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Life and Death in Rikers Island

Homer Venters, former Chief Medical Officer of NYC Jails
Kalief Browder was 16 when he was arrested in the Bronx for allegedly stealing a backpack. Unable to raise bail and unwilling to plead guilty to a crime he didn't commit, Browder spent three years in New York's infamous Rikers Island jail—two in solitary confinement—while awaiting trial. After his case was dismissed in 2013, Browder returned to his family, haunted by his ordeal. Suffering through the lonely hell of solitary, Browder had been violently...

Republic Café

David Biespiel
Inspired by Alain Resnais's Hiroshima mon amour, and sharing the spirit of Tomas Transtromer's Baltics and Yehuda Amichai's Time, Republic Café is a meditation on love during a time of violence, and a tally of what appears and disappears in every moment. Mindful of epigenetic experience as our bodies become living vessels for history's tragedies, David Biespiel praises not only the essentialness of our human memory, but also the sanctity of our flawed, human forgetting. A single sequence, arranged in fifty-four numbered...

Frog Hollow

Susan Campbell
Frog Hollow: Stories from an American Neighborhood is a collection of colorful historical vignettes of an ethnically diverse neighborhood just west of the Connecticut State Capitol in Hartford. Its 1850s row houses have been home to a wide variety of immigrants. During the Revolutionary War, Frog Hollow was a progressive hub, and later, in the mid-late 19th century, it was a hotbed of industry. Reporter Susan Campbell tells the true stories of Frog Hollow with a primary focus on the...

Insurgent Women

Jessica Trisko Darden, Alexis Henshaw, Ora Szekely
Why do women go to war? Despite the reality that female combatants exist the world over, we still know relatively little about who these women are, what motivates them to take up arms, how they are utilized by armed groups, and what happens to them when war ends. This book uses three case studies to explore variation in women's participation in nonstate armed groups in a range of contemporary political and social contexts: the civil war in Ukraine,...

Continential Divide

Alex Myers
Ron Bancroft comes out as a transgender man at nineteen. His parents reject him. His girlfriend rejects him. Feeling trapped and miserable, Ron decides to leave Harvard and travel west to work on a Wyoming ranch to prove to his parents, his ex, and himself that he can live unequivocally as a man. As he embarks on this journey of independence, Ron must deal with the constant fear and anxiety of being discovered as a trans man as he enters a world more dangerous than he ever imagined.

Pursuing Moral Warfare

Marcus Schulzke
During combat, soldiers make life-and-death choices dozens of times a day. These individual decisions accumulate to determine the outcome of wars. This work examines the theory and practice of military ethics in counterinsurgency operations. Marcus Schulzke surveys the ethical traditions that militaries borrow from; compares ethics in practice in the US Army, British Army and Royal Marines Commandos, and Israel Defense Forces; and draws...

Southern Women in the Progressive Era

edited by Giselle Roberts, Melissa A. Walker, foreword by Marjorie J. Spruill
From the 1890s to the end of World War I, the reformers who called themselves progressives helped transform the United States, and many women filled their ranks. Through solo efforts and voluntary associations, both national and regional, women agitated for change, addressing issues such as poverty, suffrage, urban overcrowding, and public health. Southern Women in the Progressive Era presents the stories of a diverse...

Strategic Warning Intelligence

John A. Gentry, Joseph S. Gordon
John A. Gentry and Joseph S. Gordon update our understanding of strategic warning intelligence analysis for the twenty-first century. Strategic warning — the process of long-range analysis to alert senior leaders to trending threats and opportunities that require action — is a critical intelligence function. It also is frequently misunderstood and underappreciated. Gentry and Gordon draw on both their practitioner and academic backgrounds to...

Arabic Second Language Learning and Effects of Input, Transfer, and Typology

Mohammad T. Alhawary
Despite the status of Arabic as a global language and the high demand to learn it, the field of Arabic second language acquisition remains underinvestigated. Second language acquisition findings are crucial for informing and advancing the field of Arabic foreign language pedagogy including Arabic language teaching, testing, and syllabus design. Arabic Second Language Learning and Effects of Input, Transfer, and Typology provides...

Trudeaumania

Paul Litt
Jan 2019 - UBC Press
One of The Hill Times' Best Books of 2016 In 1968, Canadians took a chance on a new kind of politician. Pierre Trudeau became the leader of the Liberal Party and within two months was prime minister of Canada. His meteoric rise to power was driven by Trudeaumania, a phenomenon that generated the same media hype, sexual sizzle, and adoring crowds as Beatlemania. This book examines the origins, dynamics, and enduring significance of Trudeaumania, attributing it to the rise 1960s radicalism, nationalist aspirations, and modern...

Gender, Power, and Representations of Cree Law

Emily Snyder
Jan 2019 - UBC Press
Drawing on the insights of Indigenous feminist legal theory, Emily Snyder examines representations of Cree law and gender in books, videos, graphic novels, educational websites, online lectures, and a video game. Although these resources promote the revitalization of Cree law and the principle of miyo-wicehtowin (good relations), Snyder argues that they do not capture the complexities of gendered power relations. The majority of these resources either erase women's legal authority...

Otter's Journey through Indigenous Language and Law

Lindsay Keegitah Borrows
Jan 2019 - UBC Press
Indigenous languages and laws need bodies to live in. When we bring language back to life, it becomes a medium for developing human relationships. Likewise, when laws are written on people's hearts, they are truly revitalized. Otter's Journey employs Anishinaabe storytelling to explore how Indigenous language revitalization can inform Indigenous legal revitalization. In this book, Otter journeys across the globe to compare Indigenous struggles toward...

Understanding Alice Adams

Bryant Mangum
In Understanding Alice Adams, Bryant Mangum examines the thematic intricacies and astute social commentary of Adams's eleven novels and five short story collections. Throughout her career Adams was known for creating and re-creating the "Alice Adams woman," who is bright, honest, attractive, thoughtful—and sometimes a bit offbeat. As Mangum notes, Adams's central characters—her heroes—are most often women struggling toward self-sufficiency and independence as they strive to fulfill their responsibilities,...

Seawomen of Iceland

Margaret Willson
Finalist for the 2017 Washington State Book Award in General Nonfiction / History The plaque said this was the winter fishing hut of Thurídur Einarsdóttir, one of Iceland's greatest fishing captains, and that she lived from 1777 to 1863. "Wait," anthropologist and former seawoman Margaret Willson said. "She??" So began a quest. Were there more Icelandic seawomen? Most Icelanders said no, and, after all, in most parts of the world fishing is considered a male profession. What could she...

The Deepest Roots

Kathleen Alcalá
As friends began "going back to the land" at the same time that a health issue emerged, Kathleen Alcalá set out to reexamine her relationship with food at the most local level. Remembering her parents, Mexican immigrants who grew up during the Depression, and the memory of planting, growing, and harvesting fresh food with them as a child, she decided to explore the history of the Pacific Northwest island she calls home. In The Deepest Roots, Alcalá walks,...

Becoming Hispanic-Serving Institutions

Gina Ann Garcia
Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs)—not-for-profit, degree-granting colleges and universities that enroll at least 25% or more Latinx students—are among the fastest-growing higher education segments in the United States. As of fall 2016, they represented 15% of all postsecondary institutions in the United States and enrolled 65% of all Latinx college students. As they increase in number, these questions bear consideration: What does it mean...

