Welcome to HFS Books

Since 1977 Hopkins Fulfillment Services has provided distribution services for a distinguished list of university presses and nonprofit institutions.

Our clients include Johns Hopkins University Press, Georgetown University Press, University of Washington Press, The University Press of Kentucky, Catholic University of America Press, University of New Orleans Press, Maryland Center for History and Culture, University of South Carolina Press, Wesleyan University Press, Modern Language Association, Northeastern University Press, Family Development Press, Central European University Press, and University of Alberta Press.

HFSBooks.com offers books published by our clients for sale in one place. If you are looking for information regarding our distribution services, please visit hfs.jhu.edu.

Blossoms In Snow

Joshua Parker
Thirty-five authors, through seventy-nine poems and short prose pieces, tell the story of the twentieth century's greatest refugee crisis. An English translation brings their work to English-speaking readers for the first time, side by side with the original German. The poems contextualize past and present responses to issues of asylum, reflect on the state of being stateless, drawing parallels between the United States and Austria, and resonating deeply with our own contemporary...

Dissonant Methods

edited by Ada S. Jaarsma, Kit Dobson, with contributions byKathy Cawsey, Rachel Jones, Kyle Kinaschuk, Namrata Mitra, Guy Obrecht, Katja Pettinen, Katja K. Pettinen, Kaitlin Rothberger, Ely Shipley, Martin Shuster
Dissonant Methods is an innovative collection that probes how, by approaching teaching creatively, postsecondary instructors can resist the constrictions of neoliberalism. Based on the foundations of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, whereby educators are asked to...

A World Free from Nuclear Weapons

edited by Drew Christiansen
On November 10, 2017, Pope Francis became the first pontiff in the nuclear era to take a complete stand against nuclear weapons, even as a form of deterrence. At a Vatican conference of leaders in the field of disarmament, he made it clear that the possession of the bomb itself was immoral. A World Free from Nuclear Weapons presents the pope's address and original testimony from Nobel Peace Prize laureates, religious leaders, diplomats, and civil...

Geospatial Intelligence

Robert M. Clark
A riveting introduction to the complex and evolving field of geospatial intelligence. Although geospatial intelligence is a term of recent origin, its underpinnings have a long and interesting history. Geospatial Intelligence: Origins and Evolution shows how the current age of geospatial knowledge evolved from its ancient origins to become ubiquitous in daily life across the globe. Within that framework, the book weaves a tapestry of stories about the people, events, ideas, and...

The Port of Missing Men

Aaron Goings
In the early twentieth century so many dead bodies surfaced in the rivers around Aberdeen, Washington, that they were nicknamed the "floater fleet." When Billy Gohl (1873–1927), a powerful union official, was arrested for murder, local newspapers were quick to suggest that he was responsible for many of those deaths, perhaps even dozens—thus launching the legend of the Ghoul of Grays Harbor. More than a true-crime tale, The Port of Missing Men sheds...

The Grand Union

Wendy Perron
The Grand Union was a leaderless improvisation group in SoHo in the 1970s that included people who became some of the biggest names in postmodern dance: Yvonne Rainer, Trisha Brown, Steve Paxton, Barbara Dilley, David Gordon, and Douglas Dunn. Together they unleashed a range of improvised forms from peaceful movement explorations to wildly imaginative collective fantasies. This book delves into the "collective genius" of Grand Union and explores their process of deep play.

RENDANG

Will Harris
Using long poems, ekphrasis, and ruptured forms, RENDANG is a startling new take on the self, and how an identity is constructed. Drawing on his Anglo-Indonesian heritage, Will Harris shows us new ways to think about the contradictions of identity and cultural memory. He creates companions that speak to us in multiple languages. They deftly ask us to consider how and what we look at, as well as what we don't look at and why. It is intellectual and accessible, moving and experimental, and combines a linguistic innovation with a deep...

American Spies

Michael J. Sulick
A history of Americans who spied against their country and what their stories reveal about national security What's your secret? American Spies presents the stunning histories of more than forty Americans who spied against their country during the past six decades. Michael Sulick, former head of the CIA's clandestine service, illustrates through these stories — some familiar, others much less well known — the common threads in the spy cases...

Le Ker Creole

Bruce "Sunpie" Barnes
For hundreds of years in Louisiana, lullabies were hummed, prayers were called, opera was performed, la-las were danced, and work and carnival songs were sung in Creole. A francophone language with connections to West Africa, Louisiana Creole is now one of the most endangered languages in the world. In this musical ethnography, you will find fifteen original and traditional Creole songs that cross time and musical genres such as blues, zydeco, and traditional jazz.

The Great Quake Debate

Susan Hough
In the first half of the twentieth century, when seismology was still in in its infancy, renowned geologist Bailey Willis faced off with fellow high-profile scientist Robert T. Hill in a debate with life-or-death consequences for the millions of people migrating west. Their conflict centered on a consequential question: Is southern California earthquake country? These entwined biographies of Hill and Willis offer a lively, accessible account of the ways...

Maureen O'Hara

Aubrey Malone
From her first appearances on the stage and screen, Maureen O'Hara (b. 1920) commanded attention with her striking beauty, radiant red hair, and impassioned portrayals of spirited heroines. Whether she was being rescued from the gallows by Charles Laughton (The Hunchback of Notre Dame, 1939), falling in love with Walter Pidgeon against a coal-blackened sky (How Green Was My Valley, 1941), learning to believe in miracles with Natalie Wood (Miracle on 34th Street, 1947), or matching wits with John Wayne (The...

Conjure

Rae Armantrout
Rae Armantrout has always taken pleasure in uncertainties and conundrums, the tricky nuances of language and feeling. In Conjure that pleasure is matched by dread; fascination meets fear as the poet considers the emergence of new life (twin granddaughters) into an increasingly toxic world: the Amazon smolders, children are caged or die crossing rivers and oceans, and weddings make convenient targets for drone strikes. These poems explore the restless border between self and non-self and ask us to look with new eyes at what we're...

Un-American

Hafizah Geter
Dancing between lyric and narrative, Hafizah Geter's debut collection moves readers through the fraught internal and external landscapes—linguistic, cultural, racial, familial—of those whose lives are shaped and transformed by immigration. The daughter of a Nigerian Muslim woman and a former Southern Baptist black man, Geter charts the history of a black family of mixed citizenships through poems imbued by migration, racism, queerness, loss, and the heartbreak of trying to feel at home in a country that does not recognize...

A Forest of Names

Ian Boyden
How do we honor the dead? How do we commit them to memory? And how do we come to terms with the way they died? To start, we can name them. When schools collapsed in an earthquake in China, burying over 5,000 children, the government brutally prevented parents from learning who had died. Artist Ai Weiwei, at risk to his own safety, gathered the names of these children, and their names are the subject of this book. Each poem is a poetic meditation on the image and concept suggested by the etymology in the...

Military Agility

Meir Finkel, translated by Moshe Tlamim
The need to quickly enter into conflict and succeed in the initial engagements is an enduring demand on militaries around the world. Given today's dynamic geopolitical environment, the concept of successful, rapid transition or organizational and mental readiness is more relevant than ever. Using the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) as a case study, Meir Finkel explores four important but generally neglected challenges of a swift...

