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MLA Handbook, eighth edition

The Modern Language Association of America
The Modern Language Association, the authority on research and writing, takes a fresh look at documenting sources in the eighth edition of the MLA Handbook. Works are published today in a dizzying range of formats. A book, for example, may be read in print, online, or as an e-book—or perhaps listened to in an audio version. On the Web, modes of publication are regularly invented, combined, and modified. Previous editions of the MLA Handbook provided separate instructions for each format, and...

Japan Supernatural

Melanie Eastburn
From the pioneering work of eighteenth-century painter Toriyama Sekien to contemporary superstar Takashi Murakami, Japan Supernatural presents wildly imaginative works by Japanese artists past and present and takes readers on a journey of discovery through the astonishing array of yōkai culture and yūrei (ghosts)—phenomenal beings from fiendish goblins to mischievous shapeshifters—that have inhabited Japanese culture for centuries. Once a means of explaining the...

The Poems of Renata Ferreira

Frank X. Gaspar
Jan 2020 - Tagus Press
Renata Ferreira's poems were composed in the final years of Portugal's fascist regime, exposing and subverting the government's draconian edicts against women's rights, sexual freedoms, political dissent, and progressive thought. While she worked in the resistance as a clandestine writer, passing hand-typed bulletins and banned literature throughout Lisbon, her poetry is unmistakably ardent, tender, fraught, erotic, and Sapphic. Presenting the poems of this PortugueseAmerican writer and detailing their...

Body and Earth

Andrea Olsen
"Body is our first environment," writes Andrea Olsen. "It is the medium through which we know the earth." In a remarkable integration of environmental science, biology, meditation, and creative expression, Olsen, a dancer who teaches in the environmental studies program at Middlebury College, offers a guide to a holistic understanding of person and place. Part workbook, part exploration, Body and Earth considers the question of how we can best, most responsibly inhabit both our bodies and our planet.

BodyStories

Andrea Olsen
BodyStories is a book that engages the general reader as well as the serious student of anatomy. Thirty-one days of learning sessions heighten awareness about each bone and body system and provide self-guided studies. The book draws on Ms. Olsen's thirty years as a dancer and teacher of anatomy to show how our attitudes and approaches to our body affect us day to day. Amusing and insightful personal stories enliven the text and provide ways of working with the body for efficiency and for...

Eulogy for Burying a Crane and the Art of Chinese Calligraphy

Lei Xue
Eulogy for Burying a Crane (Yi he ming) is perhaps the most eccentric piece in China's calligraphic canon. Apparently marking the burial of a crane, the large inscription, datable to 514 CE, was once carved into a cliff on Jiaoshan Island in the Yangzi River. Since the discovery of its ruins in the early eleventh century, it has fascinated generations of scholars and calligraphers and been enshrined as a calligraphic masterpiece. Nonetheless, skeptics have questioned...

Where Dragon Veins Meet

Stephen H. Whiteman
In 1702, the second emperor of the Qing dynasty ordered construction of a new summer palace in Rehe (now Chengde, Hebei) to support his annual tours north among the court's Inner Mongolian allies. The Mountain Estate to Escape the Heat (Bishu Shanzhuang) was strategically located at the node of mountain "veins" through which the Qing empire's geomantic energy was said to flow. At this site, from late spring through early autumn, the Kangxi emperor presided...

Troubling Borders

Isabelle Thuy Pelaud
Juxtaposing short stories, poetry, painting, and photographs, Troubling Borders showcases the creative work of women of Vietnamese, Cambodian, Lao, Thai, and Filipino ancestry. This thematically arranged collection interrupts borders of categorization and gender, in what preface author Shirley Geok-Lin Lim describes as a "leap over the barbed fences that have kept these women apart in these, our United States of America." The...

The Torture Doctors

Steven H. Miles, MD
Torture doctors administer and invent techniques to inflict pain and suffering without leaving scars. Their knowledge of the body and its breaking points and their credible authority over death certificates and medical records make them powerful and elusive perpetrators of the crime of torture. In The Torture Doctors, Steven H. Miles fearlessly explores who these physicians are, what they do, how they escape justice, and what can be done to hold them accountable. At...

Chinese Funerary Biographies

Patricia Buckley Ebrey
Tens of thousands of epitaphs, or funerary biographies, survive from imperial China. Engraved on stone and placed in a grave, they typically focus on the deceased's biography and exemplary words and deeds, expressing the survivors' longing for the dead. These epitaphs provide glimpses of the lives of women, men who did not leave a mark politically, and children—people who are not well documented in more conventional sources such as dynastic histories and local...

Mezzaluna

Michele Leggott
Enchanting and sustaining poems by the first Poet Laureate of New Zealand Mezzaluna gathers work from Michele Leggott's nine books of poetry. As reviewer David Eggleton writes: "Leggott shows us that the ordinary is full of marvels which . . . stitched, flow together into sequences and episodes that in turn form an ongoing serial, or bricolage: a single poem, then, rejecting exactness, literalism, naturalism in favor of resonance, currents, patterns of ebb and flow." In complex lyrics, sampling thought and...

The Caregiver's Encyclopedia

Muriel R. Gillick, MD
Caregivers hold the key to the health, well-being, and happiness of their aging relatives, partners, or friends. The Caregiver's Encyclopedia provides you with all of the information you need to take the best care of your loved one—from making major medical decisions to making sure you don't burn out. Written by Muriel R. Gillick, MD, a geriatrician with more than 30 years' experience caring for older people, this book highlights the importance of...

Learning Innovation and the Future of Higher Education

Joshua Kim and Edward Maloney
A quiet revolution is sweeping across US colleges and universities as schools rethink how students learn both inside and outside the classroom. Technology is changing not only what should be taught but how best to teach it. From active learning and inclusive pedagogy to online and hybrid courses, traditional institutions are leveraging their fundamental strengths while challenging long-standing assumptions about how teaching and learning happen. At this...

The New Student Activists

Jerusha O. Conner
Activism is once again back on college campuses as students protest issues such as sexual assault, climate change, racial injustice, and student debt. It's perhaps unsurprising that the current political moment has triggered the rise of a new breed of student activist—uncompromising, focused, and connected. But many pundits have variously derided student activists as either "snowflakes," too fragile to encounter opinions that run contrary to their own, or as...

Murder on the Ohio Belle

Stuart W. Sanders
In March 1856, a dead body washed onto the shore of the Mississippi River. Nothing out of the ordinary. In those days, people fished corpses from the river with alarming frequency. But this body, with its arms and legs tied to a chair, struck an especially eerie chord. The body belonged to a man who had been a passenger on the luxurious steamboat known as the Ohio Belle, and he was the son of a southern planter. Who had bound and pitched this wealthy man into the river? Why? As reports of the killing...

Religion and Resistance in Appalachia

Joseph D. Witt
In the last fifty years, the Appalachian Mountains have suffered permanent and profound change due to the expansion of surface coal mining. The irrevocable devastation caused by this practice has forced local citizens to redefine their identities, their connections to global economic forces, their pasts, and their futures. Religion is a key factor in the fierce debate over mountaintop removal; some argue that it violates a...

Creole Feast

Nathaniel Burton, Rudy Lombard, foreword by Leah Chase
Before there were celebrity gourmands, Creole Feast brought together the stories and knowledge of New Orleans top chefs. These masters of modern Creole cuisine share the recipes, tips, and tricks from the kitchens of New Orleans' most famous restaurants, including Dooky Chase, Commander's Palace, Broussard's, and Galatoire's. Today, Creole Feast still stands as the most comprehensive collection of Creole recipes assembled...

Slavery and the Post-Black Imagination

Bertram D. Ashe
From Kara Walker's hellscape antebellum silhouettes to Paul Beatty's bizarre twist on slavery in The Sellout and from Colson Whitehead's literal Underground Railroad to Jordan Peele's body-snatching Get Out, this volume offers commentary on contemporary artistic works that present, like musical deep cuts, some challenging "alternate takes" on American slavery. These artists deliberately confront and negotiate the psychic and representational legacies of slavery to imagine possibilities and...