Jade Mountains and Cinnabar Pools

James M. Hargett, hD
First-hand accounts of travel provide windows into places unknown to the reader, or new ways of seeing familiar places. In Jade Mountains and Cinnabar Pools, the first book-length treatment in English of Chinese travel literature (youji), James M. Hargett identifies and examines core works in the genre, from the Six Dynasties period (220–581), when its essential characteristics emerged, to its florescence in the late Ming dynasty...

Victorians Undone

Kathryn Hughes
In Victorians Undone, renowned British historian Kathryn Hughes follows five iconic figures of the nineteenth century as they encounter the world not through their imaginations or intellects but through their bodies. Or rather, through their body parts. Using the vivid language of admiring glances, cruel sniggers, and implacably turned backs, Hughes crafts a narrative of cinematic quality by combining a series of truly eye-opening and deeply intelligent accounts of life in...

Outsiders

Lyndall Gordon
Mary Shelley, Emily Brontë, George Eliot, Olive Schreiner and Virginia Woolf: they all wrote dazzling books that forever changed the way we see history. In Outsiders, award-winning biographer Lyndall Gordon shows how these five novelists shared more than talent. In a time when a woman's reputation was her security, each of these women lost hers. They were unconstrained by convention, writing against the grain of their contemporaries, prophetically imagining a different future. We...

For Church and Confederacy

edited by Robert Emmett Curran
For Church and Confederacy brings together a wealth of fascinating letters and other writings that unveil the lives of a prominent Southern Irish Catholic family during the late antebellum and Civil War years. Conlaw and Eleanor Lynch, hoping to restore the fortunes they had lost in their native country, settled in the South Carolina upcountry, where they imparted their ambitions to their children, several of whom would make exceptional marks in such areas...

Charleston Belles Abroad

Candace Bailey
In Charleston Belles Abroad, Candace Bailey examines the vital role music collections played in the lives of elite women of Charleston, South Carolina, in the years leading up to the Civil War. Bailey has studied a substantial archive of music held at several southern libraries, including the library in the historic Aiken-Rhett House, once owned by William Aiken Jr., a successful businessman, rice planter, and...

Louisiana Midrash

Marian D. Moore
"In Louisiana Midrash the poet engages the Jewish literary tradition of midrash by entering into it whole body, bringing her life both outer and inner right up against the ancient text, and breathing life, her life into every word. Just as the Bible cherishes genealogy, so does Marian Moore inscribe her own genealogy into the text, as an African American woman born in Shreveport who has found her life as a serious Jew in New Orleans. There are no contradictions because this is poetry; she makes all of her angels...

Fire and Forgiveness

Martha Dunsky, illustrated by Monica Wyrick
Making peace with her spiteful classmate Clara seems impossible to Jane. Despite encouragement from Mother Baptista, the mother superior at their convent school, Jane and Clara dig in their heels. As the girls brood they hear the cannons of the Civil War explode outside their school as General Sherman and the Union army attack the city of Columbia, South Carolina, in February 1865. Mother Baptista asks Sherman for protection for her nuns and...

The Tao of Raven

Ernestine Hayes
In her first book, Blonde Indian, Ernestine Hayes powerfully recounted the story of returning to Juneau and to her Tlingit home after many years of wandering. The Tao of Raven takes up the next and, in some ways, less explored question: once the exile returns, then what? Using the story of Raven and the Box of Daylight (and relating it to Sun Tzu's equally timeless Art of War) to deepen her narration and reflection, Hayes expresses an ongoing frustration and anger at the obstacles and prejudices...

What Is Performance Art?

edited by Adam Geczy, Mimi Kelly
This new volume looks at the rich history of performance art in Australia through a multitude of perspectives. With this collection's thirty-nine contributions by scholars, curators, and artists covering more than three decades of practice, readers will enjoy both a comprehensive overview of the Australian performance art landscape and a rich trove of personal reflections from some of its pioneers and main proponents. Scholars: Heather Barker; Charles Green; Brad...

Art AIDS America Chicago

edited by Staci Boris
Feb 2019 - Lucia Marquand
The groundbreaking 2015 exhibition Art AIDS America, and the accompanying book, revealed the deep and unforgettable impact that HIV/AIDS had on American art from the early 1980s to the present. The national tour of the exhibit concluded its run at the Alphawood Gallery in Chicago, which had been founded in part to give the exhibition a Midwest venue. Now Art AIDS America Chicago looks at the issues raised by the original exhibition and book with from new, different perspectives. An entirely new set...

Poverty and the Myths of Health Care Reform

Richard (Buz) Cooper, MD
In Poverty and the Myths of Health Care Reform, Dr. Richard (Buz) Cooper argues that US poverty and high health care spending are inextricably entwined. Our nation's health care system bears a financial burden that is greater than in any other developed country in large part because impoverished patients use more health care, driving up costs across the board. Drawing on decades of research, Dr. Cooper illuminates the geographic patterns of poverty, wealth, and health care...

Black Power, updated edition

Jeffrey O. G. Ogbar
with a new preface
Outstanding Academic Title, Choice In the 1960s and 70s, the two most important black nationalist organizations, the Nation of Islam and the Black Panther Party, gave voice and agency to the most economically and politically isolated members of black communities outside the South. Though vilified as fringe and extremist, these movements proved to be formidable agents of influence during the civil rights era, ultimately giving birth to the Black...

Wings of Night Sky, Wings of Morning Light

Joy Harjo, Priscilla Page
Joy Harjo's play Wings of Night Sky, Wings of Morning Light is the centerpiece of this collection that includes essays and interviews concerning the roots and the reaches of contemporary Native Theater. Harjo blends storytelling, music, movement, and poetic language in Wings of Night Sky, Wings of Morning Light—a healing ceremony that chronicles the challenges young protagonist Redbird faces on her path to healing and...

Freedom Made Manifest

Peter Joseph Fritz
Karl Rahner's seemingly inscrutable theology of freedom can be summarized simply: human freedom makes manifest (or fails to make manifest) God's eternal decision to create, to save creation, and thereby to share Godself. Freedom is something real, a substantive freedom for: for saying "yes" to God's merciful self-giving. This freedom most often comes to light not in extraordinary triumphs of spirit, but amid small acts whereby common sinners and...

Fyodor Dostoevsky, Walker Percy, and the Age of Suicide

John F. Desmond
Fyodor Dostoevsky, Walker Percy, and the Age of Suicide is a study of the phenomenon of suicide in modern and post-modern society as represented in the major fictional works of Fyodor Dostoevsky and Walker Percy. In his study, suicide is understood in both a literal and spiritual sense as referring to both the actual suicides in their works and to the broader social malaise of spiritual suicide, or despair. In the 19th century Dostoevsky called suicide "the terrible...

Deification in the Latin Patristic Tradition

edited by Jared Ortiz
It has become a commonplace to say that the Latin Fathers did not really hold a doctrine of deification. Indeed, it is often asserted that Western theologians have neglected this teaching, that their occasional references to it are borrowed from the Greeks, and that the Latins have generally reduced the rich biblical and Greek Patristic understanding of salvation to a narrow view of redemption. The essays in this volume challenge this common interpretation by exploring, often...

Sojourns in Charleston, South Carolina, 1865–1947

Jennie Holton Fant
Charleston is one of the most intriguing of American cities, a unique combination of quaint streets, historic architecture, picturesque gardens, and age-old tradition, embroidered with a vivid cultural, literary, and social history. It is a city of contrasts and controversy as well. To trace a documentary history of Charleston from the postbellum era into the twentieth century is to encounter an ever-shifting but...