The Whigs' America

Joseph W. Pearson, illustrated by Dick Gilbreath
Passionate political disagreement is as old as the American Republic, and the antebellum era—the thirty years before the Civil War—was as rife with partisan discord as any in our history. From 1834 to 1856, the Whigs battled their opponents, the Jacksonian Democrats, for offices, prestige, and power. The partisan expression of America's rising middle class, the Whigs boasted such famous members as Henry Clay, Daniel...

The Nazi Spy Ring in America

Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones
The first full account of Nazi spies in 1930s America and how they were exposed. In the mid-1930s just as the United States was embarking on a policy of neutrality, Nazi Germany launched a program of espionage against the unwary nation. The Nazi Spy Ring in America tells the story of Hitler's attempts to interfere in American affairs by spreading anti-Semitic propaganda, stealing military technology, and mapping US defenses. This...

Camouflaged Aggression in Organizations

Alexander Abdennur
In Camouflaged Aggression in Organizations, Alexander Abdennur unveils his theory of two modes of aggression in organizations: confrontational and camouflaged. Focusing on camouflaged aggression, he describes patterns of behaviour and shows how these intersect with personality and sociocultural factors. He defines the effects of non-confrontational aggression in terms of organizational and mental health. In discussing prevention and control of this harmful behaviour,...

The Southern Wildlife Watcher

Rob Simbeck
The Southern Wildlife Watcher is a colorful look at thirty-six common and not-so-common animals found in the southeastern United States—from the hummingbird to the bald eagle and from the bullfrog to the bobcat. Rob Simbeck, one of the Southeast's most widely read naturalists, combines a poet's voice with a journalist's rigor in offering readers an intimate introduction to the creatures around us. Through delightful storytelling each vignette offers accessible information supported by...

Birds of the Pacific Northwest, second edition

Tom Aversa
In this updated edition of their best-selling field guide, renowned bird experts Tom Aversa, Richard Cannings, and Hal Opperman illuminate the key identification traits, vocalizations, seasonal statuses, habitat preferences, and feeding behaviors of bird species from British Columbia to southern Oregon. Compact full-page accounts feature maps and more than 900 color photographs by the region's top bird photographers Comprehensive revisions to taxonomic structure and sequencing of...

Myths in Austrian History (Contemporary Austrian Studies, vol. 29)

Günter Bischof
Austria's post-WWII 'victim-myth' both shaped the country post-war history and, since its deconstruction in the aftermath of the Waldheim affair, is now a central trope in the scholarly literature. This volume aims at extending the discussion of different myths throughout Austria's 20th century-history and some of their continuing impact on the present. We consider 'myths' to be socially, culturally and politically...

The Fullness of Free Time

Conor M. Kelly
An ethical framework and vision of free time for social good — and how to achieve it. In the work-centric culture of today's world, it is easy to view free time as indulging laziness or extravagance.Conor M. Kelly, however, argues that free time possesses enormous potential for good if exercised in accordance with theological ethics. By examining pursuits such as television, digital media use, sports, and travel from the perspective of...

Understanding Tracy Letts

Thomas Fahy
Winner of the Pulitzer Prize in drama as well as Tony Awards for best play and best actor, Tracy Letts has emerged as one of the greatest playwrights of the twenty-first century. Understanding Tracy Letts, the first book dedicated to his writing, is an introduction to his plays and an invitation to engage more deeply with his work—both for its emotional power and cultural commentary. Experiencing a Tracy Letts play often feels akin to reading a Cormac McCarthy novel, watching a Cohen Brothers film, and seeing...

A Doctor for Rural America

Barbara Barksdale Clowse
Dr. Frances Sage Bradley (1862–1949) was a mediating force between the urban world of her own education and experience, and that of rural Americans. As a widow with four young children, Bradley trained as a doctor and became one of the first women to graduate from Cornell University Medical School. During the height of the Progressive Era, she left her private practice to do significant field work for the newly-created Children's Bureau, working mainly in the...

The Magnificent Mays

John Herbert Roper, Sr.
Civil rights activist, writer, theologian, preacher, and educator, Benjamin Elijah Mays (1894-1984) was one of the most distinguished South Carolinians of the twentieth century. He influenced the lives of generations of students as a dean and professor of religion at Howard University and as longtime president of Morehouse College in Atlanta. In addition to his personal achievements, Mays was also a mentor and teacher to Julian Bond, founder of the Student Nonviolent...

One Left

Kim Soom, translated by Bruce Fulton, Ju-Chan Fulton, foreword by Bonnie Oh
During the Pacific War, more than 200,000 Korean girls were forced into sexual servitude for Japanese soldiers. They lived in horrific conditions in "comfort stations" across Japanese-occupied territories. Barely 10 percent survived to return to Korea, where they lived as social outcasts. Since then, self-declared comfort women have come forward only to have their testimonies and calls for compensation largely denied by the Japanese government. Kim Soom tells...

The Redshirt

Corey Sobel
Shortlisted for 2020 Center for Fiction's First Novel Prize Corey Sobel challenges tenacious stereotypes in this compelling debut novel, shedding new light on the hypermasculine world of American football. The Redshirt introduces Miles Furling, a young man who is convinced he was placed on earth to play football. Deep in the closet, he sees the sport as a means of gaining a permanent foothold in a culture that would otherwise reject him. Still, Miles's body lags behind his ambitions, and recruiters tell him he is not big...

Making and Breaking the Yugoslav Working Class

Goran Musić
Workers' self-management was one of the unique features of communist Yugoslavia. Goran Musić has investigated the changing ways in which blue-collar workers perceived the recurring crises of the regime. Two self-managed metal enterprises, one in Serbia another in Slovenia, provide the frame of the analysis in the time span between 1945 and 1989. These two factories became famous for strikes in 1988 that evoked echoes in popular discourses...

The Doctor Who Fooled the World

Brian Deer
From San Francisco to Shanghai, from Vancouver to Venice, controversy over vaccines is erupting around the globe. Fear is spreading. Banished diseases have returned. And a militant "anti-vax" movement has surfaced to campaign against children's shots. But why? In The Doctor Who Fooled the World, award-winning investigative reporter Brian Deer exposes the truth behind the crisis. Writing with the page-turning tension of a detective story, he unmasks the players...

In Search of Sexual Health

Elliott Bowen
During the late 1800s and early 1900s, the central Arkansas city of Hot Springs enjoyed a reputation as one of the United States' premier health resorts. Throughout this period, the vast majority of Americans who traveled there did so because they had (or thought they had) syphilis—a disease whose incidence was said to be dramatically on the rise all across the country. Boasting an impressive medical infrastructure that included...

COVID-19 and World Order

edited by Hal Brands, Francis J. Gavin, Laurie Winkless
The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has killed hundreds of thousands of people and infected millions while also devastating the world economy. The consequences of the pandemic, however, go much further: they threaten the fabric of national and international politics around the world. As Henry Kissinger warned, "The coronavirus epidemic will forever alter the world order." What will be the consequences of the...

The Eagle on My Arm

Dava Guerin, Terry Bivens, foreword by Jack E. Davis, Floyd Scholz
In October 1967, eighteen-year-old Patrick Bradley enlisted in the US Army and was later deployed to Vietnam to map mobile POW camps to determine a pattern for rescuing prisoners. Combat left him physically and psychologically wounded, as it does many veterans, and Bradley struggled to adjust when he returned home. He seemed destined for military prison after an altercation in which he broke a superior...

