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Since 1977 Hopkins Fulfillment Services has provided distribution services for a distinguished list of university presses and nonprofit institutions.

Our clients include Johns Hopkins University Press, Georgetown University Press, University of Washington Press, The University Press of Kentucky, Catholic University of America Press, University of Massachusetts Press, University of New Orleans Press, Maryland Historical Society, University of South Carolina Press, Wesleyan University Press, Modern Language Association, Northeastern University Press, Family Development Press, Central European University Press, and UAlberta Press.

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The Age of Phillis

Honorée Fanonne Jeffers
Poems imagine the life and times of Phillis Wheatley In 1773, a young, African American woman named Phillis Wheatley published a book of poetry that challenged Western prejudices about African and female intellectual capabilities. Based on fifteen years of archival research, The Age of Phillis, by award-winning writer Honorée Fanonne Jeffers, imagines the life and times of Wheatley: her childhood in the Gambia, West Africa, her life with her white American owners, her friendship with Obour Tanner, and her...

Which Fork Do I Use with My Bourbon?

Peggy Noe Stevens
A good bottle of bourbon should be enjoyed in good company. During their travels in bourbon country and beyond to conduct tastings and seminars, entertainment experts Peggy Noe Stevens and Susan Reigler often heard the question, "How do I do this in my home?" This book is their definitive answer. Which Fork Do I Use with My Bourbon? offers a step-by-step guide to hosting a successful bourbon-tasting...

How We Vote

Kathleen Hale
The idea of voting is simple, but the administration of elections in ways that ensure access and integrity is complex. In How We Vote, Kathleen Hale and Mitchell Brown explore how election officials work, how ballots are cast and counted, and how jurisdictions try to innovate while also protecting the security of the voting process. Election officials must work in a difficult intergovernmental environment of constant change and intense partisanship. Voting practices and funding vary from...

Digital Contact Tracing for Pandemic Response

edited by Jeffrey P. Kahn and Johns Hopkins Project on Ethics and Governance of Digital Contact Tracing Technologies
As public health professionals around the world work tirelessly to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, it is clear that traditional methods of contact tracing need to be augmented in order to help address a public health crisis of unprecedented scope. Innovators worldwide are racing to develop and implement novel public-facing technology solutions,...

Un-American

Hafizah Geter
Dancing between lyric and narrative, Hafizah Geter's debut collection moves readers through the fraught internal and external landscapes—linguistic, cultural, racial, familial—of those whose lives are shaped and transformed by immigration. The daughter of a Nigerian Muslim woman and a former Southern Baptist black man, Geter charts the history of a black family of mixed citizenships through poems imbued by migration, racism, queerness, loss, and the heartbreak of trying to feel at home in a country that does not recognize...

Harry Dean Stanton

Joseph B. Atkins
Harry Dean Stanton (1926–2017) got his start in Hollywood in TV productions such as Zane Grey Theater and Gunsmoke. After a series of minor parts in forgettable westerns, he gradually began to get film roles that showcased his laid-back acting style, appearing in Cool Hand Luke (1967), Kelly's Heroes (1970), The Godfather: Part II (1974), and Alien (1979). He became a headliner in the eighties—starring in Wim Wenders's moving Paris, Texas (1984) and Alex Cox's Repo Man (1984)—but it was his...

I Am Still Your Negro

Valerie Mason-John
Social Justice PoetrySpoken-word poet Valerie Mason-John unsettles readers with potent images of ongoing trauma from slavery and colonization. Her narratives range from the beginnings of the African Diaspora to the story of a stowaway on the Windrush, from racism and sexism in Trump's America to the wide impact of the Me Too movement. Stories of entrapment, sexual assault, addictive behaviours, and rave culture are told and contrasted to the strengthening and forthright voice of...

MLA Handbook, eighth edition

The Modern Language Association of America
The Modern Language Association, the authority on research and writing, takes a fresh look at documenting sources in the eighth edition of the MLA Handbook. Works are published today in a dizzying range of formats. A book, for example, may be read in print, online, or as an e-book—or perhaps listened to in an audio version. On the Web, modes of publication are regularly invented, combined, and modified. Previous editions of the MLA Handbook provided separate instructions for each format, and...

In the World of Stalinist Crimes

Robert Kuśnierz
This book is a study of the Stalinist terror campaign in Soviet Ukraine in the 1930s, in particular for the period of 1934–38. This study is based on Polish diplomatic and military intelligence sources that have not hitherto been researched and analyzed. The author's unique contribution to the study of this period is its detailed analysis of the terror campaign against various national minorities in...

Body and Earth

Andrea Olsen
"Body is our first environment," writes Andrea Olsen. "It is the medium through which we know the earth." In a remarkable integration of environmental science, biology, meditation, and creative expression, Olsen, a dancer who teaches in the environmental studies program at Middlebury College, offers a guide to a holistic understanding of person and place. Part workbook, part exploration, Body and Earth considers the question of how we can best, most responsibly inhabit both our bodies and our planet.

BodyStories

Andrea Olsen
BodyStories is a book that engages the general reader as well as the serious student of anatomy. Thirty-one days of learning sessions heighten awareness about each bone and body system and provide self-guided studies. The book draws on Ms. Olsen's thirty years as a dancer and teacher of anatomy to show how our attitudes and approaches to our body affect us day to day. Amusing and insightful personal stories enliven the text and provide ways of working with the body for efficiency and for...

An Autobiography of the Autobiography of Reading

Dionne Brand
The geopolitics of empire had already prepared me for thiscoloniality constructs outsides and insides—worlds to be chosen, disturbed, interpreted, and navigated—in order to live something like a real self.Internationally acclaimed poet and novelist Dionne Brand reflects on her early reading of colonial literature and how it makes Black being inanimate. She explores her encounters with colonial, imperialist, and racist tropes; the ways that practices of reading and writing are shaped...

Mezzaluna

Michele Leggott
Enchanting and sustaining poems by the first Poet Laureate of New Zealand Mezzaluna gathers work from Michele Leggott's nine books of poetry. As reviewer David Eggleton writes: "Leggott shows us that the ordinary is full of marvels which . . . stitched, flow together into sequences and episodes that in turn form an ongoing serial, or bricolage: a single poem, then, rejecting exactness, literalism, naturalism in favor of resonance, currents, patterns of ebb and flow." In complex lyrics, sampling thought and...

Creole Feast

Nathaniel Burton, Rudy Lombard, foreword by Leah Chase
 Before there were celebrity gourmands, Creole Feast brought together the stories and knowledge of New Orleans top chefs when it was first presented in 1978. These masters of modern Creole cuisine share the recipes, tips, and tricks from the kitchens of New Orleans' most famous restaurants, including Dooky Chase, Commander's Palace, Broussard's, and Galatoire's. Today, Creole Feast still stands as the most comprehensive...

The College Stress Test

Robert Zemsky, Susan Shaman, and Susan Campbell Baldridge
In The College Stress Test, Robert Zemsky, Susan Shaman, and Susan Campbell Baldridge present readers with a full, frank, and informed discussion about college and university closures. Drawing on the massive institutional data set available from IPEDS (the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System), they build a stress test for estimating the market viability of more than 2,800 undergraduate institutions.

Approaches to Teaching Dante's Divine Comedy, second edition

edited by Christopher Kleinhenz, Kristina Olson
Dante's Divine Comedy can compel and shock readers: it combines intense emotion and psychological insight with medieval theology and philosophy. This volume will help instructors lead their students through the many dimensions—historical, literary, religious, and ethical—that make the work so rewarding and enduringly relevant yet so difficult. Part 1, "Materials," gives instructors an overview of the important scholarship on the Divine Comedy. The...

Approaches to Teaching the Works of Eliza Haywood

edited by Tiffany Potter
During her long and varied career, Eliza Haywood acted onstage, worked as a publisher and bookseller, and wrote prolifically in many genres, from novels of seduction to essays in periodicals. Her works illuminate the private emotional lives of people in eighteenth-century England, invite readers to consider how women in that culture defined themselves and criticized oppression, and help us better understand the social debates of the period. This volume addresses a...

Empowerment Skills for Leaders, 3rd ed.

Claire Forest, PhD
Guides leaders in transforming their agencies into empowerment-based organizations. Provides leaders with core concepts their workers learn in FDC classes.

Frogfishes

Theodore W. Pietsch and Rachel J. Arnold
Unique among the world's fishes, frogfishes display a bizarre combination of attributes and behaviors that make them a subject of fervent study. Through cunning and trickery, they turn would-be predators into prey; they "walk" across the ocean floor and jet-propel through open water; some lay their eggs in a floating mucoid mass, while others employ complex patterns of parental care; and they are certainly among the most colorful of nature's...