The Consequences of Loyalism

edited by Rebecca Brannon, Joseph S. Moore
Since the 1970s scholars have regarded Robert M. Calhoon as an invigorating and definitive force when it comes to the study of American Loyalism. His decades-long work redefined the Loyalists' role in the American Revolution from being portrayed as static characters opposing change to being seen eventually as reactionary actors adapting to a society in upheaval. Loyalists were central to the Revolution, and Calhoon and these authors argue...

A Dream and a Chisel

Angela Gregory, Nancy L. Penrose
Angela Gregory is considered by many the doyenne of Louisiana sculpture and is a notable twentieth century American sculptor. In A Dream and a Chisel, Angela Gregory and Nancy Penrose explore Gregory's desire, even as a teenager, to learn the art of cutting stone and to become a sculptor. Through sheer grit and persistence, Gregory achieved her dream of studying with French artist Antoine Bourdelle, one of Auguste Rodin's most trusted...

Diverse Voices in Modern US Moral Theology

Charles E. Curran
In Charles E. Curran's latest book, Diverse Voices in Modern US Moral Theology, he presents the diverse voices of US Catholic moral theologians from the mid-twentieth century to the present. The book discusses eleven key individuals in the development and evolution of moral theology as well as the New Wine, New Wineskins movement. This diversity, which differs from the monolithic understanding of moral theology that prevailed until recently, comes from the diverse historical...

Meeting China Halfway

Lyle J. Goldstein
Though a US-China conflict is far from inevitable, major tensions are building in the Asia-Pacific region. These strains are the result of historical enmity, cultural divergence, and deep ideological estrangement, not to mention apprehensions fueled by geopolitical competition and the closely related "security dilemma." Despite worrying signs of intensifying rivalry, few observers have provided concrete paradigms to lead this troubled relationship away from...

Russia, BRICS, and the Disruption of Global Order

Rachel S. Salzman
Russia's leadership in establishing the BRICS group (Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa) is emblematic of its desire to end US hegemony and rewrite the rules of the international system. Rachel S. Salzman tells the story of why Russia broke with the West, how BRICS came together, why the group is emblematic of Russia's challenge to the existing global order, and how BRICS has changed since its debut. The BRICS group of non-Western states with emerging economies...

Birds of Maryland, Delaware, and the District of Columbia

Bruce M. Beehler
photography by Middleton Evans
A Great Blue Heron wades in the shallows of the Potomac River, scanning for unsuspecting prey. Sunlight turns the water translucent as a small school of fish rises to the water's surface. The heron strikes and moments later is swallowing its quarry—predation in action! This handsome Great Blue Heron is but one of the more than 400 bird species found in Delaware, Maryland, and the District of Columbia. It shares the mid-Atlantic...

Containing Contagion

Sara E. Davies
The fields of global health and international relations are increasingly concerned with the responsibilities of nations to respond to disease outbreaks in a way that safeguards their neighbors as well as the broader international community. In Containing Contagion, Sara E. Davies focuses on one of the world's most pivotal (and riskiest) regions in the field of global health—Southeast Asia, which in recent years has responded to a wave of emerging and endemic...

Alternative Universities

David J. Staley
How can we re-envision the university? Too many examples of what passes for educational innovation today—MOOCs especially—focus on transactions, on questions of delivery. In Alternative Universities, David J. Staley argues that modern universities suffer from a poverty of imagination about how to reinvent themselves. Anyone seeking innovation in higher education today should concentrate instead, he says, on the kind of transformational experience...

How Boards Lead Small Colleges

Alice Lee Williams Brown
with Elizabeth Richmond Hayford
While the media frequently report on threats facing colleges and universities, no sector of higher education is in more danger than private colleges with small endowments and low enrollments. Numerous small private liberal arts colleges could benefit from careful consideration of characteristics and practices of successful trusteeship. In How Boards Lead Small Colleges, Alice Lee Williams Brown and Elizabeth Richmond Hayford focus on small colleges—the...

Dear Baba

Maryam Rafiee, Adam Braver
Maryam Rafiee was only a teenager when her father, Hossein Rafiee, was first imprisoned in Iran for expressing his political views. Unable to see or speak to him, she wrote him letters that she could never send. She recorded the things she wished she could tell him: thoughts on school, home, the family's struggle to free him, and—most importantly—her own hopes and dreams. Fifteen years later, in the wake of her father's second imprisonment, Maryam offers these letters to the world, to...

Austrian Environmental History (Contemporary Austrian Studies, Vol 27)

Marc Landry, Patrick Kupper
This volume on the environmental history of contemporary Austria offers an overview of the field, as well as several topical case studies. In addition to highlighting some innovative methodological approaches, the essays also show how important the environment has been to some of the most crucial aspects of the recent Austrian past. Subjects covered in Austrian Environmental History include: the role of nature in nation-building since...

Subordinating Intelligence

David P. Oakley, Ph.D.
Since September 11, 2001, the CIA and DoD have operated together in Afghanistan, Iraq, and during counterterrorism operations. Although the global war on terrorism gave the CIA and DoD a common purpose, it was actions taken in the late eighties and early nineties that set the foundation for their current relationship. Driven by the post–Cold War environment and lessons learned during military operations, policy makers made intelligence support to the...

Fishing the Jumps

Lamar Herrin
But in fishing the jumps there comes a moment when an insatiable hunger rises up in you and everything turns wild." The term "fishing the jumps" speaks to a method of catching fish while they're in the midst of a wild, frenzied state. And just like the undercurrents that exist in the lakes on which this tale is based, some relationships have a way of hiding—and revealing—turmoil just beneath the surface. In his latest novel, award-winning writer Lamar Herrin highlights the art of storytelling and the value of...

Made Under Pressure

Natalia Kamovnikova
During the Cold War, determined translators and publishers based in the Soviet Union worked together to increase the number of foreign literary texts available in Russian, despite fluctuating government restrictions. Based on extensive interviews with literary translators, Made Under Pressure offers an insider's look at Soviet censorship and the role translators played in promoting foreign authors—including figures like John Fowles, George Orwell, Kurt...

Lisbon

Magda Pinheiro, translated by Mario Pereira
Feb 2019 - Tagus Press
Winner of the Máximo Special Jury Prize (2012) Throughout the pages of this highly original and meticulously researched book, we follow the rich and fascinating history of Lisbon—European capital city and cosmopolitan metropolis—from its legendary founding by Ulysses to the present day, covering the most remarkable moments of the city, such as the conquest of Lisbon, the period of discoveries, the great earthquake of 1755, the departure of the royal court for Brazil, the Liberal revolts,...

The Georgetown Dictionary of Moroccan Arabic

edited by Mohamed Maamouri
The Georgetown Dictionary of Moroccan Arabic is a modernized language resource for learning and studying Moroccan Arabic that updates the pioneering Arabic dialect dictionary published by Georgetown University Press over fifty years ago. Students, teachers, and scholars of Arabic will welcome this upgraded resource, which includes key Moroccan words, to grow their vocabulary and learn more about Moroccan Arabic language and culture. Created...

A Song to My City

Carol Lancaster, with Douglas Farrar
This deeply felt memoir is a love letter to Washington, DC. Carol Lancaster, a third-generation Washingtonian who knew the city like few others, takes readers on a tour of the nation's capital from its swamp-infested beginnings to the present day, with an insider's view of the gritty politics, environment, society, culture, and larger-than-life heroes that characterize her beloved hometown. The former dean of Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service, a friend of presidents...