Shakespeare's King Lear

edited by Richard Knowles
Inaugurated in the 1860s, and the standard reference edition of Shakespeare's work, each volume of the New Variorum Shakespeare presents complete textual and critical histories of each line of the play, along with extensive essays on criticism, sources, stage history, and more. The New Variorum Editions are valuable resources for an international audience of scholars, students, directors, actors, and general readers. Overseen by three general editors and an...

I Feel To Believe

Jarvis DeBerry
For twenty years, starting in 1999, Jarvis DeBerry's New Orleans Times-Picayune column was the place where the city got its most honest look at itself: the good, the bad, the wonderful, and yes, also the weird. And the city took note. DeBerry's columns inspired letters to the editor, water cooler conversations, city council considerations, and barbershop pontification. I Feel To Believe collects his best columns, documenting two decades of constancy and upheaval, loss, racial injustice, and class...

Making Kantha, Making Home

Pika Ghosh
In Bengal, mothers swaddle their infants and cover their beds in colorful textiles that are passed down through generations. They create these kantha from layers of soft, recycled fabric strengthened with running stitches and use them as shawls, covers, and seating mats. Making Kantha, Making Home explores the social worlds shaped by the Bengali kantha that survive from the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. In the first study of colonial-period women's embroidery...

Paved Roads & Public Money

Richard DeLuca
A comprehensive history of modern transportation in Connecticut Drawing on a wide array of primary material, Richard DeLuca examines how land, law, and technology have shaped Connecticut and its transportation systems, including aviation, highways, bridges, ferries, steamboats, canals, railroads, electric trolleys, and water ports, in Connecticut and along the multi-state travel corridor from New York to Boston. This well-illustrated book...

Crossings and Encounters

edited by Laura R. Prieto, Stephen R. Berry, Stephen R. Berry, foreword by Sandra Slater, edited by Stephen Berry
For centuries the Atlantic world has been a site of encounter and exchange, a rich point of transit where one could remake one's identity or find it transformed. Through this interdisciplinary collection of essays, Laura R. Prieto and Stephen R. Berry offer vivid new accounts of how individuals remapped race, gender, and sexuality through their lived...

Now It's Dark

Peter Gizzi
The poems in this brilliant follow-up to the National Book Award finalist Archeophonics, are concerned with grieving, with poetry and death, with beauty and sadness, with light. As Ben Lerner has written, "Gizzi's poetry is an example of how a poet's total tonal attention can disclose new orders of sensation and meaning. His beautiful lines are full of deft archival allusion." With litany, elegy, and prose, Gizzi continues his pursuit toward a lyric of reality. Saturated with luminous detail, these original poems possess,...

Satie on the Seine

Gerald Vizenor,
In this powerful epistolary novel, acclaimed Anishinaabe author Gerald Vizenor interweaves history, cultural stories, and irony to reveal a shadow play of truth and politics. Basile Hudon Beaulieu lives in a houseboat on the River Seine in Paris between 1932 and 1945. He observes the liberals, fascist, artists, and bohemians, and presents puppet shows with his brother. His thoughts and experiences are documented in the form of fifty letters to the heirs of the fur trade.

Faces of Civil War Nurses

Ronald S. Coddington
During the American Civil War, women on both sides of the conflict, radiating patriotic fervor equal to their male counterparts, contributed to the war effort in countless ways: forming charitable societies, becoming nurses, or even marching off to war as vivandières, unofficial attachés to the regiments. In Faces of Civil War Nurses, Ronald S. Coddington turns his attention to the experiences of 77 women of all ages and walks of life who provided care during the war as nurses, aid workers, and...

Creating the South Caroliniana Library

John M. Bryan
The South Caroliniana Library, located on the historic Horseshoe of the University of South Carolina campus in Columbia, is one of the premier research archives and special collections repositories in South Carolina and the American Southeast. The library's holdings—manuscripts, published materials, university archives, and visual materials—are essential to understanding the Palmetto State and Southern culture as it has evolved over the past 300 years. When opened as the South Carolina...

Into God

Regis J. Armstrong
An annotated translation of Bonaventure's Itinerarium mentis in Deum presenting both the Latin text side-by-side with a new English translation which attempts to avoid the use of Latin cognates while remaining critically faithful to Bonaventure's text. Using endnotes to open the text, Regis Armstrong opens each chapter from the perspective of historical theology referring the reader to authors prior to Bonaventure, e.g. Augustine, the Victorines, Philip the Chancellor,...

Kentucky Bourbon Country, third edition

Susan Reigler, photographs by Carol Peachee, Pam Spaulding
Like wine lovers who dream of traveling to Bordeaux or beer enthusiasts with visions of the breweries of Belgium, bourbon lovers plan their pilgrimages to Kentucky. Some of the most famous distilleries are tucked away in the scenic Bluegrass region, which is home to nearly seventy distilleries and responsible for 95 percent of all of America's bourbon production. Locals and tourists alike continue to seek out the world's finest whiskeys...

Understanding Stewart O'Nan

Heike Paul
This first book-length study of Stewart O'Nan's work offers a comprehensive introduction to his writings and carefully examines recurring thematic concerns and stylistic characteristics of his novels. The author of eighteen novels, several works of nonfiction, and two short-story collections, O'Nan received the Pirate's Alley Faulkner Society's Gold Medal for best novel for Snow Angels and the Drew Heinz Prize for In the Walled City. In 1996 Granta magazine named him one of the Twenty Best Young American...

I Am New Orleans

Kalamu ya Salaam
NOLA Is A myth. A reality. A port. A place.  An opening. A dead end. A womb. A grave. Audubon Zoo and Monkey Hill uptown. Mardi Gras Fountain with the colored lights downtown.   Above ground crypts at St. Louis Cemeteries 1, 2, and 3. Football fields. Parade grounds. Picnic areas. Citywide. Lake front. River front.  Fishing hole. Bayou swamp.  Raw oysters. Fried chicken.  Front-liners. Second-liners.  Storefront churches. A sacred cathedral. Superdome. Shotgun...

Cosmas of Prague

edited by Janos M. Bak, Pavlina Rychterova
The Latin-English bilingual volume presents the text of The Chronicle of the Czechs by Cosmas of Prague. Cosmas was born around 1045, educated in Liège, upon his return to Bohemia, he got married as well as became a priest. In 1086 he was appointed prebendary, a senior member of clergy in Prague. He completed the first book of the Chronicle in 1119, starting with the creation of the world and the earliest deeds of the...

The Legacy of Division

edited by Ferenc Laczó, Luka Lisjak Gabrijelčič
This volume examines the legacy of the East–West divide since the implosion of the communist regimes in Europe. The ideals of 1989 have largely been frustrated by the crises and turmoil of the past decade. The liberal consensus was first challenged as early as the mid-2000s. In Eastern Europe, grievances were directed against the prevailing narratives of transition and ever sharper ethnic-racial antipathies surfaced in opposition to a supposedly...

Pittsburgh and the Urban League Movement

Joe William Trotter, Jr., illustrated by Dick Gilbreath
During the Great Migration, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, became a mecca for African Americans seeking better job opportunities, wages, and living conditions. The city's thriving economy and vibrant social and cultural scenes inspired dreams of prosperity and a new start, but this urban haven was not free of discrimination and despair. In the face of injustice, activists formed the Urban League of Pittsburgh...