Alligators

Kent A. Vliet
photographs by Wayne Lynch
Few scenes put the senses on edge more than a submerged alligator, only eyes and snout showing, when peering across a southern lake on a misty morning. An iconic American predator, these reptiles grow to thirteen feet or more and can live as long as humans. Alligators are complex creatures, capable of terrific attacks and yet tending to their young in the same gentle way a mother duck looks after her brood. Once extremely...

Marvelous Microfossils

Patrick De Wever
foreword by Hubert Reeves
translated by Alison Duncan
Microfossils—the most abundant, ancient, and easily accessible of Earth's fossils—are also the most important. Their ubiquity is such that every person on the planet touches or uses them every single day, and yet few of us even realize they exist. Despite being the sole witnesses of 3 billion years of evolutionary history, these diminutive fungi, plants, and animals are themselves invisible to the eye. In this...

The Trailhead

Kerri Webster
Song of the Husbands for Henry All winter the kind husbands hover like mortgaged angels. One smells gasoline in his sleep, would be my lover. They want me to be well. Specimen, they say, and mean endearment. I row into the flood. The vodka turns the lemon to crystal, the carp turn the pond to shit and hunger, the lingerie turns the trunkful of lingerie into a special trunk. And the husbands, the husbands If asked they will install a water feature. I tend my minor art, I push my sorrow cart, the women sing to...

French Guiana

Patrick Chamoiseau
A top francophone writer explores postcolonial amnesia in a long-overdue translation from Matt Reeck Hailed by Milan Kundera as "an heir of Joyce and Kafka," Prix Goncourt winner Patrick Chamoiseau is among the leading Francophone writers today. With most of his novels having appeared in English, this book opens a new window on his oeuvre. A moving poetic essay that bears witness to the forgotten history of the French penal colony in French Guiana, French Guiana—Memory Traces of...

Jewish Cuisine in Hungary

Andras Koerner
Winner of the 2019 National Jewish Book Award in the category of Food Writing & Cookbooks András Koerner refuses to accept that the vanished world of preShoah Hungarian Jewry and its cuisine should disappear virtually without a trace and feels compelled to reconstruct its culinary culture. His book presents eating habits not as isolated things, divorced from their social and religious contexts, but as organic parts of one's way of life. In the...

Is It Alzheimer's?

Peter V. Rabins, MD, MPH, best-selling author of The 36-Hour Day
Perhaps someone in your family has been diagnosed with Alzheimer disease—or maybe you worry about developing memory loss yourself. In Is It Alzheimer's?, Dr. Peter V. Rabins, a top expert in the field, educates readers by answering 101 often-asked questions about memory loss and dementia. Written in a conversational, easy-to-use Q&A style, the book is organized into seven unique...

Through the Seasons, second edition

Cynthia R. Green, PhD, and Joan Beloff, ACC, ALA, CDP
foreword by Peter V. Rabins, MD, MPH
Dementia and related disorders impact the lives of those affected in countless ways, making it difficult to remain independent at work, at home, and in the wider world. But recent studies have shown that structured activities can make a significant, positive difference by stimulating mental engagement while improving interactions between caregivers and memory-challenged...

The Casual Presence of Borders

Mackie JV Blanton
Borders exist in and are occupied by space and time ritualized by seen and unseen, known and unknown, human struggles. Mackie Blanton's The Casual Presence of Borders captures borders present around denizens or friends gathered at bars or over coffee, over new births, over silence and meals; at nearby places of worship or warfare or death; or unvisited planets or islands of our knowledge or imagination; or the sensed presence of the cells and arteries of the human body; and human beings noticed in easy...

The Story of Sidonie C

Ines Rieder
Now finally available in English, this biography of Margarethe Csonka-Trautenegg (1900–1999) offers a fully-rounded picture of a willful and psychologically complex aesthete. As Freud's never-before-identified "case of female homosexuality", her analysis continues to spark often heated psychoanalytic debate. Margarethe's ("Sidonie's") experiences spanned the twentieth century. Jewish by birth, she fled upper-class life in Vienna for Cuba to escape the Nazis, only to...

Paris Spleen

Charles Baudelaire
Between 1855 and his death in 1867, Charles Baudelaire inaugurated a new—and in his own words "dangerous"—hybrid form in a series of prose poems known as Paris Spleen. Important and provocative, these fifty poems take the reader on a tour of 1850s Paris, through gleaming cafes and filthy side streets, revealing a metropolis on the eve of great change. In its deliberate fragmentation and merging of the lyrical with the sardonic, Le Spleen de Paris may be regarded as one of the earliest and most...

A New and Concise History of Rock and R&B through the Early 1990s

Eric Charry
Rock and R&B history told with original charts, tables, and timelines A New and Concise History provides a strong foundation for understanding how music, the music industry, and American culture intersect. Ethnomusicologist Eric Charry's innovative and road-tested teaching style is brought to you in this textbook suitable for general education courses in music. The book is organized around a series of timelines, tables, and figures created by the author, and...

Ghosts Still Linger

Kat Cameron
In the arena, she shot cigarettes and coins from her trusting husband's hand. Some women wished she would miss.—from "Little Sure Shot"Kat Cameron's poetry illuminates the unsung perspectives of the women of the West, creating a compelling narrative that reflects the poet's own struggles with sorrow. She conjures ghosts and weaves together insights on loss, memory, and the impacts of boom and bust.

The Greek Genocide in American Naval War Diaries

Savvas "Sam" Koktzoglou
This book is a gripping collection of American naval war diaries recently found in the National Archives about what was happening on the northern coast of Turkey in 1921-1922. At the time, a series of American destroyers were continuously stationed at the port of Samsun, and the destroyer captains describe here many of the atrocities then being perpetrated upon the...

To float, to drown, to close up, to open

E. Alex Pierce
In this collection, E. Alex Pierce enters the territory of memory embedded in landscape where "language tied to the land" evokes the cadence of tidal rivers and creates a fluid world. She traces the fragmented childhood beginnings that lead to the formation of a young artist who moves from music, through theatre, to poetry. The passionate relationships and complex juxtapositions of art and performance that form an artist's life find voice here in the symphonic structure of the long poem,...

Northern Money, Southern Land

Chlotilde R. Martin
In the early 1930s Chlotilde R. Martin of Beaufort, South Carolina, wrote a series of articles for the Charleston News and Courier documenting the social and economic transformation of the lowcountry coast as an influx of wealthy northerners began buying scores of old local plantations. Her articles combined the name-dropping chatter of the lowcountry social register with reflections on the tension between past and present in the old...

Not Even Past

Cody Marrs
The American Civil War lives on in our collective imagination like few other events. The story of the war has been retold in countless films, novels, poems, memoirs, plays, sculptures, and monuments. Often remembered as an emancipatory struggle, as an attempt to destroy slavery in America now and forever, it is also memorialized as a fight for Southern independence; as a fratricide that divided the national family; and as a dark, cruel conflict defined by its brutality. What...

The Political Determinants of Health

Daniel E. Dawes
foreword by David R. Williams
Reduced life expectancy, worsening health outcomes, health inequity, and declining health care options—these are now realities for most Americans. However, in a country of more than 325 million people, addressing everyone's issues is challenging. How can we effect beneficial change for everyone so we all can thrive? What is the great equalizer? In this book, Daniel E. Dawes argues that political determinants of health create the social drivers—including poor...

Mammalogy, fifth edition

George A. Feldhamer, Joseph F. Merritt, Carey Krajewski, Janet L. Rachlow, and Kelley M. Stewart
There are more than 6,400 species in the class Mammalia, including the blue whale—the largest animal that has ever lived—and the pygmy shrew, which weighs little more than a dime. Such diversity among mammals has allowed them to play critical roles in every ecosystem, whether marine, freshwater, alpine, tundra, forest, or desert. Reflecting the expertise and perspective of five leading mammalogists, the fifth...

Neighborhood of Gray Houses

Derek Annis
Mar 2020 - Lost Horse Press
The poems in Derek Annis's debut collection, Neighborhood of Gray Houses, wander through a landscape darkened by childhood abandonment and loss, before coming to rest in a home illuminated by new life and cautious optimism. The speaker comes to consciousness at a time when parental contracts have been breached and in a world falling apart, and as it falls apart, the poems become increasingly surreal, increasingly sure of the world's uncertainty. Ultimately, the birth of the speaker's daughters provides...

Continuum

Gaylord Torrence
This landmark publication brings Indigenous art to the fore with the presentation of 280 objects from the Nelson-Atkins Museum's rich collection. More than two-thirds of the volume's featured masterworks—paintings, sculptures, drawings, regalia, ceramics, textiles, and baskets—have never before appeared in publication. Created by both known and unknown makers, these singular and profound aesthetic achievements represent the traditions of communities across the...

Hartford Seen

Pablo Delano
An unprecedented photographic exploration of the Connecticut capital's past, present, and future Hartford Seen is the first modern-day art photography book to focus on Connecticut's capital. Comprising more than 150 full-color images, it has been in the making for two decades. In this personal meditation on the city's built environment, he implements a methodical but intuitive approach, using color and meticulous compositions to evoke the city's essence, particularly the way global population flows impact the city's...