Sámi Media and Indigenous Agency in the Arctic North

Coppélie Cocq
Digital media–GIFs, films, TED Talks, tweets, and more–have become integral to daily life and, unsurprisingly, to Indigenous people's strategies for addressing the historical and ongoing effects of colonization. In Sámi Media and Indigenous Agency in the Arctic North, Thomas DuBois and Coppélie Cocq examine how Sámi people of Norway, Finland, and Sweden use media to advance a social, cultural, and political agenda anchored in notions of cultural continuity and...

Brave New Digital Classroom, Third Edition

Robert J. Blake
Robert Blake, now with Gabriel Guillén, updates his successful book (1st ed. 2008, 2nd ed. 2013) on how to teach foreign languages using technology. Brave New Digital Classroom touches on all of the key concepts and challenges of teaching with technology, focusing on issues specific to FLL or L2 learning and CALL. Originally referred to as computer-assisted language learning, CALL has come to encompass any kind of learning that uses digital tools for language...

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya Part Two, Third Edition

Kristen Brustad
Kristen Brustad is associate professor of Arabic at the University of Texas at Austin. Mahmoud Al-Batal is professor of Arabic at the American University of Beirut. Abbas Al-Tonsi is senior lecturer at Georgetown University School of Foreign Service in Qatar.

Understanding William S. Burroughs

Gerald Alva Miller, Jr.
Through critical readings Gerald Alva Miller, Jr., examines the life of William S. Burroughs and the evolution of his various radical styles not just in writing but also in audio, film, and painting. Although Burroughs remains tied to the Beat Generation, his works prove more revolutionary. Miller argues that Burroughs, more than any other author, ushered in the era of both postmodern fiction and poststructural philosophy. Through this study Miller situates Burroughs within the larger...

Understanding Marilynne Robinson

Alexander John Engebretson
Alex Engebretson offers the first comprehensive study of Marilynne Robinson's fiction and essays to date, providing an overview of the author's life, themes, and literary and religious influences. Understanding Marilynne Robinson examines this author of three highly acclaimed novels and recipient of the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction, the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, the Orange Prize for fiction, and the National Humanities Medal. Through close readings of the novels and...

An Insider's Guide to University Administration

Daniel Grassian
Most new college and university administrators, especially if they come directly from the faculty ranks or from outside academia, receive little if any training. Rather, they try to succeed mostly by stumbling through the (semi-)dark with a combination of their own knowledge and experience as well as on-the-job learning. This can lead to costly (for the administrator and the institution) mistakes as well as professional failures and campus-wide miseries. In An Insider's Guide to...

Our Germans

Brian E. Crim
Project Paperclip brought hundreds of German scientists and engineers, including aerospace engineer Wernher von Braun, to the United States in the first decade after World War II. More than the freighters full of equipment or the documents recovered from caves and hastily abandoned warehouses, the German brains who designed and built the V-2 rocket and other "wonder weapons" for the Third Reich proved invaluable to America's emerging military-industrial complex. Whether...

Understanding Karen Tei Yamashita

Jolie A. Sheffer
Among the most trenchant and provocative writers of globalization, Karen Tei Yamashita is one of the most significant, ambitious, and widely taught Asian American writers today. In four genre-bending novels, a short story collection/travel essay collage, a family memoir, and more than a dozen performance/theater works, Yamashita weaves together postmodernism, magical realism, history, social protest, and a wicked sense of humor. Her fictions challenge familiar literary tropes, especially...

China Gothic

Anthony E. Clark
As China struggled to redefine itself at the turn of the twentieth century, nationalism, religion, and material culture intertwined in revealing ways. This phenomenon is evident in the twin biographies of North China's leading Catholic bishop of the time, Alphonse Favier (1837–1905), and the Beitang cathedral, epicenter of the Roman Catholic mission in China through incarnations that began in 1701. After its relocation and reconstruction under Favier's supervision, the...

Gorbachev and Bush

Svetlana Savranskya
This book is the paperback edition of the second half of the cloth bound volume The Last Superpower Summits: Gorbachev, Reagan, and Bush Conversations that Ended the Cold War, CEU Press, 2016. It presents and interprets archival records of the meetings between Mikhail Gorbachev and George W. Bush between 1989 and 1991, including transcripts of conversations between top leaders on the rapid and monumental events of the final days of the...

Gorbachev and Reagan

Svetlana Savranskya
This book is the paperback edition of the first half of the cloth bound volume The Last Superpower Summits: Gorbachev, Reagan, and Bush Conversations that Ended the Cold War, CEU Press, 2016. It presents and interprets archival records of the meetings between Mikhail Gorbachev and George W. Bush between 1989 and 1991, including transcripts of conversations between top leaders on the rapid and monumental events of the final days of the...

Avala Is Falling

Biljana Jovanovic
In Avala Is Falling, Jovanović's breakout success in 1978, a young woman challenges the expectations that teachers, parents, bus drivers and doctors have for her. The "Avala" of the title refers to a mountain south of Belgrade which is home to some of Serbia's most important nationalist monuments and shrines; it is also the site of the main mental hospital for the region, and its "falling" is the unexpected fulfillment of a prophecy from a traditional Serbian folk song. Jovanović's use of stream of consciousness in...

North American Women Poets in the 21st Century

Lisa Sewell
Women poets writing at the intersections of different schools of poetics North American Women Poets in the 21st Century: Beyond Lyric and Language is an important new addition to the American Poets in the 21st Century series. Like the earlier anthologies, this volume includes generous selections of poetry by some of the best poets of our time as well as illuminating poetics statements and incisive essays on their work. Among the insightful pieces included...

Literacy in the Mountains

Samantha NeCamp
After the 2016 presidential election, popular media branded Appalachia as "Trump Country," decrying its inhabitants as ignorant fearmongers voting against their own interests. And since the 1880s, there have been many, including travel writers and absentee landowners, who have framed mountain people as uneducated and hostile. These stereotypes ultimately ward off potential investments in the region's educational system and skew how students understand...

Thoughts on War

Phillip S. Meilinger
War is changing. Unlike when modern military doctrine was forged, the United States no longer mobilizes massive land forces for direct political gain. Instead, the US fights small, overseas wars by global mandate to overthrow dictators, destroy terrorist groups, and broker regional peace. These conflicts hardly resemble the total wars fought and expected by foundational military theorists such as Carl von Clausewitz, yet their paradigms are ingrained in modern thinking. The twenty-first-century's new geopolitical...

John Henry Newman on Truth and Its Counterfeits

Reinhard Hütter
Reinhard Hütter's main thesis in this third volume of the Sacra Doctrina series is that John Henry Newman, in his own context of the nineteenth century, a century far from being a foreign one to our own, faced the same challenges as we do today; the problems then and now differ in degree, not in kind. Hence, Newman's engagement with these problems offers us a prescient and indeed prophetic diagnosis of what these problems or errors, if not corrected, will...

Fifth Chinese Daughter

Jade Snow Wong
Jade Snow Wong's autobiography portrays her coming-of-age in San Francisco's Chinatown, offering a rich depiction of her immigrant family and her strict upbringing, as well as her rebellion against family and societal expectations for a Chinese woman. Originally published in 1950, Fifth Chinese Daughter was one of the most widely read works by an Asian American author in the twentieth century. The US State Department even sent its charismatic young author on a four-month speaking tour throughout Asia. Cited...

Making the Modern Slum

Sheetal Chhabria
In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Bombay was beset by crises such as famine and plague. Yet, rather than halting the flow of capital, these crises served to secure it. In colonial Bombay, capitalists and governors, Indian and British alike, used moments of crisis to justify interventions that delimited the city as a distinct object and progressively excluded laborers and migrants from it. Town planners, financiers, and property developers joined...

