Welcome to HFS Books

Since 1977 Hopkins Fulfillment Services has provided distribution services for a distinguished list of university presses and nonprofit institutions.

Our clients include Johns Hopkins University Press, Georgetown University Press, University of Washington Press, The University Press of Kentucky, Catholic University of America Press, University of Massachusetts Press, University of New Orleans PressMaryland Historical Society, University of South Carolina, Wesleyan University Press, Northeastern University Press, and Family Development Press.

HFSBooks.com offers books published by our clients for sale in one place. If you are looking for information regarding our distribution services, please visit hfs.jhu.edu.


Trade, Politics, and Revolution

Huw David
London's "Carolina traders," a little-known group of transatlantic merchants, played a pivotal but historically neglected role in the rise of tensions in the South Carolina lowcountry. In Trade, Politics, and Revolution, Huw David delves into the lives of these men and explores their influence on commerce and politics in the years before and after the American Revolution.Beginning in the 1730s, a few select merchants in Charleston fueled...

The Human Person

Steven J. Jensen
Nov 2018 - HFCTH
The Human Person presents a brief introduction to the human mind, the soul, immortality, and free will. While delving into the thought of Thomas Aquinas, it addresses contemporary topics, such as skepticism, mechanism, animal language research, and determinism. Steven J. Jensen probes the primal questions of human nature. Are human beings free or determined? Is the capacity to reason distinctive to human beings or do animals also have some share of reason? Have animals really been...

Citizen Azmari

Ilana Webster-Kogen
In the thirty years since their immigration from Ethiopia to the State of Israel, Ethiopian-Israelis have put music at the center of communal and public life, using it alternatingly as a mechanism of protest and as appeal for integration. Ethiopian music develops in quiet corners of urban Israel as the most prominent advocate for equality, and the Israeli-born generation is creating new musical styles that negotiate the terms of blackness outside of Africa. For the first time,...

Wobble

Rae Armantrout, Rae Armantrout
Pulitzer Prize–winning poet Rae Armantrout is at once a most intimate and coolly calculating poet. If anyone could produce a hybrid of Charlie Chaplin’s playful “Little Tramp” and Charlize Theron’s fierce “Imperator Furiosa,” it would be Armantrout. Her language is unexpected yet exact, playing off the collective sense that the shifting ground of daily reality may be a warning of imminent systemic collapse. While there are glimmers here of what remains of “the natural world,” the poet confesses the human failings,...

A New History of Kentucky, second edition

James C. Klotter, Craig Thompson Friend
When originally published, A New History of Kentucky provided a comprehensive study of the Commonwealth, bringing it to life by revealing the many faces, deep traditions, and historical milestones of the state. With new discoveries and findings, the narrative continues to evolve, and so does the telling of Kentucky's rich history. In this second edition, authors James C. Klotter and Craig Thompson Friend provide significantly revised content with updated material on gender politics,...

Battles of the North Country

Jonathan D. Anzalone
Nov 2018 - HFMAS
The Adirondack region is trapped in a cycle of conflict. Nature lovers advocate for the preservation of wilderness, while sports enthusiasts demand infrastructure for recreation. Local residents seek economic opportunities, while environmentalists fight industrial or real estate growth. These clashes have played out over the course of the twentieth century and continue into the twenty-first. Through a...

Truth and Conviction

L. Jane McMillan
Nov 2018 - UBC Press
The name "Donald Marshall Jr." is synonymous with "wrongful conviction" and the fight for Indigenous rights in Canada. In Truth and Conviction, Jane McMillan – Marshall's former wife, an acclaimed anthropologist, and an original defendant in the Supreme Court's Marshall decision – tells the story of how Marshall's lifelong battle against injustice permeated Canadian legal consciousness and revitalized Indigenous law. Marshall died in 2009, but his legacy...

Incorporating Culture

Solen Roth
Nov 2018 - HFWSH
Fragments of culture often become commodities when the tourism and heritage business showcases local artistic and cultural practice. But what happens when local communities become more involved in this cultural marketplace? Incorporating Culture examines how Indigenous artists and entrepreneurs are cultivating more equitable relationships with the companies that reproduce their designs on everyday objects. Moving beyond assumptions that...

The Struggle Is Eternal

Joseph R. Fitzgerald
Many prominent and well-known figures greatly impacted the civil rights movement, but one of the most influential and unsung leaders of that period was Gloria Richardson. As the leader of the Cambridge Nonviolent Action Committee (CNAC), a multifaceted liberation campaign formed to target segregation and racial inequality in Cambridge, Maryland, Richardson advocated for economic justice and tactics beyond nonviolent demonstrations. Her philosophies and...

By Law or In Justice

Jane Dickson
Nov 2018 - HFWSH
The Indian Specific Claims Commission (ICC) was formed in 1991 in response to the Oka crisis. Its purpose was to resolve claims arising from promises made to Indigenous nations in treaties, in the federal Indian Act, as well as within other Crown obligations. This book traces the history of Indigenous claims and the work of the ICC. An insider's account, written by longstanding ICC Commissioner Jane Dickson, it provides an...

Writing and Freedom

William Myers
Nov 2018 - HFCTH
Twelve essays in literary theory, philosophy, and religion – about atheism, freedom, and "the Jesus thought experiment" – connect, but don't conclude. A recurring theme is the "nothing" at the heart of the deep atheism of George Eliot, Walter Pater, Oscar Wilde, Rudyard Kipling, and Thomas Hardy, who approach "nothing" with a directness lacking in their English-speaking philosophical contemporaries. How does being in the world – Thomas Nagel's "what-it's-likeness" – and how do...

Before and After Loss

Lisa M. Shulman, MD
In Before and After Loss, neurologist Dr. Lisa M. Shulman describes a personal story of loss and her journey to understand the science behind the mind-altering experience of grief. Part memoir, part creative nonfiction, part account of scientific discovery, this moving book combines Shulman's perspectives as an expert in brain science and a keen observer of behavior with her experience as a clinician, a caregiver, and a widow. Drawing on the...

Postsecondary Education in British Columbia

Robert Cowin
Nov 2018 - HFWSH
The literature about postsecondary education in British Columbia has largely focused on public colleges and universities, while paying less attention to vocational colleges, apprenticeship, continuing education, and private institutions. Robert Cowin addresses that gap. He provides a comprehensive overview of the evolution of the contemporary provincial postsecondary system and examines the role of social justice, human capital...

Trophic Cascade

Camille T. Dungy
Winner of the Colorado Book Award in Poetry (2018) In this fourth book in a series of award-winning survival narratives, Dungy writes positioned at a fulcrum, bringing a new life into the world even as her elders are passing on. In a time of massive environmental degradation, violence and abuse of power, a world in which we all must survive, these poems resonate within and beyond the scope of the human realms, delicately balancing between conflicting loci of attention. Dwelling between vibrancy and its opposite,...

Cork Wars

David A. Taylor
In 1940, with German U-boats blockading all commerce across the Atlantic Ocean, a fireball at the Crown Cork and Seal factory lit the sky over Baltimore. The newspapers said that you could see its glow as far north as Philadelphia and as far south as Annapolis. Rumors of Nazi sabotage led to an FBI investigation and pulled an entire industry into the machinery of national security as America stood on the brink of war. In Cork Wars, David A. Taylor traces this fascinating story through...

