Welcome to HFS Books

Since 1977 Hopkins Fulfillment Services has provided distribution services for a distinguished list of university presses and nonprofit institutions.

Our current clients include Johns Hopkins University Press, Georgetown University Press, University of Washington Press, The University Press of Kentucky, Catholic University of America Press, University of Massachusetts Press, University of New Orleans Press, and the Maryland Historical Society. University of South Carolina, Wesleyan University Press, and Family Development Press will soon be distributed by HFS.

HFSBooks.com offers books published by our clients for sale in one place. If you are looking for information regarding our distribution services, please visit hfs.jhu.edu.


New Orleans Griot

Tom Dent
A mid-twentieth century African American writer and cultural activist, Tom Dent worked tirelessly to help cultivate the Black Arts Movement, mentoring numerous other artists and writers. Taken from his papers held at the Amistad Research Center in New Orleans, this vital collection brings together Dent's fiction, poetry, essays, interviews, and drama, including many previously unpublished works. With introductions by Kalamu ya Salaam, New Orleans Griot: A Tom Dent Reader showcases the remarkable life...

Salazar

Cybele Gontar
In conjunction with an exhibition at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, Salazar: Portraits of Influence in Spanish New Orleans, 1782-1802 tells the story of Yucatán-born Josef Xavier Francisco de Salazar y Mendoza (c. 1750-1802), whose career spanned most of the Spanish administration of New Orleans. This catalogue includes a comprehensive collection of Salazar's portrait paintings and examines his work with essays that explore the historical and artistic implications of...

Fire in the Hole

Fi Yi Yi
During Mardi Gras, spectators wait for the approach of the Mardi Gras Indians, a sublime spectacle of dancing, chanting, and gorgeous hand-sewn costumes. But rarely are they shown the human stories behind this unique New Orleans tradition. Told through a collective oral history, Fire In The Hole weaves together the voices of costumers, anthropologists, and photographers to offer the previously undocumented stories of crafting costumes, tribe formations, and political...

Habsburg's Last War

A divergent survey of scholarship on World War I cinema produced in succession countries of the Habsburg Empire. This untapped body of film records a contentious phase in world history, from the perspective of an often misunderstood, yet pivotal, region. The volume gathers scholarly essays exploring the intersections between the political, historical, and aesthetic, as expressed in the region's various "moving pictures," with sustained attention to the relationship between artistic...

Modern Bonds

Elizabeth Ann Duclos-Orsello
What does community mean, exactly? In this interdisciplinary study, Elizabeth Ann Duclos-Orsello takes seriously the concept of community as an object of historical analysis. Focusing on St. Paul, Minnesota, from 1900 to 1920, Modern Bonds explores the diverse ways that its people renegotiated private and public affiliations during a period of modernization. The book examines a wide range of subjects and materials, including photographs from an...

John Okada

Frank Abe
No-No Boy, John Okada's only published novel, centers on a Japanese American who refuses to fight for the country that incarcerated him and his people in World War II and, upon release from federal prison after the war, is cast out by his divided community. In 1957, the novel faced a similar rejection until it was rediscovered and reissued in 1976 to become a celebrated classic of American literature. As a result of Okada's untimely death at age forty-seven, the...

Stuntwomen

Mollie Gregory
They've traded punches in knockdown brawls, crashed biplanes through barns, and raced to the rescue in fast cars. They add suspense and drama to the story, portraying the swimmer stalked by the menacing shark, the heroine dangling twenty feet below a soaring hot air balloon, or the woman leaping nine feet over a wall to escape a dog attack. Only an expert can make such feats of daring look easy, and stuntwomen with the skills to perform—and survive—great moments of action in movies have been...

Robert Penn Warren's All the King's Men

Jonathan S. Cullick
Robert Penn Warren is one of the best-known and most consequential Kentucky writers of the twentieth century and the only American writer to have won three Pulitzers in two different genres. All the King's Men, generally considered one of the finest novels ever written on American politics, transcends sensationalism and topicality to stand as art. It was a bestseller, won the Pulitzer Prize, and became an Academy Award–winning movie. Depicting the rise and fall...

A Political Companion to Frederick Douglass

Neil Roberts
Frederick Douglass (1818–1895) was a prolific writer and public speaker whose impact on American literature and history has been long studied by historians and literary critics. Yet as political theorists have focused on the legacies of such notables as W. E. B. Du Bois and Booker T. Washington, Douglass's profound influence on Afro-modern and American political thought has often been undervalued. In an effort to fill this gap in the scholarship on Douglass, editor Neil Roberts and an...

The Flora and Fauna of the Pacific Northwest Coast

Collin Varner
The Flora and Fauna of the Pacific Northwest Coast is an extensive, easy-to-follow resource guide to the plant and animal life of the vast and diverse bioregion stretching from Juneau, Alaska, south to coastal British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, and down to California's San Francisco Bay. Encompassing over eight hundred native and invasive species, and including more than two thousand color photos, this is the most complete book of its kind on the market. The book is divided...

The End of Strategic Stability?

Lawrence Rubin
During the Cold War, many believed that the superpowers shared a conception of strategic stability, a coexistence where both sides would compete for global influence but would be deterred from using nuclear weapons. In actuality, both sides understood strategic stability and deterrence quite differently. Today's international system is further complicated by more nuclear powers, regional rivalries, and nonstate actors who punch above their...

