Welcome to HFS Books

Since 1977 Hopkins Fulfillment Services has provided distribution services for a distinguished list of university presses and nonprofit institutions.

Our clients include Johns Hopkins University Press, Georgetown University Press, University of Washington Press, The University Press of Kentucky, Catholic University of America Press, University of New Orleans Press, The Maryland Center for History and Culture, University of South Carolina Press, Wesleyan University Press, Modern Language Association, Northeastern University Press, Family Development Press, Central European University Press, University of Alberta Press and Mount Sinai Health System.

HFSBooks.com offers books published by our clients for sale in one place. If you are looking for information regarding our distribution services, please visit hfs.jhu.edu.

In the Current Where Drowning Is Beautiful

Abigail Chabitnoy
A poetic re-visioning of narratives of violence against women and nature In the Current Where Drowning Is Beautiful is a meditation on water, land, women, and violent environmental changes as they affect both the natural world and human migration. The poet reckons with the unsettling realities that women experience, questioning the cause and effect of events and asking why stories of oppression are so often simply accepted as the only stories. Alutiiq language is used throughout...

"My Faith in the Constitution Is Whole"

Robin L. Owens
How Barbara Jordan used aacred and aecular acriptures in her social activism US Congresswoman Barbara Jordan is well-known as an interpreter and defender of the Constitution, particularly through her landmark speech during Richard Nixon's 1974 impeachment hearings. However, before she developed faith in the Constitution, Jordan had faith in Christianity. In "My Faith in the Constitution is Whole": Barbara Jordan and the Politics of...

Canadian Military Intelligence

David A. Charters, OtherAndrea Siew
The most comprehensive history of Canadian military intelligence and its influence on key military operations Canadian intelligence has become increasingly central to the operations of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF). Canadian Military Intelligence: Operations and Evolution from the October Crisis to the War in Afghanistan is the first comprehensive history that examines the impact of tactical,...

Policemen of the Tsar

Robert Abbott
Founded by Peter the Great in 1718, Russia's police were key instruments of tsarist power. In the reign of Alexander II (1855-1881), local police forces took on new importance. The liberation of 23 million serfs from landlord control, growing fear of crime, and the terrorist violence of the closing years challenged law enforcement with new tasks that made worse what was already a staggering burden. ("I am obliged to inform Your Imperial Highness that the police often fail to...

In a Few Minutes Before Later

Brenda Hillman
"[Hillman's] work is fierce but loving, risk-taking, and beautiful." —Harvard Review An iconoclastic ecopoet who has led the way for many young and emerging artists, Brenda Hillman continues to re-cast innovative poetic forms as instruments for tracking human and non-human experiences. At times the poet deploys short dialogues, meditations or trance techniques as means of rendering inner states; other times she uses narrative, documentary or scientific materials to record daily events during a time...

Norman Cousins

Allen Pietrobon
As the editor of the Saturday Review for more than thirty years, Norman Cousins had a powerful platform from which to help shape American public debate during the height of the Cold War. Under Cousins's leadership, the magazine was considered one of the most influential in the literary world. Cousins's progressive, nonpartisan editorials in the Review earned him the respect of the public and US government officials. But his deep impact on postwar international humanitarian aid,...

Picture Bride

Yoshiko Uchida, foreword by Elena Tajima Creef
Seeking an escape from life in her small village in Japan, Hana Omiya arrives in California in 1917, one of thousands of Japanese "picture brides" whose arranged marriages brought them to the United States. When she finally sets foot on a pier in San Francisco, she is disappointed to meet her soon-to-be husband, the stoic Taro Takeda, who looks much older than in the photo his family had shared. Far from the fantasy life she dreamed up back home, Hana confronts emotional distance...

Latter Days

Frederick Turner
Latter Days tells a story about the meaning of a human life in the strange new world that is emerging today. After an initial sonnet that presents the existential challenge of the COVID-19 pandemic, it opens with "The Wanderer," a view of the world from the perspective of an aging world traveler seeking a summation of his more than seventy years of wayfaring. It continues with "In a Plague Season," a collection of poetic notes on the pandemic and its parallel to the changing climate of the earth. The next section, "A...

The Route 9 Anthology

edited by Oliver Egger, compiled by Oliver Egger
A collection of writing from across Wesleyan University and its surrounding towns The Route Nine Anthology is a collection of poetry and prose from Wesleyan students, faculty, staff, and Middlesex County residents. It is the first collection of prose dedicated specifically to bridging the literary divide between the Wesleyan and Middlesex County communities.

A Short Treatise on the Virgin Mary

René Laurentin, foreword by Robert L. Fastiggi
As a peritus at Vatican II and by the end of his life arguably the world's leading Mariologist, René Laurentin has earned the privilege of republication of a work of considerable value for any theologian who aims for comprehensiveness of Catholic theological perspective, historically and systematically. Laurentin's orthodox, yet highly original treatment displays his command of all of the relevant biblical, patristic, medieval and modern texts up to and including...

Homewaters

David B. Williams
Not far from Seattle skyscrapers live 150-year-old clams, more than 250 species of fish, and underwater kelp forests as complex as any terrestrial ecosystem. For millennia, vibrant Coast Salish communities have lived beside these waters dense with nutrient-rich foods, with cultures intertwined through exchanges across the waterways. Transformed by settlement and resource extraction, Puget Sound and its future health now depend on a better understanding of the region's...

Jesuit Colleges and Universities in the United States

Michael T. Rizzi
Jesuit Colleges and Universities in the United States provides a comprehensive history of Jesuit higher education in the United States, weaving together the stories of the fifty-four colleges and universities that the Jesuits have operated (successfully and unsuccessfully) since 1789. It emphasizes the connections among the institutions, exploring how certain Jesuit schools like Georgetown University gave birth to others like Boston College by sharing...

Seattle from the Margins

Megan Asaka
From the origins of the city in the mid-nineteenth century to the beginning of World War II, Seattle's urban workforce consisted overwhelmingly of migrant laborers who powered the seasonal, extractive economy of the Pacific Northwest. Though the city benefitted from this mobile labor force—consisting largely of Indigenous peoples and Asian migrants—municipal authorities, elites, and reformers continually depicted these workers and the spaces they...

Women, Work, and Activism

edited by Eloisa Betti, Leda Papastefanaki, Marica Tolomelli, Susan Zimmermann
The thirteen critical and well-documented chapters of Women, Work and Activism examine women's labor struggle from late nineteenth-century Portuguese mutual societies to Yugoslav peasant women's work in the 1930s, and from the Catalan labor movement under the Franco dictatorship to workplace democracy in the United States. The authors portray women's labor activism...

First Among Men

Maurizio Valsania
George Washington—hero of the French and Indian War, commander in chief of the Continental Army, and first president of the United States—died on December 14, 1799. The myth-making began immediately thereafter, and the Washington mythos crafted after his death remains largely intact. But what do we really know about Washington as an upper-class man? Washington is frequently portrayed by his biographers as America at its unflinching best: tall, shrewd,...

Mobilizing Romani Ethnicity

Anna Mirga-Kruszelnicka, foreword by Ethel Brooks
The Roma issue is generally treated as a European matter. Indeed, the Roma are the largest European minority—their presence outside of Europe is a result of various waves of migration over the past four hundred years. Likewise, the stereotypes associated with the Roma—the problematized, stigmatized status of a "Gypsy" as well as the historical and contemporary manifestations of antigypsyism—are also of...

The Concise Guide to Bipolar Disorder

Francis Mark Mondimore, MD
When a diagnosis of bipolar disorder enters your life, you may not be sure where to turn for accurate information about this potentially devastating but treatable illness. Whether you yourself have been diagnosed, or a spouse, parent, child, friend, or employee has developed the illness, the need for information and advice is acute. Presenting the essentials of diagnosis and treatment clearly and succinctly, leading psychiatrist Dr. Francis Mark Mondimore distills everything you...

We'll Fight It Out Here

David Chanoff, with Louis W. Sullivan
Racism in the US health care system has been deliberately undermining Black health care professionals and exacerbating health disparities among Black Americans for centuries. These health disparities only became a mainstream issue on the agenda of US health leaders and policy makers because a group of health professions schools at Historically Black Colleges and Universities banded together to fight for health equity. We'll Fight...

Free-Market Socialists

Joseph Malherek
The Hungarian artist-designer László Moholy-Nagy, the Austrian sociologist Paul Lazarsfeld, and his fellow Viennese Victor Gruen—an architect and urban planner—made careers in different fields. Yet they shared common socialist politics, Jewish backgrounds, and experience as refugees from the Nazis. This book tells the story of their intellectual migration from Central Europe to the United States, beginning with the collapse of the...

The Bombardment of Åbo

Carl Spitteler, translated by Marianna D. Birnbaum
This farcical tale tells how the British bombing of a Finnish port city changes the life of the Russian governor, his wife, their cook, and the cook's Finnish fiancé. The story takes place during a Nordic offshoot of the Crimean conflict, known as the Åland War, in which a British-French naval force attacked military and civilian facilities on the coast of the Grand Duchy of Finland in 1854–1856. The location of the...

The Historical Construction of National Consciousness

Jenő Szűcs, edited by Gábor Klaniczay, Balázs Trencsényi, Gábor Gyáni
A long essay entitled Three Historical Regions of Europe, appearing first in a samizdat volume in Budapest in 1980, instantly put its author into the forefront of the transnational debate on Central Europe, alongside such intellectual luminaries as Milan Kundera and Czesław Miłosz. The present volume offers English-language readers a rich selection of the depth and breadth of the legacy of Jenő Szűcs...

The Making of Mămăligă

Alex Drace-Francis, edited by Alex Drace-Francis
Mămăligă, maize porridge or polenta, is a universally consumed dish in Romania and a prominent national symbol. But its unusual history has rarely been told. Alex Drace-Francis surveys the arrival and spread of maize cultivation in Romanian lands from Ottoman times to the eve of the First World War, and also the image of mămăligă in art and popular culture. Drawing on a rich array of sources and with many new findings,...

Black Lives in Alaska

Ian C. Hartman, David Reamer, foreword by Calvin E. Williams
The history of Black Alaskans runs deep and spans generations. Decades before statehood and earlier even than the Klondike gold rush of the 1890s, Black men and women participated in Alaska's politics and culture. They hunted whales, patrolled the seas, built roads, served in the military, and opened businesses, even as they endured racism and fought injustices. Into the twentieth century, Alaska's Black...