Xicancuicatl

Alfred Arteaga, edited by David Lloyd, preface by Cherríe Moraga
Xicancuicatl collects the poetry of leading avant-garde Chicanx poet Alfred Arteaga (1950–2008), whom French philosopher Gilles Deleuze regarded as "among those rare poets who are able to raise or shape a new language within their language." In his five published collections, Arteaga made crucial breakthroughs in the language of poetry, basing his linguistic experiments on the multilingual Xicanx culture of the US Southwest. His formal resources and finely...

Ukrainian Witchcraft Trials

Kateryna Dysa
Ukrainian Witchcraft Trials is an analysis of early modern witchcraft trials and legal procedures in Ukrainian lands, along with an examination of quantitative data drawn from the different trials. Kateryna Dysa first describes the ideological background of the tribunals based on works written by priests and theologians that reflect attitudes towards the devil and witches. The main focus of her work, however, is the process leading to witchcraft...

Byzantium after the Nation

Dimitris Stamatopoulos
Dimitris Stamatopoulos undertakes the first systematic comparison of the dominant ethnic historiographic models and divergences elaborated by Greek, Bulgarian, Serbian, Albanian, Romanian, Turkish, and Russian intellectuals with reference to the ambiguous inheritance of Byzantium. The title alludes to the seminal work of Nicolae Iorga in the 1930s, Byzantium after Byzantium, that argued for the continuity between the Byzantine and the...

Semi-aquatic Mammals

Glynnis A. Hood
illustrated by Meaghan Brierley
Semi-aquatic mammals are some of the rarest and most endangered mammals on earth. What binds them together in the minds of biologists, despite their diverse taxa and body forms, are evolutionary traits that allow them to succeed in two worlds—spending some time on land and some in the water. Semi-aquatic Mammals fills a crucial void in the literature by highlighting the important ecological roles and curious biology of these remarkable animals. In this...

Technology and the Environment in History

Sara B. Pritchard and Carl A. Zimring
Today's scientists, policymakers, and citizens are all confronted by numerous dilemmas at the nexus of technology and the environment. Every day seems to bring new worries about the dangers posed by carcinogens, "superbugs," energy crises, invasive species, genetically modified organisms, groundwater contamination, failing infrastructure, and other troubling issues. In Technology and the Environment in History, Sara B. Pritchard and Carl A. Zimring adopt an...

Black Freedom in the Age of Slavery

John Garrison Marks
Prior to the abolition of slavery, thousands of African-descended people in the Americas lived in freedom. Their efforts to navigate daily life and negotiate the boundaries of racial difference challenged the foundations of white authority—and linked the Americas together. In Black Freedom in the Age of Slavery John Garrison Marks examines how these individuals built lives in freedom for themselves and their families in two of the...

Understanding David Foster Wallace, revised and expanded edition

Marshall Boswell
Since its publication in 2003, Understanding David Foster Wallace has served as an accessible introduction to the rich array of themes and formal innovations that have made Wallace's fiction so popular and influential. A seminal text in the burgeoning field of David Foster Wallace studies, the original edition of Understanding David Foster Wallace was nevertheless incomplete as it addressed only his first four works of fiction—namely the novels The Broom of the System and Infinite Jest and the...

101 African Americans Who Shaped South Carolina

Bernard E. Powers, Jr.
The first people of African descent to live in what is now South Carolina, enslaved people living in the sixteenth century Spanish settlements of San Miguel de Gualdape and Santa Elena, arrived even before the first permanent English settlement was established in 1670. For more than 350 years South Carolina's African American population has had a significant influence on the state's cultural, economic, and political development. 101 African Americans Who Shaped South...

Stalin's Italian Prisoners of War

Maria Teresa Giusti
This book reconstructs the fate of Italian prisoners of war captured by the Red Army between August 1941 and the winter of 1942-43. On 230.000 Italians left on the Eastern front almost 100.000 did not come back home. Testimonies and memoirs from surviving veterans complement the author's intensive work in Russian and Italian archives. The study examines Italian war crimes against the Soviet civilian population and describes the particularly grim fate of the thousands of Italian military...

The Rise of Comparative History

Balazs Trencsenyi
This book—the first of a three-volume overview of comparative and transnational historiography in Europe—focuses on the complex engagement of various comparative methodological approaches with different transnational and supranational frameworks. It considers scales from universal history to meso-regional (i.e. Balkans, Central Europe, etc.) perspectives. In the form of a reader, it displays 18 historical studies written between 1900 and 1943. The collection starts with the French and German...

Girty

Richard Taylor
Along with Benedict Arnold, Simon Girty was one of the most hated men in early America. The son of an Irish immigrant, he was raised on the western Pennsylvania frontier but was captured by the Senecas as a teenager and lived among them for several years. This able frontiersman might be seen today as a defender of Native Americans, but in his own time he was branded as a traitor for siding with First Nations and the British during the Revolutionary War. He fought fiercely against Continental Army forces in the Ohio River Valley and...

Autobiography without Apology

Chon A. Noriega
This collection of essays, drawn from Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano Studies, focuses on the personal experiences of Chicanx and Latinx scholars, writers, and artists. Each essay is a reflection on the process of self-naming—the role of "I"—in the authors' work and research. Autobiography without Apology expands the earlier CSRC Press publication I Am Aztlán with the inclusion of ten essays that bring the collection up to date. The new title...

America's Entangling Alliances

Jason W. Davidson
A challenge to long-held assumptions about the costs and benefits of America's allies. Since the Revolutionary War, the United States has entered into dozens of alliances with international powers to protect its assets and advance its security interests. America's Entangling Alliances offers a corrective to long-held assumptions about US foreign policy and is relevant to current public and academic debates about the costs and benefits of America's allies. Author Jason W.

The Colosseum Critical Introduction to Dana Gioia

Matthew Brennan, William Brennan
Dana Gioia stands out as one of the most important poets, critics, and defenders of the arts in our day. His advocacy of the renewal of rhyme and meter in poetry, his work as chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, and his recent efforts to strengthen the role of Catholic artists in American life have made a great impact on our public culture over four decades. Poet and scholar Matthew Brennan provides a thorough introduction to the life and work of this...

Saving Endangered Species

edited by Robert W. Shumaker
Wildlife conservation is at a critical juncture. While large, charismatic mammals may be the first animals that come to mind—the mere 3,000 wild tigers still in existence, the giraffes declared endangered for the first time just last year—it is not only these magnificent keystone species disappearing. A full third of all studied birds, reptiles, and mammals have suffered devastating population losses, and a third of all...

Feeding the World Well

edited by Alan M. Goldberg
In the United States, food is abundant and cheap but loaded with hidden costs to the environment, human health, animal welfare, and the people who work in our food systems. The country's current food production systems lack diversity in crops and animals and are intensified but not sustainable, inhumane in the treatment of animals, and inconsiderate of labor. In order to feed the world's rapidly growing population with high-quality, ethically produced food,...

Rebels, Scholars, Explorers

Annalisa Berta, Susan Turner
For centuries, women have played key roles in defining and developing the field of vertebrate paleontology. Yet very little is known about these important paleontologists, and the true impacts of their contributions have remained obscure. In Rebels, Scholars, Explorers, Annalisa Berta and Susan Turner celebrate the history of women "bone hunters," delving into their fascinating lives and work. At the same time, they explore how the discipline has shaped...

Frederick Law Olmsted

edited by Charles E. Beveridge, Lauren Meier, and Irene Mills
Master landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted (1822–1903) is renowned for his public parks, but few know the extent of his accomplishment in meeting other needs of society. Lavishly illustrated with over 500 images, this book presents Olmsted's design commissions for a wide range of projects. The rich collection of studies, lithographs, paintings, and historical photographs depicts Olmsted's planning for...