Termination Shocks

Janice Margolis
In astronomy, the termination shock is the boundary that marks the outer limits of the sun's influence—the ripple outward of our solar wind and its collision with the interstellar medium. This debut collection of stories evokes those moments when lives are unpredictably shaken and reset by forces beyond their grasp. Making use of a diverse array of narrative modes, settings, and voices, these stories traverse space and time, moving from Egypt during the Second World War to modern-day Liberia and an unfamiliar Los...

Footbinding as Fashion

John Robert Shepherd, hD
Previous studies of the practice of footbinding in imperial China have theorized that it expressed ethnic identity or that it served an economic function. By analyzing the popularity of footbinding in different places and times, Footbinding as Fashion investigates the claim that early Qing (1644–1911) attempts by Manchu rulers to ban footbinding made it a symbol of anti-Manchu sentiment and Han identity and led to the spread of the practice...

Art AIDS America / Art AIDS America Chicago Boxed Set

Jonathan David Katz, Rock Hushka, Staci Boris
This slipcased boxed set contains the two volumes: Art AIDS America, published in 2015 to coincide with the original exhibit at the Tacoma Art Museum, and the new book Art AIDS America Chicago. Art AIDS America included work by Keith Haring, David Wojnarowicz, Peter Hujar, Robert Mapplethorpe, among many others. Taken together, these two volumes are a stunning overview of the artistic response over the last thirty years to the AIDS...

Mouse vs. Cat in Chinese Literature

translated by Wilt L. Idema, hD, foreword by Haiyan Lee
In literatures worldwide, animal fables have been analyzed for their revealingly anthropomorphic views, but until now little attention has been given to the animal tales of China. The complex, competitive relationship between rodents (vilified as thieves of grain) and the felines with whom they are perennially at war is explored in this presentation of Chinese tales about cats and mice. Master translator Wilt Idema situates them in...

Razor Clams

David Berger
In this lively history and celebration of the Pacific razor clam, David Berger shares with us his love affair with the glossy, gold-colored Siliqua patula and gets into the nitty-gritty of how to dig, clean, and cook them using his favorite recipes. In the course of his investigation, Berger brings to light the long history of razor clamming as a subsistence, commercial, and recreational activity, and shows the ways it has helped shape both the identity and the psyche of the Pacific...

Action and Character According to Aristotle

Kevin L. Flannery
Aristotle labors under no illusion that in the practical sphere humans operate according to the canons of logic. This does not prevent him, however, from bringing his own logical acumen to his study of human behavior. Aristotle, according to Fr. Flannery, depicts the way in which human acts of various sorts and in various combinations determine the logical structure of moral character. Some moral characters - or character types - manage to incorporate...

Gandhi's Search for the Perfect Diet

Nico Slate
Mahatma Gandhi redefined nutrition as a holistic approach to building a more just world. What he chose to eat was intimately tied to his beliefs. His key values of nonviolence, religious tolerance, and rural sustainability developed in coordination with his dietary experiments. His repudiation of sugar, chocolate, and salt expressed his opposition to economies based on slavery, indentured labor, and imperialism. Gandhi's Search for the Perfect Diet sheds new light...

Making Dances That Matter

Anna Halprin, Rachel Kaplan
Anna Halprin, vanguard postmodern dancer turned community artist and healer, has created ground-breaking dances with communities all over the world. Here, she presents her philosophy and experience, as well as step-by-step processes for bringing people together to create dances that foster individual and group well-being. At the heart of this book are accounts of two dances: the Planetary Dance, which continues to be performed throughout the world, and...

Music and Modernity among First Peoples of North America

edited by Victoria Lindsay Levine, Dylan Robinson
Music and Modernity among First Peoples of North America is a collaboration between Indigenous and settler scholars from both Canada and the United States. The contributors explore the intersections between music, modernity, and Indigeneity in essays addressing topics that range from hip-hop to powwow, and television soundtracks of Native Classical and experimental music. Working from the shared premise that multiple modernities...

Too Numerous

Kent Shaw
What does it really mean when people are viewed as bytes of data? And is there beauty or an imaginative potential to information culture and the databases cataloging it? As Too Numerous reveals, the raw material of bytes and data points can be reshaped and repurposed for ridiculous, melancholic, and even aesthetic purposes.  Grappling with an information culture that is both intimidating and daunting, Kent Shaw considers the impersonality represented by the continuing accumulation of personal information and the felicities—and...

Peak Japan

Brad Glosserman
The post-Cold War era has been difficult for Japan. A country once heralded for evolving a superior form of capitalism and seemingly ready to surpass the United States as the world's largest economy lost its way in the early 1990s. The bursting of the bubble in 1991 ushered in a period of political and economic uncertainty that has lasted for over two decades. There were hopes that the triple catastrophe of March 11, 2011 — a massive earthquake, tsunami, and accident at the Fukushima Daiichi...

The DOs, third edition

Norman Gevitz
Overcoming suspicion, ridicule, and outright opposition from the American Medical Association, the osteopathic medical profession today serves the health needs of more than thirty million Americans. Osteopathic medicine is now the fastest-growing segment of the US physician and surgeon population. In The DOs, historian Norman Gevitz chronicles the development of this controversial medical movement from its nineteenth-century origins in the American Midwest to the present day. He describes the...

Living Sustainably

A. Whitney Sanford
In light of concerns about food and human health, fraying social ties, economic uncertainty, and rampant consumerism, some people are foregoing a hurried, distracted existence and embracing a mindful way of living. Intentional residential communities across the United States are seeking the freedom to craft their own societies and live based on the values of nonviolence, self-sufficiency, equality, and voluntary...

Wildflowers and Ferns of Red River Gorge and the Greater Red River Basin

Dan Dourson, Judy Dourson
The Red River Gorge's intricate canyon system features an abundance of high sandstone cliffs, rock shelters, waterfalls, and natural bridges, making it one of the world's top rock-climbing destinations. The Gorge, known for its unspoiled scenic beauty and numerous hiking trails, is one of Kentucky's most popular natural destinations, attracting over 500,000 visitors a year. While books about hiking, climbing, and other recreational...

The Church of God in Jesus Christ

Roch A. Kereszty
The Church of God in Jesus Christ consists of three parts: the first provides a concise historical survey of ecclesiology elucidating the most salient teachings and insights from the Old and New Testaments, the writings of the fathers, the medievals, moderns, up to the present day. It integrates a standard historical overview with a recovery of oft ignored or forgotten insights from the tradition (e.g., beginnings of the Church in prehistoric times and in Israel, Irenaeus's...

Adolph Rupp and the Rise of Kentucky Basketball

James Duane Bolin
Known as the "Man in the Brown Suit" and "The Baron of the Bluegrass," Adolph Rupp (1901–1977) is a towering figure in the history of college athletics. In Adolph Rupp and the Rise of Kentucky Basketball, historian James Duane Bolin goes beyond the wins and losses to present a full-length biography of Rupp based on more than one-hundred interviews with Rupp, his assistant coaches, former players, University of Kentucky presidents and faculty members, and his admirers and...

Sensitive Space

Jason Cons, series edited byK. Sivaramakrishnan, Padma Kaimal, Anand A. Yang
Enclaves along the India-Bangladesh border have posed conceptual and pragmatic challenges to both states since Partition in 1947. These pieces of India inside of Bangladesh, and vice versa, are spaces in which national security, belonging, and control are shown in sharp relief. Through ethnographic and historical analysis, Jason Cons argues that these spaces are key locations for rethinking the...