Faithful Fictions, second edition

Thomas Woodman
Catholic writers have made a rich contribution to British fiction, despite their minority status. Evelyn Waugh, Graham Greene, and Muriel Spark are well-known examples, but there are many other significant novelists whose work has a Catholic aspect. This is the first book to survey the whole range of this material and examine whether valid generalizations can be made about it. In charting such fiction from its development in the Victorian period through to the work of...

Botticelli and Renaissance Florence

edited by Cecilia Frosinini, Rachel Mcgarry
This sumptuously illustrated book presents the most recent scholarship in English on Botticelli and Renaissance Florence, featuring essays and entries written by an international team of scholars and experts in the field. The authors examine both the rich array of works featured in the exhibition—paintings, drawings, prints, decorative arts, and ancient Roman marble statues—and seminal themes concerning Botticelli and the artistic...

A Field Guide to Coastal Fishes of Bermuda, Bahamas, and the Caribbean Sea

Valerie A. Kells, Luiz A. Rocha, Carole C. Baldwin
Capturing the remarkable diversity of fishes from estuaries, mangrove nurseries, coralline and rocky reefs to well offshore, this fully illustrated guide to the subtropical coast of Bermuda, the tropical waters of the Bahamas, and the entire Caribbean Sea is the most comprehensive guide of its kind. The combined work of award-winning marine science illustrator Val Kells and distinguished ichthyologists Luiz A.

Conspiracy

Michael Shermer
Nothing happens by accident, everything is connected, and there are no coincidences: that is the essence of conspiratorial thinking. Long a fringe part of the American political landscape, conspiracy theories are now mainstream: 147 members of Congress voted in favor of objections to the 2020 presidential election based on an unproven theory about a rigged electoral process promoted by the mysterious group QAnon. But this is only the latest example in a long history of ideas that...

Empire, Colonialism, and Famine in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

edited by Bohdan Klid
The essays in this volume examine the often-overlooked connection between empire building, imperial rule, and mass starvation. While droughts and other natural disasters can lead to serious food shortages, a decline in food availability need not result in wide-scale starvation. Mass starvation in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries has almost always been linked to political decisions about food distribution. Some of the worst cases...

Ends of Painting

edited by David Homewood, Paris Lettau
Contemporary art begins where painting ends, or so goes one of recent art history's most dominant narratives. This book is a postmortem of the supposed death of painting in the period following World War II. In eleven essays by a global array of leading scholars, Ends of Painting offers a counter-history, showing how the practice and discourse of painting remained integral to art throughout the 1960s and 1970s. Written by art historians from Australia, Asia, Europe,...

UnAustralian Art

Rex Butler, A. D. S. Donaldson
UnAustralian Art: Ten Essays on Transnational Art History proposes a radical rethinking of Australian art. Rex Butler and ADS Donaldson do not seek to identify a distinctive national sensibility; instead, they demonstrate that Australian art and artists have always been engaged in struggles and creative exchanges with the rest of the world. Examining Australian art as much from the outside in as the inside out, Butler and Donaldson's methodology opens...

Vivienne Binns

edited by Anneke Jaspers, Hannah Mathews
Vivienne Binns is an important and singular figure in the history of Australian visual art. Her groundbreaking and experimental work has tested the philosophical underpinnings of art itself, both preempting and participating in the most significant cultural discourses of our times: from women's social and sexual liberation to Australia's regional identity. Her outstanding, multifaceted, and sustained contribution to Australian art was recognized in 2021 with an...

Jesus Becoming Jesus, Volume 3

Thomas G. Weinandy
Jesus Becoming Jesus, Volume 3 follows upon the previous two volumes of this series entitled Jesus Becoming Jesus. Volume 1 was a theological interpretation of the Gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke, and volume 2 was a theological interpretation of the Prologue and Book of Signs of John's Gospel (chapters 1-12). Unlike many conventional biblical commentaries, Weinandy...

New Charter for Health Care Workers, English edition

Pontifical Council for Pastoral Assistance to Health Care Workers
The New Charter for Health Care Workers is a revision and updating of the earlier 1994 edition, also produced by the Pontifical Council for Health Care Workers. The work is divided into three major sections: "Procreating," "Living," and "Dying," each of which lays out authoritative teachings in medical ethics grounded in the traditional resources of the Church

The Spirit of the Oxford Movement

Christopher Dawson, edited by Kenneth L. Parker
"This is the book we have been waiting for a permanent enrichment of our understanding of the Oxford Movement" proclaimed The Downside Review upon the publication of Christopher Dawson's masterwork in 1933, exactly 100 years after John Keble's sermon "National Apostasy" stirred a nation. Dawson himself regarded the book as one of his two greatest intellectual accomplishments. Dawson and John Henry Newman were Oxonians and both were converts to Catholicism; both stood...

What Makes a Carmelite a Carmelite?

Keith Egan, introduction by Steven Payne
Vatican II initiated lively conversations about the identity of religious orders and congregations when the council pointed out that these religious communities are divine gifts in and to the church. Keith Egan examines the nature of these charisms including, not only the original or founders' charism, but how charisms evolve over the centuries. Special theological attention to these charisms show...

Art Fallen from Heaven

Koos van Brakel
Aug 2022 - LM Publishers
Art Fallen from Heaven offers a new perspective on the origin of modern Balinese sculpture in the 1930s and an overview of its evolution from 1932 to 1973. Thoroughly illustrated with photos of traditional and modern sculpture as well as historic photos, this exhibition volume provides an overview of the artists association Pita Maha (1936–39) and many of its members. After Bali was subjugated by Dutch colonial rule, patronage shifted from the ruling monarchs to tourists and the...

Re-visualizing Slavery

edited by Nancy Jouwe, Wim Manuhutu, Matthias van Rossum, Merve Tosun
May 2021 - LM Publishers
In Re-visualizing Slavery, historians, heritage specialists, and cultural scientists shed new light on the history of slavery in Asia by centering visual sources—specifically, Dutch paintings, watercolors and drawings from the seventeenth through nineteenth centuries. The traditional image of slavery in Asia is shaped and dominated by terms such as 'mild,' 'debt,' and 'household,' but new historical research that...

We Have Never Lived On Earth

Kasia Van Schaik
Kasia Van Schaik's debut story collection follows the journey of Charlotte Ferrier, a child of divorce raised by a single mother in a small town in British Columbia after moving from South Africa. Mother and daughter wait out the end of a bad year in a Mexican hotel; a friendship is tested as forest fires demolish Charlotte's town; a childhood friend disappears while travelling through Europe; and a girl on the beach examines the memories of dying jellyfish. The stories traverse the most intimate and...

The Nature of Political Philosophy

James V. Schall
In his final collection of essays, Father Schall explores the life of faith across a dazzling array of subjects, from Martin Luther to bioethics. With his characteristic patience, brilliance, and careful tenacity, Father Schall interrogates profoundly what it means to try to be a citizen of the Kingdom of God in the city of Man. Never shying away from controversy, across 14 articles and 4 book reviews Father Schall investigates the critical themes of his life and...

Shari Lewis and Lamb Chop

Nat Segaloff
For almost half a century, celebrated ventriloquist and entertainer Shari Lewis (1933–1998) delighted generations of children and adults with the help of her trusted sock puppet sidekick, Lamb Chop. For decades, the beloved pair were synonymous with children's television, educating and entrancing their young audience with their symbiotic personalities and their proclivity for song, dance, and the joy of silliness. But as iconic as their television personas are,...

A Guide to the Wildflowers of South Carolina, revised and expanded edition

Patrick D. McMillan, Richard Dwight Porcher, Jr., Douglas A. Rayner, David B. White
A comprehensive and indispensable reference for identifying and appreciating native flora From its summits to its shores, South Carolina brims with life and unparalleled beauty thanks to its abundant array of native and naturalized flora, all carefully documented in this revised and expanded edition of A Guide to the Wildflowers of South Carolina. Dramatic advances in plant taxonomy and ecology have occurred since...

Canadian Performance Documents and Debates

edited by Anthony J. Vickery, Glen F. Nichols, Allana C. Lindgren, foreword by Jerry Wasserman
Canadian Performance Documents and Debates provides insight into performance activities from the seventeenth century to the early 1970s, and probes important yet vexing questions about Canada as a country and a concept. The volume collects playscripts and archival material to explore what these documents tell us about the values, debates, and priorities of artists and their audiences from the...

Critical Brass

Andrew Snyder
Ethnography explores political activism of carnival brass bands in Brazil Critical Brass tells the story of neofanfarrismo, an explosive carnival brass band community turned activist musical movement in Rio de Janeiro, as Brazil shifted from a country on the rise in the 2000s to one beset by various crises in the 2010s. Though predominantly middle-class, neofanfarristas have creatively adapted the critical theories of carnival to militate for a more...

Love and Rage

Kelley Tatro
English language study of the punk scene in Mexico City Love and Rage is a deeply ethnographic account of punk in Mexico City as it is lived and practiced, connecting the sounds of punk music to different styles of political action. Through compelling first-person accounts, ethnographer Kelley Tatro shows that punk is more than music. It is a lifestyle choice that commits scene participants to experimentation with anarchist politics. Key to that process is the concept of autogestión...

Moving Between Worlds

Andrea Olsen
Daily explorations to enhance embodied communication Communication is a fundamental human activity, and as much as 90% of all communication is non-verbal. Yet awareness of embodied intelligence in communication is rare. This book is the fourth in a series by interdisciplinary educator Andrea Olsen focused on embodiment. Through the exercises and readings in this book, we can deepen our relationship to ourselves and others and improve our communication skills,...

Musical Resilience

Shalini R. Ayyagari
Indian regional musicians find resilience in a postcolonial world In Musical Resilience, Shalini Ayyagari shows how professional low-caste musicians from the Thar Desert borderland of Rajasthan, India have skillfully reinvented their cultural and economic value in postcolonial India. Before India's independence in 1947, the Manganiyar community of hereditary musicians were tied to traditional patrons over centuries and through hereditary ties. In postcolonial...

Rights and the City

edited by Sandeep Agrawal
Rights and the City takes stock of rights struggles and progress in cities by exploring the tensions that exist between different concepts of rights. Sandeep Agrawal and the volume's contributors expose the paradoxes that planners and municipal governments face when attempting not only to combat discriminatory practices, but also advance a human rights agenda. The authors examine the legal, conceptual, and philosophical aspects of rights, including its various...