Reassessing the Rogue Tory

edited by Janice Cavell, Ryan M. Touhey
Nov 2018 - UBC Press
The years when John Diefenbaker's Progressive Conservatives were in office were among the most tumultuous in Canadian history. This book provides a fresh assessment of foreign policy in the Diefenbaker era to determine whether its failures can be attributed to the prime minister's personality traits, particularly his indecisiveness, or to broader shifts in world affairs. Written by leading scholars who mine new sources of...

Proud Raven, Panting Wolf

Emily L. Moore
Nov 2018 - HFWSH
Among Southeast Alaska's best-known tourist attractions are its totem parks, showcases for monumental wood sculptures by Tlingit and Haida artists. Although the art form is centuries old, the parks date back only to the waning years of the Great Depression, when the US government reversed its policy of suppressing Native practices and began to pay Tlingit and Haida communities to restore older totem poles and move them from ancestral villages into parks designed for...

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the Holocaust

Johannes Morsink
Johannes Morsink argues that the 1948 UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the human rights movement today are direct descendants of revulsion to the Holocaust and the desire to never let it happen again. Much recent scholarship about human rights has severed this link between the Holocaust, the Universal Declaration, and contemporary human rights activism in favor of seeing the 1970s as the era of genesis. Morsink forcefully...

Why They Can't Write

John Warner
There seems to be widespread agreement that—when it comes to the writing skills of college students—we are in the midst of a crisis. In Why They Can’t Write, John Warner, who taught writing at the college level for two decades, argues that the problem isn’t caused by a lack of rigor, or smartphones, or some generational character defect. Instead, he asserts, we’re teaching writing wrong. Warner blames this on decades of educational reform rooted in...

The Spy Who Loved Us

Thomas A. Bass
Pham Xuan An was one of the twentieth century's greatest spies. While working as a correspondent for Time during the Vietnam War, he sent intelligence reports—written in invisible ink or hidden inside spring rolls in film canisters—to Ho Chi Minh and his generals in North Vietnam. Only after Saigon fell in 1975 did An's colleagues learn that the affable raconteur in their midst, acclaimed as "dean of the Vietnamese press corps," was actually a general in the North...

Staying Healthy Abroad

Christopher Sanford, M.D.
Dec 2018 - HFWSH
Whether planning a long weekend in Mexico or an African safari, travelers need current and practical information on protecting their health in foreign countries. Staying Healthy Abroad gives straightforward and easy-to-follow recommendations for those traveling for pleasure, study, business, or volunteer work; for short- or long-term stays; and to destinations ranging from rural areas to large cities, in both developing and industrialized nations. Observing that risk is...

The Politics of Richard Wright

edited by Jane Anna Gordon, Cyrus Ernesto Zirakzadeh, with contributions by Richard Wright, Lewis R. Gordon, Cedric Robinson, Cyrus Ernesto Zirakzadeh, Marilyn Nissim-Sabat, Floyd W. Hayes, III, Paul Gilroy, Lori Marso, Tommy J. Curry, Kevin Gaines, Dorothy Stringer, William Dow, Perry S. Moskowitz, James B. Haile, III, Abdul R. JanMohamed, Laura Grattan, Jane Anna Gordon
A pillar of African American literature, Richard Wright is one of the most celebrated and controversial authors in...

Jesuits and Matriarchs

Nadine Amsler
In early modern China, Jesuit missionaries associated with the male elite of Confucian literati in order to proselytize more freely, but they had limited contact with women, whose ritual spaces were less accessible. Historians of Catholic evangelism have similarly directed their attention to the devotional practices of men, neglecting the interior spaces in Chinese households where women worshipped and undertook the transmission of Catholicism to family members and...

Shifting Baselines in the Chesapeake Bay

Victor S. Kennedy
The concept of "shifting baselines"—changes in historical reference points used in environmental assessments—illuminates a foundational challenge when evaluating the health of ecosystems and seeking to restore degraded wildlife populations. In this important book, Victor S. Kennedy examines the problem of shifting baselines for one of the most productive aquatic resources in the world: the Chesapeake Bay. Kennedy explains that since the 1800s, when the Bay...

Diabetes Head to Toe

Rita R. Kalyani, MD, MHS, Mark D. Corriere, MD, Thomas W. Donner, MD, and Michael W. Quartuccio, MD
Diabetes Head to Toe is an invaluable resource for anyone living with diabetes. It includes everything you should know about the disease—straight from the experts. The authors, all doctors who specialize in diabetes care, offer simple explanations and essential advice on all things diabetes. Accessible and concise, Diabetes Head to Toe...

Frog Pond Philosophy

Strachan Donnelley, edited by Ceara Donnelley, Bruce Jennings, foreword by Frederick L. Kirschenmann
The philanthropist and philosopher Strachan Donnelley (1942–2008) devoted his life to studying the complex relationship between humans and nature. Founder and first president of the Center for Humans and Nature, Donnelley was a pioneer in the exploration and promotion of the idea that human beings individually and collectively have moral and civic responsibilities to...

Footprints of War

David Andrew Biggs, foreword by Paul S. Sutter, series edited byPaul S. Sutter
When American forces arrived in Vietnam, they found themselves embedded in historic village and frontier spaces already shaped by many past conflicts. American bases and bombing targets followed spatial and political logics influenced by the footprints of past wars in central Vietnam. The militarized landscapes here, like many in the world's historic conflict zones, continue to shape post-war land-use politics. ...

The Things That Matter

edited by Heidi Geibel
In the final year of his long life, eminent Thomist philosopher Jacques Maritain prepared a final book for publication: a collection of previously unpublished writings entitled Approaches san entraves, later translated into English as Untrammeled Approaches. That collection, both in its conversational yet reverent tone and in its weighty topics – faith, love, truth, beauty – gives the reader the sense that she is receiving from a great teacher and...

Women and Gender Perspectives in the Military

edited by Robert Egnell, Mayesha Alam, foreword by Melanne Verveer
Women and Gender Perspectives in the Military compares the integration of women, gender perspectives, and the women, peace, and security agenda into the armed forces of eight countries plus NATO and United Nations peacekeeping operations. This book brings a much-needed crossnational analysis of how militaries have or have not improved gender balance, what has worked and what has not, and who have been...

Bad News Travels Fast

Patrick C. File
At the turn of the twentieth century, American journalists transmitted news across the country by telegraph. But what happened when these stories weren't true? In Bad News Travels Fast, Patrick C. File examines a series of libel cases by a handful of plaintiffs—including socialites, businessmen, and Annie Oakley—who sued newspapers across the country for republishing false newswire reports. Through these cases, File demonstrates how law and...

New Southern Photography

Richard McCabe, Bradley Sumrall, L. Kasimu Harris
New Southern Photography highlights the exciting and diverse breadth of photography being practiced in the American South today from twenty-five emerging, mid-career, and established photographers. This catalogue, produced in conjunction with the exhibit debuted at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art in the fall of 2018, explores the role photography plays in formulating the visual iconography of the modern New South and...