The City Is More Than Human

Frederick L. Brown, foreword by Paul S. Sutter
Winner of the 2017 Virginia Marie Folkins Award, Association of King County Historical Organizations (AKCHO) Winner of the 2017 Hal K. Rothman Book Prize, Western History Association Seattle would not exist without animals. Animals have played a vital role in shaping the city from its founding amid existing indigenous towns in the mid-nineteenth century to the livestock-friendly town of the late nineteenth century to the pet-friendly,...

Defending Giants

Darren Frederick Speece, foreword by Paul S. Sutter
Giant redwoods are American icons, paragons of grandeur, exceptionalism, and endurance. They are also symbols of conflict and negotiation, remnants of environmental battles over the limits of industrialization, profiteering, and globalization. Since the middle of the nineteenth century, logging operations have eaten away at the redwood forest, particularly areas covered by ancient giant redwoods.

Aquinas on Emotion's Participation in Reason

Nicholas Kahm
Aquinas on Emotion's Participation in Reason aims to present Aquinas's answer to the perennial and now popular question: In what way can the emotions be rational? For Aquinas, the starting point of this inquiry is Aristotle's claim (EN. I. 13) that there are three parts to the soul: 1) the rational part, 2) the non-rational part which can participate in reason, and 3) the non-rational part that does not participate in reason. It is the extent to which the second part (the sense...

Abortion across Borders

edited by Christabelle Sethna and Gayle Davis
Safe, legal, and affordable abortion is widely recognized as an essential medical service for women across the world. When access to that service is denied or restricted, women are compelled to carry unwanted pregnancies to term, seek backstreet abortionists, attempt self-induced abortions, or even travel to less restrictive states, provinces, and countries to receive care. Abortion across Borders focuses on travel across...

Systems Failure

Andrew Franta
The Enlightenment has long been understood—and often understood itself—as an age of systems. In 1759, Jean Le Rond d'Alembert, one of the architects of the Encyclopédie, claimed that "the true system of the world has been recognized, developed, and perfected." In Systems Failure, Andrew Franta challenges this view by exploring the fascination with failure and obsession with unpredictable social forces in a range of English authors from Samuel Johnson to Jane Austen. Franta...

The Future of Academic Freedom

Henry Reichman
foreword by Joan Wallach Scott
Academic freedom—crucial to the health of American higher education—is threatened on many fronts. In The Future of Academic Freedom, a leading scholar equips us to defend academic freedom by illuminating its meaning, the challenges it faces, and its relation to freedom of expression. In the wake of the 2016 election, challenges to academic freedom have intensified, higher education has become a target of attacks by conservatives, and issues of free speech on campus have...

Ballyhoo

poems by Hastings Hensel
Though at times whimsical and witty, the poems in Hastings Hensel's Ballyhoo inhabit the world beyond and between the punchline. In tightly controlled meditations on language's limits and its necessity, as well as on the many forms that humor takes—comedy, laughter, farce, clowning, parody, and more—Hensel navigates fine lines between joy and sadness, jokes and cruelty, reality and illusion, and irony and sincerity. Universal in scope, the 47 poems in Ballyhoo are richly idiomatic and evocative. They are also...

Strange Attractors

edited by Edie Meidav, Emmalie Dropkin
Has a stunning surprise or lucky encounter ever propelled you in an unanticipated direction? Are you doing what you always thought you would be doing with your life or has some unseen magnetism changed your course? And has that redirection come to seem inevitable? Edie Meidav and Emmalie Dropkin asked leading contemporary writers to consider these questions, which they characterize through the metaphor of "the strange attractor," a scientific theory describing an...

Chiquinho

Baltazar Lopes, translated by Isabel P. B. Feo Rodrigues, Carlos A. Almeida, introduction by Ellen W. Sapega
Originally published in Portuguese in 1947, Baltazar Lopes's Chiquinho offers a rich and compelling exploration of Cabo Verde's unique identity. Tracing the arc of its young protagonist's life as he approaches adulthood, the novel follows Chiquinho as he leaves his village, journeys to São Vicente Island to further his education, returns home as drought and famine strike the archipelago, and makes the difficult...

Caring for Glaciers

Karine Gagné
Regional geopolitical processes have turned the Himalayan region of Ladakh, in northwest India, into a strategic border area with an increasing military presence that has decentered the traditional agropastoralist economy. This in turn has led to social fragmentation, the growing isolation of elders, and ethical dilemmas for those who strive to maintain traditional subsistence activities. Simultaneously, climate change is causing glaciers—a vital source of life in the...

Desiring the Beautiful

Filip Ivanovic
Desiring the Beautiful studies the concept of deification, theosis, in two of the most influential early Christian philosopher-theologians, who might be considered as theoretical consolidators of the idea of theosis, and argues that the proper understanding of their central soteriological concept must take into account its dimension of love and beauty. The core of the book consists of six chapters,...

Gateway to Equality

Keona K. Ervin
Like most of the nation during the 1930s, St. Louis, Missouri, was caught in the stifling grip of the Great Depression. For the next thirty years, the "Gateway City" continued to experience significant urban decline as its population swelled and the area's industries stagnated. Over these decades, many African American citizens in the region found themselves struggling financially and fighting for access to profitable jobs and suitable working...

Ospreys

Alan F. Poole
Ospreys are one of the few bird species that are found throughout the world. From forests in Hokkaido to rivers in Oregon and islands off Australia, Ospreys steal the show as nature lovers easily watch them build their massive nests and tend to their young. The fact that the Osprey is one of the few large birds that can hover adds to its mystique, and to watch it plunge into the water, emerging with a fish clutched in its talons, is truly a sight one will remember. As widespread as Ospreys are,...

Wild Yet Tasty

Dan Dourson, Judy Dourson, illustrated by Dan Dourson
Eastern Kentucky is home to a number of breathtaking natural attractions. Over half a million visitors each year are drawn to its scenic beauty, abundant hiking trails, and exceptional rock climbing. The region also holds some of the most diverse ecosystems in the world, from forest and mountain terrain to caves and ravines. This dramatic mixture of microclimates creates a natural abundance, including numerous edible plants, not found...

Choke Box

Christina Milletti
When Edward Tamlin disappears while writing his memoir, Jane Tamlin (his wife and the mother of his young children) begins to write a secret, corrective "counter-memoir" of her own. Calling the book Choke Box, she reveals intimate, often irreverent, details about her family and marriage, rejecting—and occasionally celebrating—her suspected role in her husband's disappearance. Choke Box isn't Jane's first book. From her room in the Buffalo Psychiatric Institute, she slowly reveals a hidden history of the ghost...

A Catalogue Of Small Pains

Meghan L. Dowling
Mothers, daughters, and sisters must both protect and betray. They must maintain appearances in order to hide their pain. Winner of the University of New Orleans Press Publishing Lab, A Catalogue of Small Pains tells the stories of three generations of women whose lives are overshadowed by the secret cruelty of the family patriarch. Layering vignettes, illustrations, and instructions on womanhood in America, this fragmented novel exhibits the memories of a family, its heartbreak and pain, and stands as a...

