and their caregivers. Robin Bennett Kanarek was a registered nurse working with patients suffering from chronic medical conditions when her ten-year-old son was diagnosed with leukemia. As her son endured grueling treatments, Robin realized how often medical professionals overlook critical psychological, emotional, and spiritual...

Sown in the Stars

Sarah L. Hall, photographs by Meg Wilson, foreword by Ronni Lundy
"To everything there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven: a time to be born, and a time to die; a time to plant, and a time to pluck up that which is planted."—Ecclesiastes 3:1–2 The Appalachian region is deeply rooted in customs that have been handed down for generations. "Planting by the signs," a practice predicated on the belief that moon phases and astrological signs exert a powerful influence on the growth and...

Underground Streams

edited by János M. Rainer
The authors of this edited volume address the hidden attraction that existed between the extremes of left and right, and of internationalism and nationalism under the decades of communist dictatorship in Eastern Europe. One might suppose that under the suppressive regimes based on leftist ideology and internationalism their right-wing opponents would have been defeated and ultimately removed. These essays, on the...

Who Speaks for You?

Leo Wise
The true story of how federal law enforcement flipped the playbook and convicted a corrupt unit of Baltimore police. In 2015 and 2016, Baltimore was reeling after the death of Freddie Gray in police custody and the protests that followed. In the midst of this unrest, a violent, highly trained, and heavily armed criminal gang roamed the city. They robbed people, sold drugs and guns, and divided the loot and profit among themselves. They...

In This World of Ultraviolet Light

Raul Palma
"These are new Cubans. Twenty-first-century Marielitos. Balseros, as the bartender had referred to them. I know, because my mom tells me that these are the kinds of Cubans I need to stay away from." In eight captivating stories, In This World of Ultraviolet Light—winner of the 2021 Don Belton Prize—navigates tensions between Cubans, Cuban Americans, and the larger Latinx community. Though these stories span many locations—from a mulch manufacturing facility on the edge of Big Cypress...

Lin's Uncommon Life

Scott Shackelford, Emily Castle, illustrated by Hannah Dickens
Elinor (Lin) Ostrom's life was an incredible journey. Being the first woman ever to win a Nobel Prize in Economics was an achievement of a lifetime. But it was just the culmination of a life spent struggling against the odds. Even while overcoming childhood hardships and a stutter and being denied opportunities because she was a woman, Lin never lost sight of the wonders around her and was always curious to learn more. Lin would teach generations of students the...

there's more

Uchechukwu Peter Umezurike
In there's more, Uchechukwu Peter Umezurike takes on the rich concepts of home and belonging: home lost and regained, home created with others and with the land, home as "anywhere we find something to love." Giving voice to the experiences of migrant and other marginalized citizens whose lives society tends to overlook, this collection challenges the oppressive systems that alienate us from one another and the land. Carefully built lyric meditations combine beauty and ugliness, engaging with violence, and...

Heaven on the Half Shell, second edition

David George Gordon, Samantha Larson, MaryAnn Barron Wagner, foreword by Kenneth K. Chew
Heaven on the Half Shell offers a thoroughly researched and richly illustrated history of the Pacific Northwest's beloved bivalve, the oyster. Starting with the earliest evidence of sea gardens and clam beds from 11,500 years ago, this book covers the history of oyster cultivation through contemporary aquaculture in coastal Washington, Oregon, British Columbia, northern California,...

Kentucky Bourbon Whiskey

Michael R. Veach
On May 4, 1964, Congress designated bourbon as a distinctive product of the United States, and it remains the only spirit produced in this country to enjoy such protection. Its history stretches back almost to the founding of the nation and includes many colorful characters, both well known and obscure, from the hatchet-wielding prohibitionist Carry Nation to George Garvin Brown, who in 1872 created Old Forester, the first bourbon to be sold only by the bottle. Although obscured by...

The Foxes of Belair

Jennifer S. Kelly
Calumet, Claiborne, King Ranch—these iconic names are among the owners and breeders revered by Thoroughbred industry professionals and racing fans around the world. As campaigners of many of the 20th century's top racehorses, their prestige has been confirmed by decades of competition in the Triple Crown, the most esteemed series in American Thoroughbred racing. Even with these substantial legacies, their success is measured against the benchmark set by one...