A Simple Justice

Melanie Beals Goan
When the Declaration of Independence was signed by a group of wealthy white men in 1776, poor white men, African Americans, and women quickly discovered that the unalienable rights it promised were not truly for all. The Nineteenth Amendment eventually gave women the right to vote in 1920, but the change was not welcomed by people of all genders in politically and religiously conservative Kentucky. As a result, the suffrage movement in the Commonwealth involved a tangled web of...

The Ends of Kinship

Sienna R. Craig, series edited byPadma Kaimal, K. Sivaramakrishnan, Anand A. Yang
For centuries, people from Mustang, Nepal, have relied on agriculture, pastoralism, and trade as a way of life. Seasonal migrations to South Asian cities for trade as well as temporary wage labor abroad have shaped their experiences for decades. Yet, more recently, permanent migrations to New York City, where many have settled, are reshaping lives and social worlds. Mustang has experienced one of...

Harry Dean Stanton

Joseph B. Atkins
Harry Dean Stanton (1926–2017) got his start in Hollywood in TV productions such as Zane Grey Theater and Gunsmoke. After a series of minor parts in forgettable westerns, he gradually began to get film roles that showcased his laid-back acting style, appearing in Cool Hand Luke (1967), Kelly's Heroes (1970), The Godfather: Part II (1974), and Alien (1979). He became a headliner in the eighties—starring in Wim Wenders's moving Paris, Texas (1984) and Alex Cox's Repo Man (1984)—but it was his...

Aboriginal Screen-Printed Textiles from Australia's Top End

Joanna Barrkman
Aboriginal Screen-Printed Textiles from Australia's Top End presents the work of contemporary Australian textile artists working at five Aboriginal-owned art centers in the Northern Territory: Tiwi Design, Jilamara Arts and Crafts Association, Injalak Arts and Crafts Aboriginal Corporation, Bábbarra Women's Centre, and Merrepen Arts, Culture and Language. This book traces the history of textile screen printing at these art centers, from its beginnings in the...

A Georgetown Life

Grant Quertermous
An invaluable primary resource for understanding nineteenth-century America. As a Georgetown resident for nearly a century, Britannia Wellington Peter Kennon (1815 — 1911) was close to the key political events of her time. Born into the prominent Peter family, Kennon came into contact with the many notable historical figures of the day who often visited Tudor Place, her home for over ninety years. Now published for the first time, the...

Popular Literature from Nineteenth-Century France: French Text

edited by Masha Belenky, Anne O'Neil-Henry
The city of Paris experienced rapid transformation in the middle of the nineteenth century: the population grew, industry and commerce increased, and barriers between social classes diminished. Innovations in printing and distribution gave rise to new mass-market genres: literary guidebooks known as tableaux de Paris and illustrated physiologies examined urban social types and fashions for a broad audience of Parisians hungry to...

Piers Plowman

William Langland, edited by Michael Calabrese, translated by Michael Calabrese
Passionate about trying to create social justice in a time of crisis after the Black Plague, William Langland spent his entire life working on Piers Plowman, an epic study of the human quest for truth, justice, and community. The "A Version," the first and shortest of the three versions he crafted, is wonderfully relatable and completely teachable to a modern student audience. Piers Plowman is becoming ever more relevant to students and scholars...

Mapping an Atlantic World, circa 1500

Alida C. Metcalf
Beginning around 1500, in the decades following Columbus's voyages, the Atlantic Ocean moved from the periphery to the center on European world maps. This brief but highly significant moment in early modern European history marks not only a paradigm shift in how the world was mapped but also the opening of what historians call the Atlantic World. But how did sixteenth-century chartmakers and mapmakers begin to conceptualize—and present to the public—an interconnected Atlantic World that...

Prefaces to Canon Law Books in Latin Christianity, second edition

Robert Somerville
An updated and expanded version of the original edition, published in 1998. That original edition went up through 1245. This new version extends to 1317 and adds two important prefaces. Praise for the First Edition "Both students and specialists can be grateful to the authors for this major contribution in English to the study of medieval canon law. It is a clear statement—one emphasized by the late John Gilchrist-that because of its...

From the Trinity

Piero Coda, foreword by Peter J. Casarella, edited by William Neu
From the Trinity provides an overall view of the history and the philosophical and theological significance of God the Trinity, not only from a religious point of view but from an anthropological and socio-cultural view as well. The perspective is that of Christian doctrine, specifically Catholic, in dialogue with the cultural sensitivity of our times and with the religious pluralism that characterizes it. Following...

Understanding the Religious Priesthood

Christian Raab
Most contemporary theologies of Holy Orders consider priesthood mainly in its diocesan context and most contemporary theologies of religious life do not consider how ordained ministry functions when it is internal rather than external to religious life. Understanding the Religious Priesthood provides a history and theology of religious priesthood that contributes to our understanding of this vocation's identity and mission. It uncovers what religious...

A White Lie

Madeeha Hafez Albatta, edited by Barbara Bill, Ghada Ageel, foreword by Salman Abu Sitta
Palestinian refugees in Gaza have lived in camps for five generations, experiencing hardship and uncertainty. In the absence of official histories, oral narratives handed down from generation to generation bear witness to life in Palestine before and after the 1948 Nakba—the catastrophe of dispossession. These narratives maintain traditions, keep alive names of destroyed villages, and record stories of the fight for dignity and freedom. The Women's...

Protected Children, Regulated Mothers

Eszter Varsa
Protected Children, Regulated Mothers examines child protection in Stalinist Hungary as part of 20th century (East Central, Eastern, and Southeastern) European history. Across the communist bloc, the increase of residential homes was preferred to the prewar system of foster care. The study challenges the transformation of state care into a tool of totalitarian power. Rather than political repression, educators...

The Tsar, The Empire, and The Nation

Darius Staliūnas
This book of essays addresses the challenge of modern nationalism to the tsarist Russian Empire. This challenge first took place on the empire's western periphery, comprised of the twelve provinces extending from Ukrainian lands in the south to the Baltic provinces in the north, as well as to the Kingdom of Poland. At issue is whether the late Russian Empire entered World War I as a multiethnic state with many of its...

Nation and Migration

György Csepeli
Nation and Migration provides a way to understand recent migration events in Europe that have attracted the world's attention. The emergence of the nations in the West promised homogenization, but instead the imagined national communities have everywhere become places of heterogeneity, and modern nation states have been haunted by the specter of minorities. This study analyses experiences relating to migration in 23 European countries. It is based on data from...

Making Muslim Women European

Fabio Giomi
This highly original book provides a social, cultural, and political history of Slavic Muslim women of the Yugoslav region in the first decades of the post-Ottoman era based on a study of voluntary associations (philanthropic, cultural, Islamic-traditionalist, and feminist). It is broadly held that Muslim women were silent and relegated to a purely private space until 1945, when the communist state "unveiled"...

The Anatomy of Post-Communist Regimes

Bálint Magyar, Bálint Madlovics
Offering a single, coherent framework of the political, economic, and social phenomena that characterize post-communist regimes this is the most comprehensive work on post-communist regimes to date. Focusing on Central Europe, the post-Soviet countries and China, the study provides concepts and theories to analyze the actors, institutions, and dynamics of post-communist democracies, autocracies, and dictatorships. The work explores the structural...