Paving the Way for Reagan

Laurence R. Jurdem
From 1964 to 1980, the United States was buffeted by a variety of international crises, including the nation's defeat in Vietnam, the growing aggression of the Soviet Union, and Washington's inability to free the fifty two American hostages held by Islamic extremists in Iran. Through this period and in the decades that followed, Commentary, Human Events, and National Review magazines were critical in supporting the development of GOP...

Racial Ecologies

Leilani Nishime
From the Flint water crisis to the Dakota Access Pipeline controversy, environmental threats and degradation disproportionately affect communities of color, with often dire consequences for people's lives and health. Racial Ecologies explores activist strategies and creative responses, such as those of Mexican migrant women, New Zealand Maori, and African American farmers in urban Detroit, demonstrating that people of color have always been and continue to be leaders in the fight for a more equitable and ecologically...

Building Reuse

Kathryn Rogers Merlino
In Building Reuse: Sustainability, Preservation, and the Value of Design, Kathryn Rogers Merlino makes an impassioned case that truly sustainable design requires reusing and reimagining existing buildings. The construction and operation of buildings is responsible for 41 percent of all primary energy use and 48 percent of all carbon emissions. The impact of the demolition and removal of an older building can greatly diminish the advantages of adding green...

Military Strategy, Joint Operations, and Airpower

Ryan Burke
Military Strategy, Joint Operations, and Airpower will introduce readers to contemporary strategy and the operational level of war, particularly as it relates to airpower. This intermediate textbook was developed as required reading for all US Air Force Academy cadets, and is designed to close the gap between military theory and military practice. It asks readers to reconceive of the military as a "profession of effects" rather than as a profession of arms...

The China-India Rivalry in the Globalization Era

T.V. Paul
As the aspirations of the two rising Asian powers collide, the China-India rivalry is likely to shape twenty-first-century international politics in the region and far beyond. This volume by T.V. Paul and an international group of leading scholars examines whether the rivalry between the two countries that began in the 1950s will intensify or dissipate in the twenty-first century. The China-India relationship is important to analyze because past experience has shown that when two rising...

Jacob L. Devers

James Scott Wheeler
General Jacob L. "Jake" Devers (1897–1979) was one of only two officers—the other was Omar C. Bradley—to command an army group during the decisive campaigns of 1944–1945 that liberated Europe and ended the war with Nazi Germany. After the war, Devers led the Army Ground Forces in the United States and eventually retired in 1949 after forty years of service. Despite incredible successes on the battlefield, General George C. Marshall's "dependable man" remains one of the most underrated and...

Fighting the Cold War

John R. Galvin, USA (Ret.)
When four-star general John Rogers Galvin retired from the US Army after forty-four years of distinguished service in 1992, the Washington Post hailed him as a man "without peer among living generals." In Fighting the Cold War: A Soldier's Memoir, the celebrated soldier, scholar, and statesman recounts his active participation in more than sixty years of international history—from the onset of World War II through the fall of the Berlin Wall and the post–Cold War era. Galvin's...

Advance and Destroy

John Nelson Rickard, Ph.D.
In the winter of 1944–1945, Hitler sought to divide Allied forces in the heavily forested Ardennes region of Luxembourg and Belgium. He deployed more than 400,000 troops in one of the last major German offensives of the war, which became known as the Battle of the Bulge, in a desperate attempt to regain the strategic initiative in the West. Hitler's effort failed for a variety of reasons, but many historians assert that Lieutenant General George S. Patton Jr.'s Third...

The Cold War at Home and Abroad

Andrew L. Johns, Ph.D.
From President Truman's use of a domestic propaganda agency to Ronald Reagan's handling of the Soviet Union during his 1984 reelection campaign, the American political system has consistently exerted a profound effect on the country's foreign policies. Americans may cling to the belief that "politics stops at the water's edge," but the reality is that parochial political interests often play a critical role in shaping the nation's...

North Korean Military Proliferation in the Middle East and Africa

Bruce E. Bechtol, Jr.
North Korea has posed a threat to stability in Northeast Asia for decades. Since Kim Jong-un assumed power, this threat has both increased and broadened. Since 2011, the small, isolated nation has detonated nuclear weapons multiple times, tested a wide variety of ballistic missiles, expanded naval and ground systems that threaten South Korea, and routinely employs hostile rhetoric. Another threat it poses has...

The Task Force for Child Survival

William H. Foege
foreword by President Jimmy Carter
Dr. Bill Foege, one of the best-known names in global health, brings readers to the table during the creation of one of the world’s most famous and successful global health efforts—the Task Force for Child Survival. In 1984, the US immunization program was so successful that many childhood diseases were at record lows—yet 40,000 children a day were dying around the world from preventable diseases. That year, Dr. Foege, former...

Monotheism and Its Complexities

Lucinda Mosher
Conventional wisdom would have it that believing in one God is straightforward; that Muslims are expert at monotheism, but that Christians complicate it, weaken it, or perhaps even abandon it altogether by speaking of the Trinity. In this book, Muslim and Christian scholars challenge that opinion. Examining together scripture texts and theological reflections from both traditions, they show that the oneness of God is taken as axiomatic in both, and also that...

Industrial Development Through Urbanization

Franz Mathis
Does economic prosperity depend on natural resources, religion and cultural history, or does it hinge on the desire of people to improve their lives? Based on empirical data from all parts of the world, economic historian Franz Mathis challenges conventionally-held perceptions tying prosperity to Western values. The key to prosperity is a rise in the productivity of human labor, which has primarily been achieved through industrialization. As...