Understanding Michael S. Harper

Michael Antonucci
A fresh examination of Harper's body of work as an archive of Black life, thought, and culture The first book devoted to the groundbreaking poet's work, Understanding Michael S. Harper locates his poetic project within Black expressive tradition. The study examines poems drawn from the eleven volumes of verse that Harper (1938-2016) produced between 1970 and 2010, bringing attention to his poetry's sustained engagement with music, literature, and the visual arts. Michael A. Antonucci offers...

Bourbon 101

Albert W. A. Schmid
The rumors are true; there are more barrels of bourbon than there are people in Kentucky. In fact, statistics tell us there are nearly two barrels of aging bourbon for every Bluegrass State citizen. With a population of nearly 4.5 million and each barrel yielding close to 200 bottles, it's safe to say the average Kentuckian doesn't have to look far for a bottle of amber gold. While Kentucky may be known as bourbon's home base, for bourbon lovers everywhere, the act of drinking bourbon is about more than just its...

Humanism, Empire, and Nation, critical edition

edited by Travis Workman, translated by Travis Workman
Essays featuring twentieth-century Korean thought on literature and culture. Faced with dramatic social and political changes, Korean writers of the twentieth century—writing in the context of Japanese imperialism, World War II, the Korean War, and the Cold War era—explored many pressing questions about modern life: What is the relationship between literature and society? How can intellectual concepts be used politically,...

Hyumŏnijŭm, cheguk, minjok, critical edition

edited by Travis Workman
Essays featuring twentieth-century Korean thought on literature and culture. Faced with dramatic social and political changes, Korean writers of the twentieth century—writing in the context of Japanese imperialism, World War II, the Korean War, and the Cold War era—explored many pressing questions about modern life: What is the relationship between literature and society? How can intellectual concepts be used politically, for good or ill? What are the...

Sir Barton and the Making of the Triple Crown

Jennifer S. Kelly
He was always destined to be a champion. Royally bred, with English and American classic winners in his pedigree, Sir Barton shone from birth, dubbed the "king of them all." But after a winless two-year-old season and a near-fatal illness, uncertainty clouded the start of Sir Barton's three-year-old season. Then his surprise victory in America's signature race, the Kentucky Derby, started him on the road to history, where he would go on to dominate the Preakness and the Belmont...

Lost Texts in Rhetoric and Composition

edited by Deborah H. Holdstein
Rediscovered texts for teaching composition and rhetoric. A project of recovery and reanimation, Lost Texts in Rhetoric and Composition foregrounds a broad range of publications that deserve renewed attention. Contributors to this volume reclaim these lost texts to reenvision the rhetorical tradition itself. Authors discussed include not only twentieth-century American compositionists but also a linguist, a poet, a philosopher, a painter, a Renaissance rhetorician, and a...

Commander of the River

Ubah Cristina Ali Farah, translated by Hope Campbell Gustafson
From an early age, Yabar listened to Aunt Rosa's story of the commander of the river. Somali legend tells of how two wise men were entrusted with creating a river, because their country had none and had no drinking water. But when crocodiles found their way into the water, the people elected a commander of the river to control the beasts and allow access to the water. To know Good, you must live with necessary Evil. After his father abandoned him, Yabar sets out...

Schooling the Movement

edited by Derrick P. Alridge, Jon N. Hale, Tondra L. Loder-Jackson
A fresh examination of teacher activism during the civil rights movements Drawing on oral history interviews and archival research, Schooling the Movement examines the pedagogical activism and vital contributions of Black teachers throughout the Black freedom struggle. By illuminating teachers' activism during the long civil rights movement, the editors and...

The NCAA and the Exploitation of College Profit-Athletes

Richard M. Southall, Mark S. Nagel, Ellen J. Staurowsky, Richard T. Karcher, Joel G. Maxcy
A well-constructed and reasoned debunking of the mythology of amateurism in for-profit NCAA athletics The NCAA and the Exploitation of College Profit-Athletes is a comprehensive historical, sociological, legal, financial, and managerial argument for the reclassification of profit-athletes as employees. The authors cut through the institutional doublespeak of approved...