Cajetan on Sacred Doctrine

Hieromonk Gregory Hrynkiw, foreword by Andrew Hofer, OP, Andrew Hofer, OP
Cardinal Tommaso de Vio (1469-1534), commonly known as Cajetan, remains a misunderstood figure. Cajetan on Sacred Doctrine is the first ever monograph on Cajetan as a theologian in his own right, and it fills an immense lacuna in the debate on the nature of sacred doctrine from the Thomism of the Renaissance. Confirming Cajetan as a key protagonist within the emergent Reformation, this work delivers an indispensable immersion into his theological...

The Metamorphoses of the City of God

Étienne Gilson, translated by James G. Colbert
Étienne Gilson (1884-1978) was a French philosopher and historian of philosophy, as well as a scholar of medieval philosophy. In 1946 he attained the distinction of being elected an "Immortal" (member) of the Académie française. He was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1959 and 1964. The appearance of Gilson's Metamorphosis of the City of God, which were originally delivered as lectures at the University of Louvain, Belgium, in the Spring of 1952,...

The Quotable Saint Jerome

Saint Jerome, foreword by Scott Hahn, edited by Justin McClain
Among the illustrious writers of the early Church, Saint Jerome (345-420) had a way with words few could equal. To honor the 1600th anniversary of the death of this patron saint of librarians and Scripture scholars, the Catholic University of America Press is releasing The Quotable Jerome, a well-organized collection of memorable wisdom from this early witness to Catholic truth. While Jerome is known for acerbic wits, editor Justin McClain shows that much of the...

The Figure of Jesus in History and Theology

edited by Vincent Skemp, Kelley Coblentz Bautch
One of the leading Historical Jesus scholars of our time, John Meier has also made significant contributions in the areas of early Judaism and New Testament studies writ large. The Figure of Jesus in History and Theology features more than a dozen prominent scholars who engage Meier's work and address its reception today. These scholars, whose areas of expertise range from second temple Judaism to early Christianity,...

A South Carolina Chronology, third edition

edited by Walter Edgar, J. Brent Morris, C. James Taylor, George C. Rogers, Jr.
This third edition of A South Carolina Chronology offers a year-by-year chronology of landmark dates and events in South Carolina's recorded history. Unique to this volume are nearly thirty additional years of notable events and important updates to material covered in earlier editions. Historians Walter Edgar, J. Brent Morris, and C. James Taylor expand previously chronicled periods using a more contemporary view of race, gender, and other...

Genre Publics

Emma Baulch
Genre Publics is a cultural history showing how new notions of 'the local' were produced in context of the Indonesian 'local music boom' of the late 1990s. Drawing on industry records and interviews, media scholar Emma Baulch traces the institutional and technological conditions that enabled the boom, and their links with the expansion of consumerism in Asia, and the specific context of Indonesian democratization. Baulch shows how this music helped reshape distinct...

Kentuckians and Pearl Harbor

Berry Craig
When the air raid alarm sounded around 7:55 a.m. on December 7, 1941, Gunner's Mate Second Class James Allard Vessels of Paducah was preparing to participate in morning colors aboard the USS Arizona. In the scramble for battle stations, Vessels quickly climbed to a machine gun platform high atop the mainmast as others descended below decks to help pass ammunition up to gunners. At 8:06, a bomb exploded and the Arizona sank. Vessels's lofty perch saved his life, but most of...

Neither Nature nor Grace

T. Adam Van Wart
Neither Nature nor Grace operates at the intersection of systematic and philosophical theology, exploring in particular how St. Thomas Aquinas variously uses the latter in service to the clarification and faithful advancement of the former. More specifically, Neither Nature nor Grace explores the overlooked logical difficulties that have followed the late modern debates in ecumenical Christian theology as to whether...

The Bishop's Burden

Celeste McNamara
In 1563, the Council of Trent published its Decrees, calling for significant reforms of the Catholic Church in response to criticism from both Protestants and Catholics alike. Bishops, according to the Decrees, would take the lead in implementing these reforms. They were tasked with creating a Church in which priests and laity were well educated, morally upright, and focused on worshipping God. Unfortunately for these bishops, the Decrees provided few practical...

Glory of the Logos in the Flesh

Michael Waldstein
In Glory of the Logos in the Flesh, Michael Waldstein helps readers of Pope John Paul II's Theology of the Body enter this masterwork with clearer understanding. Part One, designed for entry-level readers, is a map of John Paul's text, a summary of each paragraph with an explanation of the order of the argument. Part Two reflects on the breadth of reason (logos) in Plato's Republic, Aristotle's Physics, and the Gospel of John, in contrast to the narrowing...

The Art of Teaching Russian

edited by Evgeny Dengub, Irina Dubinina, Jason Merrill, with contributions byEvgeny Dengub, Irina Dubinina, Aline Germain-Rutherford, Cynthia Lee Martin, Angelika Kraemer, Jason Merrill, David Kirk Prestel, Julia Mikhailova, Anna Tumarkin, Thomas Jesus Garza, Dianna Murphy, Narek Sahakyan, Sally Sieloff Magnan, Betty Lou Leaver, Christine M. Campbell, William J. Comer, Lynne DeBenedette, Benjamin Jens, Coleen Lucey, Benjamin Rifkin, Karen Evans-Romaine, Stuart H. Goldberg, Susan C. Kresin, Vicki...
A comprehensive guide to...

The Tar Heel State, revised edition

Milton Ready
When first released in 2005, The Tar Heel State was celebrated as a comprehensive contribution to North Carolina's historical record. In this revised edition historian Milton Ready brings the text up to date, sharpens his narrative on the periods surrounding the American Revolution and the Civil War and offers new chapters on the 1920s; World War II and the 1950s; and the confrontation between Jim Hunt, North Carolina's longest-serving governor, and Jesse Helms, a transformational, if...

Beauty and the Good

edited by Alice M. Ramos
In the past twenty years or more, there has been a growing interest among philosophers and theologians alike in the transcendentals and especially in the beautiful. This seems fortuitous since so much of contemporary culture is fixated in many ways on beauty, on what might be called a superficial or man-made beauty, intent on outward appearance, with little or no concern for the human person's interiority and distinctive nature. The...

Emerald Street

Daudi Abe
From the first rap battles in Seattle's Central District to the Grammy stage, hip hop has shaped urban life and the music scene of the Pacific Northwest for more than four decades. In the early 1980s, Seattle's hip-hop artists developed a community-based culture of stylistic experimentation and multiethnic collaboration. Emerging at a distance from the hip-hop centers of New York City and Los Angeles, Seattle's most famous hip-hop figures, Sir Mix-A-Lot and Macklemore, found mainstream...

Improving Outcomes

edited by Diane Kelly-Riley, Norbert Elliot
Students thrive when they are exposed to a variety of disciplinary genres, and their lives—and our institutions—are enriched by improving their writing outcomes. Taking account of evolving research, writing in the disciplines, and demographic and institutional shifts in higher education, this volume imagines new ways to improve writing outcomes by broadening the focus of assessment to wider issues of humanity and...

Laws of the Constitution

Donald F. Bur
Laws of the Constitution: Consolidated gathers all of the historical and contemporary constitutional documents pertaining to Canada, its provinces, and its territories, organized thematically and topically for ease of reference and supported by comprehensive lists and a thorough index. The volume excludes overridden and irrelevant documents, making it a comprehensive yet focused and precise reference that presents the words, ideas, and documents that have brought the constitution into being. A...