With Extreme Prejudice

Fredrick Barton
One year after his wife dies in a car accident, film critic Mike Barnett discovers his house ransacked in an apparent robbery. However, only his wife's private files have been stolen. Mike then finds himself pulled into a seedy world of local government corruption when he starts to believe that his wife's death was no accident. A captivating legal thriller about greed, graft, and convoluted schemes, a man's search for truth to reconcile the loss of a loving marriage uncovers deeper trauma in the beauty of New...

Moving Bodies, Navigating Conflict

Ahalya Satkunaratnam
A performance-ethnographic examination of dance and civil war in Sri Lanka Moving Bodies, Navigating Conflict is a groundbreaking ethnographic examination of dance practice in Colombo, Sri Lanka, during the civil war (1983–2009). It is the first book of scholarship on bharata natyam (a classical dance originating in India) in Sri Lanka, and the first on the role of this dance in the country's war. Focusing on women dancers, Ahalya...

All the Horrors of War

Bernice Lerner
On April 15, 1945, Brigadier H. L. Glyn Hughes entered Bergen-Belsen for the first time. Waiting for him were 10,000 unburied, putrefying corpses and 60,000 living prisoners, starving and sick. One month earlier, 15-year-old Rachel Genuth arrived at Bergen-Belsen; deported with her family from Sighet, Transylvania, in May of 1944, Rachel had by then already endured Auschwitz, the Christianstadt labor camp, and a forced march through the...

Poetic Imagination in Japanese Art

edited by Maribeth Graybill
Jan 2020 - Portland Art Museum
Assembled over the last four decades and still growing, the Mary and Cheney Cowles collection of Japanese art is one of the finest in private hands in North America. What began for Cheney Cowles as an almost casual interest in collecting early Imari ware evolved, over time, into a passion for Japanese paintings and calligraphy. Cowles's tastes are broad and eclectic, embracing a dazzling diversity of styles and...

New Deal Art in the Northwest

Margaret E. Bullock
Apr 2020 - Tacoma Art Museum
From December 1933 to February 1943, as part of a sprawling economic stimulus package, four federal programs hired artists to create public artworks and provide art-making opportunities to millions of Americans. When this initiative abruptly ended shortly after the US entry into World War II, information and artworks were lost or scattered, long obscuring the story of what had happened in the Northwest. This groundbreaking volume (which accompanies an exhibition at the Tacoma...

The Chicano Studies Reader, fourth edition

Chon A. Noriega
The Chicano Studies Reader, the best-selling anthology of articles from Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano Studies, has been newly expanded with a group of essays that focus on Chicana/o and Latina/o youth. This section, Generations against Exclusion, joins Decolonizing the Territory, Performing Politics, (Re)Configuring Identities, Remapping the World, and Continuing to Push Boundaries. Introductions to each section offer analysis and contextualization. This fourth edition of...

Fields of Light and Stone

Angeline Schellenberg
You lie awake,needlessly fingeringthis patchwork guilt.Remorse, a codeyou live by; distress callsfor someone to blame.—from "Threads" Following the deaths of her Mennonite grandparents, Angeline Schellenberg began exploring their influence on her life. Her elegiac love letter to them articulates her grief against the backdrop of their involuntary emigration. She artfully captures the immigrant identity, vital to Canadian culture, in poems that draw on events both personal and global: war and famine,...

Return to Yakni Chitto

Monique Verdin
In South Louisiana, we live on a power point of our planet. A place where water comes to be purified. A place where 1,000-year-old cypress trees once grew. A place where fish still come to spawn and birds to nest. A place close to the Gulf of Mexico but where, as the old people used to say, "sweet water" could still be found that was fresh and good to drink. There is no sweet water down the bayou in Terrebonne Parish anymore. I've been trying to make sense of the strange beauty left here—the...

Wanting Radiance

Karen Salyer McElmurray
Miracelle Loving's world comes crashing down when her mother, Ruby, is murdered during a fortune-telling session gone wrong. Not that she had much of a stable world to lose in the first place; the free-spirited mother-daughter duo had never remained in one place for very long. Without the guidance of her mother, Miracelle grows up following the only path she knows, traveling from town to town, sometimes fortune-telling, picking up odd jobs to fill the time and escape the ever-present lostness she can't...

The Murder of Marion Miley

Beverly Bell
Today, the name Marion Miley is largely unrecognizable, but in the fall of 1941, she was an internationally renowned golf champion, winning every leading women's tournament except the elusive national title. This unassuming twenty-seven-year-old woman was beloved by all she met, including celebrities like jazz crooner Bing Crosby. With ambitions to become a doctor, it seemed Marion Miley was headed for greatness. But on September 28, 1941, six gunshots broke through the early morning stillness of the Lexington...

The Fifth Wave

Michael M. Crow and William B. Dabars
America's research universities lead the world in discovery, creativity, and innovation—but are captive to a set of design constraints that no longer aligns with the changing needs of society. Their commitment to discovery and innovation, which is carried out largely in isolation from the socioeconomic challenges faced by most Americans, threatens to impede the capacity of these institutions to contribute decisively and consistently to the collective good.

If Adam Had Not Sinned

Justus H. Hunter
Since the twelfth century, theologians have found a counterfactual question irresistible: "If Adam had not sinned, would the Son have become incarnate?" In the latter half of the twentieth century, Hans Urs von Balthasar, Hans Küng, Gerhard Ludwig Müller, Karl Rahner, Karl Barth, Wolfhart Pannenburg, Jürgen Moltmann, and Robert Jenson all considered this question on the reason, or motive, for the incarnation. Nearly every case refers to the classic...

Desert Redleg

L. Scott Lingamfelter
When Saddam Hussein's Iraq invaded Kuwait in August 1990, triggering the First Gulf War, a coalition of thirty-five countries led by the United States responded with Operation Desert Storm, which culminated in a one-hundred-hour coordinated air strike and ground assault that repelled Iraqi forces from Kuwait. Though largely forgotten in descriptions of the war, an eight-day barrage of artillery fire made this seemingly rapid offensive possible. At the forefront of this...

Times of Mobility

Jasmina Lukić
In an era of increased mobility and globalisation, a fast growing body of writing originates from authors who live in-between languages and cultures. In response to this challenge, transnational perspective offers a new approach to the growing body of cultural texts with an emphasis on experiences of migration, transculturation, bilingualism and (cultural) translation. The introductory analysis and the fifteen essays in this collection critically interrogate...

Bodily Evidence

Geneva Cobb Moore
The first African American to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, Toni Morrison is one of the most celebrated women writers in the world. In Bodily Evidence: Racism, Slavery, and Maternal Power in the Novels of Toni Morrison, Geneva Cobb Moore explores how Morrison uses parody and pastiche, semiotics and metaphors, and allegory to portray black life in the United States, teaching untaught history to liberate Americans. In this short and...

Frog Hollow

Susan Campbell
A trip through the heart and history of Hartford's most vibrant neighborhood Frog Hollow: Stories from an American Neighborhood is a collection of colorful historical vignette. Frog Hollow is an ethnically diverse neighborhood just west of the Connecticut State Capitol in Hartford. Its row houses have been home to inventors, entrepreneurs and workers, and it was one of the first neighborhoods in the country to experiment with successful urban planning models, including public parks...

The Experiment of Faith

Matthew J. Ramage
Pope Benedict XVI memorably remarked that the Christian faith is a lot like a Gothic cathedral with its stained-glass windows. From the outside, the Church can appear dark, dreary, and worn with age—the crumbling relic of an institution that no longer speaks to men and women living in our modern world. Indeed, for many people today, Christian morality with all of its commandments appears to be a source not of life and joy but instead of...

Tree Story

Valerie Trouet
Children around the world know that to tell how old a tree is, you count its rings. Few people, however, know that research into tree rings has also made amazing contributions to our understanding of Earth's climate history and its influences on human civilization over the past 2,000 years. In her captivating new book, Tree Story, Valerie Trouet reveals how the seemingly simple and relatively familiar concept of counting tree rings has inspired far-reaching scientific breakthroughs...

Eat a Bowl of Tea

Louis Chu
At the close of the Second World War, racist immigration laws trapped enclaves of old men in Chinatowns across the United States, preventing their wives or families from joining them. They took refuge from loneliness in the repartee and rivalries exchanged over games of mahjong in the backrooms of barbershops or at the local tong. These bachelors found hope in the nascent marriages and future children who would someday grow roots in American soil, made possible at last by the repeal of the Chinese Exclusion Act in 1943. ...