Liturgy of Change

Elizabeth Ellis Miller
Original archival research invites new ways of understanding the rhetorics of the civil rights movement In Liturgy of Change, Elizabeth Ellis Miller examines civil rights mass meetings as a transformative rhetorical, and religious, experience. Scholars of rhetoric have analyzed components of the civil rights movement, including sit ins, marches, and voter registration campaigns, as well as meeting speeches delivered by well-known figures. The mass meeting itself...

Skilletheads

Ashley L. Jones
May 2023 - Red Lightning Books
Part science and part personal preference, collecting and restoring cast-iron cookware is a complex art. For instance, what makes each company's cast iron unique? Do chemicals used during restoration leech into food? When it comes to surface finish, is textured or smooth better? In Skilletheads, the highly anticipated follow-up to Modern Cast Iron, Ashley L. Jones dives deeper than ever into the world of cast iron. In these pages, which feature over 100...

Leaving Other People Alone

Aaron Kreuter
Leaving Other People Alone reads contemporary North American Jewish fiction about Israel/Palestine through an anti-Zionist, diasporic lens. Aaron Kreuter argues that since Jewish diasporic fiction played a major role in establishing the centroperipheral relationship between Israel and the diaspora, it therefore also has the potential to challenge, trouble, and ultimately rework this relationship. Kreuter suggests that any fictional work...

Light and Legacies

Janaka Bowman Lewis
An engaging examination of Black Girl Magic and its significance in American literature In Light and Legacies, author Janaka Lewis examines Black girlhood in American literature from the mid-twentieth century to the present. The representation of Black girlhood in contemporary literature has long remained underexplored. Through this literary history of "Black Girl Magic," Lewis offers one of the first studies in this rapidly growing field of study. Light and Legacies...

Black Creole Chronicles

Mona Lisa Saloy
Who are Black Creoles? Saloy's new poems address ancestral connections to contemporary life, traditions celebrated, New Orleans Black life today, Louisiana Black life today, enduring and surviving hurricanes, romance, #BlackLivesMatter, #wematter, as well as poems of the pandemic lockdown from New Orleans. Saloy's new collection of verse advances and updates narratives of Black life to now, including day-to-day Black speech, the lives of culture keepers, and family tales. These poems detail cultural and...

Seeking a Research-Ethics Covenant in the Social Sciences

Will C. van den Hoonaard
In Seeking a Research-Ethics Covenant in the Social Sciences, Will C. van den Hoonaard chronicles the negative influence that medical research-ethics frameworks have had on social science research-ethics policies. He argues that the root causes of the current ethics disorder in the social sciences are the aggressive audit culture in universities and the privilege accorded to medical research ethics, which overrides ethical issues in all other disciplines.

The Jon Boat Years

Jim Mize, foreword by Jim Casada, illustrated by Bob White
Delightful tales of hunting and fishing, family, friends, dogs, and precious time well spent. Nationally recognized and award-winning writer Jim Mize captures the true essence of sport and living life to the fullest in this collection of stories about his outdoor escapades. In tales spanning more than five decades, Mize invites readers into carefree days hiking through the Colorado Rockies...

Jessica Lange

Anthony Uzarowski
Brilliant, beautiful, driven, uncompromising, elusive, iconic—Jessica Lange is one of the most gifted and fascinating actors of her generation. From her rise to fame in Dino De Laurentiis's remake of King Kong (1976) and her Oscar-winning performances in Tootsie (1982) and Blue Sky (1994); to her Emmy-winning work in Grey Gardens (2009) and the American Horror Story series; and her Tony Award–winning turn in Eugene O'Neill's Long Day's Journey into Night (2016), Lange has had a long and...

Dissonant Landscapes

Tore Storvøld
Listening to the dissonances of nature and nationhood in modern Iceland During the past three decades, Iceland has attained a strong presence in the world through its musical culture, with images of the nation being packaged and shipped out in melodies, harmonies, and rhythms. What 'Iceland' means for people, both at home and abroad, is conditioned by music and its ability to animate notions of nature and nationality. In six chapters that range from discussions of...