Five Hard Pieces

Diana Lewis Burgin
Diana Lewis Burgin, noted scholar and internationally known translator of Russian prose and poetry, offers her original English verse translations of five long poems by Marina Tsvetaeva, widely acclaimed as one of the greatest twentieth-century Russian poets. Burgin's translations, the majority of which appear in print here for the first time, aim at total fidelity to the challenging meter, rhythm, and meaning as well as some of the rhyme of the...

Sending Your Millennial to College

John Bader
Whether it is knowing when to ground your helicopter or park your snowplow, parenting a college student today means giving them the independence they need to make their own decisions. In this companion to his best-selling Dean's List: Ten Strategies for College Success, John Bader offers up key strategies for supporting your millennial as they enter this formative stage of their life. Written with a wit and warmth by someone who has helped...

World Politics on Screen

Mark A. Sachleben
Increasingly resistant to lessons on international politics, society often turns to television and film to engage the subject. Numerous movies made in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries reflect political themes that were of concern within the popular cultures of their times. For example, Norman Jewison's The Russians Are Coming! The Russians Are Coming! (1966) portrays the culture of suspicion between the United States and the Soviet...

Sexuality in China

Chiang
What was sex like in China, from imperial times through the post-Mao era? The answer depends, of course, on who was having sex, where they were located in time and place, and what kind of familial, social, and political structures they participated in. This collection offers a variety of perspectives by addressing diverse topics such as polygamy, pornography, free love, eugenics, sexology, crimes of passion, homosexuality, intersexuality, transsexuality, masculine anxiety, sex work, and...

Companion Website Access Key for Comme on dit, Première année de français

Claude Grangier
Comme on dit's companion website includes all homework exercises, enabling students to practice vocabulary, grammar, listening, and speaking. It capitalizes on technology to enrich the experience of students and teachers and improve learning outcomes. Following the sequence of the textbook, the website gives students their homework on a convenient and easy-to-use platform. Automatically graded and teacher-graded exercises provide students...

The Aristotelian Tradition of Natural Kinds and Its Demise

Stewart Umphrey
There are two great traditions of natural-kinds realism: the modern, instituted by Mill and elaborated by Venn, Peirce, Kripke, Putnam, Boyd, and others; and the ancient, instituted by Aristotle, elaborated by the "medieval" Aristotelians, and eventually overthrown by Galilean and Newtonian physicists, by Locke, Leibniz, and Kant, and by Darwin. Whereas the former tradition has lately received the close attention it deserves, the latter has not. The Aristotelian...

The Standard Bearer of the Roman Church

J. G. Drenas
The Standard Bearer of the Roman Church examines the missionary work of the early modern Capuchin friar, and doctor of the Church, Lawrence of Brindisi. Renowned in his own day as a preacher, Bible scholar, missionary, chaplain, and diplomat, as well as vicar general of his order, Lawrence led the first organized, papally-commissioned Capuchin mission among the non-Catholics of Bohemia in the Holy Roman Empire...

Maryland, second edition

Suzanne Ellery Chapelle, Jean B. Russo, Jean H. Baker, Dean R. Esslinger, Edward C. Papenfuse, Constance B. Schulz, and Gregory A. Stiverson
In 1634, two ships carrying a small group of settlers sailed into the Chesapeake Bay looking for a suitable place to dwell in the new colony of Maryland. The landscape confronting the pioneers bore no resemblance to their native country. They found no houses, no stores or markets, churches, schools, or courts, only the challenge of providing food and shelter. As the population increased,...

Palace of State

Thomas E. Luebke
Towering over the White House, the colossal granite Dwight D. Eisenhower Executive Office Building (EEOB) was first constructed to house the departments of State, War, and Navy in the nineteenth century, and it now serves as the home of the Executive Office of the President. Having outlasted decades of plans threatening alteration or outright demolition, the building survives as one of the foremost examples of Second Empire design in the United States. Palace of State...

Endangered Species

Matilsky
Aug 2018 - Whatcom Museum
Endangered Species: Artists on the Front Line of Biodiversity highlights sixty artists who celebrate biodiversity's beauty, interpret natural and human-induced extinctions, and focus on endangered species from diverse ecosystems. It includes the work of artists who spotlight human actions threatening biodiversity alongside art projects that revitalize habitats and reconnect people to the natural world. Endangered Species surveys a wide range of approaches and media used by...

Flowers from Universe

Djajasoebrata
Aug 2018 - LM Publishers
Java's original textile art is the perfect medium for telling stories of ancient Javanese culture. Flowers from Universe: Textiles of Java is based, first and foremost, on the memories and associations of Alit Djajasoebrata. Ajajasoebrata grew up in a close-knit West Javanese family and frequently came into contact with batik, mostly in the form of the highly prized batikked hipcloths. Her female relatives used these hipcloths to indirectly express their personal attitudes about their...

Natural History and Ecology of Suriname

Bart De Dijn
Aug 2018 - LM Publishers
Natural History and Ecology of Suriname offers a unique overview of the remarkable nature of this diverse and beautiful country. The book showcases more than 200 fascinating tropical plant and animal species, making it an indispensable guide for anyone wanting to explore Suriname's remarkable flora and fauna. It also provides an introduction to the country's history, geology, climate, ecosystems, and more. World Wildlife Fund Guianas is part of the international World Wildlife Fund...