Malignant

Vinayak K. Prasad, MD, MPH
Each week, people read about new and exciting cancer drugs. Some of these drugs are truly transformative, offering major improvements in how long patients live or how they feel—but what is often missing from the popular narrative is that, far too often, these new drugs have marginal or minimal benefits. Some are even harmful. In Malignant, hematologist-oncologist Dr. Vinayak K. Prasad writes about the many sobering examples of how patients are too often...

The Opioid Fix

Barbara Andraka-Christou
America's addiction crisis is growing worse. More than 115 Americans die daily from opioid overdoses, with half a million deaths expected in the next decade. Time and again, scientific studies show that medications like Suboxone and methadone are the most reliable and effective treatment, yet more than 60 percent of US addiction treatment centers fail to provide access to them. In The Opioid Fix, Barbara Andraka-Christou highlights both...

How Students Write: A Linguistic Analysis

Laura Louise Aull
Broad generalizations about "people today" are a familiar feature of first-year student writing. How Students Write brings a fresh perspective to this perennial observation, using corpus linguistics techniques. This study analyzes sentence-level patterns in student writing to develop an understanding of how students present evidence, draw connections between ideas, relate to their readers, and, ultimately, learn to construct knowledge in their writing. Drawing on both first-year and...

American Datu

Ronald K. Edgerton
American Datu: John J. Pershing and Counterinsurgency Warfare in the Muslim Philippines, 1899–1913 provides a play-by-play account of a crucial but often overlooked period in the development of American counterinsurgency strategy. Tracing Pershing's military campaigns in the Philippines, Ronald K. Edgerton examines how Progressive Counterinsurgency doctrine evolved in direct response to the first sustained military encounter...

Yumeji Modern

Nozomi Naoi
The hugely popular Japanese artist Takehisa Yumeji (1884–1934) is an emblematic figure of Japan's rapidly changing cultural milieu in the early twentieth century. His graphic works include leftist and antiwar illustrations in socialist bulletins, wrenching portrayals of Tokyo after the Great Kantō Earthquake of 1923, and fashionable images of beautiful women—referred to as "Yumeji-style beauties"—in books and magazines that targeted a new demographic of young female...

After the Blast

Eric Wagner, hD
On May 18, 1980, people all over the world watched with awe and horror as Mount St. Helens erupted. Fifty-seven people were killed and hundreds of square miles of what had been lush forests and wild rivers were to all appearances destroyed. Ecologists thought they would have to wait years, or even decades, for life to return to the mountain, but when forest scientist Jerry Franklin helicoptered into the blast area a couple of weeks after the eruption, he found small...

Dinner at 10:32

Mahyar A. Amouzegar
In Dinner At 10:32, Mahyar A. Amouzegar offers a textured examination of the ambiguity of the most intimate human relationships. Near the end of his life, Donte's granddaughter asks him a simple question: What are the true origins of his long love affair with his wife? From there, Donte embarks on a reminiscence of their complex love story, along with other romances, friendships, and intrigues that peppered his younger days. As Donte reveals the moments that formed him by sharing stories with his granddaughter,...

things we'll need for the coming difficulties

Valerie Vogrin
"Valerie Vogrin's first full-length story collection is populated with characters who are lost, characters who are wounded, characters rendered with precision and the unflinching eye of an expert storyteller at the top of her craft. . . . Like us, they are deeply human and, in that way, utterly recognizable. . . . Vogrin's prose is clear and confident and often grimly humorous, but in the end she is an artist of the unstated, deftly seeding clues that blossom into stories rich in...

Meleko Mokgosi

Erica P. Jones
Botswana-born Meleko Mokgosi is an emerging contemporary artist whose large-scale figurative paintings are garnering growing accolades and attention worldwide. In all his work, Mokgosi emphasizes narrative storytelling. This approach inspires the viewer to think deeply about the politics, power structures, and role of history in the creation of independent nations of southern Africa. Mokgosi organizes his episodic painting cycles like chapters in a book. "Bread, Butter, and Power" forms a...

Confederate Citadel

Mary A. DeCredico
Richmond, Virginia: pride of the founding fathers, doomed capital of the Confederate States of America. Unlike other Southern cities, Richmond boasted a vibrant, urban industrial complex capable of producing crucial ammunition and military supplies. Despite its northern position, Richmond became the Confederacy's beating heart—its capital, second-largest city, and impenetrable citadel. As long as the city endured, the Confederacy remained a well-supplied and formidable force.

Tomas G Masaryk a Scholar and a Statesman

Zdenek V. David
The importance of the political thought of Tomas G. Masaryk (1850-1937), the first president of Czechoslovakia, has been based on two considerations. One was his image as the principal shaper of the democratic culture in inter-war Czechoslovakia. The other image was as a model of political prudence and sagacity not only for East-Central Europe, but one recognized universally. He was called by his contemporaries "the wisest...

The Legacy of Division

Laczo
This volume examines the legacy of the East–West divide since the implosion of the communist regimes in Europe. The ideals of 1989 have largely been frustrated by the crises and turmoil of the past decade. The liberal consensus was first challenged as early as the mid-2000s. In Eastern Europe, grievances were directed against the prevailing narratives of transition and ever sharper ethnic-racial antipathies surfaced in opposition to a supposedly postnational and multicultural West. In Western...

Dressed with Distinction

Gillian Vogelsang-Eastwood
For hundreds of years, skilled craftspeople in the Syrian centers of Aleppo, Damascus, and Homs produced intricately woven textiles for the royal courts, worldly merchants, and elite Bedouin families of the Ottoman Empire. City dwellers were renowned for wearing brightly colored silk garments that glittered with gold and silver threads. By contrast, nomadic Bedouins wore woolen garments in hues and designs reflecting their desert lifestyle. The allure of these...

Approaches to Teaching the Works of Miguel de Unamuno

edited by Luis Álvarez-Castro
A central figure of Spanish culture and an author in many genres, Miguel de Unamuno (1864-1936) is less well known outside Spain. He was a surprising writer and thinker: a professor of Greek who embraced metafiction and modernist methods; a proponent of Castilian Spanish although born in the Basque country and influenced by many international writers; religious yet an early existentialist. He found himself in opposition to both King Alfonso XIII and the...

The Atlantic Economy during the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries

Peter A. Coclanis
The Atlantic Economy during the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries is a collection of essays focusing on the expansion, elaboration, and increasing integration of the economy of the Atlantic basin—comprising parts of Europe, West Africa, and the Americas—during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. In thirteen essays, the contributors examine the complex and variegated processes by which markets...

Life should be Transparent

Aurimas Svedas
This book of thirteen conversations introduces us to the life of an exceptional person—theatre critic, Germanist, and long-time chair of the Open Lithuania Fund board Irena Veisaitė. The dialogue between Lithuanian historian Aurimas Švedas and a woman who reflects deeply on her experiences reveals both one individual's historically dramatic life and the fate of Europe and Lithuania in the twentieth century. Through the...

Fourteen Points for the Twenty-First Century

Richard H. Immerman
When the United States entered World War I, President Woodrow Wilson declared to Congress that the objective was not merely to bring "a new balance of power," but rather to bring a "just and secure peace" to the world by the end of the conflict. In this famous speech, known as "The Fourteen Points," Wilson offered the world a road map toward a more equitable international system in the midst of unprecedented global conflict,...

The Distance From Four Points

Margo Orlando Littell
Soon after her husband's tragic death, Robin Besher makes a startling discovery: He had recklessly blown through their entire savings on decrepit rentals in Four Points, the Appalachian town Robin grew up in. Forced to return after decades, Robin and her daughter, Haley, set out to renovate the properties as quickly as possible—before anyone exposes Robin's secret past as a teenage prostitute. Disaster strikes when Haley befriends a troubled teen mother, hurling Robin back into a past she'd worked so...

Revolutionary Pairs

Larry Ceplair
When examining history, one must be careful not to blame rapid political change solely on famine, war, economic inequality, or structural disfunctions alone. These conditions may linger for decades without social upheaval. Successful revolution requires two triggering elements: a crisis or conjuncture and revolutionary actors who are organized in a dedicated revolutionary party, armed with a radical ideology, and poised to...

Learning Online

George Veletsianos
Online learning is ubiquitous for millions of students worldwide, yet our understanding of student experiences in online learning settings is limited. The geographic distance that separates faculty from students in an online environment is its signature feature, but it is also one that risks widening the gulf between teachers and learners. In Learning Online, George Veletsianos argues that in order to critique, understand, and improve online learning, we must examine it through the lens of...

Russian Cyber Operations

Scott Jasper
Russia has deployed cyber operations to interfere in foreign elections, launch disinformation campaigns, and cripple neighboring states — all while maintaining a thin veneer of deniability and avoiding strikes that cross the line into acts of war. How should a targeted nation respond? In Russian Cyber Operations, Scott Jasper dives into the legal and technical maneuvers of Russian cyber strategies, proposing that nations develop solutions for resilience to withstand future...