Collecting the Globe

George H. Schwartz
The East India Marine Society Museum was one of the most influential collecting institutions in nineteenth-century America. From 1799 to 1867, when Salem, Massachusetts, was a premier American port and launching pad for international trade, the museum's collection developed at a nexus of global exchange, with donations of artwork, crafts, and flora and fauna pouring in from distant ports of call. At a time when the country was filled with Barnum-esque exhibitions,...

The Snow Leopard and the Goat

Shafqat Hussain, hD
Following the downgrading of the snow leopard's status from "endangered" to "vulnerable" by the International Union for Conservation of Nature in 2017, debate has renewed about the actual number of snow leopards in the wild and the most effective strategies for coexisting with these enigmatic animals. Evidence from Pakistan and other countries in the snow leopard's home range shows that they rely heavily on human society—domestic livestock accounts...

The Organic Profit

Andrew N. Case
Where did the curious idea of buying one's way to sustainability come from? In no small part, the answer lies in the story of entrepreneurial health reformer J. I. Rodale, his son Robert Rodale, and their company, the Rodale Press. These early advocates of organic gardening cultivated a niche for natural health products in the 1950s, organized the emerging marketplace for organic foods in the 1960s, and in the process published an endless supply of advice books...

Return to the Land of the Head Hunters

Brad Evans
Photographer Edward Curtis's 1914 orchestrally scored melodrama In the Land of the Head Hunters was one of the first US films to feature an Indigenous cast. This landmark of early silent cinema was an intercultural product of Curtis's collaboration with the Kwakwk'wakw of British Columbia—meant, like Curtis's photographs, to document a supposedly vanishing race. But as this collection shows, the epic film is not simply...

Blood in the Fields

Matthew Philipp Whelan
On March 24, 1980, a sniper shot and killed Archbishop scar Romero as he celebrated mass. Today, nearly four decades after his death, the world continues to wrestle with the meaning of his witness. Blood in the Fields: scar Romero, Catholic Social Teaching, and Land Reform treats Romero's role in one of the central conflicts that seized El Salvador during his time as archbishop and that plunged the country into civil war immediately after his...

The Rise of Populist Nationalism

Margit Feischmidt
The authors of this book approach the emergence and endurance of the populist nationalism in post-socialist Eastern Europe, with special emphasis on Hungary. They attempt to understand the reasons behind public discourses that increasingly reframe politics in terms of nationhood and nationalism. Overall, the volume attempts to explain how the new nationalism is rooted in recent political, economic and social processes. The contributors...

Protected Children, Regulated Mothers

Eszter Varsa
Protected Children, Regulated Mothers examines child protection in Stalinist Hungary as part of 20th century (East Central, Eastern, and Southeastern) European history. Across the communist bloc, the increase of residential homes was preferred to the prewar system of foster care. The study challenges the transformation of state care into a tool of totalitarian power. Rather than political repression, educators...

Life should be Transparent

Aurimas Svedas
This book of thirteen conversations introduces us to the life of an exceptional person—theatre critic, Germanist, and long-time chair of the Open Lithuania Fund board Irena Veisaitė. The dialogue between Lithuanian historian Aurimas Švedas and a woman who reflects deeply on her experiences reveals both one individual's historically dramatic life and the fate of Europe and Lithuania in the twentieth century. Through the...

Integrating the Digital Humanities into the Second Language Classroom

Melinda A. Cro
Second language classrooms provide unique opportunities for intellectual growth, cognitive skill development, and cultural exchange. In Integrating the Digital Humanities into the Second Language Classroom, Melinda A. Cro makes the case for bringing the digital humanities (DH) into that sphere, strengthening students' language skills while furthering their critical thinking and research abilities. Written as a practical guide for...

Changing the Game

Jim Host
Many Kentuckians and fans of intercollegiate athletics are familiar with the name Jim Host. As founder and CEO of Host Communications, he was the pioneer in college sports marketing. Host's prevailing innovation in collegiate sports was the concept of bundled licensing, which encouraged corporate partners to become official sponsors of athletic programs across media formats. Host and his team developed the NCAA Radio Network and introduced what became known as the NCAA's...

Making Bourbon

Karl Raitz
While other industries chase after the new and improved, bourbon makers celebrate traditions that hearken back to an authentic frontier craft. Distillers enshrine local history in their branding and time-tested recipes, and rightfully so. Kentucky's unique geography shaped the whiskeys its settlers produced, and for more than two centuries, distilling bourbon fundamentally altered every aspect of Kentucky's landscape and culture. Making Bourbon: A...

A Wolf by the Ears

Wayne Karlin
We have the wolf by the ears, and we can neither hold him, nor safely let him go. —Thomas Jefferson During the War of 1812, thousands of enslaved people from plantations across the Tidewater rallied to the British side, turning against an American republic that had barred them from the promises of freedom and democracy. Set against the backdrop of rebellion and war, Wayne Karlin's A Wolf by the Ears follows the interconnected stories of Towerhill and Sarai, two African slaves, and their master, Jacob Hallam. Educated...

Trad Nation

Tes Slominski
A provocative call to dislodge ethnic nationalism from Irish traditional music Just how "Irish" is traditional Irish music? Trad Nation combines ethnography, oral history, and archival research to challenge the longstanding practice of using ethnic nationalism as a framework for understanding vernacular music traditions. Tes Slominski argues that ethnic nationalism hinders this music's development today in an increasingly multiethnic Ireland and in the transnational...

Empowerment Skills for Leaders, 3rd ed.

Claire Forest, PhD
Guides leaders in transforming their agencies into empowerment-based organizations. Provides leaders with core concepts their workers learn in FDC classes.

Frogfishes

Theodore W. Pietsch and Rachel J. Arnold
Unique among the world's fishes, frogfishes display a bizarre combination of attributes and behaviors that make them a subject of fervent study. Through cunning and trickery, they turn would-be predators into prey; they "walk" across the ocean floor and jet-propel through open water; some lay their eggs in a floating mucoid mass, while others employ complex patterns of parental care; and they are certainly among the most colorful of nature's...

Marvelous Microfossils

Patrick De Wever
foreword by Hubert Reeves
translated by Alison Duncan
Microfossils—the most abundant, ancient, and easily accessible of Earth's fossils—are also the most important. Their ubiquity is such that every person on the planet touches or uses them every single day, and yet few of us even realize they exist. Despite being the sole witnesses of 3 billion years of evolutionary history, these diminutive fungi, plants, and animals are themselves invisible to the eye. In this...

If Adam Had Not Sinned

Justus H. Hunter
Since the twelfth century, theologians have found a counterfactual question irresistible: "If Adam had not sinned, would the Son have become incarnate?" In the latter half of the twentieth century, Hans Urs von Balthasar, Hans Küng, Gerhard Ludwig Müller, Karl Rahner, Karl Barth, Wolfhart Pannenburg, Jürgen Moltmann, and Robert Jenson all considered this question on the reason, or motive, for the incarnation. Nearly every case refers to the classic...

The World of Jak Smyrl

Joan A. Inabinet
"I was just a poor artist. I couldn't afford a 'C.'" This quip by Jak Smyrl, born Oscar Jackson Smyrl, Jr., in Camden, South Carolina, captures all the charm, humility, and humor of a one-of-a-kind character, beloved cartoonist, artist, and journalist who uniquely rendered his era and place with his pen, brushes, and words. In this long-overdue biography ranging from his humble beginnings to being honored by the South Carolina General Assembly "for his...

Understanding Susan Sontag

Carl Rollyson
With the publication of Susan Sontag's diaries, the development of her career can now be evaluated in a more genetic sense, so that the origins of her ideas and plans for publication are made plain in the context of her role as a public intellectual, who is increasingly aware of her impact on her culture. In Understanding Susan Sontag, Carl Rollyson not only provides an introduction to her essays, novels, plays, films, diaries, and uncollected work published in various periodicals, he now has a lens...