Israel's Long War with Hezbollah

Raphael D. Marcus
The ongoing conflict between Israel and the Lebanese militant group Hezbollah is now in its fourth decade and shows no signs of ending. Raphael D. Marcus examines this conflict since the formation of Hezbollah during Israel's occupation of Lebanon in the early 1980s. He critically evaluates events including Israel's long counterguerrilla campaign throughout the 1990s, the Israeli withdrawal in 2000, the 2006 summer war, and concludes with an...

Moonshiners and Prohibitionists

Bruce E. Stewart
Homemade liquor has played a prominent role in the Appalachian economy for nearly two centuries. The region endured profound transformations during the extreme prohibition movements of the nineteenth century, when the manufacturing and sale of alcohol—an integral part of daily life for many Appalachians—was banned. In Moonshiners and Prohibitionists: The Battle over Alcohol in Southern Appalachia, Bruce E. Stewart chronicles the social tensions...

Breaking the Banks

Matthew McKenzie
With skillful storytelling, Matthew McKenzie weaves together the industrial, cultural, political, and ecological history of New England's fisheries through the story of how the Boston haddock fleet—one of the region's largest and most heavily industrialized—rose, flourished, and then fished itself into near oblivion before the arrival of foreign competition in 1961. This fleet also embodied the industry's change during this period, as it...

Comme on dit, Première année de français, Bundle

Claude Grangier
Comme on dit, a comprehensive first year French textbook program, engages students in the learning process from day one using an inductive methodology centered around guided observation and rule discovery. Together with students' communicative needs and an analysis of their most pervasive transfer errors from English, the everyday speech patterns of 100 native speakers — culled from 150 hours of unscripted recordings — form the linguistic backbone...

Ornithology

edited by Michael L. Morrison, Amanda D. Rodewald, Gary Voelker, Melanie R. Colón, and Jonathan F. Prather
Aves, the birds, is the wildlife group that people most frequently encounter. With over 10,000 species worldwide, these animals are part of our everyday experience. They are also the focus of intense research, and their management and conservation is a subject of considerable effort throughout the world. But what are the defining attributes that make a bird a bird? Aimed at undergraduate and...

On the Virtues

John Capreolus
In light of current interest in the thought of St. Thomas Aquinas, rediscovery of the work of John Capreolus (1380-1444) is particularly important. Known to the Renaissance theologians who succeeded him as "prince of Thomists," he established a mode of Thomistic theological and philosophical engagement that has set the pattern for Thomistic thinkers after him. Twentieth-century scholarship on Capreolus tended to focus on questions concerning metaphysics, the person, and the beatific vision. The purpose of the present...

Who Is My Neighbor?

Thomas D. Williams
Over the past half century the language of human rights has gained such dominance in moral, civic, and ecclesiastical discourse that ethical and social questions are increasingly framed in terms of rights. Yet the vast literature dealing with human and civil rights focuses almost exclusively on the juridical and practical ramifications of rights, rather than the philosophical, moral, and foundational aspects. As a result, the proliferation of rights claims and...

Teaching Teachers

James W. Fraser and Lauren Lefty
foreword by Arthur Levine
As recently as 1990, if a person wanted to become a public school teacher in the United States, he or she needed to attend an accredited university education program. Less than three decades later, the variety of routes into teaching is staggering. In Teaching Teachers, education historians James W. Fraser and Lauren Lefty look at these alternative programs through the lens of the past. Fraser and Lefty explain how, beginning in...

Dear Parents

Jon McGee
foreword by Chris Farrell
Written for parents and families of college-bound students, Jon McGee’s Dear Parents is an essential tool you’ll need to navigate the complex and often emotional challenge of getting your daughter or son prepared for—and through—college. Organized chronologically, the book takes readers through the stages of childhood leading up to college, as well as the process of searching for and selecting a college. From the decisions you make during your child’s early...

The Philosophy of War Films

David LaRocca
Wars have played a momentous role in shaping the course of human history. The ever-present specter of conflict has made it an enduring topic of interest in popular culture, and many movies, from Hollywood blockbusters to independent films, have sought to show the complexities and horrors of war on-screen. In The Philosophy of War Films, David LaRocca compiles a series of essays by prominent scholars that examine the impact of representing war in film and the influence that cinematic images of battle have on...

Elkhorn

Richard Taylor
When former Kentucky Poet Laureate Richard Taylor took a job at Kentucky State University in 1975, he purchased a fixer-upper—in need of a roof, a paint job, city water, and central heating—that became known to his friends as "Taylor's Folly." The historic Giltner-Holt House, which was built in 1859 and sits close by the Elkhorn Creek a few miles outside of Frankfort, became the poet's entrance into the area's history and culture, and the Elkhorn became a source of inspiration for his writing. ...

The Educational Odyssey of a Woman College President

Joanne V. Creighton
Early in her tenure as president of Mount Holyoke College, Joanne V. Creighton faced crises as students staged protests and occupied academic buildings; the alumnae association threatened a revolt; and a distinguished professor became the subject of a major scandal. Yet Creighton weathered each storm, serving for nearly fifteen years in office and shepherding the college through a notable revitalization. In her autobiography, The Educational Odyssey of a Woman College...

Train Wreck

George Bibel
Trains are massive—with some weighing 15,000 tons or more. When these metal monsters collide or go off the rails, their destructive power becomes clear. In this book, George Bibel presents riveting tales of trains gone wrong, the detective work of finding out why, and the safety improvements that were born of tragedy. Train Wreck details numerous crashes, including 17 in which more than 200 people were killed. Readers follow investigators as they sift through the rubble and work with...