Forbidden Federalism

Zoltán Bécsi
The key concept of his title is that of federalism, understood as a unifying factor for the peoples of the former Austro-Hungarian Empire. During the First World War, even those resolutely in favor of dismantling Austria-Hungary recognized that the Danubian area required some sort of federal unity, if only for economic reasons. One of the main actors of the narrative is Karl of Habsburg-Lorraine, the last Emperor-King of Austria-Hungary.

A Contested Europe

György Schöpflin
It's a well-worn cliché that every policy has costs, not just benefits, as well as unintended consequences. The eastward enlargement of the European Union in 2004 and after is a case very much in point. Fifteen years on there is greater or lesser dissatisfaction both in Brussels and in the new member states that joined. This book explores the whys and wherefores from an unusual and original perspective. The author, György Schöpflin, worked for nearly three decades as an academic at the...

Gorbachev and Bush

Svetlana Savranskya
This book is the paperback edition of the second half of the cloth bound volume The Last Superpower Summits: Gorbachev, Reagan, and Bush Conversations that Ended the Cold War, CEU Press, 2016. It presents and interprets archival records of the meetings between Mikhail Gorbachev and George W. Bush between 1989 and 1991, including transcripts of conversations between top leaders on the rapid and monumental events of the final days of the...

South Carolina at the Brink

Philip G. Grose
As the governor of South Carolina during the height of the civil rights movement, Robert E. McNair faced the task of leading the state through the dismantling of its pervasive Jim Crow culture. Despite the obstacles, McNair was able to navigate a moderate course away from a past dominated by an old-guard oligarchy toward a more pragmatic, inclusive, and prosperous era. South Carolina at the Brink is the first biography of this remarkable statesman as...

What Price Hollywood?

Elyce Rae Helford
During the early Hollywood sound era, studio director George Cukor produced nearly fifty films in as many years, famously winning the Best Director Oscar at the 1964 Academy Awards for My Fair Lady. His collaborations with so-called difficult actresses such as Katharine Hepburn, Judy Garland, and Marilyn Monroe unsettled producers even as his ticket sales lined their pockets. Fired from Gone with the Wind for giving Vivien Leigh more screen time than Clark...

Liberty Brought Us Here

Susan E. Lindsey
Between 1820 and 1913, approximately 16,000 black people left the United States to start new lives in Liberia, Africa, in what was at the time the largest out-migration in US history. When Tolbert Major, a former Kentucky slave and single father, was offered his own chance for freedom, he accepted. He, several family members, and seventy other people boarded the Luna on July 5, 1836. After they arrived in Liberia, Tolbert penned a letter to his...

The Wayfarer's End

Shawn M. Colberg
The Wayfarer's End follows the human person's journey to union with God in the theologies of Saint Bonaventure and Saint Thomas Aquinas. It argues that these seminal thinkers of the 13th Century emphasize scriptural notions of divine rewards as ordering principles for the graced movement of human viators to eternal life. Divine rewards emerge as a fundamental category through the study's emphasis on Thomas and Bonaventure as scriptural...

The Godly Image

Romanus Cessario
Christian satisfaction stands at the center of the Church's teaching about salvation. Satisfaction pertains to studies about Christ, redemption, the Sacraments, and pastoral practice. The topic also enters into questions about God and the creature as well as about the divine mercy and providence. Somewhat neglected in the period after Vatican II, satisfaction now appears to scholars as the forgotten key to entering deeply into the mystery of Christ and his work. Seminarians especially...

Teaching Young Adult Literature

edited by Mike Cadden, Karen Coats, Roberta S. Trites
Thanks to the success of franchises such as The Hunger Games and Twilight, young adult literature has reached a new level of prominence and popularity. Teens and adults alike are drawn to the genre's coming-of-age themes, fast pacing, and vivid emotional portrayals. The essays in this volume suggest ways high school and college instructors can incorporate YA texts into courses in literature, education, library science, and general education. The first group of...

Anselm's Pursuit of Joy

Gavin R. Ortlund
The interpretation of Anselm of Canterbury's Proslogion has a long and rich tradition. However, its study is often narrowly focused on its so-called "ontological argument." As a result, engagement with the text of this work tends to be lopsided, and the prayerful purpose that undergirds the whole book is often completely ignored. Even the most rigorous engagements with the Proslogion often have little to say, for instance, about how the prayers of Proslogion 1, 14, and 18...

Reading Job with St. Thomas Aquinas

Matthew Levering
Reading Job with St. Thomas Aquinas is a scholarly contribution to Thomistic studies, specifically to the study of Aquinas's biblical exegesis in relation to his philosophy and theology. Each of the thirteen chapters has a different focus, within the shared concentration of the book on Aquinas's Literal Exposition on Job. The essays are arranged in three Parts: "Job and Sacra Doctrina"; "Providence and Suffering"; and "Job and the Moral Life". Boyle's opening essay argues that Aquinas's...

Seamus Heaney and the End of Catholic Ireland

Kieran Quinlan
Seamus Heaney & the End of Catholic Ireland takes off from the poet's growing awareness in the new millennium of "something far more important in my mental formation than cultural nationalism or the British presence or any of that stuff—namely, my early religious education." It then pursues an examination of the full trajectory of Heaney's religious beliefs as represented in his poetry, prose, and interviews, with a briefer account of the interactive religious histories of the...

Conflict and Negotiation in the Early Church

Bronwen Neil
Recent decades have seen great progress made in scholarship towards understanding the major civic role played by bishops of the eastern and western churches of Late Antiquity. Brownen Neil and Pauline Allen explore and evaluate one aspect of this civic role, the negotiation of religious conflict. Conflict and Negotiation in the Early Church focuses on the period 500 to 700 CE, one of the least documented...

Treatises on Noah and David

St. Ambrose
These sermons by Ambrose of Milan (340–397 AD) provide a window into the preaching and scriptural exegesis of the legendary bishop, whose exposition of the Old Testament was instrumental in the conversion of Augustine of Hippo and in the development of Latin theology. In his treatise On Noah and his two Defenses for David, Ambrose borrows from influential Greek theologians, including Philo of Alexandria, Origen, and Didymus the Blind, while developing his own commentary on the exemplary patriarchs.

Determining Death by Neurological Criteria

Matthew Hanley
The neurological criteria for the determination of death remain controversial within secular and Catholic circles, even though they are widely accepted within the medical community. In Determining Death by Neurological Criteria, Matthew Hanley offers both a practical and a philosophical defense. Hanley shows that the criteria are often misapplied in clinical settings, leading to cases where persons declared dead apparently spontaneously revive. These...

Spectrum of Fashion

Maryland Historical Society

Walking the High Desert

Ellen Waterston
Former high desert rancher Ellen Waterston writes of a wild, essentially roadless, starkly beautiful part of the American West. Following the recently created 750-mile Oregon Desert Trail, she embarks on a creative and inquisitive exploration, introducing readers to a "trusting, naïve, earnest, stubbly, grumpy old man of a desert" that is grappling with issues at the forefront of national, if not global, concern: public land use, grazing rights...

Like Wildfire

Sean Patrick O'Rourke
The sit-ins of the American civil rights movement were extraordinary acts of dissent in an age marked by protest. By sitting in at "whites only" lunch counters, libraries, beaches, swimming pools, skating rinks, and churches, young African Americans and their allies put their lives on the line, fully aware that their actions would almost inevitably incite hateful, violent responses from entrenched and increasingly desperate white segregationists. And yet they did so in...

Catechesis for the New Evangelization

Brian Pedraza
Popes Francis, Benedict XVI, and John Paul II have called the present a time of New Evangelization for the Church and have stressed the importance of catechesis for this mission. John Paul II claimed that this renewal of the Church's mission is grounded in the teachings of the Second Vatican Council. Nevertheless, approaches to catechesis in the conciliar and postconciliar era have varied greatly, as evidenced by the...

Institution Building in Weak States

Andrew Radin
The effort to improve state institutions in post-conflict societies is a complicated business. Even when foreign intervention is carried out with the best of intentions and the greatest resources, it often fails. What can account for this failure? In Institution Building in Weak States, Andrew Radin argues that the international community's approach to building state institutions needs its own reform. This innovative book proposes a new strategy, rooted in a...

A Century of Populist Demagogues

Ivan T. Berend
The renowned historian Ivan Berend discusses populist demagoguery through the presentation of 18 politicians from 12 European countries from World War I to the present. In this book, Berend defines demagoguery, reflects on its connections with populism, and examines the common features and differences in the demagogues' programs and language. Mussolini and Hitler, the "model demagogues," are only briefly discussed, as is the election of Donald Trump in the...