Jesuits and Matriarchs

Nadine Amsler
In early modern China, Jesuit missionaries associated with the male elite of Confucian literati in order to proselytize more freely, but they had limited contact with women, whose ritual spaces were less accessible. Historians of Catholic evangelism have similarly directed their attention to the devotional practices of men, neglecting the interior spaces in Chinese households where women worshipped and undertook the transmission of Catholicism to family members and...

Art Smart, Science Detective

Melinda Long, illustrated by Monica Wyrick
When Art and his friends—Robbie, Jason, and Amy—are having a sleepover, they decide to use Art's telescope for some stargazing. They are shocked to see a purple spaceship hurtling toward Earth. While his parents think his imagination is getting the best of him, Art thinks Earth is at risk of an alien invasion. What should he do? Should Art and his fellow science detectives alert the authorities, or should they take matters into their own...

Flowering Plums and Curio Cabinets

Sunglim Kim, series edited byClark W. Sorensen
The social and economic rise of the chungin class ("middle people" who ranked between the yangban aristocracy and commoners) during the late Choson period (1700–1910) ushered in a world of materialism and commodification of painting and other art objects. Generally overlooked in art history, the chungin contributed to a flourishing art market, especially for ch'aekkori, a new form of still life painting that...

Ukrainian Bishop, American Church

Martha Bohachevsky-Chomiak
Constantine Bohachevsky was not a typical bishop. On the eve of his unexpected nomination as bishop to the Ukrainian Catholics in America, in March 1924, the Vatican secretly whisked him from Warsaw to Rome to be ordained. He arrived in America that August to a bankrupt church and a hostile clergy. He stood his ground, and chose to live simple missionary life. He eschewed public pomp, as did his immigrant congregations.

Thinking through Revelation

Robert J. Dobie
Navigating the seemingly competing claims of human reason and divine revelation to truth is without a doubt one of the central problems of medieval philosophy. Medieval thinkers argued a whole gamut of positions on the proper relation of religious faith to human reason. Thinking Through Revelation attempts to ask deeper questions: what possibilities for philosophical thought did divine revelation open up for medieval thinkers? How did the...

Understanding Francisco Goldman

Ariana E. Vigil
Award-winning writer and journalist Francisco Goldman is the author of novels and works of nonfiction and is a regular contributor to the New Yorker magazine. His awards include the Sue Kaufman Prize for First Fiction and the T. R. Fyvel Book Award, as well as a Guggenheim Fellowship. Born to a Guatemalan mother and Jewish American father, Goldman's heritage has shaped his unique perspective and has had a significant influence on his literary themes.In Understanding Francisco Goldman, the first...

Recovering the Piedmont Past

edited by Timothy P. Grady, Andrew H. Myers, foreword by Melissa A. Walker
Continuing the theme of unexplored moments introduced in Recovering the Piedmont Past: Unexplored Moments in Nineteenth-Century Upcountry South Carolina History, Timothy P. Grady joins with Andrew H. Myers to edit this second anthology that uncovers the microhistory of this northwest region of the state. Topics include the influence of railroads on traveling circuses,...

Kenneth Burke's Permanence and Change

Ann George
Since its publication in 1935, Kenneth Burke's Permanence and Change, a text that can serve as an introduction to all his theories, has become a landmark of rhetorical theory. Using new archival sources and contextualizing Burke in the past and present, Ann George offers the first sustained exploration of this work and seeks to clarify the challenging book for both amateurs and scholars of rhetoric.This companion to Permanence and Change explains Burke's theories through...

Understanding Alice Adams

Bryant Mangum
In Understanding Alice Adams, Bryant Mangum examines the thematic intricacies and astute social commentary of Adams's eleven novels and five short story collections. Throughout her career Adams was known for creating and re-creating the "Alice Adams woman," who is bright, honest, attractive, thoughtful—and sometimes a bit offbeat. As Mangum notes, Adams's central characters—her heroes—are most often women struggling toward self-sufficiency and independence as they strive to fulfill their responsibilities,...

Poetic Imagination in Japanese Art

edited by Maribeth Graybill
Dec 2018 - Portland Art Museum
Assembled over the last four decades and still growing, the Mary and Cheney Cowles collection of Japanese art is one of the finest in private hands in North America. What began for Cheney Cowles as an almost casual interest in collecting early Imari ware evolved, over time, into a passion for Japanese paintings and calligraphy. Cowles's tastes are broad and eclectic, embracing a dazzling diversity of styles and...

Art AIDS America Chicago

edited by Staci Boris
Dec 2018 - Lucia Marquand
The groundbreaking 2015 exhibition Art AIDS America, and the accompanying book, revealed the deep and unforgettable impact that HIV/AIDS had on American art from the early 1980s to the present. The national tour of the exhibit concluded its run at the Alphawood Gallery in Chicago, which had been founded in part to give the exhibition a Midwest venue. Now Art AIDS America Chicago looks at the issues raised by the original exhibition and book with from new, different perspectives. An entirely new set...

American Labour's Cold War Abroad

Andrew Carew
Dec 2018 - UBC Press
Carew presents a lively and clear account of what has largely been an unknown dimension of the Cold War. In impressive detail, Carew maps the international programs of the American Federation of Labour–Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL–CIO) during the Cold War and its relations with labour organizations abroad, in addition to providing a summary of the labour situation of a dozen or more countries including Finland, France, Italy, Germany, Japan,...

The Medium Is the Monster

Mark McCutcheon
Dec 2018 - UBC Press
Technology, a word that emerged historically first to denote the study of any art or technique, has come, in modernity, to describe advanced machines, industrial systems, and media. McCutcheon argues that it is Mary Shelley's 1818 novel Frankenstein that effectively reinvented the meaning of the word for modern English. It was then Marshall McLuhan's media theory and its adaptations in Canadian popular culture that popularized, even...

Art AIDS America / Art AIDS America Chicago Boxed Set

Jonathan David Katz, Rock Hushka, Staci Boris
This slipcased boxed set contains the two volumes: Art AIDS America, published in 2015 to coincide with the original exhibit at the Tacoma Art Museum, and the new book Art AIDS America Chicago. Art AIDS America included work by Keith Haring, David Wojnarowicz, Peter Hujar, Robert Mapplethorpe, among many others. Taken together, these two volumes are a stunning overview of the artistic response over the last thirty years to the AIDS...

Tough on Kids

Ross Gordon Green, Kearney Healy
Dec 2018 - UBC Press
Does our current system for dealing with young offenders – which focuses on punishment – work? Not according to the authors of this compelling and thought-provoking book. It simply ensures that we jail more youth than any other country, including the United States. Green and Healy argue that a new approach is needed and offer ample evidence from around the world, and our own back yard, to make the case for a shift to restorative justice. The voices of their young...

Tom Three Persons

Hugh A. Dempsey
Dec 2018 - UBC Press
Tom Three Persons became a successful rancher at a time when Canadians did not expect Indians to succeed. His even greater claim to fame was in the rodeo arena—at the first Calgary Stampede in 1912 he won a world championship in bronc riding, and was the only Canadian to achieve a championship in any major event at the stampede. He became a hero, took up calf roping, and inspired generations of Blood Indians to success in the rodeo arena. But there was a dark side—Tom Three Persons...

Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics

edited by Scott Paeth, Kevin Carnahan
The Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics continues to be an essential resource for students and faculty pursuing the latest developments in Christian and religious ethics, publishing refereed scholarly articles — a preeminent source for further research. The Journal also contains book reviews of the latest scholarship in the field.

Southern History on Screen

edited by Bryan M. Jack, with contributions by Oliver Gruner, Daniel Farrell, Erik Alexander, Caroline Schroeter, Todd Simpson, Kwakiutl Dreher, Megan Hunt, Gene Kelly, Tatiana Prorokova
Hollywood films have been influential in the portrayal and representation of race relations in the South and how African Americans are cinematically depicted in history, from The Birth of a Nation (1915) and Gone with the Wind (1939) to The Help (2011) and 12 Years a Slave (2013). With an ability to reach...

Connecticut Architecture

Christopher Wigren,
Connecticut boasts some of the oldest and most distinctive architecture in New England, from Colonial churches and Modernist houses to refurbished nineteenth-century factories. The state’s history includes landscapes of small farmsteads, country churches, urban streets, tobacco sheds, quiet maritime villages, and town greens, as well as more recent suburbs and corporate headquarters. In his guide to this rich and diverse architectural heritage, Christopher Wigren introduces...

Country Acres and Cul-de-Sacs

edited by Jay Gitlin
In 1938, the first year of its publication, Connecticut Circle magazine covered the opening of the Merritt Parkway in June, a devastating hurricane in September, and a transformative election in November that saw Raymond Baldwin replace Governor Wilbur Cross on the brink of WWII. Covering the news, recreation, literary figures, and politicians, and above all—the achievements and products of the state, Connecticut Circle...

The Priest Who Put Europe Back Together

Sean Brennan
Philp Fabian Flynn led a remarkable life, bearing witness to some of the most pivotal events of the twentieth century. Flynn took part in the invasions of Sicily and Normandy, the Battle of Aachen, and the Battle of the Hürtgen Forest. He acted as confessor to Nazi War Criminals during the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg, assisted Hungarian Revolutionaries on the streets of Budapest, and assisted the waves of refugees arriving in Austria feeling...

Glaphyra on the Pentateuch, Volume 1

Cyril Of Alexandria
Cyril of Alexandria (ca. 376–444) is best known for his defense of orthodoxy at the time of the Nestorian controversy over the nature of Christ. However, by far the larger part of Cyril's literary output consisted of commentaries on books of both Old and New Testaments, written before the Christological debate was sparked off in 428. One of these works, of major proportions, was the so-called Glaphyra ("elegant comments") on the Pentateuch. This comprises a total of thirteen...

Social Justice and Subsidiarity

Thomas C. Behr
Luigi Taparelli, SJ, 1793-1862, in his Theoretical Treatise of Natural Right Based on Fact, 1840-43, presents a neo-Thomistic approach to social, economic, and political sciences grounded in an integral conception of the human person as social animal but also as rational truth seeker. His conceptions of social justice and of subsidiarity are fundamental to modern Catholic social teaching (CST). His work moves away from...

Meeting China Halfway

Lyle J. Goldstein
Though a US China conflict is far from inevitable, major tensions are building in the Asia-Pacific region. These strains are the result of historical enmity, cultural divergence, and deep ideological estrangement, not to mention apprehensions fueled by geopolitical competition and the closely related "security dilemma." Despite worrying signs of intensifying rivalry, few observers have provided concrete paradigms to lead this troubled relationship away from...

The Generosity of Creation

David L. Schindler
Referring to creation as generous is not common. We normally associate notions of generosity and gift in the created order with human being and action, imputing such notions to other creatures and the whole of creation often only in a "poetic" sense. Once we center the reality of all things in God as a loving Creator, however, we become disposed to see everything, in its very givenness, as gift—a reality that participates from its depths, in analogical ways, in God's generosity, such as to make possible a...

Before Truth

Jeremy D. Wilkins
It's frequently said that we live in a "post-truth" age. That obviously can't be true, but it does name a real problem on our hands. Getting things right is hard, especially if they're complicated. It takes preparation, diligence, and honesty. Wisdom, according to Thomas Aquinas, is the quality of right judgment. This book is about the problem of becoming wise, the problem "before truth." It is about that problem particularly as it comes up for religious, philosophical,...

Books for Idle Hours

Donna Harrington-Lueker
The publishing phenomenon of summer reading, often focused on novels set in vacation destinations, started in the nineteenth century, as both print culture and tourist culture expanded in the United States. As an emerging middle class increasingly embraced summer leisure as a marker of social status, book publishers sought new market opportunities, authors discovered a growing readership, and more readers indulged in lighter fare. Drawing...

Freedom Made Manifest

Peter Joseph Fritz
Karl Rahner's seemingly inscrutable theology of freedom can be summarized simply: human freedom makes manifest (or fails to make manifest) God's eternal decision to create, to save creation, and thereby to share Godself. Freedom is something real, a substantive freedom for: for saying "yes" to God's merciful self-giving. This freedom most often comes to light not in extraordinary triumphs of spirit, but amid small acts whereby common sinners and...

Analogy after Aquinas

Domenic D'Ettore
Since the first decade of the 14th Century, Thomas Aquinas's disciples have struggled to explain and defend his doctrine of analogy. Analogy after Aquinas: Logical Problems, Thomistic Answers relates a history of prominent Medieval and Renaissance Thomists' efforts to solve three distinct but interrelated problems arising from their reading both of Aquinas's own texts on analogy, and from John Duns Scotus's arguments against analogy and in favor of univocity in...

Alfred Loisy and Modern Biblical Studies

Jeffrey L. Morrow
The French Catholic priest and biblical scholar Alfred Loisy (1857-1940) was at the heart of the Roman Catholic Modernist crisis in the early part of the twentieth century. He saw much of his work as an attempt to bring John Henry Newman's notion of development of doctrine into the realm of Catholic biblical studies, and thereby transform Catholic theology. This volume situates Loisy's better known works on the New Testament and theology in the context of his lesser known work in...

People in a Magazine

edited by Joseph Goodrich, foreword by Thomas Vinciguerra
Playwright, biographer, screenwriter, and critic S. N. Behrman (1893–1973) characterized the years he spent writing for The New Yorker as a time defined by "feverish contact with great theatre stars, rich people and social people at posh hotels, at parties, in mansions and great estates." While he hobnobbed with the likes of Mary McCarthy, Elia Kazan, and Greta Garbo and was one of Broadway's...

Amherst Rotary Goes to War

edited by Mason I. Lowance, Jr.
Between 1941 and 1945, over sixteen million men and women served in the U.S. armed forces. In an effort to deepen our understanding of the Second World War and capture individual voices for posterity, this book collects twenty personal accounts from members of the Amherst Rotary who served. In these narratives, veterans share their stories, many for the first time. Edited by University of Massachusetts Professor Emeritus Mason Lowance Jr., the...