Williamstown and Williams College

Dustin Griffin
Nestled in the Berkshires of western Massachusetts, Williamstown is home to one of the most prestigious liberal arts colleges in the country, Williams College. In this engrossing and entertaining book, Dustin Griffin offers fourteen vignettes that detail the local history of this ideal New England college town. Each chapter focuses on the stories behind a single feature that visitors to present-day Williamstown and Williams College might encounter, including a...

The Age of Strict Construction

Zavodnyik Peter , Peter Zavodnyik
The Age of Strict Construction explores the growth of the federal government's power and influence between 1789 and 1861, and the varying reactions of Americans to that growth. The book focuses on the dispute over the spending power of Congress, the Supreme Court's expansion of the Contract Clause, and the centralizing effects of the Jacksonian spoils system. The book also surveys the conflict over constitutional...

Book 1: That All May Sing—Teacher Workbook

Justin Ward
To order Ward Method Books and Materials, please call toll-free Hopkins Fulfillment Service at 1-800-537-5487.

Medieval Church Law and the Origins of the Western Legal Tradition

edited by Wolfgang P. Muller, Mary E. Sommar
In this volume dedicated to medieval canon law expert Kenneth Pennington, leading scholars from around the world discuss the contribution of medieval church law to the origins of the western legal tradition. The stellar cast assembled by editors Wolfgang P. Müller and Mary E. Sommar includes younger scholars as well as long-established specialists in the field. Müller's introduction provides...

On Liturgical Asceticism

David W. Fagerberg
Drawing on the Eastern Orthodox tradition of asceticism and integrating it with recent Western thought on liturgy, David W. Fagerberg examines the interaction between the two and presents a powerful argument that asceticism is necessary for understanding liturgy as the foundation of theology. Asceticism may have been perfected in the sands of the desert, but it is demanded of every theologian and, indeed, every Christian. It grants the capacity for pondering liturgy and sharing the life of Christ.

Exploring Biblical Kinship

Joan Cecelia Campbell
Exploring Biblical Kinship honors John J. Pilch, a long-time member of the Catholic Biblical Association and a founding member of the Context Group. The festschrift, generated by the Social-Science Taskforce of the CBA explores biological and fictive kinship issues reflected in the lives of biblical persons. The essays in Part One deal with how patronage operates in biblical culture. Part Two analyzes family dynamics, commencing with an essay on violence...

Drawing the Line

Tom Sito
Some of the most beloved characters in film and television inhabit two-dimensional worlds that spring from the fertile imaginations of talented animators. The movements, characterizations, and settings in the best animated films are as vivid as any live action film, and sometimes seem more alive than life itself. In this case, Hollywood's marketing slogans are fitting; animated stories are frequently magical, leaving memories of happy endings in young...

Essential Readings in Wildlife Management and Conservation

edited by Paul R. Krausman and Bruce D. Leopold
Prepared by two of the leading figures in wildlife biology, this book gathers in one volume the most influential articles published in the field. Paul R. Krausman and Bruce D. Leopold have collected the forty-two papers that every wildlife student should read. Each piece is introduced with a commentary that explains why it is important and a brief listing of papers that inspired or were inspired by the classic. Practical and...

A Catechism for Family Life

Sarah Bartel
The purpose of A Catechism for Family Life: Insights from Church Teaching on Love, Marriage, Sex, and Parenting is to present the teachings of the Catholic Church as they relate to specific questions in marriage and family life. Many Catholics are under-catechized and have trouble both understanding and articulating Church teaching on sexuality and marriage to an increasingly challenging culture. Pope Francis, along with the fathers...

A Philosophical Primer on the Summa Theologica

Richard J. Regan
What is the meaning of human life? The Summa Theologica is, in effect, Thomas Aquinas' answer to this question. With the goal of showing why human beings exist, their destiny, and how they can achieve it, Aquinas argues that human beings exist to know God, that their destiny is to enjoy the vision of him in the next life, that they need to act properly in this life in order to be worthy of their destiny, and that the Church's sacraments are the means to do so. The Summa Theologica...

I'm Half of Your Heart

Julian Kornhauser
Sep 2018 - Lost Horse Press
In more than seventy poems gathered in I'm Half of Your Heart: Selected Poems, 1967–2017, we encounter a poet who is as politically outspoken as he is lyrically private. Fascinated by the quotidian bric-a-brac, keenly attuned to the plight of the less fortunate among us, and immersed in timeless philosophical, historical, and aesthetic peregrinations, Kornhauser remains our contemporary by speaking loud and clear about what it is that makes us human. This career-spanning...

Terribly in Love

Tautvyda Marcinkeviciute
Sep 2018 - Lost Horse Press
This bilingual edition is the first English-language collection by the most celebrated woman poet in Lithuania today. Tautvyda Marcinkeviciute's voice is both cool and ferocious, as one might expect from the official translator of Sylvia Plath into Lithuanian. Six Lithuanian and American translators including poets H. L. Hix, Julie Kane, and Jonas Zdanys have collaborated to bring this important poet—writing in a language with only three million speakers—to a world audience.

Frankenstein's Children

Bruce Bond
Sep 2018 - Lost Horse Press
Frankenstein 's Children explores Mary Shelley's Frankenstein as a lens into contemporary loneliness and hunger, fantasies of reanimation and artificial thought born of a dread that would deny or master the necessities that define us, join us, tear us apart. Having lost her own child, Shelley gives voice to a powerful illusion, a creature half-invented, half-found, raised from the dead and yet, by life, abandoned. These poems would bring her parable into conversation with movies and commercials that make of the...