What the Emperor Built

Aurelia Campbell
One of the most famous rulers in Chinese history, the Yongle emperor (r. 1402–24) gained renown for constructing Beijing's magnificent Forbidden City, directing ambitious naval expeditions, and creating the world's largest encyclopedia. What the Emperor Built is the first book-length study devoted to the architectural projects of a single Chinese emperor. Focusing on the imperial palaces in Beijing, a Daoist architectural complex on Mount Wudang, and a Buddhist...

The Mystical Theology, by Dionysius the Areopagite

William Riordan
The Mystical Theology of Dionysius the Areopagite is one of the greatest classical texts ever written on prayer. The mysterious author, living during the fifth and sixth centuries, most likely in Syria, has been recognized both in the East and the West as a consummate theologian. This volume provides the finest available Greek text along with a facing-page translation as well as an introduction with historical background on Dionysius the Areopagite. Also given is an extended,...

Our Rightful Place

Terry L. Birdwhistell
In 1880, forty-three women walked into the president's office at the University of Kentucky (UK) and signed the student register, becoming the first female students at a public college in the commonwealth. But gaining admittance was only the beginning. For the next sixty-five years—encompassing two world wars, an economic depression, and the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment—generations of women at UK claimed and reclaimed their right to...

Dissonant Methods

Ada S. Jaarsma
Dissonant Methods is an innovative collection that probes how, by teaching inventively, postsecondary instructors can resist the constrictions of neoliberalism. Taking up the call in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning to understand teaching as scholarship, these essays offer concrete and practical meditations on resistant and sustainable teaching. The contributors seek to undermine forms of oppression frequently practised in higher education, and instead...

Lowcountry at High Tide

Christina R. Butler
The signs are there: our coastal cities are increasingly susceptible to flooding as the climate changes. Charleston, South Carolina, is no exception, and is one of the American cities most vulnerable to rising sea levels. Lowcountry at High Tide is the first book to deal with the topographic evolution of Charleston, its history of flooding from the seventeenth century to the present, and the efforts made to keep its...

Understanding Joseph Roth

Sidney Rosenfeld
A writer described as a "Jew in search of a fatherland" and a "wanderer in flight toward a tragic end," the Austrian writer Joseph Roth (1894–1939) spent his life in pursuit of a national and cultural identity and his final years writing in fervent opposition to the Third Reich. In this introduction to Roth's novels, which include Job and The Radetzky March, Sidney Rosenfeld demonstrates how the experience of homelessness not only shaped Roth's life but also decisively defined his body of work. Rosenfeld...

Teaching Jewish American Literature

edited by Roberta Rosenberg, Rachel Rubinstein
A multilingual, transnational literary tradition, Jewish American writing has long explored questions of personal identity and national boundaries. These questions can engage students in literature, writing, or religion; at Jewish, Christian, or secular schools; in or outside the United States. This volume takes an expansive view of Jewish American literature, beginning with writing from the earliest colonies in the Americas and continuing to contemporary...

Writing Changes: Alphabetic Text and Multimodal Composition

Pegeen Reichert Powell
Writing Changes moves beyond restrictive thinking about composition to examine writing as a material and social practice rich with contradictions. It analyzes the assumed dichotomy between writing and multimodal composition (which incorporates sounds, images, and gestures) as well as the truism that all texts are multimodal. Organized in four sections, the essays explore alphabetic text and multimodal composition in writing studies specific pedagogies...

Transcending Gender Ideology

Antonio Malo
Human sexuality is a very important subject, especially in a cultural context such as ours, in which social and work transformations offer behavioral models that are characterized by a remarkable sexual indeterminacy. In Transcending Gender Ideology, Antonio Malo tries to rethink sexuality with equilibrium and intellectual rigor, using a philosophical approach, since sexuality does not only affect biological aspects or social conditioning, but above all the same...

Harry Potter and Beyond

Tison Pugh
Harry Potter and Beyond explores J. K. Rowling's beloved best-selling series and its virtuoso reimagining of British literary traditions. Weaving together elements of fantasy, the school-story novel, detective fiction, allegory, and bildungsroman, the Harry Potter novels evade simplistic categorization as children's or fantasy literature. Because the Potter series both breaks new ground and adheres to longstanding narrative formulas, readers can enhance their...

The River That Made Seattle

BJ Cummings
With bountiful salmon and fertile plains, the Duwamish River has drawn people to its shores over the centuries for trading, transport, and sustenance. Chief Se'alth and his allies fished and lived in villages here and white settlers established their first settlements nearby. Industrialists later straightened the river's natural turns and built factories on its banks, floating in raw materials and shipping out airplane parts, cement, and steel. Unfortunately, the...

Unsettling Native Art Histories on the Northwest Coast

Kathryn Bunn-Marcuse
Inseparable from its communities, Northwest Coast art functions aesthetically and performatively beyond the scope of non-Indigenous scholarship, from demonstrating kinship connections to manifesting spiritual power. Contributors to this volume foreground Indigenous understandings in recognition of this rich context and its historical erasure within the discipline of art history. By centering voices that uphold Indigenous priorities, integrating the expertise of...

Picturing Peter Bogdanovich

Peter Tonguette
In 1971, Newsweek heralded The Last Picture Show as "the most impressive work by a young American director since Citizen Kane." Indeed, few filmmakers rivaled Peter Bogdanovich's popularity over the next decade. Riding the success of What's Up, Doc? (1972) and Paper Moon (1973), Bogdanovich became a bona fide celebrity, making regular appearances in his own movie trailers, occasionally hosting late-night television shows, and publicly advocating for...

America's Israel

Kenneth Kolander
One of the defining features of United States foreign policy since World War II has been the nation's special relationship with Israel. This informal alliance, rooted in shared values and culture, grew out of a moral obligation to promote Israel's survival in the aftermath of the Holocaust as US policymakers provided military aid, weapons, and political protection. In return, Israel served American interests through efforts to contain communism and...

Diplomatic Games

Heather L. Dichter
International sporting events, including the Olympic Games and the FIFA World Cup, have experienced profound growth in popularity and significance since the mid-twentieth century. Sports often facilitate diplomacy, revealing common interests across borders and uniting groups of people who are otherwise divided by history, ethnicity, or politics. In many countries, popular athletes have become diplomatic envoys. Sport is an arena in which international...

Seeing with the Eyes of the Heart

Elizabeth T. Groppe
In an era in which the internet has made pornography readily accessible, Seeing with the Eyes of the Heart offers a theological critique of pornography and retrieves from the Christian tradition an alternative visual culture. This visual culture is constituted by both the character of the images we behold and the manner in which we see. Contributors include psychologists William M. Struthers and Jill Manning, who address the...

The Art of the Game of Chess

Michael J. McGrath
The Art of the Game of Chess is the first English translation of Fr. Ruy López's 1561 book about chess, Libro de la invención liberal y arte del juego del ajedrez. López was a priest who served as King Philip II's confessor and royal advisor. As a connoisseur of chess, King Philip II promoted the game in his court, and it did not take long for López to become known as Spain's and one of Europe's greatest chess players. López is widely acclaimed as one of the most influential chess thinkers of all time...

RENDANG

Will Harris
Using long poems, ekphrasis, and ruptured forms, RENDANG is a startling new take on the self, and how an identity is constructed. Drawing on his Anglo-Indonesian heritage, Will Harris shows us new ways to think about the contradictions of identity and cultural memory. He creates companions that speak to us in multiple languages. They deftly ask us to consider how and what we look at, as well as what we don't look at and why. It is intellectual and accessible, moving and experimental, and combines a linguistic innovation with a deep...

Reading Flannery O'Connor in Spain

Mark Bosco
This collection of essays places Flannery O'Connor's work in constructive and collaborative dialogue with Spanish literature and literary aesthetics. The international scholars who contributed to this volume explore the ways in which O'Connor's literary and religious vision continues to work in the imaginations of both American and European—mostly Spanish—authors. The subtitle of the collection—From Andalusia to Andalucía—is a play on the name of O'Connor's family farm...

All the Feels / Tous les sens

Marie Carrière
All the Feels / Tous les sens presents research into emotion and cognition in Canadian, Indigenous, and Québécois writings in English or French. Affect is both internal and external, private and public; with its fluid boundaries, it represents a productive dimension for literary analysis. The emerging field of affect studies makes vital claims about ethical impulses, social justice, and critical resistance, and thus much is at stake when...

Camouflaged Aggression in Organizations

Alexander Abdennur
When aggression is expressed by means of formal organizational structures, it becomes camouflaged and non-confrontational, and affects mental health. Alexander Abdennur's observations show people avoiding open discourse, taking segmented positions, and hiding behind organizational structures. After reviewing two universally occurring and challenging developments—complexity and camouflage—Abdennur recommends a cognitive approach for the management of workplace...

The Butler's Child

Lewis M. Steel
Lewis M. Steel, born a Warner Brothers' grandson, inherited a life of privilege, access, and opportunity. With every option available, he chose a life of purpose, spending more than fifty years as a no-holds-barred civil rights lawyer whose victories set legal precedents still relevant today. In The Butler's Child, Steel explores the important role race played in his upbringing, anchored by his relationship with the family's African American butler, and why...