Between the Tides in Washington and Oregon

Ryan P. Kelly, Terrie Klinger, John J. Meyer
A spectacular variety of life flourishes between the ebb and flow of high and low tide. Anemones talk to each other through chemical signaling, clingfish grip rocks and resist the surging tide, and bioluminescent dinoflagellates—single-celled algae—light up disturbances in the shallow water like glowing fingerprints. This guidebook helps readers uncover the hidden workings of the natural world of the shoreline. Richly...

The Art of Ceremony

Rebecca J. Dobkins
The practice of ceremony offers ways to build relationships between the land and its beings, reflecting change while drawing upon deep relationships going back millennia. Ceremony may involve intricate and spectacular regalia but may also involve simple tools, such as a plastic bucket for harvesting huckleberries or a river rock that holds heat for sweat. The Art of Ceremony provides a contemporary and historical overview of the nine federally recognized tribes in Oregon,...

The Austrian Second Republic (Contemporary Austrian Studies, Vol 31)

edited by Marc Landry, Eva Pfanzelter
Contemporary Austria remains greatly influenced by post-1945 efforts to re-establish an Austrian state and forge a new "Austrian" identity. This volume focuses on the Austrian Second Republic and seeks, in particular, to explore aspects of nation-building and state-building. It adopts a multi-disciplinary perspective, bringing together insights from history, sociology, and cultural studies. With topics ranging from the role of South...

Traces

Patricia L. Hudson
An early American adage proclaimed, "The frontier was heaven for men and dogs—hell for women and mules." Since the 1700s, when his name first appeared in print, Daniel Boone has been synonymous with America's westward expansion and life on the frontier. Traces is a retelling of Boone's saga through the eyes of his wife, Rebecca, and her two oldest daughters, Susannah and Jemima. Daniel became a mythic figure during his lifetime, but his fame fueled backwoods gossip that bedeviled the Boone women throughout their...

Understanding Philip K. Dick

Eric Carl Link
A guide to the fantastic world of a science fiction legend Author of more than forty novels and myriad short stories over a three-decade literary career, Philip K. Dick (1928–1982) single-handedly reshaped twentieth-century science fiction. His influence has only increased since his death with the release of numerous feature films and television series based on his work, including Blade Runner, Total Recall, Minority Report, A Scanner Darkly, and The Man in the High Castle. In Understanding Philip K.

Aswat Muasira

Jonas Elbousty, foreword by Roger Allen
An engaging collection of contemporary short stories from various Arabic countries develops students' mastery of literary analysis and cultural awareness Aswat Mu'asira introduces advanced level students to contemporary short stories from across the Middle East. Fifty-five stories in Arabic from twenty countries engage students with current topics and literary approaches that open the door to discovering both established and emerging authors and literary...

Birdlife

Todd Ballantine
An illustrated flight across the Southeast Birdlife invites readers into the lives of birds we often meet in the southeastern United States. Writer, scientist, and illustrator Todd Ballantine presents the habits and habitats, colorings, migratory paths, and songs of nearly one hundred birds of the Southeast that he has come to know so well. He wings us across diverse landscapes, along the coasts of states from Virginia to Texas, and in elds and forests in between, providing...

Defending the Republic

edited by Bruce P. Frohnen, Kenneth L. Grasso
In recent years, our constitutional order has increasingly come under attack as irredeemably undemocratic, racist, and oppressive. At the same time, it is increasingly obvious that politic practices in the United States have strayed very far from the founders' designs and become deeply dysfunctional. The time is thus ripe for renewed reflection about the American political tradition. This...

Parental Rights in Peril

edited by Stephen M Krason
Parental Rights in Peril details the many reasons parental rights - one of the most basic of natural rights grounded in the very relationship of parents and their children - have come under considerable attack in recent times. The contributors to this volume lay out the different areas and ways in which those attacks have occurred and what has led to them. Their exploring of the nature and seriousness of the problem is a prerequisite to knowing how to respond to the attacks and restoring respect...

Buffalo Dance, expanded edition

Frank X Walker
When Frank X Walker's compelling collection of personal poems was first released in 2004, it told the story of the infamous Lewis and Clark expedition from the point of view of York, who was enslaved to Clark and became the first African American man to traverse the continent. The fictionalized poems in Buffalo Dance form a narrative of York's inner journey before, during, and after the expedition—a journey from slavery to freedom, from the plantation to the great Northwest, from servant to soul...

Faith and the Sacraments

International Theological Commission, edited by Thomas G. Weinandy
In September of 2014 thirty new members were appointed for a five-year term to the Vatican's International Theological Commission. These theologians, clerical and lay, were chosen from twenty-six different countries and from five continents. The commission was charged with...

House of Champions

Kevin Cook
The stories and accounts of Kentucky basketball's players, iconic coaches, and epic games have been told and retold, but lesser known are the stories of the arenas and venues that have been home to the Wildcats—buildings that have witnessed the sights, sounds, and shared spirit of the Big Blue Nation for over a century. In House of Champions: The Story of Kentucky Basketball's Home Courts, author Kevin Cook combines archival research and numerous interviews with...

Reconnecting after Isolation

Susan J. Noonan, MD, MPH
Although spending time alone for short periods may be restorative and helpful, unintentional or involuntary isolation can have profound detrimental effects on emotional and physical health. We all need social interaction and meaningful relationships in our lives to be well and thrive. Without them, we flounder. In Reconnecting after Isolation, Dr. Susan J. Noonan draws on our collective experience of the COVID-19 pandemic to help...

A Strange Whim of the Sea

Tim Loughman
On January 16, 1944, the submarine rescue vessel USS Macaw ran aground at Midway Atoll while attempting to tow the stranded submarine USS Flier. The Flier was pulled free six days later but another three weeks of salvage efforts plagued by rough seas and equipment failures failed to dislodge the Macaw. On February 12, enormous waves nudged the ship backward into deeper water. As night fell and the Macaw slowly sank, the twenty-two sailors on board—ship's captain Paul W. Burton, his...

Activist Literacies

Jennifer Nish
A groundbreaking rhetorical framework for the study of transnational digital activism What does it mean when we call a movement "global"? How can we engage with digital activism without Jennifer Nish "slacktivists"? In Activist Literacies, Jennifer Nish responds to these questions and a larger problem in contemporary public discourse: many discussions and analyses of digital and transnational activism rely on inaccurate language and inadequate frameworks.

National Literature in Multinational States

edited by Albert Braz, Paul Morris
If literature has often informed the creation of a national imaginary—a sense of common history and destiny—it has also complicated, even challenged, the unifying vision assumed in the formation of a national literature and sense of nation. National Literature in Multinational States questions the persistent association of literature and nation-states, contrasting this with the reality of multinational and ethnocultural diversity. The contributors to this...

A Guide to John Henry Newman

edited by Juan R. Velez
John Henry Newman (1801-1890), renowned thinker and writer, Anglican clergyman and later Roman Catholic priest and cardinal, has had a lasting influence on both Anglicans and Catholics, in the fields of literature, education, and theology. On October 13, 2019, Pope Francis declared him a saint in Rome. Appealing to both the student and the scholar, A Guide to John Henry Newman provides a wide range of subjects on Newman's life and thought relevant for our times and...

A Primer of Pastoral Spanish

Michael J. McGrath
A Primer of Pastoral Spanish is designed to provide clergy, religious and laity alike with the tools to be pastoral among Spanish-speaking people. This primer is modeled after Madrigal's Magic Key to Spanish (1953), whose author, Margarita Madrigal, bases her methodology on creating with the language instead of memorizing it. Previous knowledge of Spanish is not necessary, although, as you will discover, you already know thousands of words in Spanish. The vocabulary you know in English is the...

Saint Thomas Aquinas, third edition

Jean-Pierre Torrell, translated by Matthew K. Minerd, Robert Royal
The presentation of the life and work of any great thinker is a formidable task, even for a renowned scholar. This is all the more the case when such a historical figure is a saint and mystic, such as Friar Thomas Aquinas. In this volume, Fr. Jean-Pierre Torrell, OP, masterfully takes up the strenuous task of presenting such a biography, providing readers with a detailed, scholarly, and profound account of the thirteenth-century...

A Front Row Seat

Nancy Olson Livingston
From her idyllic childhood in the American Midwest to her Oscar–nominated performance in Sunset Boulevard (1950) and the social circles of New York and Los Angeles, actress Nancy Olson Livingston has lived abundantly. In her memoir, A Front Row Seat, Livingston treats readers to an intimate, charming chronicle of her life as an actress, wife, and mother, and her memories of many of the most notable figures and moments of her time. Livingston...

Can We Trust AI?

Rama Chellappa, with Eric Niiler
Artificial intelligence (AI) has evolved from an experimental computer algorithm used by academic researchers to a commercially reliable method of sifting through large sets of data that detect patterns not readily apparent through more rudimentary search tools. As a result, AI-based programs are helping doctors make more informed decisions about patient care, city planners align roads and highways to reduce traffic congestion with better efficiency, and merchants scan financial transactions to...

What the Eyes Can't See

Margaret Edds
The transformation of Governor Ralph Northam Virginia Governor Ralph Northam's "blackface scandal" could have destroyed any politician. The photo of Governor Northam purportedly in blackface created a firestorm not only locally but also in every political sphere. What the Eyes Can't See details why Northam's career did not end with the scandal, and how it made him a better governor—and a better citizen. In this book Margaret Edds draws on...

A Companion to Margaret More Roper Studies

Elizabeth McCutcheon, William Gentrup
This volume is an important contribution to the field of Margaret More Roper studies, early modern women's writing, as well as Erasmian piety, Renaissance humanism, and historical and cultural studies more generally. Margaret More Roper is the learned daughter of St. Thomas More, the Catholic martyr; their lives are closely linked to each other and to early sixteenth-century changes in politics and religion...

Teaching and Studying Transnational Composition

edited by Christiane Donahue, Bruce Horner
Essays exploring transnational composition as a site for engaging with difference. Transnational composition is a site for engaging with difference across populations, economies, languages, and borders and for asking how cultures, languages, and national imaginaries interanimate one another. Organized in three parts, the book addresses the transnational in composition in scholarship, teaching, and administration. It brings together contributions...

The Key to Unlocking the Door to the Truth

William Daniel
Father Ignacio Gordon, SJ, taught canon law (the Catholic Church's law) from 1960 until 1985 at the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome, with a concentration on procedural law, or the laws on trials. By all testimonies, he was outstanding for the clarity of his teaching, his humble affection for his students, his indefatigable and hidden service to the Apostolic See, and his priestly...