Under the Big Tree

Ellen Agler
with Mojie Crigler
foreword by Bill Gates
Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) affect over one billion of the world's poorest people. More than 170,000 people die from NTDs each year, and many more suffer from blindness, disability, disfigurement, cognitive impairment, and stunted growth. Yet NTDs are treatable and preventable, and the annual cost of treatment is incredibly low. In Under the Big Tree, public health leader Ellen Agler...

The Making of Jane Austen

Devoney Looser
with a new afterword
Just how did Jane Austen become the celebrity author and the inspiration for generations of loyal fans she is today? Devoney Looser’s The Making of Jane Austen turns to the people, performances, activism, and images that fostered Austen’s early fame, laying the groundwork for the beloved author we think we know. Here are the Austen influencers, including her first English illustrator, the eccentric Ferdinand Pickering, whose sensational gothic images may be better understood through his...

A Modern Contagion

Amir A. Afkhami
Pandemic cholera reached Iran for the first of many times in 1821, assisted by Britain's territorial expansion and growing commercial pursuits. The revival of Iran's trade arteries after six decades of intermittent civil war, fractured rule, and isolation allowed the epidemic to spread inland and assume national proportions. In A Modern Contagion, Amir A. Afkhami argues that the disease had a profound influence on the development of modern Iran, steering the...

Timelines of American Literature

edited by Cody Marrs and Christopher Hager
It is all but inevitable for literary history to be divided into periods. "Early American," "antebellum," "modern," "post-1945"—such designations organize our knowledge of the past and shape the ways we discuss that past today. These periods tend to align with the watershed moments in American history, even as the field has shifted its perspective away from the nation-state. It is high time we rethink these defining periods of American literary history, as the drawing...

Timelines of American Literature

edited by Cody Marrs and Christopher Hager
It is all but inevitable for literary history to be divided into periods. "Early American," "antebellum," "modern," "post-1945"—such designations organize our knowledge of the past and shape the ways we discuss that past today. These periods tend to align with the watershed moments in American history, even as the field has shifted its perspective away from the nation-state. It is high time we rethink these defining periods of American literary history, as the drawing...

Stanley Cavell and the Claim of Literature

David Rudrum
Stanley Cavell is widely recognized as one of America's most important contemporary philosophers, and his legacy and writings continue to attract considerable attention among literary critics and theorists. Stanley Cavell and the Claim of Literature comprehensively addresses the importance of literature in Cavell's philosophy and, in turn, the potential effect of his philosophy on contemporary literary criticism. David Rudrum dedicates a chapter to each of the writers that principally...

Generous Thinking

Kathleen Fitzpatrick
Higher education occupies a difficult place in twenty-first-century American culture. Universities—the institutions that bear so much responsibility for the future health of our nation—are at odds with the very publics they are intended to serve. As Kathleen Fitzpatrick asserts, it is imperative that we re-center the mission of the university to rebuild that lost trust. In Generous Thinking, Fitzpatrick roots this crisis in the work of scholars. Critical...

A South Carolina Upcountry Saga

edited by A. Gibert Kennedy
Hope, sacrifice, and restoration: throughout the American Civil War and its aftermath, the Foster family endured all of these in no small measure. Drawing from dozens of public and privately owned letters, A. Gibert Kennedy recounts the story of his great-great-grandfather and his family in A South Carolina Upcountry Saga: The Civil War Letters of Barham Bobo Foster and His Family, 1860-1863.Barham Bobo Foster was...

Understanding Jim Grimsley

David Deutsch
Since the early 1980s, Jim Grimsley has received increasing acclaim for his achievements in a variety of dramatic and literary genres. Through his novels, plays, and short stories, Grimsley portrays an unrelenting search for happiness and interrogates themes of corruption, technology, poverty, domestic abuse, sexuality, and faith in the contemporary United States. Through unique characters and a multitude of forms, the award-winning author explores the complexities of southern culture, his own troubled...

Dear Baba

Maryam Rafiee, Adam Braver
Jan 2019 - HFUNO
Maryam Rafiee was only a teenager when her father, Hossein Rafiee, was first imprisoned in Iran for expressing his political views. Unable to see or speak to him, she wrote him letters that she could never send. She recorded the things she wished she could tell him: thoughts on school, home, the family's struggle to free him, and—most importantly—her own hopes and dreams. Fifteen years later, in the wake of her father's second imprisonment, Maryam offers these letters to the world, to...

The Georgetown Dictionary of Moroccan Arabic

edited by Mohamed Maamouri
The Georgetown Dictionary of Moroccan Arabic is a modernized language resource for learning and studying Moroccan Arabic that updates the pioneering Arabic dialect dictionary published by Georgetown University Press over fifty years ago. Students, teachers, and scholars of Arabic will welcome this upgraded resource, which includes key Moroccan words, to grow their vocabulary and learn more about Moroccan Arabic language and culture. Created...

Women and Gender Perspectives in the Military

edited by Robert Egnell, Mayesha Alam, foreword by Melanne Verveer
Women and Gender Perspectives in the Military compares the integration of women, gender perspectives, and the women, peace, and security agenda into the armed forces of eight countries plus NATO and United Nations peacekeeping operations. This book brings a much-needed crossnational analysis of how militaries have or have not improved gender balance, what has worked and what has not, and who have been...

American Power and Liberal Order

Paul D. Miller
Paul D. Miller offers a tough minded critique of recent trends in American grand strategy. He rejects retrenchment but also the excesses of liberal internationalism. He prescribes a conservative internationalist grand strategy to preserve the American security and leadership in the world while avoiding overstretch. Originally written before the 2016 US presidential election, this first paperback edition contains a new preface that repositions the...

The Struggle for Cooperation

Robert L. Fuller
During World War II, French citizens expressed that the German occupiers behaved more "correctly" than the American combat troops who replaced them. In The Struggle for Cooperation: Liberated France and the American Military, 1944–1946, author Robert L. Fuller presents a unique perspective on the relations between France and the United States during the Second World War. Until the summer of 1944, the German Army made real efforts to fare well with...

Aquinas on Emotion's Participation in Reason

Nicholas Kahm
Aquinas on Emotion's Participation in Reason aims to present Aquinas's answer to the perennial and now popular question: In what way can the emotions be rational? For Aquinas, the starting point of this inquiry is Aristotle's claim (EN. I. 13) that there are three parts to the soul: 1) the rational part, 2) the non-rational part which can participate in reason, and 3) the non-rational part that does not participate in reason. It is the extent to which the second part (the sense...

The Backwash of War

Ellen N. La Motte
edited with an introduction and biography by Cynthia Wachtell
"We are witnessing a phase in the evolution of humanity, a phase called War—and the slow, onward progress stirs up the slime in the shallows, and this is the Backwash of War. It is very ugly."—Ellen N. La Motte In September 1916, as World War I advanced into a third deadly year, an American woman named Ellen N. La Motte published a collection of stories about her experience as a war nurse. Deemed...

To Antietam Creek

D. Scott Hartwig
In early September 1862 thousands of Union soldiers huddled within the defenses of Washington, disorganized and discouraged from their recent defeat at Second Manassas. Confederate General Robert E. Lee then led his tough and confident Army of Northern Virginia into Maryland in a bold gamble to force a showdown that could win Southern independence. The future of the Union hung in the balance. The campaign that followed lasted only two weeks, but it changed the course of...

