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Next Time There's a Pandemic

Vivek Shraya, afterword by J.R. Carpenter
"During my first post-lockdown massage we had the requisite chit chat about our lockdown experiences. He gushed: 'Oh man. It was so great. Every day I woke up, drank coffee, read, rode my bike' This did sound pretty great. But it was nothing like my own, anxiety-ridden ordeal. Had I done the lockdown wrong?" In Next Time There's a Pandemic, artist Vivek Shraya reflects on how she might have approached 2020 and the COVID-19 pandemic differently, and how challenging and...

COPD

Donald A. Mahler, MD
A leading expert answers your questions about how to live to your fullest with COPD. Significant lung damage from smoking, exposure in some jobs, or even diseases such as AIDS and tuberculosis can lead to COPD. Having chronic obstructive pulmonary disease can leave you feeling short of breath, sometimes reluctant to go shopping or for a walk because you are afraid of more difficulties. You may have wheezing, tightness in the chest, or...

Asked What Has Changed

Ed Roberson
Black ecopoet observes the changing world from a high-rise window Award-winning poet Ed Roberson confronts the realities of an era in which the fate of humanity and the very survival of our planet are uncertain. Departing from the traditional nature poem, Roberson's work reclaims a much older tradition, drawing into poetry's orbit what the physical and human sciences reveal about the state of a changing world. These poems test how far the lyric can go as an answer to our crisis, even calling into question poetic...

My Quest for Health Equity

David Satcher, MD, PhD
Reading this book is like sitting down with Dr. David Satcher to hear stories of leadership and lessons learned from his lifetime commitment to health equity. Dr. David Satcher is one of the most widely known and well-regarded physicians of our time. A former four-star admiral in the US Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, he served as the assistant secretary for health, the surgeon general of the United States, and the director of the Centers for Disease...

Washington's Iron Butterfly

Donald Ritchie, Donald A. Ritchie, Terry L. Birdwhistell, Terry Birdwhistell, foreword by Richard N. Smith, Richard Norton Smith
Had Elizabeth "Bess" Clements Abell (1933–2020) been a boy, she would likely have become a politician like her father, Earle C. Clements. Effectively barred from office because of her gender, she forged her own path by helping family friends Lyndon and Lady Bird Johnson. Abell's Secret Service code name, "Iron Butterfly," exemplified her graceful but...

Sinkhole

Davida Breier
Boiled peanuts, lovebugs, and murder. Lies from the past and a dangerous present collide when, after fifteen years in exile, Michelle Miller returns to her tiny hometown of Lorida, Florida. With her mother in the hospital, she's forced to reckon with the broken relationships she left behind: with her family, with friends, and with herself. As a teenager, Michelle felt isolated and invisible until she met Sissy, a dynamic and wealthy classmate. Their sudden, intense friendship was all-consuming. Punk rocker Morrison later joins...

Never Say Die

James C. Nicholson, foreword by Pete Best
A quarter of a million people braved miserable conditions at Epsom Downs on June 2, 1954, to see the 175th running of the prestigious Derby Stakes. Queen Elizabeth II and Sir Winston Churchill were in attendance, along with thousands of Britons who were all convinced of the unfailing superiority of English bloodstock and eager to see a British colt take the victory. They were shocked when a Kentucky-born...

Brookgreen Gardens

Brookgreen Gardens, introduction by Page Hayhurst Kiniry, foreword by Dick Rosen, with contributions by Robin R. Salmon
An oasis of art and nature, Brookgreen Gardens is America's first public sculpture garden and largest collection of American figurative sculpture. Founded in 1931 by Archer Milton Huntington and Anna Hyatt Huntington, its lush South Carolina coastal location, between Myrtle Beach to the north and Charleston to the south, is an exquisite setting for the more than two thousand works...