Emily Carr

Lisa Baldissera
Emily Carr (1871–1945) gained prominence when female painters were not recognized internationally. Her work reveals a fascination with questions inspired by the Canadian sea, landscapes, and people, reflecting a profound commitment to the land she knew and loved. Along with the Group of Seven, Carr became a leading figure in Canadian modern art. Although more than half a century has passed since her death, her paintings continue to challenge and inspire. Emily Carr: Life & Work traces Carr's trajectory from...

Iljuwas Bill Reid

Gerald McMaster
Few twentieth-century artists were catalysts for the reclamation of a culture, but Iljuwas Bill Reid (1920–1998) was among them. The first book on Reid by an Indigenous scholar details his incredible journey to becoming one of the most significant Northwest Coast artists of our time. Born in British Columbia and denied his mother's Haida heritage in his youth, Iljuwas Bill Reid lived the reality of colonialism yet tenaciously forged a creative practice that celebrated Haida ways of seeing and...

Rock & Roll in Kennedy's America

Richard Aquila
In the early 1960s, the nation was on track to fulfill its destiny in what was being called "the American Century." Baby boomers and rock & roll shared the country's optimism and energy. For "one brief, shining moment" in the early 1960s, both President John F. Kennedy and young people across the country were riding high. The dream of a New Frontier would soon give way, however, to a new reality involving assassinations, the Vietnam War, Cold War crises, the...

Charleston Renaissance Man

Ralph C. Muldrow
A study of the life, work, and extraordinary influence of an innovative architect In the years between World Wars I and II, Charleston, South Carolina, experienced a cultural renaissance led largely by artists, writers, architects, and preservationists that has been credited with making this port city the popular tourist destination it is today. Architect Albert Simons was foremost among this group and contributed mightily to the cultural...

American Defense Reform

Dave Oliver, Anand Toprani, foreword by Bill Owens
A roadmap for US military innovation based on the Navy's history of success through civilian-military collaborations The US military must continually adapt to evolving technologies, shifting adversaries, and a changing social environment for its personnel. In American Defense Reform, Dave Oliver and Anand Toprani use US naval history as a guide for leading successful change in the Pentagon. American Defense Reform...

Divine Speech in Human Words

Emmanuel Durand
Is the portrait of God revealed in Scripture fundamentally intelligible? The biblical accounts of God reveal seemingly contradictory themes: God's holiness and narratives telling of his anger; the Divine Omnipotence faced with the Impossible; the suffering Christ upon the Cross and the transcendent Trinity of Persons in God; the unique Savior and the universality of God's salvific will; and so forth. How are we to hold together all of this data without denying...

Her Birth and Later Years

Irena Klepfisz
Collected poems of pivotal Jewish lesbian activist A trailblazing lesbian poet, child Holocaust survivor, and political activist whose work is deeply informed by socialist values, Irena Klepfisz is a vital and individual American voice. This book is the first complete collection of her work. For fifty years, Klepfisz has written powerful, searching poems about relatives murdered during the war, recent immigrants, a lost Yiddish writer, a Palestinian boy in Gaza, and...

Kreisky, Israel, and Jewish Identity

Daniel Aschheim
The personal and professional life of Bruno Kreisky (1911–1990), Austria's long-serving Socialist chancellor from August 1970 to May 1983, has been the focus of many books and articles. However, his ambiguous and complex relationship to his Jewishness, the State of Israel, and Zionism, as well as his connections to his overall political project and global aspirations, remain only partially researched. This book studies and analyzes these more systematically and comprehensively and places...

Lawrence Tierney

Burt Kearns
Lawrence Tierney (1919–2002) was the kind of actor whose natural swagger and gruff disposition made him the perfect fit for the Hollywood "tough guy" archetype. Known for his erratic and oftentimes violent nature, Tierney drew upon his bellicose reputation throughout his career—a reputation that made him one of the most feared and mythologized characters in the industry. Born in Brooklyn to Irish American parents, Tierney worked in theater productions in New York before moving to...

Mao's Army Goes to Sea

Toshi Yoshihara
New details about the founding of China's Navy reveals critical historical context and insight into future strategy From 1949 to 1950, the People's Liberation Army (PLA) made crucial decisions to establish a navy and secure China's periphery. The civil war had been fought with a peasant army, yet in order to capture key offshore islands from the Nationalist rival, Mao Zedong needed to develop maritime capabilities. Mao's Army Goes to Sea is a...

Pro-dvizhenie

Alyssa DeBlasio, Izolda Savenkova
An advanced, student-centered textbook that uses popular media to explore diverse perspectives from across Russian-speaking cultures Pro-dvizhenie is a student-centered, inquiry-based textbook designed to build Advanced-level Russian proficiency through engagement with timely topics that encourage reflection and examination. Whether exploring the role of technology in relationships, learning about indigenous communities of Russia, or reflecting on what it...

Subcontinental Drift

Rajesh Basrur
How domestic constraints hamper India's foreign policy and its potential as a superpower One of the most important developments in today's changing international system is the emergence of India as a rising power. However, Rajesh Basrur finds that India is held back by serious domestic constraints. Subcontinental Drift explains why India's foreign policy is often characterized by multiple hesitations, delays, and diversions that may ultimately hamper its rise. ...

Walking Together, Working Together

edited by Leslie Main Johnson, Janelle Marie Baker
This collection takes a holistic view of well-being, seeking complementarities between Indigenous approaches to healing and Western biomedicine. Topics include traditional healers and approaches to treatment of disease and illness; traditional knowledge and intellectual property around medicinal plant knowledge; the role of diet and traditional foods in health promotion; culturally sensitive approaches to healing...

From Educational Experiment to Standard Bearer

edited by Daniel B. Friedman, Tracy L. Skipper, Catherine S. Greene, foreword by John N. Gardner
An exploration of the University of South Carolina's trailblazing approach to the first-year experience As an innovative educational experiment, University 101 was designed to support students' transition to and success in college. Now, fifty years after its inception, the program continues to bring national recognition to the University of...

George Tsutakawa

David F. Martin
Nov 2022 - Cascadia Art Museum
One of the leading Northwest artists of his generation, George Tsutakawa (1910–97) is internationally known for his sculpture and fountain designs. However, a lesser-known aspect of his career was the production of blockprints, watercolors, and works on paper that began in the 1930s and continued throughout his career. Born in Seattle and educated in Japan, Tsutakawa had early success while still in high school. He attended the University of Washington, where he received an MFA in sculpture in...

Building Breakthroughs

Raju Prasad
In Building Breakthroughs, Raju Prasad tells the story of important advancements in biotechnology and medical innovation from gene therapies to mRNA vaccines, providing historical context and examining cutting-edge research. Based on in-depth interviews with both the scientists who developed these discoveries and the patients who have benefited from them, Building Breakthroughs reveals the key players behind drug development and the inner workings of this essential...

Byzantium after the Nation

Dimitris Stamatopoulos
Dimitris Stamatopoulos undertakes the first systematic comparison of the dominant ethnic historiographic models and divergences elaborated by Greek, Bulgarian, Serbian, Albanian, Romanian, Turkish, and Russian intellectuals with reference to the ambiguous inheritance of Byzantium. The title alludes to the seminal work of Nicolae Iorga in the 1930s, Byzantium after Byzantium, that argued for the continuity between the Byzantine and the...

Germans against Germans

Moshe Zimmermann, translated by Naftali Greenwood
Among the many narratives about the atrocities committed against Jews in the Holocaust, the story about the Jews who lived in the eye of the storm—the German Jews—has received little attention. Germans against Germans: The Fate of the Jews, 1938–1945, tells this story—how Germans declared war against other Germans, that is, against German Jews. Author Moshe Zimmermann explores questions of what made such a war possible? How could such a...

The Contagion of Liberty

Andrew M. Wehrman
The Revolutionary War broke out during a smallpox epidemic, and in response, General George Washington ordered the inoculation of the Continental Army. But Washington did not have to convince fearful colonists to protect themselves against smallpox—they were the ones demanding it. In The Contagion of Liberty, Andrew M. Wehrman describes a revolution within a revolution, where the violent insistence for freedom from disease ultimately helped American...

Rejoice the Head of Paul McCartney

Adam Braver
From the author of November 22, 2963 and Mr. Lincoln's Wars "Sophisticated, subtle, nuanced, and very moving." —Rick Moody "Fierce and true, his fiction is unforgettable." —Claire Messud "A moving, illuminating, relevant book." —Joanna Scott In the fall of 1969, on Sunset Boulevard, a giant billboard advertised the newly released album, Abbey Road. Shortly after it appeared, Paul McCartney's head was cut off the display, mysteriously disappearing. Set against that backdrop, Rejoice the Head of...

Gender and Sexuality in Indigenous North America, 1400-1850, updated edition

edited by Sandra Slater, Fay A. Yarbrough
Groundbreaking historical scholarship on the complex attitudes toward gender and sexual roles in Native American culture, with a new preface and supplemental bibliography Prior to the arrival of Europeans in the New World, Native Americans across the continent had developed richly complex attitudes and forms of expression concerning gender and sexual roles. The role of the "berdache," a man living as a woman or a woman living as a man...

Man Kind

Zachary Gerdes
Masculinity requires a redesign. Men exhibit higher rates of suicide, lower rates of help-seeking, higher rates of substance use and abuse, and higher rates of anger and violence. How can this change? In Man Kind, counseling psychologist Zachary Gerdes, PhD, provides a framework for improving men's mental health and well-being while redefining what it means to be masculine. Rather than following a traditional view of masculinity focused on stoicism,...

Precarious Workers

Eloisa Betti
The recent vast upsurge in social science scholarship on job precarity has generally little to say about earlier forms of this phenomenon. Eloisa Betti's monograph convincingly demonstrates on the example of Italy that even in the post-war phase of Keynesian stability and welfare state, precarious labor was an underlying feature of economic development. She examines how in this short period exceptional politics of labor stability prevailed. The volume...

The Future of Sustainability Education at North American Universities

edited by Naomi Krogman, with Apryl Bergstrom, foreword by Thomas E. Lovejoy
From engineering to sociology, sustainability has, in recent years, become a key concept across academic disciplines. This collection explores sustainability education in the North American academy. The editors and contributors advocate for a more integrated approach to teaching sustainability in order to help students address the most pressing problems of the world, embrace experimentation, and...