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the Holocaust

Johannes Morsink
Johannes Morsink argues that the 1948 UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the human rights movement today are direct descendants of revulsion to the Holocaust and the desire to never let it happen again. Much recent scholarship about human rights has severed this link between the Holocaust, the Universal Declaration, and contemporary human rights activism in favor of seeing the 1970s as the era of genesis. Morsink forcefully...

Austrian Environmental History

Marc Landry, Patrick Kupper
Oct 2018 - HFUNO
This volume on the environmental history of contemporary Austria offers an overview of the field, as well as several topical case studies. In addition to highlighting some innovative methodological approaches, the essays also show how important the environment has been to some of the most crucial aspects of the recent Austrian past. Subjects covered in Austrian Environmental History include: the role of nature in nation-building since the collapse of the Habsburg Monarchy; the reshaping...

Manufacturing Advantage

Lindsay Schakenbach Regele
In 1783, the Revolutionary War drew to a close, but America was still threatened by enemies at home and abroad. The emerging nation faced tax rebellions, Indian warfare, and hostilities with France and England. Its arsenal—a collection of hand-me-down and beat-up firearms—was woefully inadequate, and its manufacturing sector was weak. In an era when armies literally froze in the field, military preparedness depended on blankets...

Life and Death in Rikers Island

Homer Venters, former Chief Medical Officer of NYC Jails
Kalief Browder was 16 when he was arrested in the Bronx for allegedly stealing a backpack. Unable to raise bail and unwilling to plead guilty to a crime he didn't commit, Browder spent three years in New York's infamous Rikers Island jail—two in solitary confinement—while awaiting trial. After his case was dismissed in 2013, Browder returned to his family, haunted by his ordeal. Suffering through the lonely hell of solitary, Browder had been violently...

Criminals and Enemies

edited by Austin Sarat, Lawrence Douglas, Martha Merrill Umphrey
Key binaries like public/private and speech/conduct are mainstays of the liberal legal system. However, the pairing of criminal/enemy has received little scholarly attention by comparison. Bringing together a group of distinguished and disciplinarily diverse scholars, Criminals and Enemies, the most recent volume in the Amherst Series in Law, Jurisprudence, and Social Thought, addresses this gap in the literature. Drawing on political philosophy, legal analysis,...

A Catalogue of Small Pains

Meghan L. Dowling
Jan 2019 - HFUNO
Mothers, daughters, and sisters must both protect and betray. They must maintain appearances in order to hide their pain. Winner of the University of New Orleans Press Publishing Lab, A Catalogue of Small Pains tells the stories of three generations of women whose lives are overshadowed by the secret cruelty of the family patriarch. Layering vignettes, illustrations, and instructions on womanhood in America, this fragmented novel exhibits the memories of a family, its heartbreak and pain, and stands as a...

Diverse Voices in Modern US Moral Theology

Charles E. Curran
In Charles E. Curran's latest book, Diverse Voices in Modern US Moral Theology, he presents the diverse voices of US Catholic moral theologians from the mid-twentieth century to the present. The book discusses eleven key individuals in the development and evolution of moral theology as well as the New Wine, New Wineskins movement. This diversity, which differs from the monolithic understanding of moral theology that prevailed until recently, comes from the diverse historical...

The Road to Universal Health Coverage

edited by Jeffrey L. Sturchio, Ilona Kickbusch, and Louis Galambos
foreword by Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization
Like many ambitious global goals, universal health coverage (UHC) remains an aspiration for many countries. The World Health Organization estimates that half the world's population lacks access to basic health services. Moreover, this already staggering number masks inequities that exist between and within...

Soldiers of the Pen

Thomas Howell
From 1942 to 1945, a small, influential group of media figures willingly volunteered their services to form the Writers' War Board (WWB), accepting requests from government agencies to create propaganda. Members included mystery writer Rex Stout, Pulitzer and Nobel Prize winner Pearl S. Buck, novelist and sports writer Paul Gallico, Book-of-the-Month Club editor and popular radio host Clifton Fadiman, and Broadway lyricist Oscar Hammerstein II. The WWB mobilized thousands...

Rodnaya rech': An Introductory Course for Heritage Learners of Russian, Student Bundle

Irina Dubinina, Olesya Kisselev
Rodnaya rech', an introductory textbook for heritage learners, addresses the unique needs of students who have at least Intermediate-level listening and speaking skills on the ACTFL scale but who have underdeveloped or nonexistent literacy skills. With an emphasis on conceptual understanding of vocabulary and grammar, Rodnaya rech' builds students' literacy skills and...

How to Be a Dean

George Justice
A deanship in higher education is an exciting but complex job combining technical administration and academic leadership. On one hand, the dean is an institutional leader, standing up for the faculty, staff, and students. On the other, the dean is a middle manager, managing personnel, curriculum, and budgets and trying to live up to the expectations of the governing board, president, and provost. But what is it really like to be a dean? In How to Be a Dean, George Justice illuminates both of these leadership roles,...

University Finances

Dean O. Smith
In University Finances, higher education expert Dean O. Smith • demystifies basic accounting procedures, budgets, debt financing, and financial statements • explores more unusual financial topics, such as methods for calculating fringe benefit rates, bond refunding costs, and indirect cost allocations • shows that the use of university wealth is highly restricted by donors, bondholders, government regulators, and others • answers nuanced questions, like...

Age of Fear

Zachary Smith
Although Americans have long celebrated their nation's diversity, they also have consistently harbored suspicions of foreign peoples both at home and abroad. In Age of Fear, Zachary Smith argues that, as World War I grew more menacing and the presumed German threat loomed over the United States, many white "Anglo-Saxon" Americans grew increasingly concerned about the vulnerability of their race, culture, and authority. Consequently, they directed their long-held...

More Than a Likeness

Mary Whyte, Martha R. Severens
More Than a Likeness: The Enduring Art of Mary Whyte is the first comprehensive book on the life and work of one of today's most renowned watercolorists. From Whyte's earliest paintings in rural Ohio and Pennsylvania, to the riveting portraits of her southern neighbors, historian Martha R. Severens provides us with an intimate look into the artist's private world. With more than two hundred full-color images of Whyte's paintings and sketches, as well as comparison...

Arabic Second Language Learning and Effects of Input, Transfer, and Typology

Mohammad T. Alhawary
Despite the status of Arabic as a global language and the high demand to learn it, the field of Arabic second language acquisition remains underinvestigated. Second language acquisition findings are crucial for informing and advancing the field of Arabic foreign language pedagogy including Arabic language teaching, testing, and syllabus design. Arabic Second Language Learning and Effects of Input, Transfer, and Typology provides...

Arabic Second Language Learning and Effects of Input, Transfer, and Typology

Mohammad T. Alhawary
Despite the status of Arabic as a global language and the high demand to learn it, the field of Arabic second language acquisition remains underinvestigated. Second language acquisition findings are crucial for informing and advancing the field of Arabic foreign language pedagogy including Arabic language teaching, testing, and syllabus design. Arabic Second Language Learning and Effects of Input, Transfer, and Typology provides...