Gay Poems for Red States

Willie Carver, Willie Edward Taylor Carver, Jr.
No one will protect you. Months after being named the 2022 Kentucky Teacher of the Year, Willie Edward Taylor Carver Jr. announced his decision to leave the public school system. His career as a high school English teacher had spanned more than a decade but ended abruptly—another casualty of the cruel and dangerous anti-LGBTQ+ discrimination that is creeping back into the halls of government and the homes of Americans. At the beginning of Carver's career, an administrator...

From Chinese Cosmology to English Romanticism

Yu Liu
A culturally sensitive and rewarding new understanding of the cross-cultural interaction between China and Europe In this important new work author Yu Liu argues that, confined by a narrow English and European conceptual framework, scholars have so far obscured the radical innovation and revolutionary implication of Samuel Taylor Coleridge and William Wordsworth's monistic philosophy. Liu's innovative intellectual history traces the organic...

The Rhetoric of Outrage

Jeff Rice
An accessible and important look at what is truly behind our digital outrage On any given day, at any given hour, across the various platforms constituting what we call social media, someone is angry. Facebook. Instagram. Twitter. Reddit. 4Chan. In The Rhetoric of Outrage: Why Social Media is Making Us Angry Jeff Rice addresses the critical question of why anger has become the dominant digital response on social media. He examines the theoretical and rhetorical explanations for...

Inside Comedy

David Steinberg
David Steinberg's name has been synonymous with comedy for decades. The Canadian-born comedian, producer, writer, director, and author has been called "a comic institution himself" by the New York Times. He appeared on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson 140 times (second only to Bob Hope), and directed episodes of popular television sitcoms, including Curb Your Enthusiasm, Seinfeld, Friends, Mad About You, The Golden Girls, and Designing...

How to Clean a Fish

Esmeralda Cabral
"Perhaps it is saudade that pulls me back to visit my other country as often as possible. When the opportunity arose for our family to live in Costa da Caparica for an extended period, it took only minutes to decide. We were going." How To Clean a Fish is an inviting family travel story about an extended stay in Portugal, full of food and cooking adventures, language barriers and bureaucracy, and that irresistible need to connect with the culture of our birth. After immigrating...

Tar Hollow Trans

Stacy Jane Grover
"I've lived a completely ordinary life, so much that I don't know how to write a transgender or queer or Appalachian story, because I don't feel like I've lived one. ... Though, in searching for ways to write myself in my stories, maybe I can find power in this ordinariness." Raised in southeast Ohio, Stacy Jane Grover would not describe her upbringing as "Appalachian." Appalachia existed farther afield—more rural, more country than the landscape of her hometown. Grover returned to the places of her...

Inside the World of Climate Change Skeptics

Kristin Haltinner, Dilshani Sarathchandra
As wildfires rip across the western United States and sea levels rise along coastal cities from Louisiana to Alaska, some people nevertheless reject the mainstream scientific consensus on anthropogenic climate change. What leads people to doubt or outright denial? What leads skeptics to change their minds? Drawing from a rich collection of interviews and surveys with self-identified climate change skeptics (and some former ones), sociologists Kristin...

Adams and Calhoun

William F. Hartford
Examines the evolving lives of two men who were crucial political figures in the consequential decades prior to the Civil War Although neither of them lived to see the Civil War, John Quincy Adams and John C. Calhoun did as much any two political figures of the era to shape the intersectional tensions that produced the conflict. William F. Hartford examines the lives of Adams and Calhoun as a prism through which to view the developing sectional conflict. While...

The COVID Journals

edited by Shane Neilson, Sarah Fraser, Arundhati Dhara
This diverse collection is the first book in which a broad range of Canadian health care workers from across the country recount their experiences of the COVID-19 pandemic. Some pieces reflect on the strange pertinence of today's headlines with those of the past; others use humour, art, and the power of narrative to offer a glimpse of how disorienting it is when to help is to put oneself at risk, when care itself is redefined from moment to...

From Barbycu to Barbecue

Joseph R. Haynes
An award-winning barbecue cook boldly asserts that barbecuing is a unique American tradition that was not imported. The origin story of barbecue is a popular topic with a ravenous audience, but commonly held understandings of barbecue are often plagued by half-truths and misconceptions. From Barbycu to Barbecue offers a fresh new look at the story of southern barbecuing. Award winning barbecue cook Joseph R. Haynes sets out to correct one of the most common...