Charleston to Phnom Penh

John Martin Taylor, foreword by Jessica B. Harris
A journey through the lands of boiled peanuts, pesto, and pickled peppercorns—with thirty recipes Foodies, travel enthusiasts, culinary historians, fans of fine writing, and cookbook collectors will feast on John Martin Taylor's Charleston to Phnom Penh. A unique vision of a joyous and peripatetic life, these essays take readers on a journey across three continents, from the South Carolina Lowcountry of Taylor's upbringing to the Caribbean, Italy, France,...

Heritage Drinks of Myanmar

Luke J. Corbin, photographs by Shwe Paw Mya Tin
Nov 2022 - Silkworm Books
Heritage Drinks of Myanmar takes the reader on an anthropological journey through emerald mountains and rust-red valleys to showcase some of the myriad alcoholic drinks made in this unique and fascinating country. In Myanmar, freshly brewed and distilled beers, wines, and spirits are integral parts of village economies, providing health, communal, and financial benefits. Rice whiskeys infused with insects and fresh beers made from a cornucopia of grains await eager...

Engineering the Lower Danube

Luminita Gatejel
The Lower Danube—the stretch of Europe's second longest river between the Romanian-Serbian border and the confluence to the Black Sea—was effectively transformed during the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. In describing this lengthy undertaking, Luminita Gatejel proposes that remaking two key stretches—the Iron Gates and the delta—not only physically altered the river but also redefined...

Eternal Offerings

edited by Liu Yang, with Robert Bagley, Li Xueqin, Jenny F. So, Zhu Fenghan
The collection of ancient Chinese bronzes at the Minneapolis Institute of Art is exceptional in its depth and rarity. It is generally considered to be one of the most important in the United States. The works span millennia, from the Shang through the Han dynasties (1600 BCE to 220 CE), illustrating the evolving function of ritual bronzes in Chinese society. This luxuriously illustrated...

Animal Truth and Other Stories

Sharona Muir
Animal Truth and Other Stories is a collection of eco-fabulist tales in which adventures with fantastic animals and real science lead to metamorphoses of the heart. Familiar legends, from Faust and Oedipus to werewolves and time travel, appear in radically new ways: An artist obsessed with species extinction unwittingly summons a demonic double when he creates a "banquet" featuring a baked mermaid. A brilliant woman studying a rare fish makes a soul-shattering discovery about motherhood. A...

How to Become an American

Daniel Wolff
An odyssey from pre–Civil War Charleston to post–World War II Minneapolis through Jewish immigrants' eyes The histories of US immigrants do not always begin and end in Ellis Island and northeastern cities. Many arrived earlier and some migrated south and west, fanning out into their vast new country. They sought a renewed life, fresh prospects, and a safe harbor, despite a nation that was not always welcoming and not always tolerant. How to Become...

Finding Francis

Elizabeth J. West
Finding Francis, finding family, freeing history Francis is found. Beyond Francis, a family is found—in archival material that barely deigned to notice their existence. This is the story of Francis Sistrunk and her children, from enslavement into forced migration across South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi. It spans decades before the Civil War and continues into post-emancipation America. A family story full of twists and turns, Finding Francis reclaims...

Piety in Practice

Judit Majorossy
This study of religion in the everyday life of late medieval Pressburg (historical Posonium/Pozsony, present-day Bratislava) shows what bequests for the souls of the dead can tell about the religious thinking of fifteenth- and early sixteenth-century inhabitants, and how overlapping religious and secular communities were active in memorial activities. Due to its geographical position, Pressburg was always an important cultural...

Ida Lupino

William Donati
British-born actress, singer, director, and producer Ida Lupino (1918-1995) cut one of the most alluring profiles of any Hollywood persona during the forties and fifties. The star of classic films such as They Drive by Night (1940), High Sierra (1941), and Road House (1948), she was a stalwart of the screen throughout her early career and frequently received top billing ahead of stars such as Humphrey Bogart. While her talent was undeniable, her insistence on taking only roles she felt would challenge her...

Ishiro Honda

Steve Ryfle, Ed Godziszewski, OtherYuuko Honda-Yun, Martin Scorsese
The first comprehensive biography of the director behind Godzilla and other Japanese sci-fi classics Ishiro Honda was arguably the most internationally successful Japanese director of his generation, with an unmatched succession of science fiction films that were commercial hits worldwide. From the atomic allegory of Godzilla and the beguiling charms of Mothra to the tragic mystery of Matango and the disaster and spectacle of...

Mastering Italian through Global Debate

Marie Bertola, Sandra Carletti
Critical engagement with complex global issues that provides an effective approach to promoting linguistic proficiency and social responsibility Mastering Italian through Global Debate is a one-semester textbook designed for students with Advanced-level Italian language skills, moving toward Superior and above. Over the course of each chapter, students gain linguistic and rhetorical skills as they prepare to debate on broad, timely topics, including environmental...

Mastering Spanish through Global Debate

Nieves Knapp, Krishauna Hines-Gaither, Morella Ruscitti-Tovar
Building superior Spanish language proficiency through critical engagement with global challenges Mastering Spanish through Global Debate is a one-semester textbook designed for students with Advanced-level Spanish language skills, moving toward Superior. Over the course of each chapter, students gain linguistic and rhetorical skills as they prepare to debate on broad, timely topics, including environmental consciousness, immigration, wealth...

Park Dae Sung

edited by Sunglim Kim, with contributions by Sunglim Kim, Jinyoung A. Jin, Jungsil Jenny Lee, Jiyeon Kim, Young Ji Lee, Suzie Kim
Contemporary Korean artist Park Dae Sung (b. 1945) works in the traditional medium of ink painting while transforming familiar Korean landscapes with his modern and imaginative interpretations of the natural world. Park, who lost his left arm and both parents at the age of five and is entirely self-taught, has said, "Nature is my teacher." He devoted sixty years to mastering traditional brush...

Carolina's Lost Colony

Peter N. Moore
An examination of the dual Scottish–Yamasee colonization of Port Royal Those interested in the early colonial history of South Carolina and the southeastern borderlands will find much to discover in Carolina's Lost Colony in which historian Peter N. Moore examines the dual colonization of Port Royal at the end of the seventeenth century. From the east came Scottish Covenanters, who established the small outpost of Stuarts Town. Meanwhile,...

Seizures and Epilepsy in Children, fourth edition

Eileen P. G. Vining, MD, Carl Stafstrom, MD, PhD, Eric Kossoff, MD, Adam Hartman, MD, Sarah Kelley, MD, Sarah Doerrer, Christa Habela, MD, PhD, Cynthia Salorio, Samata Singhi, MD, MS, MSc
For more than 30 years, parents, caregivers, and health care providers have trusted Seizures and Epilepsy in Children to provide comprehensive, science-based information and practical answers to the most common questions about these conditions. In this new edition, completely revised and updated, a team...

The Glaucoma Guidebook

Constance Okeke, MD, MSCE
When you receive a glaucoma diagnosis, knowing where to turn and how to understand treatment options can be overwhelming. Fifty percent of people with glaucoma do not even know they have the disease, and those who do may still struggle with managing it. If left untreated, glaucoma can lead to irreversible blindness. The Glaucoma Guidebook is an invaluable resource for anyone living with glaucoma and for those who are at high risk of developing the disease.

They Got Daddy

Sharon Tubbs
Decades had passed since I got the first hint that something illegal, something tragic, had happened to my grandfather. Back then, I was a little girl in the latter stages of elementary school, living in my childhood home in Fort Wayne, Indiana. My mother and I sat on the couch watching the TV news, and a cloud of silly dunce caps paraded across the screen. The Ku Klux Klan had a permit to march somewhere in the state. This was the 1980s. I thought of nice white teachers,...

Abraham Lincoln's Wilderness Years

J. Edward Murr, edited by Joshua Claybourn
From the introduction Abraham Lincoln spent one fourth of his life—age seven to twenty-one—learning and growing in southwestern Indiana between 1816 and 1830. Despite the importance of these formative years, Lincoln rarely discussed this period; indeed, he said of his youth, "It is a great piece of folly to attempt to make anything out of my early life. It can all be condensed into a single sentence, and that sentence you will...

Jesintel

Children of the Setting Sun Productions, edited by Darrell Hillaire, Natasha Frey, photographs by Fay "Beau" Garreau, Jr., with contributions by Lynda V. Mapes, Nicole Brown, afterword by Danita Washington
Dynamic and diverse, Coast Salish culture is bound together by shared values and relations that generate a resilient worldview. Jesintel—"to learn and grow together"—characterizes the spirit of this book, which brings the cultural teachings of nineteen elders to new generations. Featuring interviews...

Honest Aging

Rosanne M. Leipzig, MD, PhD
From Dr. Rosanne M. Leipzig, a top doctor with more than 35 years of experience caring for older people, Honest Aging is an indispensable guide to the second half of life, describing what to expect physically, psychologically, functionally, and emotionally as you age. Leipzig, an expert in evidence-based geriatrics, highlights how 80-year-olds differ from 60-year-olds and why knowing this is important for your health. With candor, humor, and empathy, this book...

Embracing Vocation

Dianne C. Luce
Revelations on craft from a foundational scholar of Cormac McCarthy Devotees of Cormac McCarthy's novels are legion, and deservedly so. Embracing Vocation, which tells the tale of his journey to become one of America's greatest living writers, will be invaluable to scholars and literary critics—and to the many fans—interested in his work. Dianne C. Luce, a foundational scholar of McCarthy's writing, through extensive archival research, examines the first fifteen years...

Multicultural Cities of the Habsburg Empire, 1880–1914

Catherine Horel
Catherine Horel has undertaken a comparative analysis of the societal, ethnic, and cultural diversity in the last decades of the Habsburg Monarchy as represented in twelve cities: Arad, Bratislava, Brno, Chernivtsi, Lviv, Oradea, Rijeka, Sarajevo, Subotica, Timioara, Trieste, and Zagreb. By purposely selecting these cities, the author aims to counter the disproportionate attention that the largest cities in the empire...

Immeasurable Outcomes

Gayle Greene
In this engaging account of teaching a Shakespeare class at a small liberal arts college, Gayle Greene illustrates what is so vital and urgent about the humanities. Follow along with Greene as she introduces us to her students and showcases their strengths, needs, and vulnerabilities, so we can experience the magic of her classroom. In Immeasurable Outcomes, Greene's class builds a complex human ecosystem that pushes students to think more deeply and discover...