Stardust Media

Christina Pugh
Christina Pugh's fifth book of poems explores the technologies both ancient and new that inhabit our contemporary cultural moment. Mapping an uncanny journey through the clusters of media we encounter daily but seldom stop to contemplate, Pugh's focused descriptions, contrasting linguistic textures, and acute poetic music become multifarious sources of beauty, disruption, humor, and hurt. Here, Netflix and YouTube share space with eighteenth-century paintings, Italian graffiti, ballet, Kurt Cobain's recordings, and even...

Being Unfolded

Thomas Gricoski
Being Unfolded responds to the question, 'What is the meaning of being for Edith Stein.' In Finite and Eternal Being Stein tentatively concludes that 'being is the unfolding of meaning.' Neither Stein nor her commentators have elaborated much on this suggestive phrase. Thomas Gricoski argues that Stein's mature metaphysical project can be developed into an 'ontology of unfolding.' The differentiating factor of this ontology is its resistance to both existentialism and essentialism.

Paradise Lost

Michael Cavanagh
A record of a teacher's lifelong love affair with the beauty, wit, and profundity of Paradise Lost, celebrating John Milton's un-doctrinal, complex, and therefore deeply satisfying perception of the human condition. After surveying Milton's recurrent struggle as a reconciler of conflicting ideals, this Primer undertakes a book-by-book reading of Paradise Lost, reviewing key features of Milton's "various style," and why we treasure that style. Cavanagh constantly revisits Milton the singer and maker, and the...

Teaching Languages in Blended Synchronous Learning Classrooms

Alba Girons
Blended synchronous learning (BSL), where some students are present in a physical classroom while others participate online in real time, has been gaining momentum and shows great potential for teaching less commonly taught languages (LCTLs). In Teaching Languages in Blended Synchronous Learning Classrooms, Alba Girons and Nicholas Swinehart provide a concise overview of BSL as it pertains to language instruction. Topics include a number of key...

Appalachia in Regional Context

Dwight B. Billings
In an increasingly globalized world, place matters more than ever. This concept especially holds true in Appalachian studies—a field that brings scholars, activists, artists, and citizens together around the region to contest misappropriations of resources and power and to combat stereotypes of isolation and intolerance. In Appalachia in Regional Context: Place Matters, Dwight B. Billings and Ann E. Kingsolver assemble scholars and artists from a variety of disciplines to broaden...

This Grand and Magnificent Place

Christopher Johnson
This is the complex story of New Hampshire’s White Mountains, from the range’s days as the majestic homeland of the Abenaki, first seen by English colonists four centuries ago, to its unassailable standing today as one of America’s most beloved national forests, comprising 112,000 acres of protected wilderness. Christopher Johnson, an avid hiker intimately familiar with the White Mountains, achieves two important objectives in This Grand and...

Understanding Truman Capote

Thomas Fahy
Truman Capote—along with his most famous works In Cold Blood and Breakfast at Tiffany's—continues to have a powerful hold over the American popular imagination. His glamorous lifestyle, which included hobnobbing with the rich and famous and frequenting the most elite nightclubs in Manhattan, makes him the subject of ongoing interest for public and academic audiences alike. In Understanding Truman Capote, Thomas Fahy provides a new direction for Capote studies that offers a way to reconsider the author's...

Intelligence in the National Security Enterprise

Roger Z. George
This textbook introduces students to the critical role of the US intelligence community within the wider national security decision-making and political process. Intelligence in the National Security Enterprise defines what intelligence is and what intelligence agencies do, but the emphasis is on showing how intelligence serves the policymaker. Roger Z. George draws on his thirty-year CIA career and more than a decade of teaching at both the undergraduate and...

On tourne!

Véronique Anover
On tourne! is a one-semester, advanced French textbook (5th/6th semester of instruction) designed to be used as a stand-alone text for a course on French and francophone films or for a French conversation course. This textbook could also be used as a supplementary text in an advanced conversation course, a composition course, or a contemporary culture course. On tourne! guides students to analyze and discuss 13 films from France and the francophone world. Each chapter focuses on a...

Ancient Ink

Lars Krutak
The human desire to adorn the body is universal and timeless. While specific forms of body decoration and the motivations for them vary by region, culture, and era, all human societies have engaged in practices designed to augment and enhance people's natural appearance. Tattooing, the process of inserting pigment into the skin to create permanent designs and patterns, is one of the most widespread forms of body art and was practiced by ancient cultures throughout the world, with tattoos appearing...

French Guiana

Patrick Chamoiseau
A top francophone writer explores postcolonial amnesia in a long-overdue translation from Matt Reeck Hailed by Milan Kundera as "an heir of Joyce and Kafka," Prix Goncourt winner Patrick Chamoiseau is among the leading Francophone writers today. With most of his novels having appeared in English, this book opens a new window on his oeuvre. A moving poetic essay that bears witness to the forgotten history of the French penal colony in French Guiana, French Guiana—Memory Traces of...

The Trailhead

Kerri Webster
Song of the Husbands for Henry All winter the kind husbands hover like mortgaged angels. One smells gasoline in his sleep, would be my lover. They want me to be well. Specimen, they say, and mean endearment. I row into the flood. The vodka turns the lemon to crystal, the carp turn the pond to shit and hunger, the lingerie turns the trunkful of lingerie into a special trunk. And the husbands, the husbands If asked they will install a water feature. I tend my minor art, I push my sorrow cart, the women sing to...

Sacred Mountains

Andrew R. H. Thompson
On a misty morning in eastern Kentucky, cross-bearing Christians gather for a service on a surface-mined mountain. They pray for the health and renewal of the land and for their communities, lamenting the corporate greed of the mining companies. On another day, in southern West Virginia, Andrew Jordon hosts Bible study in a small cabin overlooking a disused 1,400-acre surface mine. He believes his efforts to reclaim sites like these represent responsible...

Jewish Cuisine in Hungary

Andras Koerner
Winner of the 2019 National Jewish Book Award in the category of Food Writing & Cookbooks András Koerner refuses to accept that the vanished world of preShoah Hungarian Jewry and its cuisine should disappear virtually without a trace and feels compelled to reconstruct its culinary culture. His book presents eating habits not as isolated things, divorced from their social and religious contexts, but as organic parts of one's way of life. In the...

The Arthurdale Community School

Sam F. Stack, Jr.
The first of many homestead communities designed during the rollout of the New Deal, Arthurdale, West Virginia, was a bold experiment in progressive social planning. At the center of the settlement was the school, which was established to improve the curriculum offered to Appalachian students. Offering displaced and unemployed coal miners and their families new opportunities, the school also helped those in need to develop a sense of dignity during...

The Story of Sidonie C

Ines Rieder
Now finally available in English, this biography of Margarethe Csonka-Trautenegg (1900–1999) offers a fully-rounded picture of a willful and psychologically complex aesthete. As Freud's never-before-identified "case of female homosexuality", her analysis continues to spark often heated psychoanalytic debate. Margarethe's ("Sidonie's") experiences spanned the twentieth century. Jewish by birth, she fled upper-class life in Vienna for Cuba to escape the Nazis, only to...

The Casual Presence of Borders

Mackie JV Blanton
Borders exist in and are occupied by space and time ritualized by seen and unseen, known and unknown, human struggles. Mackie Blanton's The Casual Presence of Borders captures borders present around denizens or friends gathered at bars or over coffee, over new births, over silence and meals; at nearby places of worship or warfare or death; or unvisited planets or islands of our knowledge or imagination; or the sensed presence of the cells and arteries of the human body; and human beings noticed in easy...

Prophets, Publicists, and Parasites

Adam Gordon
Print culture expanded significantly in the nineteenth century due to new print technologies and more efficient distribution methods, providing literary critics, who were alternately celebrated and reviled, with an ever-increasing number of venues to publish their work. Adam Gordon embraces the multiplicity of critique in the period from 1830 to 1860 by exploring the critical forms that emerged. Prophets, Publicists, and Parasites is...