Patriots in Exile

James Waring McCrady
In the months following the May 1780 capture of Charleston, South Carolina, by combined British and loyalist forces, British soldiers arrested sixty-three paroled American prisoners and transported them to the borderland town of St. Augustine, East Florida—territory under British control since the French and Indian War. In Patriots in Exile, James Waring McCrady and C. L. Bragg chronicle the banishment of these elite southerners, the...

A White Lie

Madeeha Hafez Albatta
Palestinian refugees in Gaza have lived in camps for five generations, experiencing hardship and uncertainty. In the absence of voice or official histories, oral narratives handed down from generation to generation bear witness to life in Gaza since Nakba—the catastrophe of dispossession. These histories maintain traditions, keep names of destroyed villages alive, and record stories of fighting for dignity and freedom. The Women's Voices from Gaza series honours women's unique and underrepresented perspectives on the...

A World Free from Nuclear Weapons

Drew Christiansen
On November 10, 2017, Pope Francis became the first pontiff in the nuclear era to take a complete stand against nuclear weapons, even as a form of deterrence. At a Vatican conference of leaders in the field of disarmament, he made it clear that the possession of the bomb itself was immoral. A World Free from Nuclear Weapons presents the pope's address and original testimony from Nobel Peace Prize laureates, religious leaders, diplomats, and civil society...

Geospatial Intelligence

Robert M. Clark
A riveting introduction to the complex and evolving field of geospatial intelligence. Although geospatial intelligence is a term of recent origin, its underpinnings have a long and interesting history. Geospatial Intelligence: Origins and Evolution shows how the current age of geospatial knowledge evolved from its ancient origins to become ubiquitous in daily life across the globe. Within that framework, the book weaves a tapestry of stories about the people, events, ideas, and...

Soccer Diplomacy

Heather L. Dichter
Although the game of soccer is known by many names around the world—football, fútbol, Fußball, voetbal—the sport is a universal language. Throughout the past century, governments have used soccer to further their diplomatic aims through a range of actions including boycotts, carefully orchestrated displays at matches, and more. In turn, soccer organizations have leveraged their power over membership and tournament decisions to play a role in international...

Avala Is Falling

Biljana Jovanovic
In Avala Is Falling, Jovanović's breakout success in 1978, a young woman challenges the expectations that teachers, parents, bus drivers and doctors have for her. The "Avala" of the title refers to a mountain south of Belgrade which is home to some of Serbia's most important nationalist monuments and shrines; it is also the site of the main mental hospital for the region, and its "falling" is the unexpected fulfillment of a prophecy from a traditional Serbian folk song. Jovanović's use of stream of consciousness in...

Natural Law Ethics in Theory and Practice

Joseph Boyle
Natural Law Ethics in Theory and Practice brings together a selection of essays of the late Joseph Boyle. Boyle was, with Germain Grisez and John Finnis, a founder and developer of the New Classical Natural Law Theory, arguably the most important development in Catholic moral philosophy of the twentieth century. While this theory is indebted to the work of St. Thomas Aquinas, it incorporates an understanding and assessment of that work that is different from that...

The One Creator God in Thomas Aquinas and Contemporary Theology

Michael J. Dodds
This book provides a fundamental introduction to Aquinas's theology of the One Creator God. Aimed at making that thought accessible to contemporary audiences, it gives a basic explanation of his theology while showing its compatibility with contemporary science and its relevance to current theological issues. Opening with a brief account of Aquinas's life, it then describes the purpose and nature of the Summa Theologica and gives a short review of current...

Blossoms In Snow

Joshua Parker
Thirty-five authors, through seventy-nine poems and short prose pieces, tell the story of the twentieth century's greatest refugee crisis. An English translation brings their work to English-speaking readers for the first time, side by side with the original German. The poems contextualize past and present responses to issues of asylum, reflect on the state of being stateless, drawing parallels between the United States and Austria, and resonating deeply with our own contemporary...

Understanding David Foster Wallace, revised and expanded edition

Marshall Boswell
Since its publication in 2003, Understanding David Foster Wallace has served as an accessible introduction to the rich array of themes and formal innovations that have made Wallace's fiction so popular and influential. A seminal text in the burgeoning field of David Foster Wallace studies, the original edition of Understanding David Foster Wallace was nevertheless incomplete as it addressed only his first four works of fiction—namely the novels The Broom of the System and Infinite Jest and the...

American Spies

Michael J. Sulick
A history of Americans who spied against their country and what their stories reveal about national security What's your secret? American Spies presents the stunning histories of more than forty Americans who spied against their country during the past six decades. Michael Sulick, former head of the CIA's clandestine service, illustrates through these stories — some familiar, others much less well known — the common threads in the spy cases...

Stage Money, revised and updated edition

Tim Donahue
For decades roughly 80 percent of commercial Broadway productions have failed to recoup their original investments. In light of this shocking and harsh reality, how does the show go on? Tim Donahue and Jim Patterson answer this question and many others in this updated edition of their popular, straightforward guide to understanding professional theater finances and the economic realities of theater production. This revised edition of Stage Money not only includes the latest...

Laws of the Constitution

Donald F. Bur
Laws of the Constitution: Consolidated gathers all of the historical and contemporary constitutional documents pertaining to Canada, its provinces, and its territories, organized thematically and topically for ease of reference and supported by comprehensive lists and a thorough index. The volume excludes overridden and irrelevant documents, making it a comprehensive yet focused and precise reference that presents the words, ideas, and documents that have brought the constitution into being. A...

Labor in State Socialist Europe, 1945-1989

Marsha Siefert
Labor regimes under communism in East-Central Europe were complex, shifting and ambiguous. This collection of sixteen essays offers new conceptual and empirical ways to understand their history from the end of the Second World War to 1989, challenging accepted notions of East European "transitions" and "transformations." The authors reconsider the history of state socialism by reexamining the policies and problems of communist regimes and...

Lviv – Wrocław, Cities in Parallel?

Jan Fellerer
In the 20th century, both Lviv and Wrocław went through cataclysmic changes. Assertively Polish pre-war Lwów became Soviet Lvov, and then, after 1991, it became assertively Ukrainian Lviv. Breslau, the third largest city in Germany before 1945, was in turn 'recovered' by communist Poland as Wroclaw. Practically the entire population of Breslau was replaced, and Lwów's demography too was dramatically restructured: many Polish inhabitants migrated to...

Stalin's Italian Prisoners of War

Maria Teresa Giusti
This book reconstructs the fate of Italian prisoners of war captured by the Red Army between August 1941 and the winter of 1942-43. On 230.000 Italians left on the Eastern front almost 100.000 did not come back home. Testimonies and memoirs from surviving veterans complement the author's intensive work in Russian and Italian archives. The study examines Italian war crimes against the Soviet civilian population and describes the particularly grim fate of the thousands of Italian military...

Multicultural Cities of the Habsburg Empire, 1880–1914

Catherine Horel
This book offers a comparative analysis of the societal, ethnic, and cultural diversity of twelve cities in the last decades of the Habsburg Monarchy. The following cities are discussed (by their current names): Arad, Bratislava, Brno, Chernivtsi, Lviv, Oradea, Rijeka, Sarajevo, Subotica, Timioara, Trieste, and Zagreb. This selection aims to counter the disproportionate attention that the largest cities in the empire...

Rhetoric of the Chinese Cultural Revolution

Xing Lu
Now known to the Chinese as the "ten years of chaos," the Chinese Cultural Revolution (1966–76) brought death to thousands of Chinese and persecution to millions. In Rhetoric of the Chinese Cultural Revolution Xing Lu identifies the rhetorical practices and persuasive effects of the polarizing political language and symbolic practices used by Communist Party leaders to legitimize their use of power and violence to dehumanize...

Fundamental Rights and Conflict among Rights

Mary Ann Glendon
How far have we come putting into practice what was declared in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which this year marks its 70th anniversary? How can the Church respond today to the new challenges threatening these rights, whether relativism, fundamentalism, and persecution or new types of poverty and oppression? And with whom can the Church engage on these issues? With states, religious leaders, international institutions, cultural institutions, or first and foremost...

A Guide to Formation Advising for Seminarians

Edward McCormack
The future of the Church depends, in part, on forming future priests and ministers who are ready to accompany, lead, and love the People of God. Formation advising is one important part of that work. A Guide to Formation Advising for Seminarians/Seminary Faculty offers a practical guide to formation advising as a ministry of accompaniment, participation, and evaluation. Deacon Edward McCormack offers a comprehensive introduction to the ministry of formation advising for seminarians...