Glory of the Logos in the Flesh

Michael Waldstein
In Glory of the Logos in the Flesh, Michael Waldstein helps readers of Pope John Paul II's Theology of the Body enter this masterwork with clearer understanding. Part One, designed for entry-level readers, is a map of John Paul's text, a summary of each paragraph with an explanation of the order of the argument. Part Two reflects on the breadth of reason (logos) in Plato's Republic, Aristotle's Physics, and the Gospel of John, in contrast to the narrowing...

The Priest Who Put Europe Back Together

Sean Brennan
Philp Fabian Flynn led a remarkable life, bearing witness to some of the most pivotal events of the twentieth century. Flynn took part in the invasions of Sicily and Normandy, the Battle of Aachen, and the Battle of the Hürtgen Forest. He acted as confessor to Nazi War Criminals during the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg, assisted Hungarian Revolutionaries on the streets of Budapest, and assisted the waves of refugees arriving in Austria feeling...

Alfred Wegener

Mott T. Greene
Alfred Wegener aimed to create a revolution in science which would rank with those of Nicolaus Copernicus and Charles Darwin. After completing his doctoral studies in astronomy at the University of Berlin, Wegener found himself drawn not to observatory science but to rugged fieldwork, which allowed him to cross into a variety of disciplines. The author of the theory of continental drift—the direct ancestor of the modern theory of plate tectonics and one of...

The Trials of Psychedelic Therapy

Matthew Oram
After LSD arrived in the United States in 1949, the drug’s therapeutic promise quickly captured the interests of psychiatrists. In the decade that followed, modern psychopharmacology was born and research into the drug’s perceptual and psychological effects boomed. By the early 1960s, psychiatrists focused on a particularly promising treatment known as psychedelic therapy: a single, carefully guided, high-dose LSD session coupled with brief but intensive psychotherapy.

Let There Be Enlightenment

edited by Anton M. Matytsin and Dan Edelstein
According to most scholars, the Enlightenment was a rational awakening, a radical break from a past dominated by religion and superstition. But in Let There Be Enlightenment, Anton M. Matytsin, Dan Edelstein, and the contributors they have assembled deftly undermine this simplistic narrative. Emphasizing the ways in which religious beliefs and motivations shaped philosophical perspectives, essays in this book highlight...

Take Control of Your Depression

Susan J. Noonan, MD, MPH
foreword by Jerrold F. Rosenbaum, MD, and Timothy J. Petersen, PhD
Some call it the blues or a storm in their head. William Styron referred to it as "darkness visible." Whatever the description, depression is a disorder of the mind and body that affects millions of adults at some point in their lives. In Take Control of Your Depression, Dr. Susan J. Noonan provides people experiencing depression with strategies to take stock of their mental...

Listen to the Poet

Wendy R. Williams
Youth spoken word poetry groups are on the rise in the United States, offering safe spaces for young people to write and perform. These diverse groups encourage members to share their lived experiences, decry injustices, and imagine a better future. At a time when students may find writing in school alienating and formulaic, composing in these poetry groups can be refreshingly relevant and exciting. Listen to the Poet investigates two Arizona...

Songs for a Dead Rooster

Yuri Andrukhovych
Sep 2018 - Lost Horse Press
Yuri Andrukhovych emerged as a prominent voice in Ukrainian literature with the publication of his first book of poems in 1985. The same year, together with Oleksandr Irvanets and Viktor Neborak, he formed the poetic group Bu-ba-bu, which became a leading force in Ukrainian poetic innovation for nearly a decade. After publishing only prose for a number of years, Andrukhovych returned to poetry in great form but with a much-changed poetics in 2004, with the publication of another collection. A...

Pacific Northwest Insects

Merrill A. Peterson
This field guide sets a new standard for insect identification, making it an indispensable resource to naturalists, educators, gardeners, and others. Engaging and accessible, Pacific Northwest Insects features detailed species accounts, each with a vivid photograph of a living adult, along with information for distinguishing similar species, allowing the reader to identify more than 3,000 species found from southern British Columbia to northern California, and as far east as Montana. The book features...

Russia Abroad

Anna Ohanyan
While we know a great deal about the benefits of regional integration, there is a knowledge gap when it comes to areas with weak, dysfunctional, or nonexistent regional fabric in political and economic life. Further, deliberate "un-regioning," applied by actors external as well as internal to a region, has also gone unnoticed despite its increasingly sophisticated modern application by Russia in its peripheries. This volume helps us understand what Anna...

China's Global Identity

Hoo Tiang Boon
China is today regarded as a major player in world politics, with growing expectations for it to do more to address global challenges. Yet relatively little is known about how it sees itself as a great power and understands its obligations to the world. In China's Global Identity, Hoo Tiang Boon embarks on the first sustained study of China's great power identity. Focus is drawn to China's positioning of itself as a responsible power and the underestimated...

War and Remembrance

Thomas H. Conner
No soldier could ask for a sweeter resting place than on the field of glory where he fell. The land he died to save vies with the one which gave him birth in paying tribute to his memory, and the kindly hands which so often come to spread flowers upon his earthly coverlet express in their gentle task a personal affection."—General John J. Pershing To remember and honor the memory of the American soldiers who fought and died in foreign wars during the...