History of Ukraine-Rus'

Mykhailo Hrushevsky, edited by Christian Raffensperger, Frank E. Sysyn, Tania Plawuszczak-Stech, translated by Ian Press
Volume 2 is the central volume of the first cycle of Mykhailo Hrushevsky's History of Ukraine-Rus'. In this cycle, the eminent historian explores, chiefly, the history of the Ukrainian lands during the medieval period up until the dissolution of the Rus' state on western Ukrainian territories in the fourteenth century. This middle volume of the cycle...

Small Screen, Big Feels

Melissa Ames
While television has always played a role in recording and curating history, shaping cultural memory, and influencing public sentiment, the changing nature of the medium in the post-network era finds viewers experiencing and participating in this process in new ways. They skim through commercials, live tweet press conferences and award shows, and tune into reality shows to escape reality. This new era, defined by the heightened anxiety and fear...

Educating Air Forces

edited by Randall Wakelam, David Varey, Emanuele Sica, foreword by Alexander Meinzinger, with contributions byJames S. Corum, Harold R. Winton, Edward B. Westermann, Paul T. Mitchell, Wray R. Johnson, Martin James, Peter W. Gray, Richard Goette, John T. Farquhar, Jerome de Lespinois, Howard G. Coombs, James Beldon
Compared to armies and navies, which have existed as professional fighting services for centuries, the technology that makes air forces possible is much newer. As a result,...

Stories of Struggle

Claudia Smith Brinson
In this pioneering study of the long and arduous struggle for civil rights in South Carolina, longtime journalist Claudia Smith Brinson details the lynchings, beatings, bombings, cross burnings, death threats, arson, and venomous hatred that black South Carolinians endured—as well as the astonishing courage, devotion, dignity, and compassion of those who risked their lives for equality. Through extensive research and interviews with more than one hundred...

White Lawyer, Black Power

Donald A. Jelinek
Inspired by a colleague's involvement in the Mississippi Summer Project of 1964, Wall Street attorney Donald A. Jelinek traveled to the Deep South to volunteer as a civil rights lawyer during his three-week summer vacation in 1965. He stayed for three years. In White Lawyer, Black Power, Jelinek recounts the battles he fought in defense of militant civil rights activists and rural African Americans, risking his career and his life to further the...

My House Is Killing Me!, second edition

Jeffrey C. May and Connie L. May
foreword by Jonathan M. Samet, MD, and Elizabeth Matsui, MD, MHS
In this thoroughly revised edition of My House Is Killing Me! Jeffrey C. and Connie L. May draw on the dramatic personal stories of their clients to help readers understand the links between indoor environmental conditions and human health. Explaining how air conditioning, finished basements, and other home features affect indoor air quality, the authors offer a...

BAX 2020

Seth Abramson, Jesse Damiani, edited by Carmen Maria Machado, Joyelle McSweeney
BAX 2020, guest-edited by Joyelle McSweeney and Carmen Maria Machado, is the sixth edition of the critically acclaimed anthology series compiling an exciting mix of fiction, poetry, non-fiction, and genre-defying work. Featuring a diverse roster of new and established authors—including Anne Boyer, Alice Notley, and Raquel Salas Rivera—BAX 2020 presents an expansive view of high-energy writing. from Okazaki Fragments by Kanika...

The Power of the Brush

Hwisang Cho, series edited byClark W. Sorensen
Open access edition: DOI 10.6069/9780295747828 The invention of an easily learned Korean alphabet in the mid-fifteenth century sparked an "epistolary revolution" in the following century as letter writing became an indispensable daily practice for elite men and women alike. The amount of correspondence increased exponentially as new epistolary networks were built among scholars and within families, and written culture created room for...

All the Feels / Tous les sens

edited by Marie Carrière, Ursula Mathis-Moser, Kit Dobson, with contributions byNicole Brossard, Matthew Cormier, Nicoletta Dolce, Louise Dupré, Margery Fee, Ana María Fraile-Marcos, Smaro Kamboureli, Aaron Kreuter, Daniel Laforest, Carmen Mata Barreiro, Tanis MacDonald, Heather Milne, Eric Schmaltz, Maïté Snauwaert, Jeanette Toonder
All the Feels / Tous les sens presents research into emotion and cognition in Canadian, Indigenous, and Québécois...

Protecting Whiteness

edited by Cameron D. Lippard, J. Scott Carter, David G. Embrick, foreword by Eduardo Bonilla-Silva

Further Adventures on the Journey to the West

Master of Silent Whistle Studio, translated by Qiancheng Li, Robert E. Hegel, introduction by Qiancheng Li

A World of Inequalities

edited by Lucinda Mosher
An important interfaith dialogue examines causes of global inequality and explores solutions. In A World of Inequalities: Christian and Muslim Perspectives, fourteen leading Christian and Muslim scholars respond to the global crisis of inequality by demanding and modeling interreligious dialogue. This volume takes an intersectional approach, examining aspects of global inequality including gender, race and ethnicity, caste and social class, economic and...

Understanding Kate Atkinson

Brian Diemert
Best known for her Jackson Brodie series of detective novels, which were adapted into the BBC television series Case Histories, Kate Atkinson is the author of eleven novels, two plays, and a collection of short stories. Her literary awards include the 1995 Whitbread Award for a first novel and book of the year for Behind the Scenes at the Museum and the Costa Book Awards for best novel in 2013 and 2015 for Life after Life and A God in Ruins. In this first book-length study of Atkinson's literary career,...

Helping Others with Depression

Susan J. Noonan, MD, MPH
Mood disorders such as depression and bipolar disorder are biologic conditions of the mind and body that affect our everyday functioning, thoughts, feelings, and actions. Often devastating to the person, mood disorders can also be overwhelming to their family and close friends, who are frequently the first to recognize the subtle changes and symptoms of depression and the ones who provide daily support. Yet many feel unsure about how to help someone through the...

The Structures of Virtue and Vice

Daniel J. Daly
A new ethics for understanding the social forces that shape moral character. It is easy to be vicious and difficult to be virtuous in today's world, especially given that many of the social structures that connect and sustain us enable exploitation and disincentivize justice. There are others, though, that encourage virtue. In his book Daniel J. Daly uses the lens of virtue and vice to reimagine from the ground up a Catholic ethics that can better scrutinize the social forces that both affect our...

Affaires globales

Deborah S. Reisinger, Mary Beth Raycraft, Nathalie Dieu-Porter
Develop language skills and cultural knowledge essential for a career in the francophone world Affaires globales' broad scope of disciplines and cultural content will appeal to students interested in a wide variety of careers while giving them the skills needed to pursue them. This intermediate-high to advanced-level French textbook is designed for French for specific purposes courses such as...

Oak Seed Dispersal

Michael A. Steele
Seed dispersal is a critical stage in the life cycle of most flowering plants. The process can have far-reaching effects on a species' biology, especially numerous aspects of its ecology and evolution. This is particularly the case for the oaks, in which the dispersal of the acorn is tied to numerous tree characteristics, as well as the behavior and ecology of the animals that feed on and move these seeds to their final destination. Forest structure, composition, and...