Strategic Warning Intelligence

John A. Gentry, Joseph S. Gordon
John A. Gentry and Joseph S. Gordon update our understanding of strategic warning intelligence analysis for the twenty-first century. Strategic warning — the process of long-range analysis to alert senior leaders to trending threats and opportunities that require action — is a critical intelligence function. It also is frequently misunderstood and underappreciated. Gentry and Gordon draw on both their practitioner and academic backgrounds to...

Pursuing Moral Warfare

Marcus Schulzke
During combat, soldiers make life-and-death choices dozens of times a day. These individual decisions accumulate to determine the outcome of wars. This work examines the theory and practice of military ethics in counterinsurgency operations. Marcus Schulzke surveys the ethical traditions that militaries borrow from; compares ethics in practice in the US Army, British Army and Royal Marines Commandos, and Israel Defense Forces; and draws...

C'est ce qu'on dit: Deuxième année de français, Bundle

Claude Grangier, Nadine O'Connor Di Vito, Marie Berg
C'est ce qu'on dit is a second-year (intermediate-level) companion textbook to the beginning-level textbook Comme on dit, and as such follows the same basic format and principles: students work with hundreds of samples of authentic, nonscripted spoken and written French and are led in a step-by-step manner from rule discovery to the acquisition of speaking, reading, writing, and listening competence. The...

Charleston Belles Abroad

Candace Bailey
In Charleston Belles Abroad, Candace Bailey examines the vital role music collections played in the lives of elite women of Charleston, South Carolina, in the years leading up to the Civil War. Bailey has studied a substantial archive of music held at several southern libraries, including the library in the historic Aiken-Rhett House, once owned by William Aiken Jr., a successful businessman, rice planter, and...

For Church and Confederacy

edited by Robert Emmett Curran
For Church and Confederacy brings together a wealth of fascinating letters and other writings that unveil the lives of a prominent Southern Irish Catholic family during the late antebellum and Civil War years. Conlaw and Eleanor Lynch, hoping to restore the fortunes they had lost in their native country, settled in the South Carolina upcountry, where they imparted their ambitions to their children, several of whom would make exceptional marks in such areas...

Southern Women in the Progressive Era

edited by Giselle Roberts, Melissa A. Walker, foreword by Marjorie J. Spruill
From the 1890s to the end of World War I, the reformers who called themselves progressives helped transform the United States, and many women filled their ranks. Through solo efforts and voluntary associations, both national and regional, women agitated for change, addressing issues such as poverty, suffrage, urban overcrowding, and public health. Southern Women in the Progressive Era presents the stories of a diverse...

A Dream and a Chisel

Angela Gregory, Nancy L. Penrose
Angela Gregory is considered by many the doyenne of Louisiana sculpture and is a notable twentieth century American sculptor. In A Dream and a Chisel, Angela Gregory and Nancy Penrose explore Gregory's desire, even as a teenager, to learn the art of cutting stone and to become a sculptor. Through sheer grit and persistence, Gregory achieved her dream of studying with French artist Antoine Bourdelle, one of Auguste Rodin's most trusted...

The Consequences of Loyalism

edited by Rebecca Brannon, Joseph S. Moore
Since the 1970s scholars have regarded Robert M. Calhoon as an invigorating and definitive force when it comes to the study of American Loyalism. His decades-long work redefined the Loyalists' role in the American Revolution from being portrayed as static characters opposing change to being seen eventually as reactionary actors adapting to a society in upheaval. Loyalists were central to the Revolution, and Calhoon and these authors argue...

Adolph Rupp and the Rise of Kentucky Basketball

James Duane Bolin
Known as the "Man in the Brown Suit" and "Baron of the Bluegrass," Adolph Rupp (1901–1977) is a towering figure in the history of college athletics. From 1930 until his retirement in 1972, Rupp coached the University of Kentucky men's basketball team to unprecedented success. His teams won four NCAA championships (1948, 1949, 1951, and 1958) and twenty-seven Southeastern Conference regular season titles. He was also the winningest coach in NCAA division I men's basketball...

Wild Yet Tasty

Dan Dourson, Judy Dourson, illustrated by Dan Dourson

Living Sustainably

A. Whitney Sanford
In light of concerns about food and human health, fraying social ties, economic uncertainty, and rampant consumerism, some people are foregoing a hurried, distracted existence and embracing a mindful way of living. Intentional residential communities across the United States are seeking the freedom to craft their own societies and live out Mohandas K. Gandhi's vision of democracy based on the values of nonviolence,...

semiautomatic

Evie Shockley, Evie Shockley
Art can’t shield our bodies or stabilize the earth’s climate, but Evie Shockley’s semiautomatic insists that it can feed the spirit and reawaken the imagination. The volume responds primarily to the twenty-first century’s inescapable evidence of the terms of black life—not so much new as newly visible. The poems trace a whole web of connections between the kinds of violence that affect people across the racial, ethnic, gender, class, sexual, national, and linguistic boundaries that do and do not divide us. ...

How to Dress a Fish

Abigail Chabitnoy
In How to Dress a Fish, poet Abigail Chabitnoy, of Aleut descent, addresses the lives disrupted by US Indian boarding school policy. She pays particular attention to the life story of her great grandfather, Michael, who was taken from the Baptist Orphanage, Wood Island, Alaska, and sent to Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Pennsylvania. Incorporating extracts from Michael's boarding school records and early Russian ethnologies—while engaging Alutiiq language, storytelling motifs, and traditional...

Making Dances That Matter

Anna Halprin, Rachel Kaplan
Anna Halprin, vanguard postmodern dancer turned community artist and healer, has created ground-breaking dances with communities all over the world. Here, she presents her philosophy and experience, as well as step-by-step processes for bringing people together to create dances that foster individual and group well-being. At the heart of this book are accounts of two dances: the Planetary Dance, which continues to be performed throughout the world, and...

Wobble

Rae Armantrout
Pulitzer Prize winning poet Rae Armantrout is at once a most intimate and coolly calculating poet. If anyone could produce a hybrid of Charlie Chaplin's playful "Little Tramp" and Charlize Theron's fierce "Imperator Furiosa," it would be Armantrout. Her language is unexpected yet exact, playing off the collective sense that the shifting ground of daily reality may be a warning of imminent systemic collapse. While there are glimmers here of what remains of "the natural world," the poet confesses the human failings, personal and...

How to Dress a Fish

Abigail Chabitnoy
In How to Dress a Fish, poet Abigail Chabitnoy, of Aleut descent, addresses the lives disrupted by US Indian boarding school policy. She pays particular attention to the life story of her great grandfather, Michael, who was taken from the Baptist Orphanage, Wood Island, Alaska, and sent to Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Pennsylvania. Incorporating extracts from Michael's boarding school records and early Russian ethnologies—while engaging Alutiiq language, storytelling motifs, and traditional...

Music and Modernity among First Peoples of North America

edited by Victoria Lindsay Levine, Dylan Robinson
Music and Modernity among First Peoples of North America is a collaboration between Indigenous and settler scholars from both Canada and the United States. The contributors explore the intersections between music, modernity, and Indigeneity in essays addressing topics that range from hip-hop to powwow, and television soundtracks of Native Classical and experimental music. Working from the shared premise that multiple modernities...