"Our Country First, Then Greenville"

Courtney L. Tollison Hartness
Places Greenville's experience during World War I within the context of the progressive era to better understand the rise of this New South city Greenville, South Carolina has become an attractive destination, frequently included in lists of the "Best Small Cities" in America. While Greenville's twenty-first-century Renaissance has been impressive, in "Our Country First, Then Greenville," Courtney L. Tollison...

Come My Children

Hekmat Al-Taweel, edited by Ghada Ageel, Barbara Bill
Hekmat Al-Taweel (1922-2008) was a native Palestinian Christian from Gaza City whose narrative provides an unfamiliar perspective on Muslim–Christian relationships in Gaza, highlighting shared history, culture, customs, and traditions. In relating her life story, continuing education after marriage, volunteer work, activism, and aspirations, she invites readers to understand her experiences in a way that contradicts widespread Western orientalized stereotypes of Arab women. She...

Fierce Elegy

Peter Gizzi
Peter Gizzi's powerful new collection reminds us that the elegy is lament but also—as it has been for centuries—a work of love Peter Gizzi has said that "the elegy is a mode that can transform a broken heart in a fierce world into a fierce heart in a broken world." For Gizzi, ferocity can be reimagined as vulnerability, bravery and discovery, a braiding of emotional and otherworldly depth, "a holding open." In Gizzi's voice joy and sorrow make a complex ecosystem. In their quest for a lyric reality, these poems remind us...

Charleston Horse Power

Christina Rae Butler
Discover the fascinating history and legact of working equines in Charleston, South Carolina. Featuring thorough research, absorbing storytelling, and captivating photographs, Charleston Horse Power takes readers back to an equine-dominated city of the past, in which horses and mules pervaded all aspects of urban life. Author, scholar, and preservationist Christina Rae Butler describes carriage types and equines roles (both privately owned animals and those in the...

Sukun

Kazim Ali
New and selected poems from celebrated poet Kazim Ali Kazim Ali is a poet, novelist, and essayist whose work explores themes of identity, migration, and the intersections of cultural and spiritual traditions. His poetry is known for its lyrical and expressive language, as well as its exploration of themes such as love, loss, and the search for meaning in a rapidly changing world. "Sukun" means serenity or calm, and a sukun is also a form of punctuation in Arabic orthography that denotes a pause over a consonant.

The Words and Wares of David Drake

edited by Jill Beute Koverman, Jane Przybysz
A celebration of the remarkable poem vessels of Dave the Potter David Drake, also known as Dave the Potter, was born enslaved in Edgefield, South Carolina, at the turn of the nineteenth century. Despite laws prohibiting enslaved people from learning to read or write, Drake was literate and signed some of his pots, not only with his name and a date, but with verse—making a powerful statement of...

Connecticut Walk Book, twenty-first edition

Connecticut Forest and Park Association
The ultimate guide to Connecticut's extensive public trails system Lace up your boots and experience some of the best hiking in New England. Whether you are a day-tripper or long-distance hiker, old hand or novice, you'll find trails suited to every ability and interest. The Connecticut Forest and Park Association (CFPA) maintains over 825 miles of Blue-Blazed Trails in Connecticut, trails that wind through state parks and...

Queer Arrangements

Lisa Barg
Queer Arrangements is a new study of Billy Strayhorn that examines his music and career at the intersection of jazz and Black queer history The legacy of Black queer composer, arranger and pianist Billy Strayhorn (1915–1967) hovers at the edge of canonical jazz narratives. Queer Arrangements explores the ways in which Strayhorn's identity as an openly gay Black jazz musician shaped his career, including the creative roles he could assume and the dynamics between...

The Ruins of Nostalgia

Donna Stonecipher
New work from one of the most compelling and transformative writers of the contemporary prose poem What is it to feel nostalgia, to be skeptical of it yet cleave intently to the complex truths of feeling and thought? In a series of 64 gorgeous, ramifying, unsettling prose poems addressing late-twentieth- and twenty-first century experience and its discontents, The Ruins of Nostalgia offers a strikingly original exploration of the misunderstood phenomenon of nostalgia as both feeling-state and historical...