The Count of Abranhos

Robert M Fedorchek
José Maria Eça de Queirós (1845-1900) was a Portuguese author in the realist style, whose work has been translated into 20 languages. The Count of Abranhos was published posthumously, and this is the first time it has been translated into English. Alípio Severo Abranhos, born to poor parents in a small town in the north of Portugal, goes off to spend his boyhood and adolescence with an aunt whose material well-being constitutes, for him, the lap of luxury. And he likes and becomes accustomed to luxury. As he...

Transforming US Intelligence for Irregular War

Richard H. Shultz, Jr.
When Joint Special Operations Command deployed Task Force 714 to Iraq in 2003, it faced an adversary unlike any it had previously encountered: al-Qaeda in Iraq (AQI). AQI's organization into multiple, independent networks and its application of Information Age technologies allowed it to wage war across a vast landscape. To meet this unique threat, TF 714 developed the intelligence capacity to operate inside those networks, and in the words of...

Writing Appalachia

Katherine Ledford
Despite the stereotypes and misconceptions surrounding Appalachia, the region has nurtured and inspired some of the nation's finest writers. Featuring dozens of authors born into or adopted by the region over the past two centuries, Writing Appalachia showcases for the first time the nuances and contradictions that place Appalachia at the heart of American history. This comprehensive anthology covers an exceedingly diverse range of subjects, genres, and time periods, beginning with early Native...

Understanding John Updike

Frederic Svoboda
The winner of every major American literary prize, John Updike (1932-2009) was one of the most popular and prolific novelists of his time and a major cultural figure who traced the high point and fall of midcentury American self-confidence and energy. A superb stylist with sixty books to his credit, he brilliantly rendered the physical surfaces of the nation's life even as he revealed the intense longings beneath those surfaces. In Understanding John Updike, Frederic Svoboda elucidates the author's deep...

Discerning Persons

Pia Matthews
Drawing on rich insights from the early Church Fathers, Discerning Persons addresses the neglected issue of disablism and how discriminatory attitudes fail to treat people with profound disabilities as persons. This discrimination can be found in the field of bioethics, where the stakes are often high and a matter of life or death. Whereas views that give priority to human beings whatever their capacities are seen as...

A Just Peace Ethic Primer

Eli S. McCarthy
The just peace movement offers a critical shift in focus and imagination. Recognizing that all life is sacred and seeking peace through violence is unsustainable, the just peace approach turns our attention to rehumanization, participatory processes, nonviolent resistance, restorative justice, reconciliation, racial justice, and creative strategies of active nonviolence to build sustainable peace, transform conflict, and end cycles of violence.

A New and Concise History of Rock and R&B through the Early 1990s

Eric Charry
Rock and R&B history told with original charts, tables, and timelines A New and Concise History provides a strong foundation for understanding how music, the music industry, and American culture intersect. Ethnomusicologist Eric Charry's innovative and road-tested teaching style is brought to you in this textbook suitable for general education courses in music. The book is organized around a series of timelines, tables, and figures created by the author, and...

Paris Spleen

Charles Baudelaire
Between 1855 and his death in 1867, Charles Baudelaire inaugurated a new—and in his own words "dangerous"—hybrid form in a series of prose poems known as Paris Spleen. Important and provocative, these fifty poems take the reader on a tour of 1850s Paris, through gleaming cafes and filthy side streets, revealing a metropolis on the eve of great change. In its deliberate fragmentation and merging of the lyrical with the sardonic, Le Spleen de Paris may be regarded as one of the earliest and most...

Why They Can't Write

John Warner
There seems to be widespread agreement that—when it comes to the writing skills of college students—we are in the midst of a crisis. In Why They Can't Write, John Warner, who taught writing at the college level for two decades, argues that the problem isn't caused by a lack of rigor, or smartphones, or some generational character defect. Instead, he asserts, we're teaching writing wrong. Warner blames this on decades of educational reform rooted in...

The Greek Genocide in American Naval War Diaries

Savvas "Sam" Koktzoglou
This book is a gripping collection of American naval war diaries recently found in the National Archives about what was happening on the northern coast of Turkey in 1921-1922. At the time, a series of American destroyers were continuously stationed at the port of Samsun, and the destroyer captains describe here many of the atrocities then being perpetrated upon the...

Times of Mobility

Jasmina Lukić
In an era of increased mobility and globalisation, a fast growing body of writing originates from authors who live in-between languages and cultures. In response to this challenge, transnational perspective offers a new approach to the growing body of cultural texts with an emphasis on experiences of migration, transculturation, bilingualism and (cultural) translation. The introductory analysis and the fifteen essays in this collection critically interrogate...

Labor in State Socialist Europe, 1945-1989

Marsha Siefert
Labor regimes under communism in East-Central Europe were complex, shifting and ambiguous. This collection of sixteen essays offers new conceptual and empirical ways to understand their history from the end of the Second World War to 1989, challenging accepted notions of East European "transitions" and "transformations." The authors reconsider the history of state socialism by reexamining the policies and problems of communist regimes and...

The Age of Phillis

Honorée Fanonne Jeffers
Poems imagine the life and times of Phillis Wheatley In 1773, a young, African American woman named Phillis Wheatley published a book of poetry that challenged Western prejudices about African and female intellectual capabilities. Based on fifteen years of archival research, The Age of Phillis, by award-winning writer Honorée Fanonne Jeffers, imagines the life and times of Wheatley: her childhood in the Gambia, West Africa, her life with her white American owners, her friendship with Obour Tanner, and her...

Hartford Seen

Pablo Delano
An unprecedented photographic exploration of the Connecticut capital's past, present, and future Hartford Seen is the first modern-day art photography book to focus on Connecticut's capital. Comprising more than 150 full-color images, it has been in the making for two decades. In this personal meditation on the city's built environment, he implements a methodical but intuitive approach, using color and meticulous compositions to evoke the city's essence, particularly the way global population flows impact the city's...

The Memory Eaters

Elizabeth Kadetsky
On autopsy, the brain of an Alzheimer's patient can weigh as little as 30 percent of a healthy brain. The tissue grows porous. It is a sieve through which the past slips. As her mother loses her grasp on their shared history, Elizabeth Kadetsky sifts through boxes of the snapshots, newspaper clippings, pamphlets, and notebooks that remain, hoping to uncover the memories that her mother is actively losing as her dementia progresses. These remnants offer the false yet beguiling suggestion that the past is easy to...

Northern Money, Southern Land

Chlotilde R. Martin
In the early 1930s Chlotilde R. Martin of Beaufort, South Carolina, wrote a series of articles for the Charleston News and Courier documenting the social and economic transformation of the lowcountry coast as an influx of wealthy northerners began buying scores of old local plantations. Her articles combined the name-dropping chatter of the lowcountry social register with reflections on the tension between past and present in the old...

Arabic Sociolinguistics, Second Edition

Reem Bassiouney
In this second edition of Arabic Sociolinguistics, Reem Bassiouney expands the discussion of major theoretical approaches since the publication of the book's first edition to account for new sociolinguistic theories in Arabic contexts with up-to-date examples, data, and approaches. The second edition features revised sections on diglossia, code-switching, gender discourse, language variation, and language policy in the region while adding a chapter on...

Continuum

Gaylord Torrence
This landmark publication brings Indigenous art to the fore with the presentation of 280 objects from the Nelson-Atkins Museum's rich collection. More than two-thirds of the volume's featured masterworks—paintings, sculptures, drawings, regalia, ceramics, textiles, and baskets—have never before appeared in publication. Created by both known and unknown makers, these singular and profound aesthetic achievements represent the traditions of communities across the...

Wars and Betweenness

Aliaksandr Piahanau
This book illuminates a set of crisis and conflicts that marked the 1920s and 1930s in the area between the Baltic and the Black Seas, demonstrating the diplomatic, military, economic or cultural engagement of France, Germany, Russia, Britain, Italy and Japan in this highly volatile region, and critically damaging the fragile post-Versailles political arrangement. By connoting the region as "Middle Europe," the editors revive the symbolic geography of the time and...