Too Numerous

Kent Shaw
What does it really mean when people are viewed as bytes of data? And is there beauty or an imaginative potential to information culture and the databases cataloging it? As Too Numerous reveals, the raw material of bytes and data points can be reshaped and repurposed for ridiculous, melancholic, and even aesthetic purposes.  Grappling with an information culture that is both intimidating and daunting, Kent Shaw considers the impersonality represented by the continuing accumulation of personal information and the felicities—and...

Boston's Twentieth-Century Bicycling Renaissance

Lorenz J. Finison
At the end of the nineteenth century, cycling's popularity surged in the Boston area, but by 1900, the trend faded. Within the next few decades, automobiles became commonplace and roads were refashioned to serve them. Lorenz J. Finison argues that bicycling witnessed a renaissance in the 1970s as concerns over physical and environmental health coalesced. Whether cyclists hit the roads on their way to work or to work out, went off-road in the...

Chiquinho

Baltazar Lopes, translated by Isabel P. B. Feo Rodrigues, Carlos A. Almeida, introduction by Ellen W. Sapega
Originally published in Portuguese in 1947, Baltazar Lopes's Chiquinho offers a rich and compelling exploration of Cabo Verde's unique identity. Tracing the arc of its young protagonist's life as he approaches adulthood, the novel follows Chiquinho as he leaves his village, journeys to São Vicente Island to further his education, returns home as drought and famine strike the archipelago, and makes the difficult...

Termination Shocks

Janice Margolis
In astronomy, the termination shock is the boundary that marks the outer limits of the sun's influence—the ripple outward of our solar wind and its collision with the interstellar medium. This debut collection of stories evokes those moments when lives are unpredictably shaken and reset by forces beyond their grasp. Making use of a diverse array of narrative modes, settings, and voices, these stories traverse space and time, moving from Egypt during the Second World War to modern-day Liberia and an unfamiliar Los...

Made Under Pressure

Natalia Kamovnikova
During the Cold War, determined translators and publishers based in the Soviet Union worked together to increase the number of foreign literary texts available in Russian, despite fluctuating government restrictions. Based on extensive interviews with literary translators, Made Under Pressure offers an insider's look at Soviet censorship and the role translators played in promoting foreign authors—including figures like John Fowles, George Orwell, Kurt...

Strange Attractors

edited by Edie Meidav, Emmalie Dropkin
Has a stunning surprise or lucky encounter ever propelled you in an unanticipated direction? Are you doing what you always thought you would be doing with your life or has some unseen magnetism changed your course? And has that redirection come to seem inevitable? Edie Meidav and Emmalie Dropkin asked leading contemporary writers to consider these questions, which they characterize through the metaphor of "the strange attractor," a scientific theory describing an...

Choke Box

Christina Milletti
When Edward Tamlin disappears while writing his memoir, Jane Tamlin (his wife and the mother of his young children) begins to write a secret, corrective "counter-memoir" of her own. Calling the book Choke Box, she reveals intimate, often irreverent, details about her family and marriage, rejecting—and occasionally celebrating—her suspected role in her husband's disappearance. Choke Box isn't Jane's first book. From her room in the Buffalo Psychiatric Institute, she slowly reveals a hidden history of the ghost...

Frog Hollow

Susan Campbell
Frog Hollow: Stories from an American Neighborhood is a collection of colorful historical vignettes of an ethnically diverse neighborhood just west of the Connecticut State Capitol in Hartford. Its 1850s row houses have been home to a wide variety of immigrants. During the Revolutionary War, Frog Hollow was a progressive hub, and later, in the mid-late 19th century, it was a hotbed of industry. Reporter Susan Campbell tells the true stories of Frog Hollow with a primary focus on the...

Oxota

Lyn Hejinian
Over the course of nearly a decade (1983–1991), author Lyn Hejinian visited the USSR seven times, staying frequently with her friends the poet Arkadii Dragomoshchenko and his wife Zina in Leningrad. During this period, she embarked on translating into English several volumes of Dragomoshcheko's poetry, and the two poets began an extensive correspondence, exchanging hundreds of letters until Dragomoshchenko's death in 2012. During her fifth visit, in conversation with Dragomoshchenko and other poets, she decided...

Wings of Night Sky, Wings of Morning Light

Joy Harjo, Priscilla Page
Joy Harjo's play Wings of Night Sky, Wings of Morning Light is the centerpiece of this collection that includes essays and interviews concerning the roots and the reaches of contemporary Native Theater. Harjo blends storytelling, music, movement, and poetic language in Wings of Night Sky, Wings of Morning Light—a healing ceremony that chronicles the challenges young protagonist Redbird faces on her path to healing and...

Death of the Poets, Thirty Polite Things to Say, and Dog Truths (Gift Set)

Kit Reed, illustrated by Joseph Reed
Death of a Poet is rhyming couplets meet etched illustrations in this whimsically dark chapbook about poets and their deaths. In hyperbolic fashion, the preface to Thirty Polite Things to Say reads, "There are times in the lives of us all in which we are at a loss for words. This volume attempts a partial solution." What follows are thirty things perhaps we shouldn't say, but find ourselves saying anyway. The book is...

Sol LeWitt

Lary Bloom
Sol LeWitt (1928-2007), one of the most influential artists of the twentieth century, upended traditional practices of how art is made and marketed. A key figure in minimalism and conceptualism, he proclaimed that the work of the mind is much more important than that of the hand. For his site-specific work—wall drawings and sculpture in dozens of countries—he created the idea and basic plan and then hired young artists to install the pieces. Though typically enormous and intricate, the physical works held no...

Extra Hidden Life, among the Days

Brenda Hillman
Brenda Hillman begins her new book in a place of mourning and listening that is deeply transformative. By turns plain and transcendent, these poems meditate on trees, bacteria, wasps, buildings, roots, and stars, ending with twinned elegies and poems of praise that open into spaces that are both magical and archetypal for human imagination: forests and seashores. As always, Hillman's vision is entirely original, her forms inventive and playful. At times the language turns feral as the poet feels...

In the Language of My Captor

Shane McCrae
Acclaimed poet Shane McCrae's latest collection is a book about freedom told through stories of captivity. Historical persona poems and a prose memoir at the center of the book address the illusory freedom of both black and white Americans. In the book's three sequences, McCrae explores the role mass entertainment plays in oppression, he confronts the myth that freedom can be based upon the power to dominate others, and, in poems about the mixed-race child adopted by Jefferson Davis in the last year of...

Creole Feast

Nathaniel Burton, Rudy Lombard, foreword by Leah Chase
Apr 2019 - HFUNO
Before there were celebrity gourmands, Creole Feast brought together the stories and knowledge of New Orleans top chefs. These masters of modern Creole cuisine share the recipes, tips, and tricks from the kitchens of New Orleans' most famous restaurants, including Dooky Chase, Commander's Palace, Broussard's, and Galatoire's. Today, Creole Feast still stands as the most comprehensive collection of Creole recipes assembled...