Allies in Air Power

edited by Steven Paget, with contributions byBert Frandsen, Matthew Powell, Andrew Conway, John Moremon, Stephen L. Renner, Corbin Williamson, Richard P. Hallion, Maria E. Burczynska, Benjamin S. Lambeth, Walter A. Dorn
In the past century, multinational military operations have become the norm; but while contributions from different nations provide many benefits—from expanded capability to political credibility—they also present a number of challenges. Issues such as command and...

Teaching Late Twentieth-Century Mexicana and Chicana Writers

edited by Elizabeth Coonrod Martínez
Mexicana and Chicana authors from the late 1970s to the turn of the century helped overturn the patriarchal literary culture and mores of their time. This landmark volume acquaints readers with the provocative, at times defiant, yet subtle discourses of this important generation of writers and explains the influences and historical contexts that shaped their work. Until now, little criticism has been published about these important works.

Nineteenth-Century American Activist Rhetorics

edited by Patricia Bizzell, , edited by Lisa Zimmerelli, Lisa Zimerelli
In the nineteenth century the United States was ablaze with activism and reform: people of all races, creeds, classes, and genders engaged with diverse intellectual, social, and civic issues. This cutting-edge, revelatory book focuses on rhetoric that is overtly political and oriented to social reform. It not only contributes to our historical understanding of the period by covering a wide array of contexts—from letters,...

Popular Literature from Nineteenth-Century France: English Translation

translated by Masha Belenky, Anne O'Neil-Henry
The city of Paris experienced rapid transformation in the middle of the nineteenth century: the population grew, industry and commerce increased, and barriers between social classes diminished. Innovations in printing and distribution gave rise to new mass-market genres: literary guidebooks known as tableaux de Paris and illustrated physiologies examined urban social types and fashions for a broad audience of...

Cosmic Deputy

Kalamu ya Salaam
Cosmic Deputy is a literary memoir from esteemed activist, educator, producer, and poet Kalamu ya Salaam. Representative poems from Salaam's fifty years of writing are interspersed in an overarching essay tracing the poet's multitude of influences. Toward mapping a theory of a Black literary aesthetic, Salaam explores the cultural inheritances of Black resistance movements, blues music, and the ways in which these sources and others have shaped not only his own work but Black letters more...

Reimagining Human Rights

William O'Neill, William R. O'Neill
An interpretation of human rights that centers on the rhetorical — and religious — power of testimony. Jeremy Bentham described the idea of human rights as "rhetorical nonsense." In Reimagining Human Rights, William O'Neill shows that the rhetorical aspect of human rights is in fact crucial. By examining how victims and their advocates embrace the rhetoric of human rights to tell their stories, he presents an interpretation of human rights "from below,"...

Generous Thinking

Kathleen Fitzpatrick
Higher education occupies a difficult place in twenty-first-century American culture. Universities—the institutions that bear so much responsibility for the future health of our nation—are at odds with the very publics they are intended to serve. As Kathleen Fitzpatrick asserts, it is imperative that we re-center the mission of the university to rebuild that lost trust. Critical thinking—the heart of what academics do—can today often negate, refuse, and reject new...

The Environment

Paul Warde, Libby Robin, and Sverker Sörlin
Is it possible for the economy to grow without the environment being destroyed? Will our lifestyles impoverish the planet for our children and grandchildren? Is the world sick? Can it be healed? Less than a lifetime ago, these questions would have made no sense. This was not because our ancestors had no impact on nature—nor because they were unaware of the serious damage they had done. What people lacked was an idea: a way of imagining the web of interconnection and...

101 Women Who Shaped South Carolina

edited by Valinda W. Littlefield, foreword by Walter Edgar
Prior to the twenty-first century, most historical writing about women in South Carolina focused on elite White women, even though working-class women of diverse backgrounds were actively engaged in the social, economic, and political battles of the state. Although often unrecognized publicly, they influenced cultural and political landscapes both within and outside of the state's borders through their careers, writing, art, music, and activism.

Radical Sufficiency

Christine Firer Hinze
Rethinking the means through which we can achieve economic well-being for all. In this timely book, Christine Firer Hinze looks back at the influential teachings of priest-economist Monsignor John A. Ryan (1869-1945), who supported worker justice and defended a living wage for all Americans in the first half of the twentieth century. Advancing Ryan's efforts to articulate a persuasive plan for social reform, Hinze advocates for an action-oriented...

Spy Sites of Philadelphia

H. Keith Melton, Robert Wallace, with Henry R. Schlesinger
An illustrated guide to the history of espionage in Philadelphia and the Delaware Valley. Philadelphia became a battleground for spies as George Washington's Patriot army in nearby Valley Forge struggled to survive the winter of 1776-77. In the centuries that followed — through the Civil War, the rise of fascism and communism in the twentieth century, and today's fight against terrorism — the city has been home to...

Our Whole Gwich'in Way of Life Has Changed / Gwich'in K'yuu Gwiidandi' Tthak Ejuk Gonlih

Leslie McCartney, Gwich'in Tribal Council, foreword by Jordan Peterson, with contributions byLydia (Vittrekwa/Valetsi/Neyando) Alexie/Elias, Antoine Andre, Caroline Andre, Caroline (Kendo) Andre, Hyacinthe Andre, Annie Benoit, Annie (Koe) Benoit, Pierre Benoit, Sarah Bonnetplume, Sarah (Mitchell) Bonnetplume, Marka Bullock, Marka (Andre) Bullock, Lydia Alexie Elias, Mary Martha (Robert) Firth, Mary Martha Firth, Sarah Ann (Firth) Gardlund, Sarah Ann Gardlund, Elizabeth (Bonneplume) Greenland, El...
...

Viral BS

Dr. Seema Yasmin
Can your zip code predict when you will die? Should you space out childhood vaccines? Does talcum powder cause cancer? Why do some doctors recommend e-cigarettes while other doctors recommend you stay away from them? Health information—and misinformation—is all around us, and it can be hard to separate the two. A long history of unethical medical experiments and medical mistakes, along with a host of celebrities spewing anti-science beliefs, has left many wary of science and the...

Take Control of Your Drinking, second edition

Michael S. Levy
For decades, the standard treatment for people struggling with alcohol consumption has focused on convincing them to admit that they are an alcoholic, to stop drinking entirely, and to enter into a program, most commonly Alcoholics Anonymous. But in his more than thirty-five-year career as an addiction specialist working with people who want to change their drinking habits, Michael S. Levy has found that the...

Ossium Carnes Multae e Marci Tullii Ciceronis epistulis

Reginald Foster, Daniel P. McCarthy
Beginners and experts alike will find a complete immersion into the workings and nature of the Latin language embodied in the incomparable, insuperable epistles of the great Marcus Tullius Cicero, something which other commentators pass over or scorn. This second volume puts "meat on the bones" of the Latin language presented in the first volume: Ossa Latinitatis Sola: The...

George Washington's Final Battle

Robert P. Watson
George Washington is remembered for leading the Continental Army to victory, presiding over the Constitution, and forging a new nation, but few know the story of his involvement in the establishment of a capital city and how it nearly tore the United States apart. In George Washington's Final Battle, Robert P. Watson brings this tale to life, telling how the country's first president tirelessly advocated for a capital on the shores of...

Monumental Harm

Roger C. Hartley
In recent years, the debate over the future of Confederate monuments has taken center stage and caused bitter clashes in communities throughout the American South. At the heart of the debate is the question of what these monuments represent. The arguments and counterarguments are formulated around sets of assumptions grounded in Southern history, politics, culture, and race relations. Comprehending and evaluating accurately the associated claims and counterclaims...