Oxota, revised edition

Lyn Hejinian
Over the course of nearly a decade (1983–1991), author Lyn Hejinian visited the USSR seven times, staying frequently with her friends the poet Arkadii Dragomoshchenko and his wife Zina in Leningrad. During this period, she embarked on translating into English several volumes of Dragomoshcheko's poetry, and the two poets began an extensive correspondence, exchanging hundreds of letters until Dragomoshchenko's death in 2012. During her fifth visit, in conversation with Dragomoshchenko and other poets, she decided...

Boston's Twentieth-Century Bicycling Renaissance

Lorenz J. Finison
At the end of the nineteenth century, cycling's popularity surged in the Boston area, but by 1900, the trend faded. Within the next few decades, automobiles became commonplace and roads were refashioned to serve them. Lorenz J. Finison argues that bicycling witnessed a renaissance in the 1970s as concerns over physical and environmental health coalesced. Whether cyclists hit the roads on their way to work or to work out, went off-road in the...

Freshwater Mollusks of the World

edited by Charles Lydeard and Kevin S. Cummings
There are more species of freshwater mollusks—well over 5,000—than all the mammal species of the world. Freshwater mollusks are also arguably the most endangered fauna on the planet. Yet few references exist for researchers, shell enthusiasts, and general readers who are interested in learning more about these fascinating creatures. In Freshwater Mollusks of the World, Charles Lydeard and Kevin S. Cummings fill that void with contributions...

The Black Skyscraper

Adrienne Brown
With the development of the first skyscrapers in the 1880s, urban built environments could expand vertically as well as horizontally. Tall buildings emerged in growing cities to house and manage the large and racially diverse populations of migrants and immigrants flocking to their centers following Reconstruction. Beginning with Chicago's early 10-story towers and concluding with the 1931 erection of the 102-story Empire State Building, Adrienne Brown's The Black Skyscraper...

Lincoln, Seward, and US Foreign Relations in the Civil War Era

Joseph A. Fry
The Civil War marked a significant turning point in American history—not only for the United States itself but also for its relations with foreign powers both during and after the conflict. The friendship and foreign policy partnership between President Abraham Lincoln and Secretary of State William Henry Seward shaped those US foreign policies. These unlikely allies, who began as rivals during the 1860 presidential nomination, helped ensure that America...

Rodnaya rech'

Irina Dubinina, Olesya Kisselev
Rodnaya rech', an introductory textbook for heritage learners, addresses the unique needs of students who have at least Intermediate-level listening and speaking skills on the ACTFL scale but who have underdeveloped or nonexistent literacy skills. With an emphasis on conceptual understanding of vocabulary and grammar, Rodnaya rech' builds students' literacy skills and teaches them to strategically use the linguistic intuition they have gained as...

Governing Health, fifth edition

William G. Weissert and Carol S. Weissert
In this classic text, William G. Weissert and Carol S. Weissert describe how government and private interests help define health policy. Under the Obama administration, the federal government took a broadened role in setting health policy and insurance regulations. But the succeeding Trump administration and a Republican congress threatened to dismantle the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and its core tenets. Chronicling these recent important changes, Governing...

Extra Hidden Life, among the Days

Brenda Hillman
Brenda Hillman begins her new book in a place of mourning and listening that is deeply transformative. By turns plain and transcendent, these poems meditate on trees, bacteria, wasps, buildings, roots, and stars, ending with twinned elegies and poems of praise that open into spaces that are both magical and archetypal for human imagination: forests and seashores. As always, Hillman's vision is entirely original, her forms inventive and playful. At times the language turns feral as the poet feels...

Behind the Stars, More Stars

edited by Christopher Larkosh, Oona Patrick
Presenting experimental and boundary-breaking prose from women, people of color, and LGBTQ writers, Behind the Stars, More Stars imagines a more diverse and inclusive Luso-American and Portuguese-American literary scene, which has traditionally been dominated by male voices. Since its first "Writing the Luso Experience" workshops were held in 2011, Dzanc Books's Disquiet International Literary Program in...

Death of the Poets, Thirty Polite Things to Say, and Dog Truths (Gift Set)

Kit Reed, illustrated by Joseph Reed
Death of a Poet is rhyming couplets meet etched illustrations in this whimsically dark chapbook about poets and their deaths. In hyperbolic fashion, the preface to Thirty Polite Things to Say reads, "There are times in the lives of us all in which we are at a loss for words. This volume attempts a partial solution." What follows are thirty things perhaps we shouldn't say, but find ourselves saying anyway. The book is...

Death, Judgment, Heaven, and Hell

edited by Edward Condon, foreword by Chad C. Pecknold
Catholic University of America Press is proud to present the second volume in its new Sayings of the Fathers of the Church Series. Featuring a wide range of scholars compiling material from our acclaimed Fathers of the Church volumes, each title will be devoted to a few specific areas of theology. The inaugural volume covered The Seven Deadly Sins, and future volumes are planned to focus on Angels and Demons, the Mass,...

Lectures of the Air Corps Tactical School and American Strategic Bombing in World War II

edited by Phil Haun
Following the cataclysmic losses suffered in World War I, air power theorists in Europe advocated for long-range bombers to overfly the trenches and strike deep into the enemy's heartland. The bombing of cities was seen as a means to collapse the enemy's will to resist and bring the war to a quick end. In the United States, airmen called for an independent air force, but with the nation's return to isolationism, there was...

Maxwell Taylor's Cold War

Ingo Trauschweizer
General Maxwell Taylor served at the nerve centers of US military policy and Cold War strategy and experienced firsthand the wars in Korea and Vietnam, as well as crises in Berlin and Cuba. Along the way he became an adversary of President Dwight D. Eisenhower's nuclear deterrence strategy and a champion of President John F. Kennedy's shift toward Flexible Response. Taylor also remained a public critic of defense policy and civil-military relations into the 1980s and was one of...

Foreign Friends

David P. Fields
The division of Korea in August 1945 was one of the most consequential foreign policy decisions of the twentieth century. Despite the enormous impact this split has had on international relations from the Cold War to the present, comparatively little has been done to explain the decision. In Foreign Friends: Syngman Rhee, American Exceptionalism, and the Division of Korea, author David P. Fields argues that the division resulted not from a snap...

Biplanes at War

Wray R. Johnson, drawings by George Stoll
Unlike the relative uniformity of conventional warfare, the peculiarities of small wars prevent a clear definition of rules and roles for military forces to follow. During the small wars era, aviation was still in its infancy, and the US military had only recently begun battling in the skies. The US Marine Corps recognized that flexibility and ingenuity would be critical to the successful conduct of small wars and thus employed the...

In the Language of My Captor

Shane McCrae
Acclaimed poet Shane McCrae's latest collection is a book about freedom told through stories of captivity. Historical persona poems and a prose memoir at the center of the book address the illusory freedom of both black and white Americans. In the book's three sequences, McCrae explores the role mass entertainment plays in oppression, he confronts the myth that freedom can be based upon the power to dominate others, and, in poems about the mixed-race child adopted by Jefferson Davis in the last year of...

Letters from Amherst

Samuel R. Delany
Five substantial letters written from 1989 to 1991 bring readers into conversation with Hugo and Nebula Award winning-author Samuel Delany. With engaging prose, Delany shares details about his work, his relationships, and the thoughts he had while living in Amherst and teaching as a professor at the UMASS campus just outside of town, in contrast to the more chaotic life of New York City. Along with commentary on his own work and the work of other writers, he ponders the state of America,...