The Rise of Comparative History

Balazs Trencsenyi
This book—the first of a three-volume overview of comparative and transnational historiography in Europe—focuses on the complex engagement of various comparative methodological approaches with different transnational and supranational frameworks. It considers scales from universal history to meso-regional (i.e. Balkans, Central Europe, etc.) perspectives. In the form of a reader, it displays 18 historical studies written between 1900 and 1943. The collection starts with the French and German...

A Century of Populist Demagogues

Ivan T. Berend
The renowned historian Ivan Berend discusses populist demagoguery through the presentation of 18 politicians from 12 European countries from World War I to the present. In this book, Berend defines demagoguery, reflects on its connections with populism, and examines the common features and differences in the demagogues' programs and language. Mussolini and Hitler, the "model demagogues," are only briefly discussed, as is the election of Donald Trump in the...

Juanita and the Frog Prince

Ed McClanahan
A miscreant, misanthrope, and misfit, two-nosed Luther Jukes lands in jail for murdering a man who insulted his froglike facial features. As Luther schemes in his cell, "hoosegow scullery maid" Juanita Sparks frets over an unwanted pregnancy. But there may be a bit of magic that can sort out this mess. In the style of underground comix, Ed McClanahan and J. T. Dockery present Juanita and the Frog Prince, an outrageous tale adapted from McClanahan's novella of the same name, originally...

Grieving for Guava

Cecilia M. Fernandez
Castro's communist regime gained control of Cuba in 1959, sparking a surge of immigration to the United States, particularly Miami, as refugees sought a better life. But for many, Cuba will always be home. The island's stories pass from refugee to refugee, immigrant to grandchild, mingling hope for the future with grief for what's lost. Yet these stories also pass down a deep, unconscious desire for the unattainable, which often results in fractured relationships and a loss of purpose for both young...

Marriage on the Border

Allison Dorothy Fredette
Not quite the Cotton Kingdom or the free labor North, the nineteenth-century border South was a land in between. Here, the era's clashing values—slavery and freedom, city and country, industry and agriculture—met and melded. In factories and plantations along the Ohio River, a unique regional identity emerged: one rooted in kinship, tolerance, and compromise. Border families articulated these hybrid values in both the...

The Cancer Crisis in Appalachia

Nathan L. Vanderford
Kentucky has more cancer diagnoses and cancer-related deaths than any other state in the nation, and most of these cases are concentrated in the fifty-four counties that constitute the Appalachian region of the commonwealth. These high rankings can be attributed to factors such as elevated smoking rates, unhealthy eating habits, lower levels of education, and limited access to health care. What is lost in the statistics is just how life-changing cancer can...

That Place Where You Opened Your Hands

Susan Leslie Moore
Celebrating the tension between what we imagine and what we know the world to be, Susan Leslie Moore's debut collection moves between certainty and doubt, dead seriousness and determined playfulness. Exploring identity and the exterior and interior selves we create through the natural world, language, and relationships, the poems of That Place Where You Opened Your Hands bring the ordinary rhythms of life and motherhood into coexistence with wilder truths. As Moore writes, "If I can't...

Senseless Women

Sarah Harris Wallman
Exploring the darker side of optimism, Sarah Harris Wallman's debut collection shows women attempting to build durable havens from reality, struggling to keep relationships intact, and reinventing themselves. A lonely music teacher at a Nashville Christian academy awaits the miracle of love; a Jane Doe recalls the affair that sustained, and ended, her; a new mother brings life into the world during a bleak election party; young girls are exploited by a nightclub owner in death, as in life. Alone or in weird...

Smiling in the Darkness

Adelaide Freitas
Mar 2020 - Tagus Press
Many people of Portuguese descent take pride in claiming that the word "saudade" is untranslatable. In reality, we come close with a melding of bittersweet nostalgia, bone-deep longing, and an endless yearning for what one can never have again—or indeed may never have had. Adelaide Freitas dipped her pen in saudade to tell of family separation and bonds that never loosen. In her authentic Azorean voice, she recounts the immigrant experience and centrifugal impulses that force people apart in spite of their...

Moving Bodies, Navigating Conflict

Ahalya Satkunaratnam
A performance-ethnographic examination of dance and civil war in Sri Lanka Moving Bodies, Navigating Conflict is a groundbreaking ethnographic examination of dance practice in Colombo, Sri Lanka, during the civil war (1983–2009). It is the first book of scholarship on bharata natyam (a classical dance originating in India) in Sri Lanka, and the first on the role of this dance in the country's war. Focusing on women dancers, Ahalya...

Frog Hollow

Susan Campbell
A trip through the heart and history of Hartford's most vibrant neighborhood Frog Hollow: Stories from an American Neighborhood is a collection of colorful historical vignette. Frog Hollow is an ethnically diverse neighborhood just west of the Connecticut State Capitol in Hartford. Its row houses have been home to inventors, entrepreneurs and workers, and it was one of the first neighborhoods in the country to experiment with successful urban planning models, including public parks...

Conflict and Negotiation in the Early Church

Bronwen Neil
Recent decades have seen great progress made in scholarship towards understanding the major civic role played by bishops of the eastern and western churches of Late Antiquity. Brownen Neil and Pauline Allen explore and evaluate one aspect of this civic role, the negotiation of religious conflict. Conflict and Negotiation in the Early Church focuses on the period 500 to 700 CE, one of the least documented...

George Washington's Final Battle

Robert P. Watson
Despite America's newly won independence, a bitter dispute over whether to have a capital and where to locate it almost tore the young nation apart. Few have written about the key role George Washington played in settling this question. George Washington's Final Battle recounts Washington's exceptional political skill and involvement in the placement of America's capital, moving it from New York to Philadelphia to the city that...

Bridging the Theory-Practice Divide in International Relations

Daniel Maliniak
There is a widening divide between the data, tools, and knowledge that international relations scholars produce and what policy practitioners find relevant for their work. In this first-of-its-kind conversation, leading academics and practitioners reflect on the nature and size of the theory-practice divide. They find the gap varies by issue area and over time. The essays in this volume use data gathered by the Teaching, Research, and International Policy...

Wanting Radiance

Karen Salyer McElmurray
Miracelle Loving's world comes crashing down when her mother, Ruby, is murdered during a fortune-telling session gone wrong. Not that she had much of a stable world to lose in the first place; the free-spirited mother-daughter duo had never remained in one place for very long. Without the guidance of her mother, Miracelle grows up following the only path she knows, traveling from town to town, sometimes fortune-telling, picking up odd jobs to fill the time and escape the ever-present lostness she can't...

Mary Elizabeth Garrett

Kathleen Waters Sander
with a new foreword by Senator Barbara A. Mikulski
Mary Elizabeth Garrett was one of the most influential philanthropists and women activists of the Gilded Age. With Mary's legacy all but forgotten, Kathleen Waters Sander recounts in impressive detail the life and times of this remarkable woman, through the turbulent years of the Civil War to the early twentieth century. At once a captivating biography of Garrett and an epic account of the rise of...

The Experiment of Faith

Matthew J. Ramage
Pope Benedict XVI memorably remarked that the Christian faith is a lot like a Gothic cathedral with its stained-glass windows. From the outside, the Church can appear dark, dreary, and worn with age—the crumbling relic of an institution that no longer speaks to men and women living in our modern world. Indeed, for many people today, Christian morality with all of its commandments appears to be a source not of life and joy but instead of...

Exporting Jim Crow

Chinua Thelwell
Following the pathways of imperial commerce, blackface minstrel troupes began to cross the globe in the mid-nineteenth century, popularizing American racial ideologies as they traveled from Britain to its colonies in the Pacific, Asia, and Oceania, finally landing in South Africa during the 1860s and 1870s. The first popular culture export of the United States, minstrel shows frequently portrayed black characters as noncitizens who were unfit for democratic...