Ink

Angela Woodward
"We have extensive accounts, typed out neatly: 'They took me into a dark room and started hitting me on the head and stomach and legs. I stayed in this room for 5 days, naked, with no clothes.'" Angela Woodward's novel Ink tells the story of the two women who spend their days doing that neat typing. Sylvia and Marina, both single mothers, work in a suburban office building, transcribing tape recordings of witness statements describing detainee abuse at Abu Ghraib. Their ordinary preoccupations—problems with the soap in the...

Omega Balance

Anthony John Hulbert
Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are essential in the human diet. In Omega Balance, noted scientist Anthony J. Hulbert explains how the balance between these fatty acids in the human food chain has changed over the last half-century and the very serious negative health impacts this imbalance has created. An imbalance of these omega fats contributes to increased rates of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, allergies, asthma, as well as cancer and a variety...

Open Society Unresolved

edited by Liviu Matei, Christof Royer
Is the concept of open society still relevant in the 21st century? Do the current social, moral, and political realities call for a drastic revision of this concept? Here fifteen essays address real-world contemporary challenges to open society from a variety of perspectives. What unites the individual authors and chapters is an interest in open society's continuing usefulness and relevance to address current problems. And what...

Teaching Postwar Japanese Fiction

edited by Alex Bates
Essays about teaching postwar Japanese fiction in its cultural and historical contexts. As Japan moved from the devastation of 1945 to the economic security that survived even the boom and bust of the 1980s and 1990s, its literature came to embrace new subjects and styles and to reflect on the nation's changing relationship to other Asian countries and to the West. This volume will help instructors introduce students to novels, short stories, and manga that confront postwar Japanese...

Journey Indiana: From Above

WTIU
Travel the skies to see the Hoosier state in a whole new way. Utilizing aerial cinematography exclusively, Journey Indiana: From Above breathes new life into well-known areas of the state and showcases some of Indiana's hidden gems. From busy cityscapes to quiet landscapes, discover the history and grandeur of Indiana. The Journey Indiana team, along with hosts Ashley Chilla and Brandon Wentz, take viewers on adventures across the state. Head to Indianapolis for a bird's eye view of Monument Circle. See the USS...

A Life for Belarus

Stanislau Shushkevich
This memoir of the first president of an independent Belarus (1991-1994) tells about the revival of independent Belarus, the difficulties in establishing a democracy and a market economy, a hardened Soviet mentality, and the political immaturity of the intelligentsia and obduracy of the old nomenklatura. Stanislau Shushkevich, born in 1934, narrates his path from a son of an "enemy of the people" to a doctorate in physics, and then to be the first head of independent...

Brilliance in Exile

István Hargittai, Balazs Hargittai
By addressing the enigma of the exceptional success of Hungarian emigrant scientists and telling their life stories, Brilliance in Exile combines scholarly analysis with fascinating portrayals of uncommon personalities. István and Balazs Hargittai discuss the conditions that led to five different waves of emigration of scientists from the early twentieth century to the present. Although these exodes were driven...

Liberals, Conservatives, and Mavericks

edited by Frank Cibulka, Zachary T. Irwin
No Church is monolithic—this is the preliminary premise of this volume on the public place of religion in a representative number of post-communist countries. The studies confirm that within any religious organization we can expect to find fissures, factions, theological or ideological quarrels, and perhaps even competing interest groups, such as missionary workers,...

Underground Streams

edited by János M. Rainer
The authors of this edited volume address the hidden attraction that existed between the extremes of left and right, and of internationalism and nationalism under the decades of communist dictatorship in Eastern Europe. One might suppose that under the suppressive regimes based on leftist ideology and internationalism their right-wing opponents would have been defeated and ultimately removed. These essays, on the...

Al-Qata'i

Reem Bassiouney, translated by Roger Allen
An award-winning novelist's vibrant portrayal of the struggle to create a more unified society in medieval Egypt and how this has shaped Egypt today. Brimming with intrigue, adventure, and romance, Al-Qata'i: Ibn Tulun's City Without Walls tells the epic story of visionary Egyptian leader Ahmad Ibn Tulun who built Al-Qata'i (now Cairo) into a thriving multicultural empire. The novel begins with the rediscovery of the Ibn Tulun Mosque in 1918 and recounts Ibn...

America's Path Forward

edited by Konstanze Frischen, Michael Zakaras
Critiques and solutions offered by social changemakers from all walks of life The United States is living through a period of polarization and upheaval. We hunger for answers, yet too often turn to the same people and institutions, expecting different outcomes. How can this be? This book takes a different angle. It features award-winning social innovators from all walks of life with decades of...

Fixing American Cybersecurity

edited by Larry Clinton, foreword by Kiersten Todt, with contributions by Anthony Shapella, Lou DeSorbo, Jeffrey C. Brown, J.R. Williamson, Michael Higgins, Michael Gordon, Josh Higgins, Greg Montana, Gary McAlum, Kenneth Huh, Ryan Boulais, Jamison Gardner, Andy Kirkland, Alex Green, Richard Spearman, Carter Zheng, Tarun Krishnakumar, Larry Clinton

Forbidden

edited by Drew Christiansen, Carole Sargent
Moral theologians, defense analysts, conflict scholars, and nuclear experts imagine a world free from nuclear weapons At a 2017 Vatican conference, Pope Francis condemned nuclear weapons. This volume, issued after the 60th anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis, presents essays from moral theologians, defense analysts, conflict transformation scholars, and nuclear arms control experts, with testimonies from witnesses. It is a companion...

Reinventing the Supply Chain

Jack Buffington
An original vision for using technology to transform supply chains into value chains in order to revitalize American communities When the COVID-19 pandemic led to a global economic "shutdown" in March 2020, our supply chains began to fail, and out-of-stocks and delivery delays became the new norm. Contrary to public perception, the pandemic strain did not break the current system of supply chains; it merely exposed weaknesses and fault lines that were decades in...

The COVID-19 Intelligence Failure

Erik J. Dahl
An in-depth analysis of why COVID-19 warnings failed and how to avert the next disaster Epidemiologists and national security agencies warned for years about the potential for a deadly pandemic, but in the end global surveillance and warning systems were not enough to avert the COVID-19 disaster. In The COVID-19 Intelligence Failure, Erik J. Dahl demonstrates that understanding how intelligence warnings work — and how they fail — shows why the years of predictions were not...

Beyond Fitting In

edited by Kelly Ritter
Guidance on teaching writing to first-generation college students. Beyond Fitting In interrogates how the cultural capital and lived experiences of first-generation college students inform literacy studies and the writing-centered classroom. Essays, written by scholar-teachers in the field of rhetoric and composition, discuss best practices for teaching first-generation students in writing classrooms, centers, programs, and other environments.

Lucky Medicine

Lester W. Thompson
A remarkable, personal glimpse of Black student life at Indiana University in the early 1960s.   In 1961, a skinny African American boy from Indianapolis arrived at Indiana University Bloomington determined to become a doctor. For the next three years, Lester Thompson kept a detailed, intimate diary of his journey to graduation. In Lucky Medicine, Lester returns to his long-ago journal and, with honesty, humor, and a healthy dose of rueful self-reflection, shares stories from...

Harvard, Hollywood, Hitmen, and Holy Men

Paul W. Williams
The movie director Paul Williams is a real-life Forrest Gump. Williams' experiences form a unique and often wild constellation of encounters with star power, political power, and spiritual power—a life cycle that led to fame and fortune and to integrity and anonymity.     In a mad childhood created by an autocratic English teacher father and an infantilizing mother, he develops a precocious visual acuity to avoid wallops and a writing ability that mollified his father. This...

A Is for Affrilachia

Frank X Walker, illustrated by Ronald W. Davis
The people and places in Appalachia are as rich, multifaceted, and diverse as the region itself. When author Frank X Walker first coined the phrase "Affrilachia," he wanted to ensure that the voices and accomplishments of African Americans in that region were recognized and exalted. A is for Affrilachia not only brings awareness of notable African Americans from this region, but this inspired children's alphabet book is also an exuberant celebration of the people, physical spaces, and...

Building Inclusive Communities in Rural Canada

edited by Clark Banack, Dionne Pohler
This collection challenges misconceptions that rural Canada is a bastion of intolerance. While examining the extent and nature of contemporary cultural and religious discrimination in rural Canadian communities, the editors and contributors explore the many efforts by rural citizens, community groups, and municipalities to counter intolerance, build inclusive communities, and become better neighbours. Throughout, scholars and community leaders focus on...

Making Wonderful

Martin Tweedale
In Making Wonderful, Martin M. Tweedale tells how an ideology arose in the West that energized the economic expansion that has led to ecological disaster. He takes us back to the rise of cities and autocratic rulers, and analyzes how respect for custom and tradition gave way to the dominance of top-down rational planning and organization. Then came a highly attractive myth of an eventual future in which all of humankind's material and spiritual ills would be banished and...

Mercantile Mobility

Helen Kwan Yee Cheung
This exhibition catalogue traces a group of dynamic Chinese merchants and their business activities in big cities and small towns in Western Canada after they arrived from China, covering the mid-nineteenth century into the millennium. Their movements are illustrated on various maps and chronicled in many written accounts. By managing the flow of people, products, and money at the municipal, provincial, and global levels, these individuals added to the growth of the...

Never Too Late

Shannon Dowler, MD
In Never Too Late, Shannon Dowler, MD, a family physician who is also an expert on sexually transmitted diseases (STD), provides a refreshing overview of sexual education for people over 55. With the advent of dating apps, vibrant 55+ retirement communities, and sexual enhancement drugs, adults are sexually active well into their golden years. Unfortunately, the rates of STDs are dramatically increasing in older adults. In entertaining, accessible language, Dr. Dowler presents...

Heaven on the Half Shell, second edition

David George Gordon, Samantha Larson, MaryAnn Barron Wagner, foreword by Kenneth K. Chew
Heaven on the Half Shell offers a thoroughly researched and richly illustrated history of the Pacific Northwest's beloved bivalve, the oyster. Starting with the earliest evidence of sea gardens and clam beds from 11,500 years ago, this book covers the history of oyster cultivation through contemporary aquaculture in coastal Washington, Oregon, British Columbia, northern California,...

Cherokee Earth Dwellers

Christopher B. Teuton, with Loretta Shade, Hastings Shade, with Larry Shade, illustrated by MaryBeth Timothy
Ayetli gadogv—to "stand in the middle"—is at the heart of a Cherokee perspective of the natural world. From this stance, Cherokee Earth Dwellers offers a rich understanding of nature grounded in Cherokee creature names, oral traditional stories, and reflections of elders and knowledge holders. During his lifetime, elder Hastings Shade created booklets with over six...