Novel Medicine

Andrew Schonebaum
By examining the dynamic interplay between discourses of fiction and medicine, Novel Medicine demonstrates how fiction incorporated, created, and disseminated medical knowledge in China, beginning in the sixteenth century. Critical readings of fictional and medical texts provide a counterpoint to prevailing narratives that focus only on the "literati" aspects of the novel, showing that these texts were not merely read, but were used by a wide...

Counterpunch

Meg Frisbee
Boxing was popular in the American West long before Las Vegas became its epicenter. However, not everyone in the region was a fan. Counterpunch examines how the sport's meteoric rise in popularity in the West ran concurrently with a growing backlash among Progressive Era social reformers who saw boxing as barbaric. These tensions created a morality war that pitted state officials against city leaders, boxing promoters against social reformers, and...

The Afterlife of Sai Baba

Karline McLain
Nearly a century after his death, the image of Sai Baba, the serene old man with the white beard from Shirdi village in Maharashtra, India, is instantly recognizable to most South Asians (and many Westerners) as a guru for all faiths—Hindus, Muslims, and others. During his lifetime Sai Baba accepted all followers who came to him, regardless of religious or caste background, and preached a path of spiritual enlightenment and mutual tolerance. These days, tens of thousands of...

The Generosity of Creation

David L. Schindler
Referring to creation as generous is not common. We normally associate notions of generosity and gift in the created order with human being and action, imputing such notions to other creatures and the whole of creation often only in a "poetic" sense. Once we center the reality of all things in God as a loving Creator, however, we become disposed to see everything, in its very givenness, as gift—a reality that participates from its depths, in analogical ways, in God's generosity, such as to make possible a...

Treasures Afoot

Kimberly S. Alexander
In Treasures Afoot, Kimberly S. Alexander introduces readers to the history of the Georgian shoe. Presenting a series of stories that reveal how shoes were made, sold, and worn during the long eighteenth century, Alexander traces the fortunes and misfortunes of wearers as their footwear was altered to accommodate poor health, flagging finances, and changing styles. She explores the lives and letters of clever apprentices, skilled cordwainers, wealthy merchants, and elegant...

Pershing's Tankers

Lawrence M. Kaplan, Ph.D.
After the United States declared war against Germany in April 1917, the US Army established the Tank Corps to help break the deadlock of trench warfare in France during World War I. The army envisioned having a large tank force by 1919, but when the war ended in November 1918, only three tank battalions had participated in combat operations. Shortly after, Brigadier General Samuel D. Rockenbach, Chief of the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF)...

The New Chesapeake Kitchen

John Shields
photographs by David W. Harp
Captain John Smith, upon entering the Chesapeake, wrote in his diaries that the fish were so plentiful "we attempted to catch them with a frying pan." That method sums up classic Chesapeake cooking—fresh and simple. In The New Chesapeake Kitchen, celebrated Maryland chef John Shields takes the best of what grows, swims, or grazes in the Bay’s watershed and prepares it simply, letting the pure flavors shine through. Honoring the farmers, watermen, butchers, cheese makers, and...

Investigating College Student Misconduct

Oren R. Griffin
All colleges and universities grapple with the complexities of student misconduct. How can these institutions conduct efficient fact-finding investigations and disciplinary proceedings? What best practices should administrators and legal counsel follow when student behavior interferes with a university’s mission or poses a campus safety threat? Oren R. Griffin answers these questions and more in Investigating College Student Misconduct, an essential resource for student affairs...

Designing the New American University

Michael M. Crow and William B. Dabars
America’s research universities consistently dominate global rankings but may be entrenched in a model that no longer accomplishes their purposes. With their multiple roles of discovery, teaching, and public service, these institutions represent the gold standard in American higher education, but their evolution since the nineteenth century has been only incremental. The need for a new and complementary model that offers broader accessibility to an academic platform...

Massachusetts Treasures

Chuck D'Imperio
Well known for its world-renowned art museums—from the Clark Art Institute in Williamstown to the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston—Massachusetts is also home to numerous institutions with more eclectic collections and, oftentimes, lower profiles. These include Mansfield's National Black Doll Museum of History and Culture, Watertown's Plumbing Museum, and Granville's Noble and Cooley Center for Historic Preservation. In Massachusetts Treasures, Chuck D'Imperio explores...

Vaccines Did Not Cause Rachel's Autism

Peter J. Hotez, MD, PhD
foreword by Arthur L. Caplan
In 1994, Peter J. Hotez's nineteen-month-old daughter, Rachel, was diagnosed with autism. Dr. Hotez, a pediatrician-scientist who develops vaccines for neglected tropical diseases affecting the world's poorest people, became troubled by the decades-long rise of the influential anti-vaccine community and their inescapable narrative around childhood vaccines and autism. The alleged...

Veterans Crisis Hotline

Jon Chopan
The twelve stories of Veterans Crisis Hotline offer a meditation on the relationship between war and righteousness and consider the impossible distance between who men are and who they want to be. A veteran working at the hotline listens to the stories men tell when they need someone to hear their voices, when they need to access a language for their pain. Two men search for the head of a decapitated Iraqi civilian so that they might absolve themselves of the atrocities of war, a Marine hunts for the man who...