The Opioid Fix

Barbara Andraka-Christou
America's addiction crisis is growing worse. More than 115 Americans die daily from opioid overdoses, with half a million deaths expected in the next decade. Time and again, scientific studies show that medications like Suboxone and methadone are the most reliable and effective treatment, yet more than 60 percent of US addiction treatment centers fail to provide access to them. In The Opioid Fix, Barbara Andraka-Christou highlights both...

Reading Job with St. Thomas Aquinas

Matthew Levering
Reading Job with St. Thomas Aquinas is a scholarly contribution to Thomistic studies, specifically to the study of Aquinas's biblical exegesis in relation to his philosophy and theology. Each of the thirteen chapters has a different focus, within the shared concentration of the book on Aquinas's Literal Exposition on Job. The essays are arranged in three Parts: "Job and Sacra Doctrina"; "Providence and Suffering"; and "Job and the Moral Life". Boyle's opening essay argues that Aquinas's...

Seamus Heaney and the End of Catholic Ireland

Kieran Quinlan
Seamus Heaney & the End of Catholic Ireland takes off from the poet's growing awareness in the new millennium of "something far more important in my mental formation than cultural nationalism or the British presence or any of that stuff—namely, my early religious education." It then pursues an examination of the full trajectory of Heaney's religious beliefs as represented in his poetry, prose, and interviews, with a briefer account of the interactive religious histories of the...

Cross-Racial Class Protest in Antebellum American Literature

Timothy Helwig
Historians have long claimed that the antebellum white working class viewed blacks, both free and enslaved, not as allies but enemies. While it is true that racial and ethnic strife among northern workers prevented an effective labor movement from materializing in America prior to the Civil War, Cross-Racial Class Protest in Antebellum American Literature demonstrates that a considerable subset of white and black writers were able to imagine cross-racial...

Return to Yakni Chitto

Monique Verdin
In South Louisiana, we live on a power point of our planet. A place where water comes to be purified. A place where 1,000-year-old cypress trees once grew. A place where fish still come to spawn and birds to nest. A place close to the Gulf of Mexico but where, as the old people used to say, "sweet water" could still be found that was fresh and good to drink. There is no sweet water down the bayou in Terrebonne Parish anymore. I've been trying to make sense of the strange beauty left here—the...

Al-Munjiz

Mohssen Esseesy
Successful communication in business requires more than the mastery of another language.Mohssen Esseesy's Al-Munjiz helps learners cultivate strategies for increasing language proficiency while building strong cultural awareness. It merges language instruction with lessons on how to design an appropriate résumé, respond to a job advertisement, analyze energy and fuel markets, and otherwise navigate Arab business contexts. Through this thoughtful exposure to Arab professional life and culture, Esseesy...

Battling over the Balkans

John R. Lampe
The tumultuous history of the Balkans has been subject to a plethora of conflicting interpretations by local as well as non-Balkan historians. In an attempt to help overcome the stereotypes that still pervade Balkan history and historiography, Battling over the Balkans concentrates on five principal controversies from the precommunist period: (1) pre-1914 Ottoman and Eastern Christian Orthodox legacies; (2) post-1918 struggles involving state-building; (3) in...

Anselm's Pursuit of Joy

Gavin R. Ortlund
The interpretation of Anselm of Canterbury's Proslogion has a long and rich tradition. However, its study is often narrowly focused on its so-called "ontological argument." As a result, engagement with the text of this work tends to be lopsided, and the prayerful purpose that undergirds the whole book is often completely ignored. Even the most rigorous engagements with the Proslogion often have little to say, for instance, about how the prayers of Proslogion 1, 14, and 18...

Treatises on Noah and David

St. Ambrose
These sermons by Ambrose of Milan (340–397 AD) provide a window into the preaching and scriptural exegesis of the legendary bishop, whose exposition of the Old Testament was instrumental in the conversion of Augustine of Hippo and in the development of Latin theology. In his treatise On Noah and his two Defenses for David, Ambrose borrows from influential Greek theologians, including Philo of Alexandria, Origen, and Didymus the Blind, while developing his own commentary on the exemplary patriarchs.

Diplomacy Arabic

Elisabeth Kendall
What is the word for peacebuilding in Arabic? How is bilateralism translated? Diplomacy Arabic is a convenient guide for Arabic language learners, featuring common terms and expressions essential for success in diplomatic communication. Diplomacy Arabic can be used as either a comprehensive reference or a study aid. The book features more than 1,300 expressions, terms, and idioms divided into ten areas of diplomatic discourse: general terms, concepts and practices, diplomatic service and...

Which Fork Do I Use with My Bourbon?

Peggy Noe Stevens
A good bottle of bourbon should be enjoyed in good company. During their travels in bourbon country and beyond to conduct tastings and seminars, entertainment experts Peggy Noe Stevens and Susan Reigler often heard the question, "How do I do this in my home?" This book is their definitive answer. Which Fork Do I Use with My Bourbon? offers a step-by-step guide to hosting a successful bourbon-tasting...

Confederate Citadel

Mary A. DeCredico
Richmond, Virginia: pride of the founding fathers, doomed capital of the Confederate States of America. Unlike other Southern cities, Richmond boasted a vibrant, urban industrial complex capable of producing crucial ammunition and military supplies. Despite its northern position, Richmond became the Confederacy's beating heart—its capital, second-largest city, and impenetrable citadel. As long as the city endured, the Confederacy remained a well-supplied and formidable force.

Desert Redleg

L. Scott Lingamfelter
When Saddam Hussein's Iraq invaded Kuwait in August 1990, triggering the First Gulf War, a coalition of thirty-five countries led by the United States responded with Operation Desert Storm, which culminated in a one-hundred-hour coordinated air strike and ground assault that repelled Iraqi forces from Kuwait. Though largely forgotten in descriptions of the war, an eight-day barrage of artillery fire made this seemingly rapid offensive possible. At the forefront of this...

American Datu

Ronald K. Edgerton
American Datu: John J. Pershing and Counterinsurgency Warfare in the Muslim Philippines, 1899–1913 provides a play-by-play account of a crucial but often overlooked period in the development of American counterinsurgency strategy. Tracing Pershing's military campaigns in the Philippines, Ronald K. Edgerton examines how Progressive Counterinsurgency doctrine evolved in direct response to the first sustained military encounter...

The Murder of Marion Miley

Beverly Bell
Today, the name Marion Miley is largely unrecognizable, but in the fall of 1941, she was an internationally renowned golf champion, winning every leading women's tournament except the elusive national title. This unassuming twenty-seven-year-old woman was beloved by all she met, including celebrities like jazz crooner Bing Crosby. With ambitions to become a doctor, it seemed Marion Miley was headed for greatness. But on September 28, 1941, six gunshots broke through the early morning stillness of the Lexington...

Pakistan's Political Parties

Mariam Mufti
Pakistan's 2018 general elections marked the second successful transfer of power from one elected civilian government to another — a remarkable achievement considering the country's history of dictatorial rule. Pakistan's Political Parties examines how the civilian side of the state's current regime has survived the transition to democracy, providing critical insight into the evolution of political parties in Pakistan and their role in developing...

Dinner at 10:32

Mahyar A. Amouzegar
In Dinner At 10:32, Mahyar A. Amouzegar offers a textured examination of the ambiguity of the most intimate human relationships. Near the end of his life, Donte's granddaughter asks him a simple question: What are the true origins of his long love affair with his wife? From there, Donte embarks on a reminiscence of their complex love story, along with other romances, friendships, and intrigues that peppered his younger days. As Donte reveals the moments that formed him by sharing stories with his granddaughter,...

The Wayfarer's End

Shawn M. Colberg
The Wayfarer's End follows the human person's journey to union with God in the theologies of Saint Bonaventure and Saint Thomas Aquinas. It argues that these seminal thinkers of the 13th Century emphasize scriptural notions of divine rewards as ordering principles for the graced movement of human viators to eternal life. Divine rewards emerge as a fundamental category through the study's emphasis on Thomas and Bonaventure as scriptural...