What Things Cost

edited by Rebecca Gayle Howell, Ashley M. Jones, Emily J. Jalloul
What Things Cost: an anthology for the people is the first major anthology of labor writing in nearly a century. Here, editors Rebecca Gayle Howell & Ashley M. Jones bring together more than one hundred contemporary writers singing out from the corners of the 99 Percent, each telling their own truth of today's economy. In his final days, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. called for a "multiracial coalition of the working poor." King hoped...

The Richmond Group Artists

Shaun Thomas Dingwerth
This is the untold story of a group of artists whose interest in fostering art in their community made an authentic contribution to the history of art in America. Taking for their subjects the local people, flora, and landscapes, they developed a distinctive impressionistic style, uninfluenced by other art movements in Indiana. Richmond, Indiana, became an important center for art in the Midwest, a place that nourished and inspired the artists whose work this book celebrates.

Icelight

Ranjit Hoskote
Set in an age of ecological catastrophe, Icelight eloquently accepts transience yet asserts the robustness of hope Icelight, Ranjit Hoskote's eighth collection of poems, enacts the experience of standing at the edge—of a life, a landscape, a world assuming new contours or going up in flames. Yet, the protagonists of these poems also stand at the edge of epiphany. In the title poem, we meet the Neolithic cave-dweller who, dazzled by a shapeshifting nature, crafts the first icon. The 'I' of these poems is not a sovereign 'I'. A...

In Springtime

Sarah Blake
Lost in the woods with a horse, a mouse, and the ghost of a dead bird, you will discover if you're meant to live In Sarah Blake's epic poem of survival, we follow a nameless main character lost in the woods. There, they discover the world anew, negotiating their place among the trees and the rain and the animals. Something brought them to the woods that nearly killed them, and they're not sure they want to live through this experience either. But the world surprises them again and again with beauty and intrigue. They come...

suddenly we

Evie Shockley
Evie Shockley's new poems invite us to dream—and work—toward a more capacious "we" In her new poetry collection, Evie Shockley mobilizes visual art, sound, and multilayered language to chart routes towards openings for the collective dreaming of a more capacious "we." How do we navigate between the urgency of our own becoming and the imperative insight that whoever we are, we are in relation to each other? Beginning with the visionary art of Black women like Alison Saar and Alma Thomas, Shockley's poems draw and forge a...

The Wild Hunt Divinations

Trevor Ketner
Shakespeare's 154 sonnets anagrammed into wildly new poems about queer desire and kink The Wild Hunt Divinations: A Grimoire is a stunning second collection from National Poetry Series winner, Trevor Ketner. Comprised of 154 sonnets, each anagrammed line-by-line from Shakespeare's sonnets, the book refracts these lines through the thematic lens of transness, queer desire, kink, and British paganism. The sonnets come together to form a grimoire that casts a trancelike and intense spell on the reader.

Waiting for Wovoka

Gerald Vizenor
Native puppeteers from the White Earth Reservation travel to the 1962 World's Fair In the summer of 1962, a group of young Native American puppeteers travel in a converted school bus from the White Earth Reservation to the Century 21 Exposition, World's Fair in Seattle, Washington. The five Natives, three young men and two young women, have endured abandonment, abuse, poverty, and find solace, humor, and courage with a mute puppeteer—a Native woman in her seventies who writes...

Stomp and Shout

Peter Blecha
Long before the world discovered grunge, the Pacific Northwest was already home to a singular music culture. In the late 1950s, locals had codified a distinct offshoot of rockin' R&B, and a surprising number of them would skyrocket to success, including Little Bill & the Bluenotes, the Wailers, Ron Holden, Paul Revere & the Raiders, the Kingsmen, Merrilee Rush, and the Sonics. Peter Blecha tells the story of music in the Pacific Northwest from the 1940s to the...

The Words and Wares of David Drake

edited by Jill Beute Koverman, Jane Przybysz
A celebration of the remarkable poem vessels of Dave the Potter David Drake, also known as Dave the Potter, was born enslaved in Edgefield, South Carolina, at the turn of the nineteenth century. Despite laws prohibiting enslaved people from learning to read or write, Drake was literate and signed some of his pots, not only with his name and a date, but with verse—making a powerful statement of...

Drinking from Graveyard Wells

Yvette Lisa Ndlovu
"Even in death, who has ownership over Black women's bodies?" Questions like this lurk between the lines of this stunning collection of stories that engage with African women's histories, both personal and generational. Their history is not just one thing: there is heartbreak and pain, and joy, and flying and magic, so much magic. An avenging spirit takes on the patriarchy from beyond the grave. An immigrant woman undergoes a naturalization ceremony in an imagined American state that...

Little Ohio

Jane Simon Ammeson
Granville A New England village tucked away in the hills of East Central Ohio? That's what settlers from Granville, Massachusetts and Granby, Connecticut wanted when they set roots here in 1805. It's a dream that persisted and even today Granville, population under 6000 but seemingly so much larger when Dennison University students are in attendance, is a lovely stretch of tree-lined streets and gracious 19th century buildings filled with eclectic shops, galleries, restaurants and boutiques. ...

Railroads, Art, and American Life

J. Craig Thorpe
Explore the past, present, and future of rail travel through 30 years of one artist's work. Once a common part of the American landscape, trains are increasingly fading from public view. Though photographs can accurately convey the details of "what, where, and when," sometimes paintings can better convey the deeper truths of an era. Collecting more than thirty years of paintings and renderings, Railroads, Art, and American Life tells the story of rail transportation in...

39 Berne Street

Max Lobe, translated by Johanna McCalmont
Chewing determinedly on his ndongo ndongo, Uncle Démoney contemplated the sunrise. It was more than a routine for him. It was an essential daily ritual. A religion. His ndongo ndongo, a thirty-centimeter rattan stem as thick as a cigar, served as a toothbrush. My uncle simply had no desire to buy himself a regular one. That's what we use over here, he said, a well-dried-out ndongo ndongo. I don't know why Uncle Démoney spent so much time on oral hygiene. As a child, I used to think it was...

Lost Texts in Rhetoric and Composition

edited by Deborah H. Holdstein
Rediscovered texts for teaching composition and rhetoric. A project of recovery and reanimation, Lost Texts in Rhetoric and Composition foregrounds a broad range of publications that deserve renewed attention. Contributors to this volume reclaim these lost texts to reenvision the rhetorical tradition itself. Authors discussed include not only twentieth-century American compositionists but also a linguist, a poet, a philosopher, a painter, a Renaissance rhetorician, and a...

Brother Poem

Will Harris
A speculative-poetic work from the Forward Prize-winning, T.S. Eliot shortlisted author of RENDANG 4 million years ago, a tiny branch in the multiverse led to the formation of Brother Poem, a book from a dimension uncannily like our own but intuited through signs, whispers, glitches, and echoes, shadowed by the loss of what can't be seen. Brother Poem tells stories of bizarre familial reckonings and difficult relationships, about love and living with others; it is a shifting portrait of the personas which define us. At the...

An Anthology of Monsters

Cherie Dimaline
An Anthology of Monsters by Cherie Dimaline, award-winning Métis author of The Marrow Thieves, is the tale of an intricate dance with life-long anxiety. It is about how the stories we tell ourselves—both the excellent and the horrible—can help reshape the ways in which we think, cope, and ultimately survive. Using examples from her published and forthcoming books, from her mère, and from her own late night worry sessions, Dimaline choreographs a deeply personal narrative...

Indie Rock

Joe Bishop
Indie Rock candidly focuses on a queer poet/musician's life in Newfoundland, and his personal struggles with addiction, OCD, and trauma. This intelligent and punchy collection is steeped in musicality and the geographies and cadences of Newfoundland. With an astute attention to form, rhythm, and aesthetics, Joe Bishop tells an honest and contemporary coming-of-age story about an artist alienated from, but fascinated by, the world he inhabits. Readers dealing with grief and living through recovery will find solace in these poems,...

Monitoring Station

Sonja Ruth Greckol
Sonja Ruth Greckol's Monitoring Station enters a slipstream of space and planetary language, circling time, embodying loss and longing, generating and regenerating in a faltering climate. Orbiting through a mother's death, a grandbaby's birth, and a pandemic summer, these poems loop and fragment in expansive and empathetic ways. The title poem locates a settler voice revisiting Treaties 6 and 7 and the Métis lands of her Alberta childhood, while the overall collection is tethered to Toronto shadowed by northland...

In This World of Ultraviolet Light

Raul Palma
His first time in Miami International Airport, Palacio was dazzled. How do I know? Coño! Because that's how I felt when I arrived an eternity ago. I was eighteen and standing in this long terminal of waiting and cancelled flights and indecipherable announcements and food—oh God, food! —the whole corridor fragrant with frying oil, salt, so much grease I felt full just breathing. Back then, it was easy for me to break my visa and seek asylum. My parents were already dead—or at least those...

Approaches to Teaching the Romance of the Rose

edited by Daisy Delogu, Anne-Hélène Miller
Essays on teaching love, ethics, and medieval allegory. One of the most influential texts of its time, the Romance of the Rose offers readers a window into the world view of the late Middle Ages in Europe, including notions of moral philosophy and courtly love. Yet the Rose also explores topics that remain relevant to readers today, such as gender, desire, and the power of speech. Students, however, can find the work challenging because of its dual...

A Calabash of Cowries

Luisah Teish
A Calabash of Cowries: Ancient Wisdom for Modern Times is a collection of tales featuring the Orishas and the wonders of the natural world. Suitable for adults and children, artists and teachers, readers of all cultures will discover in these retellings of traditional tales a resource that illuminates the mythic and the real, the ancient past and the emerging present. An offering of spiritual wisdom and cultural celebration through stories that have and will continue to endure the...

On Nixon's Madness

Zachary Jacobson
When Richard Nixon battled for the presidency in 1968, he did so with the knowledge that, should he win, he would face the looming question of how to extract the United States from its disastrous war in Vietnam. It was on a beach that summer that Nixon disclosed to his chief aide, H. R. Haldeman, one of his most notorious, risky gambits: the madman theory. In On Nixon's Madness, Zachary Jonathan Jacobson examines the enigmatic president through this theory of Nixon's own invention. With...

Unsettling

Gilberto Rosas
On August 3, 2019, a far-right extremist committed a deadly mass shooting at a major shopping center in El Paso, Texas, a city on the border of the United States and Mexico. In Unsettling, Gilberto Rosas situates this devastating shooting as the latest unsettling consequence of our border crisis and currents of deeply rooted white nationalism embedded in the United States. Tracing strict immigration policies and inhumane border treatment from...