My Escapee

Corinna Vallianatos
Delicate and assured, the stories in My Escapee illuminate unseen forces in women's lives: the shameful thought, the stifled hope, the subterranean stresses of marriage, friendship, and family. Grappling with lost memories, escaped time, the longing to be loved, and the instinct for autonomy, the stories peer inside their characters' minds to their benign delusions, their triumphs and defeats. A girl taking a test for admittance to a selective school finds that what she loves most of all is the ordinary. A...

The Favrot Family of Louisiana

G. Martin Moeller, Jr
The Favrot family is among the most venerable in Louisiana, with a continuous presence there dating to 1728. From the French colonial period, through four decades of Spanish colonial rule, followed by U.S. statehood, secession, and the Civil War, and ultimately into the modern era, the Favrots have remained influential. The family's story offers a lens through which to view the complex and often-turbulent history of Louisiana. This book traces the story of eight...

A Service Beyond All Recompense

edited by Kurt Martens
When Monsignor Thomas J. Green, professor at the School of Canon Law at The Catholic University of America, approached his seventy-fifth birthday and the fiftieth anniversary of his priestly ordination, his colleagues planned on offering him a fitting tribute in the form of a festschrift. Six people with different backgrounds, but all related to Msgr. Green on one way or another, have written a laudatio – a short congratulatory letter – in...

America's Teilhard

Susan Kassman Sack
The period from 1959–1972 was the crucial years during which the French priest, paleontologist, and writer Pierre Teilhard de Chardin's writing and thought significantly impacted the spiritual thought of the United States. During this time his writings first became available in North America; indeed, over five hundred works concerning him were published in the US during these years. America's Teilhard: Christ and Hope in the 1960s is a study of the reception of Teilhard in the...

Went to the Devil

Anthony J. Connors
Edward Davoll was a respected New Bedford whaling captain in an industry at its peak in the 1850s. But mid-career, disillusioned with whaling, desperately lonely at sea, and experiencing financial problems, he turned to the slave trade, with disastrous results. Why would a man of good reputation, in a city known for its racial tolerance and Quaker-inspired abolitionism, risk engagement with this morally repugnant industry? In this riveting biography, Anthony J. Connors...

The Book of Acts

Charles Raith, II
The Book of Acts: Catholic, Orthodox, and Evangelical Readings brings together leading Catholic, Orthodox, and Evangelical theologians to read and interpret the book of Acts from within their ecclesial tradition, while simultaneously engaging one another in critical dialogue. Combining both theological exegesis and ecumenical dialogue, each chapter is uniquely structured to facilitate a rich reading of Scripture and an engaging though critical dialogue across the...

Bound for Beatitude

Reinhard Hütter
Bound for Beatitude is about St. Thomas Aquinas's theology of beatitude and the journey thereto. Consequently, the work's topic is the meaning and purpose of human life embedded in that of the whole cosmos. This study is not an antiquarian exercise in the thought of some sundry medieval thinker, but an exercise of ressourcement in the philosophical and theological wisdom of one of the most profound theologians of the Catholic Church, one whom the Church has...

When Not Yet Is Now

Samuel Hazo
Samuel Hazo has won acclaim for his novels, plays, essays, and memoirs, but he is best known for his poetry. This is his thirtieth collection of poems. In When Not Yet Is Now, as in all his work, Hazo finds the quiet nobility in the quotidian. He speaks with subtlety and humor about the stuff of ordinary life and inevitable loss. Hazo served as Pennsylvania's Poet Laureate from 1993 to 2003. He has won many awards and holds twelve honorary doctorates. Poet Dana Gioia notes that he "has been a constant and positive...

Gamer Nation

John Wills
In 1975, design engineer Dave Nutting completed work on a new arcade machine. A version of Taito's Western Gun, a recent Japanese arcade machine, Nutting's Gun Fight depicted a classic showdown between gunfighters. Rich in Western folklore, the game seemed perfect for the American market; players easily adapted to the new technology, becoming pistol-wielding pixel cowboys. One of the first successful early arcade titles, Gun Fight helped introduce an entire nation to video-gaming and sold...

The Sacking of Fallujah

Ross Caputi, Richard Hil, Donna Mulhearn
The Iraqi city of Fallujah has become an epicenter of geopolitical conflict, where foreign powers and non-state actors have repeatedly waged war in residential neighborhoods with staggering humanitarian consequences. The Sacking of Fallujah is the first comprehensive study of the three recent sieges of this city, including those by the United States in 2004 and the Iraqi-led operation to defeat ISIS in 2016. Unlike dominant military accounts that focus on American...

To Catch a Spy

James M. Olson
The United States is losing the counterintelligence war. Foreign intelligence services, particularly those of China, Russia, and Cuba, are recruiting spies in our midst and stealing our secrets and cutting-edge technologies. In To Catch a Spy: The Art of Counterintelligence, James M. Olson, former chief of CIA counterintelligence, offers a wake-up call for the American public and also a guide for how our country can do a better job of protecting its national security and trade secrets.

Ridley Scott

Vincent LoBrutto
With celebrated works such as Alien, Blade Runner, Thelma & Louise, and Gladiator, Ridley Scott has secured his place in Hollywood. This legendary director and filmmaker has had an undeniable influence on art and the culture of filmmaking, but is also a respected media businessman. In Ridley Scott: A Biography, Vincent LoBrutto delves into Ridley Scott's oeuvre in a way that allows readers to understand the yin and yang of his exceptional career. Presented is a unique crosscut between the biographical facts...

Sir Barton and the Making of the Triple Crown

Jennifer S. Kelly, foreword by Steve Haskin
He was always destined to be a champion. Royally bred, with English and American classic winners in his pedigree, Sir Barton shone from birth, dubbed the "king of them all." But after a winless two-year-old season and a near-fatal illness, uncertainty clouded the start of Sir Barton's three-year-old season. Then his surprise victory in America's signature race, the Kentucky Derby, started him on the road to history, where he would go on to dominate the...

Olivia de Havilland

Victoria Amador
Legendary actress and two-time Academy Award winner Olivia de Havilland is best known for her role as Melanie Wilkes in Gone with the Wind (1939). She often inhabited characters who were delicate, ladylike, elegant, and refined. At the same time, she was a survivor with a fierce desire to direct her own destiny on and off the screen. She fought and won a lawsuit against Warner Bros. over a contract dispute that changed the studio contract system forever. She is also renowned for her long feud with...

Pop Culture and the Dark Side of the American Dream

Paul A. Cantor
The many con men, gangsters, and drug lords portrayed in popular culture are examples of the dark side of the American dream. Viewers are fascinated by these twisted versions of heroic American archetypes, like the self-made man and the entrepreneur. Applying the critical skills he developed as a Shakespeare scholar, Paul A. Cantor finds new depth in familiar landmarks of popular culture. He invokes Shakespearean models to...

Cover Name: Dr. Rantzau

Nikolaus Ritter, edited by Katharine R. Wallace, foreword by Mary Kathryn Barbier
Cover Name: Dr. Rantzau is a gripping diary-like personal account of espionage during the Second World War and is one of very few historic memoirs written by an ex-Abwehr officer. Detailed is how Colonel Nikolaus Ritter, following a brief World War I career and over ten years as a businessman in America, returned to Germany in spring of 1935 and became Chief of Air Intelligence in the Abwehr. He was assigned to establish a network of agents to...