Bodily Evidence

Geneva Cobb Moore
The first African American to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, Toni Morrison is one of the most celebrated women writers in the world. In Bodily Evidence: Racism, Slavery, and Maternal Power in the Novels of Toni Morrison, Geneva Cobb Moore explores how Morrison uses parody and pastiche, semiotics and metaphors, and allegory to portray black life in the United States, teaching untaught history to liberate Americans. In this short and...

With Extreme Prejudice

Fredrick Barton
One year after his wife dies in a car accident, film critic Mike Barnett discovers his house ransacked in an apparent robbery. However, only his wife's private files have been stolen. Mike then finds himself pulled into a seedy world of local government corruption when he starts to believe that his wife's death was no accident. A captivating legal thriller about greed, graft, and convoluted schemes, a man's search for truth to reconcile the loss of a loving marriage uncovers deeper trauma in the beauty of New...

Reading Flannery O'Connor in Spain

Mark Bosco
This collection of essays places Flannery O'Connor's work in constructive and collaborative dialogue with Spanish literature and literary aesthetics. The international scholars who contributed to this volume explore the ways in which O'Connor's literary and religious vision continues to work in the imaginations of both American and European—mostly Spanish—authors. The subtitle of the collection—From Andalusia to Andalucía—is a play on the name of O'Connor's family farm...

Brick City Vanguard

James Smethurst
Amiri Baraka is unquestionably the most recognized leader of the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s and 1970s, and one of the key literary and cultural figures of the postwar United States. While Baraka's political and aesthetic stances changed considerably over the course of his career, Brick City Vanguard demonstrates the continuity in his thinking about the meaning of black music in the material, psychic, and ideological development of black people. Drawing on...

Transcendental Heresies

David Faflik
At a moment when the requirements of belief and unbelief were being negotiated in unexpected ways, transcendentalism allowed for a more creative approach to spiritual questions. Interrogating the movement's alleged atheistic underpinnings, David Faflik contends that transcendentalism reconstituted the religious sensibilities of 1830s and 1840s New England, producing a dynamic and complex array of beliefs and behaviors that cannot be categorized as either...

Ocean Crossings

Andre Novoa
Mar 2020 - Tagus Press
The theme of the seas has long been a central topic in scholarship on the Lusophone world, but more recent research has invested ocean crossings with new relevance and urgency. This special issue brings together a diversity of approaches, paying close attention to sea mobilities, what they entailed, and how they were practiced, and what meanings have been associated with them. Scholars also consider the performance or practice of movement in itself, from the efforts of ocean crossing to the subtleties of moving and the...

Becoming a Wildlife Professional

edited by Scott E. Henke and Paul R. Krausman
Working with wildlife can be a thrilling adventure steeped in the wonders of the natural world, but entering the field demands a strong personal commitment. With proper training and guidance, students can transform themselves into competitive applicants and forge successful careers. This book reveals the best way to become a wildlife management professional. Becoming a Wildlife Professional is the first comprehensive book to describe the entry-level jobs available...

Paved Roads & Public Money

Richard DeLuca
A comprehensive history of modern transportation in Connecticut Drawing on a wide array of primary material, Richard DeLuca examines how land, law, and technology have shaped Connecticut and its transportation systems, including aviation, highways, bridges, ferries, steamboats, canals, railroads, electric trolleys, and water ports, in Connecticut and along the multi-state travel corridor from New York to Boston. This well-illustrated book...

The Cultural Work

Corinna Campbell
The politics & poetics of cultural representation in a multiethnic city How do people in an intensely multicultural city live alongside one another while maintaining clear boundaries? This question is at the core of The Cultural Work, which illustrates how the Maroons (descendants of escaped slaves) of Suriname and French Guiana, on the northern coast of South America, have used culture-representational performance to sustain their communities within Paramaribo, the...

Creative Engagement

Rachael Wonderlin
with Geri M. Lotze, PhD
Whether they are cared for at home or in an assisted living community, adults living with dementia should be offered a life that is interesting and fun. But what can you do to enhance the everyday experience of a loved one who is losing interest in or is unable to participate in their old hobbies and pursuits? In Creative Engagement, dementia activity expert Rachael Wonderlin and developmental psychology professor Geri M. Lotze...

Like Wildfire

Sean Patrick O'Rourke
The sit-ins of the American civil rights movement were extraordinary acts of dissent in an age marked by protest. By sitting in at "whites only" lunch counters, libraries, beaches, swimming pools, skating rinks, and churches, young African Americans and their allies put their lives on the line, fully aware that their actions would almost inevitably incite hateful, violent responses from entrenched and increasingly desperate white segregationists. And yet they did so in...

The Distance From Four Points

Margo Orlando Littell
Soon after her husband's tragic death, Robin Besher makes a startling discovery: He had recklessly blown through their entire savings on decrepit rentals in Four Points, the Appalachian town Robin grew up in. Forced to return after decades, Robin and her daughter, Haley, set out to renovate the properties as quickly as possible—before anyone exposes Robin's secret past as a teenage prostitute. Disaster strikes when Haley befriends a troubled teen mother, hurling Robin back into a past she'd worked so...

Lowcountry at High Tide

Christina R. Butler
The signs are there: our coastal cities are increasingly susceptible to flooding as the climate changes. Charleston, South Carolina, is no exception, and is one of the American cities most vulnerable to rising sea levels. Lowcountry at High Tide is the first book to deal with the topographic evolution of Charleston, its history of flooding from the seventeenth century to the present, and the efforts made to keep its...

Harry Potter and Beyond

Tison Pugh
Harry Potter and Beyond explores J. K. Rowling's beloved best-selling series and its virtuoso reimagining of British literary traditions. Weaving together elements of fantasy, the school-story novel, detective fiction, allegory, and bildungsroman, the Harry Potter novels evade simplistic categorization as children's or fantasy literature. Because the Potter series both breaks new ground and adheres to longstanding narrative formulas, readers can enhance their...

Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture, Volume 49

edited by Eve Tavor Bannet and Roxann Wheeler

The Butler's Child

Lewis M. Steel
Lewis M. Steel, born a Warner Brothers' grandson, inherited a life of privilege, access, and opportunity. With every option available, he chose a life of purpose, spending more than fifty years as a no-holds-barred civil rights lawyer whose victories set legal precedents still relevant today. In The Butler's Child, Steel explores the important role race played in his upbringing, anchored by his relationship with the family's African American butler, and why...

Patriots in Exile

James Waring McCrady
In the months following the May 1780 capture of Charleston, South Carolina, by combined British and loyalist forces, British soldiers arrested sixty-three paroled American prisoners and transported them to the borderland town of St. Augustine, East Florida—territory under British control since the French and Indian War. In Patriots in Exile, James Waring McCrady and C. L. Bragg chronicle the banishment of these elite southerners, the...

The Natural History of Sexuality in Early America

Greta LaFleur
If sexology—the science of sex—came into being sometime in the nineteenth century, then how did statesmen, scientists, and everyday people make meaning out of sex before that point? In The Natural History of Sexuality in Early America, Greta LaFleur demonstrates that eighteenth-century natural history—the study of organic life in its environment—actually provided the intellectual foundations for the later development of the scientific study of sex. Natural historians understood the...

Eisenhower

Louis Galambos
In this engaging, fast-paced biography, Louis Galambos follows the career of Dwight D. "Ike" Eisenhower, offering new insight into this singular man who guided America toward consensus at home and a peaceful victory in the Cold War. The longtime editor of the Eisenhower papers, Galambos may know more about this president than anyone alive. In this compelling book, he explores the shifts in Eisenhower's identity and reputation over his lifetime and explains how he developed his...

Blossoms In Snow

Joshua Parker
Thirty-five authors, through seventy-nine poems and short prose pieces, tell the story of the twentieth century's greatest refugee crisis. An English translation brings their work to English-speaking readers for the first time, side by side with the original German. The poems contextualize past and present responses to issues of asylum, reflect on the state of being stateless, drawing parallels between the United States and Austria, and resonating deeply with our own contemporary...