Dance Works

Allison Orr, foreword by Liz Lerman
Ride along with choreographer Allison Orr and her civic collaborators as they reflect on their dances together In 2001, Allison Orr made a dance with 13 City of Austin firefighters. Over the next 20 years, her unique practice of collaborating with city employees flowered into civic storytelling through movement at public pools, tableaus of power line workers shimmying up 40' poles in front of 5000 people, and intricate choreography of trash trucks on a misty tarmac.

Half-Life of a Secret

Emily Strasser
In 1942, the US government began construction on a sixty-thousand-acre planned community named Oak Ridge in a rural area west of Knoxville, Tennessee. Unmarked on regional maps, Oak Ridge attracted more than seventy thousand people eager for high-paying wartime jobs. Among them were author Emily Strasser's grandfather George, a chemist. All employees—from scientists to secretaries, from military personnel to construction workers—were restricted by the tightest security. They...

Stone Breaker

Kathleen L. Housley
Percival probed the volcanic origins of rock via geology and the seething nature of his psyche via poetry Stone Breaker is an in-depth, accessible biography of a true American polymath, James Gates Percival. A poet, linguist, and unstable savant Percival was also a brilliant geologist who walked thousands of miles crisscrossing first Connecticut and then Wisconsin to lay the foundation for the work of generations of Earth scientists.

Sown in the Stars

Sarah L. Hall, photographs by Meg Wilson, foreword by Ronni Lundy
"To everything there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven: a time to be born, and a time to die; a time to plant, and a time to pluck up that which is planted."—Ecclesiastes 3:1-2 The Appalachian region is deeply rooted in customs that have been handed down for generations. "Planting by the signs," a practice predicated on the belief that moon phases and astrological signs exert a powerful influence on the growth and...

Who Speaks for You?

Leo J. Wise
In 2015 and 2016, Baltimore was reeling after the death of Freddie Gray in police custody and the protests that followed. In the midst of this unrest, the Baltimore Police Department's Gun Trace Task Force (GTTF) roamed the city, robbing people, selling drugs and guns back onto the same streets they were supposed to be policing, and dividing the loot and profit among themselves. Created to trace guns back to the criminals...

The Killer Whale Journals

Hanne Strager, foreword by Paul Nicklen
When intrepid biology student Hanne Strager volunteered to be the cook on a small research vessel in Norway's Lofoten Islands, the trip inspired a decades-long journey into the lives of killer whales—and an exploration of people's complex relationships with the biggest predators on earth. The Killer Whale Journals chronicles the now internationally renowned science writer's fascinating adventures around the world, documenting Strager's personal experiences...

there's more

Uchechukwu Peter Umezurike
In there's more, Uchechukwu Peter Umezurike takes on the rich concepts of home and belonging: home lost and regained, home created with others and with the land, home as "anywhere we find something to love." Giving voice to the experiences of migrant and other marginalized citizens whose lives society tends to overlook, this collection challenges the oppressive systems that alienate us from one another and the land. Carefully built lyric meditations combine beauty and ugliness, engaging with violence, and...

Bourbon 101

Albert W. A. Schmid
The rumors are true; there are more barrels of bourbon than there are people in Kentucky. In fact, statistics tell us there are nearly two barrels of aging bourbon for every Bluegrass State citizen. With a population of nearly 4.5 million and each barrel yielding close to 200 bottles, it's safe to say the average Kentuckian doesn't have to look far for a bottle of amber gold. While Kentucky may be known as bourbon's home base, for bourbon lovers everywhere, the act of drinking bourbon is about more than just its...

Humanism, Empire, and Nation, critical edition

edited by Travis Workman, translated by Travis Workman
Essays featuring twentieth-century Korean thought on literature and culture. Faced with dramatic social and political changes, Korean writers of the twentieth century—writing in the context of Japanese imperialism, World War II, the Korean War, and the Cold War era—explored many pressing questions about modern life: What is the relationship between literature and society? How can intellectual concepts be used politically,...

Hyumŏnijŭm, cheguk, minjok, critical edition

edited by Travis Workman
Essays featuring twentieth-century Korean thought on literature and culture. Faced with dramatic social and political changes, Korean writers of the twentieth century—writing in the context of Japanese imperialism, World War II, the Korean War, and the Cold War era—explored many pressing questions about modern life: What is the relationship between literature and society? How can intellectual concepts be used politically, for good or ill? What are the...

Kentucky Bourbon Whiskey

Michael R. Veach
On May 4, 1964, Congress designated bourbon as a distinctive product of the United States, and it remains the only spirit produced in this country to enjoy such protection. Its history stretches back almost to the founding of the nation and includes many colorful characters, both well known and obscure, from the hatchet-wielding prohibitionist Carry Nation to George Garvin Brown, who in 1872 created Old Forester, the first bourbon to be sold only by the bottle. Although obscured by...

Sir Barton and the Making of the Triple Crown

Jennifer S. Kelly
He was always destined to be a champion. Royally bred, with English and American classic winners in his pedigree, Sir Barton shone from birth, dubbed the "king of them all." But after a winless two-year-old season and a near-fatal illness, uncertainty clouded the start of Sir Barton's three-year-old season. Then his surprise victory in America's signature race, the Kentucky Derby, started him on the road to history, where he would go on to dominate the Preakness and the Belmont...

The Ice Book

Camper English
May 2023 - Red Lightning Books
Ice. It's frozen water, so what's the big deal? Just as drinking champagne from a flute instead of a plastic cup changes the experience, good ice can drastically improve your beverage. In The Ice Book, cocktails and spirits expert Camper English details how to use directional freezing, which eliminates trapped air and impurities, to create the ultimate drink garnish. Taking it a step further, English reveals how to include objects in ice, from flowers to citrus...

Leaving Other People Alone

Aaron Kreuter
Leaving Other People Alone reads contemporary North American Jewish fiction about Israel/Palestine through an anti-Zionist, diasporic lens. Aaron Kreuter argues that since Jewish diasporic fiction played a major role in establishing the centroperipheral relationship between Israel and the diaspora, it therefore also has the potential to challenge, trouble, and ultimately rework this relationship. Kreuter suggests that any fictional work...

Under Penalty of Death

Kevin E. Meredith, David W. Hendry, Jr.
May 2023 - Red Lightning Books
An FBI cover-up spanning nearly a century. A victim and his family sworn to secrecy. Machine Gun Kelly's first kidnapping, a crime that changed America before it was swept under the rug of history. Under Penalty of Death: The Untold Story of Machine Gun Kelly's First Kidnapping brings to light for the first time the long-forgotten (and covered up) tale of the 1930s kidnapping that saved America from itself. In January 1932,...

Skilletheads

Ashley L. Jones
May 2023 - Red Lightning Books
From Chapter 1 Shopping for Vintage Cast Iron To truly appreciate your new pan, it should be comfortable to handle—not too heavy or bulky for you to lift. It should also appeal to your aesthetics, for you're sure to use a pan you enjoy more than one you don't. Lastly, you should appreciate the history of your vintage pan, and for that you'll need to research the manufacturer. If you're interested in restoring and selling cast iron, then you'll need to...

Black Creole Chronicles

Mona Lisa Saloy
Who are Black Creoles? Saloy's new poems address ancestral connections to contemporary life, traditions celebrated, New Orleans Black Life today, Louisiana Black life today, enduring and surviving hurricanes, romance, #BlackLivesMatter, #wematter, as well as poems of the Pandemic Lockdown from New Orleans. Saloy's new collection of verse advances and updates narratives of Black life to now, including day-to-day Black speech, the lives of culture keepers, and family tales. These poems detail cultural and...

Seeking a Research-Ethics Covenant in the Social Sciences

Will C. van den Hoonaard
In Seeking a Research-Ethics Covenant in the Social Sciences, Will C. van den Hoonaard chronicles the negative influence that medical research-ethics frameworks have had on social science research-ethics policies. He argues that the root causes of the current ethics disorder in the social sciences are the aggressive audit culture in universities and the privilege accorded to medical research ethics, which overrides ethical issues in all other disciplines.

Jessica Lange

Anthony Uzarowski
Brilliant, beautiful, driven, uncompromising, elusive, iconic—Jessica Lange is one of the most gifted and fascinating actors of her generation. From her rise to fame in Dino De Laurentiis's remake of King Kong (1976) and her Oscar-winning performances in Tootsie (1982) and Blue Sky (1994); to her Emmy-winning work in Grey Gardens (2009) and the American Horror Story series; and her Tony Award–winning turn in Eugene O'Neill's Long Day's Journey into Night (2016), Lange has had a long and...

Dissonant Landscapes

Tore Storvøld
Listening to the dissonances of nature and nationhood in modern Iceland During the past three decades, Iceland has attained a strong presence in the world through its musical culture, with images of the nation being packaged and shipped out in melodies, harmonies, and rhythms. What 'Iceland' means for people, both at home and abroad, is conditioned by music and its ability to animate notions of nature and nationality. In six chapters that range from discussions of...

How to Clean a Fish

Esmeralda Cabral
"Perhaps it is saudade that pulls me back to visit my other country as often as possible. When the opportunity arose for our family to live in Costa da Caparica for an extended period, it took only minutes to decide. We were going." How To Clean a Fish is an inviting family travel story about an extended stay in Portugal, full of food and cooking adventures, language barriers and bureaucracy, and that irresistible need to connect with the culture of our birth. After immigrating...

Tar Hollow Trans

Stacy Jane Grover
"I've lived a completely ordinary life, so much that I don't know how to write a transgender or queer or Appalachian story, because I don't feel like I've lived one. ... Though, in searching for ways to write myself in my stories, maybe I can find power in this ordinariness." Raised in southeast Ohio, Stacy Jane Grover would not describe her upbringing as "Appalachian." Appalachia existed farther afield—more rural, more country than the landscape of her hometown. Grover returned to the places of her...

Harry Dean Stanton

Joseph B. Atkins
Harry Dean Stanton (1926–2017) got his start in Hollywood in TV productions such as Zane Grey Theater and Gunsmoke. After a series of minor parts in forgettable westerns, he gradually began to get film roles that showcased his laid-back acting style, appearing in Cool Hand Luke (1967), Kelly's Heroes (1970), The Godfather: Part II (1974), and Alien (1979). He became a headliner in the eighties—starring in Wim Wenders's moving Paris, Texas (1984) and Alex Cox's Repo Man (1984)—but it was his...