Sabers through the Reich

William Stuart Nance, foreword by Robert M. Citino
In Sabers through the Reich, William Stuart Nance provides the first comprehensive operational history of American corps cavalry in the European Theater of Operations (ETO) during World War II. The corps cavalry had a substantive and direct impact on Allied success in almost every campaign, and served as offensive guards for armies across Europe, conducting reconnaissance, economy of force, and security missions, as...

Decision in the Atlantic

edited by Marcus Faulkner, Christopher M. Bell, with contributions by Marc Milner, Christopher M. Bell, Kevin Smith, Tim Benbow, Ben Jones, James Goldrick, Marcus Faulkner, G. H. Bennett, David Kohnen
The Battle of the Atlantic was the longest campaign of the Second World War. This volume highlights the scale and complexity of this bitterly contested campaign, one that encompassed far more than just attacks by German U-boats on Allied shipping. The team of...

At Home

Beth Luey
With its abundant history of prominent families, Massachusetts boasts some of the most historically rich residences in the country. In the eastern half of the Commonwealth, these include Presidents John and John Quincy Adams's home in Quincy, Bronson and Louisa May Alcott's Orchard House in Concord, the Charles Bulfinch—designed Harrison Gray Otis House in Boston, and Edward Gorey's Elephant House in Yarmouth Port. In At Home: Historic Houses of Eastern Massachusetts, Beth Luey uses...

Becoming an Academic

Inger Mewburn
Welcome to the university, where the Academic Hunger Games, fueled by precarious employment conditions, is the new reality: a perpetual jostle for short-term contracts and the occasional plum job. But Inger Mewburn is here to tell you that life doesn't have to be so grim. A veteran of the university gig economy, Mewburn—aka The Thesis Whisperer—is perfectly placed to reflect on her experience and offer a wealth of practical strategies to survive and thrive. In Becoming...

Taking Nazi Technology

Douglas M. O'Reagan
During the Second World War, German science and technology posed a terrifying threat to the Allied nations. Combined with Germany's generations-old reputation for excellence in science and engineering, these advanced weapons, which included rockets, V-2 missiles, tanks, submarines, and jet airplanes, gave troubling credence to Nazi propaganda about forthcoming "wonder-weapons" that would turn the war decisively in the Axis' favor. After...

Thomas Aquinas and the Greek Fathers

edited by Michael Dauphinais, Roger W. Nutt, Andrew Hofer, OP
Scholars have often been quick to acknowledge Thomas Aquinas's distinctive retrieval of Aristotle's Greek philosophical heritage. Often lagging, however, has been a proper appreciation of both his originality and indebtedness in appropriating the great theological insights of the Greek Fathers of the Church. In a similar way to his integration of the Aristotelian philosophical corpus, Aquinas successfully interwove the often newly received and...

Creole Feast

Nathaniel Burton, Rudy Lombard, foreword by Leah Chase
Before there were celebrity gourmands, Creole Feast brought together the stories and knowledge of New Orleans top chefs. These masters of modern Creole cuisine share the recipes, tips, and tricks from the kitchens of New Orleans' most famous restaurants, including Dooky Chase, Commander's Palace, Broussard's, and Galatoire's. Today, Creole Feast still stands as the most comprehensive collection of Creole recipes assembled...

Glaphyra on the Pentateuch, Volume 2

Saint Cyril of Alexandria
The translation of the commentary of Cyril of Alexandria (ca. 376-444) on the Pentateuch, known as the Glaphyra, or "elegant comments," is now completed by this second volume. Volume 1 contained the whole of his remarks on Genesis, and now Volume 2 presents his comments on Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy, along with indices for the entire work. At this early stage in his patriarchate Cyril was an avid expositor of Scripture, on books of both...

Taking Possession

Heidi Aronson Kolk
West of downtown St. Louis sits an 1851 town house that bears no obvious relationship to the monumental architecture, trendy condominiums, and sports stadia of its surroundings. Originally the residence of a fur-trade tycoon and now the Campbell House Museum, the house has been subject to energetic preservation and heritage work for some 130 years. In Taking Possession, Heidi Aronson Kolk explores the complex and sometimes contradictory motivations for...

Aquinas on Transubstantiation

Reinhard Hütter
Aquinas on Transubstantiation treats one of the most frequently mis-understood and mis-represented teachings of Thomas Aquinas—Eucharistic transubstantiation. The study interprets Aquinas's teaching as an exercise of "holy teaching" (sacra doctrina) that intends to show theologically and back up philosophically the simple yet profound thesis that "transubstantiation" affirms nothing but the truth of Christ's words at the Last Supper—"This is my body,"...

Migraine

Katherine Foxhall
For centuries, people have talked of a powerful bodily disorder called migraine, which currently affects about a billion people around the world. Yet until now, the rich history of this condition has barely been told. In Migraine, award-winning historian Katherine Foxhall reveals the ideas and methods that ordinary people and medical professionals have used to describe, explain, and treat migraine since the Middle Ages. Touching on classical theories of humoral disturbance and medieval bloodletting, Foxhall also...

Guadalupe Mountains National Park

Jeffrey P. Shepherd
The Guadalupe Mountains stand nearly 9,000 feet tall, spanning the far western fringe of Texas, the border of New Mexico, and the meeting point of the Southern Plains and Chihuahuan Desert. Long an iconic landmark of the Trans-Pecos region, the Guadalupe Mountains have played a critical role for the people in this beautiful corner of the Southwest borderlands. In the late 1960s, the area was finally designated a national park. ...

Transnational Africas

Christopher Larkosh
Apr 2019 - Tagus Press
This issue of Portuguese Literary & Cultural Studies focuses on the visual, material, and sonic cultures of Lusophone Africa from the precolonial period to the contemporary moment and seeks to complicate current understandings of Lusophone Africa that are based on colonial and postindependence national borders.

A Passion for American Art

edited by Dean Lahikainen
A Passion for American Art celebrates the outstanding examples of American painting, furniture and decorative arts, and Native American art from the Carolyn and Peter Lynch collection. Peter Lynch, described in the popular press as a "financial wizard" and "stock-picker extraordinaire," is more soundly characterized as a beloved family man, devout Catholic, effective philanthropist, and passionate collector. This luxuriously illustrated...

Sol LeWitt

Lary Bloom
Sol LeWitt (1928-2007), one of the most influential artists of the twentieth century, upended traditional practices of how art is made and marketed. A key figure in minimalism and conceptualism, he proclaimed that the work of the mind is much more important than that of the hand. For his site-specific work—wall drawings and sculpture in dozens of countries—he created the idea and basic plan and then hired young artists to install the pieces. Though typically enormous and intricate, the physical works held no...

Konnakkol Manual

David P. Nelson
David Nelson wrote and compiled Konnakkol Manual to assist teaching an advanced course in the rhythmic compositions of Karnatak (South Indian) music. This new instructional book picks up where his previous book, Solkau Manual, left off. It includes advanced exercises for developing control of odd pulse divisions, such as three and five notes per beat. There is a chapter on the sources of Karnatak tāas (meters), and another on the evolution of rhythmic compositions—told through the...

Staging Brazil

Ana Paula Höfling
Staging Brazil: Choreographies of Capoeira is the first in-depth study of the processes of legitimization and globalization of capoeira, the Afro-Brazilian combat game practiced today throughout the world. Ana Paula Höfling contextualizes the emergence of the two main styles of capoeira, angola and regional, within discourses of race and nation in mid-twentieth century Brazil. This history of capoeira's corporeality, on the page and on the stage, includes analysis of illustrated capoeira...