Be About Beauty

Kalamu ya Salaam
Activist, educator, filmmaker, writer, and poet Kalamu ya Salaam (born Vallery Ferdinand, III on 24 March 1947 in New Orleans) presents a collection of selected writings that celebrates "essential human beauty and goodness." Through essays, poetry, and speeches, ya Salaam distills his years of wisdom, reflecting on a career built on art and activism, which strove to create community while resisting the powerful who worked to tear it apart. Intensely personal and refreshingly honest, Be About Beauty covers topics close...

Honeybee Hotel

Leslie Day
The tale of Honeybee Hotel begins over one hundred years ago, with the Astor family and the birth of the iconic Manhattan landmark, the magnificent Waldorf Astoria. In those early days the posh art deco masterpiece had its own rooftop garden for guests to enjoy. Fast-forward to the turn of the twenty-first century, and we meet executive chef David Garcelon, the creative genius behind the idea of restoring the celebrated rooftop garden. His vision included six...

The Chesapeake Table

Renee Brooks Catacalos
There was a time when most food was local, whether you lived on a farm or bought your food at a farmers market in the city. Exotic foods like olives, spices, and chocolate shipped in from other parts of the world were considered luxuries. Now, most food that Americans eat is shipped from somewhere else, and eating local is considered by some to be a luxury. Renee Brooks Catacalos is here to remind us that eating local is easier—and more rewarding—than we may think. There is an...

People in a Magazine

Joseph Goodrich
Playwright, biographer, screenwriter, and critic S. N. Behrman (1893–1973) characterized the years he spent writing for The New Yorker as a time defined by "feverish contact with great theatre stars, rich people and social people at posh hotels, at parties, in mansions and great estates." While he hobnobbed with the likes of Mary McCarthy, Elia Kazan, and Greta Garbo and was one of Broadway's leading luminaries, Behrman would later...

Emancipation without Equality

Thomas E. Smith
At the Pan–African Conference in London in 1900, W. E. B. Du Bois famously prophesied that the problem of the twentieth century would be the global color line, the elevation of "whiteness" that created a racially divided world. While Pan-Africanism recognized the global nature of the color line in this period, Thomas E. Smith argues that it also pushed against it, advocating for what Du Bois called "opportunities and privileges of modern civilization"...

Austrian Environmental History

This volume on the environmental history of contemporary Austria offers an overview of the field, as well as several topical case studies. In addition to highlighting some innovative methodological approaches, the essays also show how important the environment has been to some of the most crucial aspects of the recent Austrian past. Subjects covered in Austrian Environmental History include: the role of nature in nation-building since the collapse of the Habsburg Monarchy; the reshaping of landscapes during the...

Community-Based Language Learning

Joan Clifford
Community-based Language Learning offers a new framework for world language educators interested in integrating community-based language learning (CBLL) into their teaching and curricula. CBLL connects academic learning objectives with experiential learning, ranging from reciprocal partnerships with the community (e.g., community engagement, service learning) to one-directional learning situations such as community service and site visits. This resource prepares...

India and Nuclear Asia

Yogesh Joshi
India's nuclear profile, doctrine, and practices have evolved rapidly since the country's nuclear breakout in 1998. However, the outside world's understanding of India's doctrinal debates, forward-looking strategy, and technical developments are still two decades behind the present. India and Nuclear Asia will fill that gap in our knowledge by focusing on the post-1998 evolution of Indian nuclear thought, its arsenal, the triangular rivalry with Pakistan and China, and New Delhi's...

Taking to the Air

Lily Ford
The possibilities of flight have long fascinated us. Each innovation captivated a broad public, from those who gathered to witness winged medieval visionaries jumping from towers, to those who tuned in to watch the moon landings.Throughout history, the visibility of airborne objects from the ground has made for a spectacle of flight, with sizeable crowds gathering for eighteenth-century balloon launches and early twentieth-century air shows. Taking to the Air tells the history of flight...

Butterflies of the World

Adrian Hoskins, F.R.E.S.
Take a fascinating tour of the butterflies of the world guided by renowned lepidopterist and writer Adrian Hoskins, who shares hundreds of spectacular color photographs captured at butterfly hot spots around the world. In the book’s opening chapters, Hoskins describes the evolution, anatomy, lifecycle, ecology, and taxonomy of the world’s butterflies. The second half of the book offers comprehensive coverage of every butterfly family, along with fascinating accounts of butterfly behavior. Readers...

New Southern Photography

Richard McCabe
New Southern Photography highlights the exciting and diverse breadth of photography being practiced in the American South today from twenty-five emerging, mid-career, and established photographers. This catalogue, produced in conjunction with the exhibit debuted at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art in the fall of 2018, explores the role photography plays in formulating the visual iconography of the modern New South and regional identity in an...

Creole Feast

Nathaniel Burton
Before there were celebrity gourmands, Creole Feast brought together the stories and knowledge of New Orleans top chefs. These masters of modern Creole cuisine share the recipes, tips, and tricks from the kitchens of New Orleans' most famous restaurants, including Dooky Chase, Commander's Palace, Broussard's, and Galatoire's. Today, Creole Feast still stands as the most comprehensive collection of Creole recipes assembled in one volume. The recipes include...

Meeting China Halfway

Lyle J. Goldstein
Though a US China conflict is far from inevitable, major tensions are building in the Asia-Pacific region. These strains are the result of historical enmity, cultural divergence, and deep ideological estrangement, not to mention apprehensions fueled by geopolitical competition and the closely related "security dilemma." Despite worrying signs of intensifying rivalry, few observers have provided concrete paradigms to lead this troubled relationship away from...