The Nazi Spy Ring in America

Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones
The first full account of Nazi spies in 1930s America and how they were exposed. In the mid-1930s just as the United States was embarking on a policy of neutrality, Nazi Germany launched a program of espionage against the unwary nation. The Nazi Spy Ring in America tells the story of Hitler's attempts to interfere in American affairs by spreading anti-Semitic propaganda, stealing military technology, and mapping US defenses. This...

The Doctor to the Dead

John H. Bennett, Jr.
"You ask for a story. I will tell you one, fact for fact and true for true." So begins "Crook-Neck Dick," one of twenty-three stories in this beguiling collection of Charleston lore. John Bennett's interpretations of the legends shared with him by African-descended Charlestonians have entertained generations. Among them are tales of ghosts, conjuring, superhuman feats, and supernatural powers; accounts of ingenuity, humor, terror, mystery, and solidarity...

Writing War and Reunion

Jeffery J. Rogers
William Gilmore Simms (1806–1870) was a novelist, poet, and essayist and was considered the South's premier literary figure at the height of his popularity. No less an authority than Edgar Allen Poe remarked of Simms that "he has surpassed, we think, any of his countrymen" as a novelist. Simms's literary achievements include more than twenty major novels, several volumes of poetry, and biographies of important...

The Horses Pulled Me Back To Them

Aubrey Dawne Edwards
An exploration of living and working at Fair Grounds Race Course in New Orleans comprising photography, interviews, and personal correspondence of jockeys, horse groomers, trainers, and other key backside players.

I Feel To Believe

Jarvis DeBerry
For twenty years, starting in 1999, Jarvis DeBerry's New Orleans Times-Picayune column was the place where the city got its most honest look at itself: the good, the bad, the wonderful, and yes, also the weird. And the city took note. DeBerry's columns inspired letters to the editor, water cooler conversations, city council considerations, and barbershop pontification. I Feel To Believe collects his best columns, documenting two decades of constancy and upheaval, loss, racial injustice, and class...

Myths in Austrian History (Contemporary Austrian Studies, vol. 29)

Günter Bischof
Austria's post-WWII 'victim-myth' both shaped the country post-war history and, since its deconstruction in the aftermath of the Waldheim affair, is now a central trope in the scholarly literature. This volume aims at extending the discussion of different myths throughout Austria's 20th century-history and some of their continuing impact on the present. We consider 'myths' to be socially, culturally and politically...

Conjure

Rae Armantrout
Rae Armantrout has always taken pleasure in uncertainties and conundrums, the tricky nuances of language and feeling. In Conjure that pleasure is matched by dread; fascination meets fear as the poet considers the emergence of new life (twin granddaughters) into an increasingly toxic world: the Amazon smolders, children are caged or die crossing rivers and oceans, and weddings make convenient targets for drone strikes. These poems explore the restless border between self and non-self and ask us to look with new eyes at what we're...

Xicancuicatl

Alfred Arteaga
Xicancuicatl collects the poetry of leading avant-garde Chicanx poet Alfred Arteaga (1950–2008), whom French philosopher Gilles Deleuze regarded as "among those rare poets who are able to raise or shape a new language within their language." In his five published collections, Arteaga made crucial breakthroughs in the language of poetry, basing his linguistic experiments on the multilingual Xicanx culture of the US Southwest. His formal resources and finely tuned ear for sound patterns and language play...

I Am New Orleans

Kalamu ya Salaam
NOLA Is A myth. A reality. A port. A place.  An opening. A dead end. A womb. A grave. Audubon Zoo and Monkey Hill uptown. Mardi Gras Fountain with the colored lights downtown.   Above ground crypts at St. Louis Cemeteries 1, 2, and 3. Football fields. Parade grounds. Picnic areas. Citywide. Lake front. River front.  Fishing hole. Bayou swamp.  Raw oysters. Fried chicken.  Front-liners. Second-liners.  Storefront churches. A sacred cathedral. Superdome. Shotgun...

Georgetown Journal of International Affairs

Aaron Baum
Climate — Change is Inevitable is the theme of the twenty-first edition of the Georgetown Journal of International Affairs. This issue confronts one of humanity's most consequential challenges head-on in pursuit of a better world. With insights from practitioners, experts, and academics from around the globe, this edition provides a full and robust picture of the intersecting impacts of climate change — from business to security to culture and beyond. The Georgetown...

A Georgetown Life

Grant Quertermous
An invaluable primary resource for understanding nineteenth-century America. As a Georgetown resident for nearly a century, Britannia Wellington Peter Kennon (1815 — 1911) was close to the key political events of her time. Born into the prominent Peter family, Kennon came into contact with the many notable historical figures of the day who often visited Tudor Place, her home for over ninety years. Now published for the first time, the...

Now It's Dark

Peter Gizzi
The poems in this brilliant follow-up to the National Book Award finalist Archeophonics, are concerned with grieving, with poetry and death, with beauty and sadness, with light. As Ben Lerner has written, "Gizzi's poetry is an example of how a poet's total tonal attention can disclose new orders of sensation and meaning. His beautiful lines are full of deft archival allusion." With litany, elegy, and prose, Gizzi continues his pursuit toward a lyric of reality. Saturated with luminous detail, these original poems possess,...

The Fullness of Free Time

Conor M. Kelly
An ethical framework and vision of free time for social good — and how to achieve it. In the work-centric culture of today's world, it is easy to view free time as indulging laziness or extravagance.Conor M. Kelly, however, argues that free time possesses enormous potential for good if exercised in accordance with theological ethics. By examining pursuits such as television, digital media use, sports, and travel from the perspective of...

Cosmic Deputy

Kalamu ya Salaam
Cosmic Deputy is a literary memoir from esteemed activist, educator, producer, and poet Kalamu ya Salaam. Representative poems from Salaam's fifty years of writing are interspersed in an overarching essay tracing the poet's multitude of influences. Toward mapping a theory of a Black literary aesthetic, Salaam explores the cultural inheritances of Black resistance movements, blues music, and the ways in which these sources and others have shaped not only his own work but Black letters more...

America's Entangling Alliances

Jason W. Davidson
A challenge to long-held assumptions about the costs and benefits of America's allies. Since the Revolutionary War, the United States has entered into dozens of alliances with international powers to protect its assets and advance its security interests. America's Entangling Alliances offers a corrective to long-held assumptions about US foreign policy and is relevant to current public and academic debates about the costs and benefits of America's allies. Author Jason W.

Tecumseh's War

Donald R. Hickey
A history of the last great Native American war in North America. At the dawn of the nineteenth century, Native American dominance of the Northwest Territory was threatened by a series of treaties designed to open the land to US settlement. In response, a coalition of tribes launched what would come to be known as Tecumseh's War, named after the charismatic Shawnee war chief who was the guiding force behind the Native confederacy. Often treated today as an adjunct to...

Radical Sufficiency

Christine Firer Hinze
Rethinking the means through which we can achieve economic well-being for all. In this timely book, Christine Firer Hinze looks back at the influential teachings of priest-economist Monsignor John A. Ryan (1869-1945), who supported worker justice and defended a living wage for all Americans in the first half of the twentieth century. Advancing Ryan's efforts to articulate a persuasive plan for social reform, Hinze advocates for an action-oriented...

A World of Inequalities

Lucinda Mosher
An important interfaith dialogue examines causes of global inequality and explores solutions. In A World of Inequalities: Christian and Muslim Perspectives, fourteen leading Christian and Muslim scholars respond to the global crisis of inequality by demanding and modeling interreligious dialogue. This volume takes an intersectional approach, examining aspects of global inequality including gender, race and ethnicity, caste and social class, economic and sociopolitical...

The Art of Teaching Russian

Evgeny Dengub
A comprehensive guide to Russian-language instruction combining the latest research, pedagogy, and practice. The Art of Teaching Russian offers practitioners current research, pedagogical thinking, and specific methodologies for teaching the Russian language and culture in the twenty-first century. With contributions from the leading professionals in the field, this collection covers the most important aspects of teaching the Russian language. The book begins with an overview of the past and current trends...

Our Whole Gwich'in Way of Life Has Changed / Gwich'in K'yuu Gwiidandi' Tthak Ejuk Gonlih

Leslie McCartney
A project originally conceived to document the biographies of Elders by the Gwich'in Social and Cultural Institute, Our Whole Gwich'in Way of Life Has Changed / Gwich'in K'yuu Gwiidandi' Tthak Ejuk Gonlih is an invaluable compilation of historical and cultural information. The stories of twenty-three Gwich'in Elders from the Northwest Territories communities of Fort McPherson,...

Shakespeare's King Lear

edited by Richard Knowles
Inaugurated in the 1860s, and the standard reference edition of Shakespeare's work, each volume of the New Variorum Shakespeare presents complete textual and critical histories of each line of the play, along with extensive essays on criticism, sources, stage history, and more. The New Variorum Editions are valuable resources for an international audience of scholars, students, directors, actors, and general readers. Overseen by three general editors and an...