Catholic Labor Movements in Europe

Paul Misner
Catholic Labor Movements in Europe narrates the history of industrial labor movements of Catholic inspiration in the period from the onset of World War I to the reconstruction after World War II. The stated goal of concerned Catholics in the 1920s and 1930s was to "rechristianize society." But dominant labor movements in many countries during this period consisted of socialist elements that viewed religion as an obstacle to social progress. It was a daunting...

This is Home Now

Arwen Donahue, photographs by Rebecca Gayle Howell, foreword by Joan Ringelheim, preface by Douglas A. Boyd, James C. Klotter, Terry Birdwhistell, Terry L. Birdwhistell
At the end of World War II, many thousands of Jewish Holocaust survivors immigrated to the United States from Europe in search of a new beginning. Most settled in major metropolitan areas, usually in predominantly Jewish communities, where proximity to coreligionists offered a measure of cultural and social support. However,...

Ancestors

Sarah Carter, Inez Lightning
This exhibition catalogue introduces historic photographs of Indigenous peoples of Western Canada from a collection housed at the University of Alberta's Bruce Peel Special Collections. The publication focuses on the ancestors represented in the collection and how their images continue to generate stories and meanings in the present. The selected photographs contribute to a richer, deeper understanding of the past. There is strength, character,...

Mumbai Taximen

Tarini Bedi, series edited by Padma Kaimal, K. Sivaramakrishnan, Anand A. Yang
In this first book-length study of Mumbai's taxi industry and of the livelihoods that surround it, Tarini Bedi draws from the lives and voices of chillia taxi drivers who have sustained a hereditary trade for more than a century. Bedi considers the Bombay taxi in all its forms: a material object that is driven, an economic and political connection, an expression of kinship, an embodiment of urban time and...

The Guide to James Joyce's Ulysses

Patrick Hastings
From the creator of UlyssesGuide.com, this essential guide to James Joyce's masterpiece weaves together plot summaries, interpretive analyses, scholarly perspectives, and historical and biographical context to create an easy-to-read, entertaining, and thorough review of Ulysses. In The Guide to James Joyce's 'Ulysses,' Patrick Hastings provides comprehensive support to readers of Joyce's magnum opus by illuminating crucial details and reveling in the mischievous genius of this unparalleled...

Garden of Eloquence / Shuoyuan

Liu Xiang, translated by Eric Henry, introduction by Eric Henry
In 17 BCE the Han dynasty archivist Liu Xiang presented to the throne a collection of some seven hundred items of varying length, mostly quasi-historical anecdotes and narratives, that he deemed essential reading for wise leadership. Garden of Eloquence (Shuoyuan), divided into twenty books grouped by theme, follows a tradition of narrative writing on historical and philosophical themes that began seven centuries earlier. Long popular in China as a...

Fugitive Movements

edited by James O'Neil Spady
In 1822, White authorities in Charleston, South Carolina, learned of plans among the city's enslaved and free Black population to lead an armed antislavery rebellion. Among the leaders was a free Black carpenter named Denmark Vesey. After a brief investigation and what some have considered a dubious trial, Vesey and thirty-five others were convicted of attempted insurrection and hanged. Although the...

Victim of History

Margit Balogh
"Victim of history," "a martyr from behind the Iron Curtain," "the Hungarian Gandhi" – these are just some of the epithets which people used to describe Cardinal Mindszenty, archbishop of Esztergom, who was the last Hungarian prelate to use the title of prince primate. Today, Mindszenty has been forgotten in most countries except for Hungary, but when he died in 1975, he was known all over the world as a symbol of the struggle of the Catholic Church against communism. Cardinal...

Staged Otherness

edited by Dagnosław Demski, Dominika Czarnecka
The cultural phenomenon of exhibiting non-European people in front of the European audiences in the 19th and 20th century was concentrated in the metropolises in the western part of the continent. Nevertheless, traveling ethnic troupes and temporary exhibitions of non-European humans took place also in territories located to the east of the Oder river and Austria. The contributors to this edited volume present practices of...

The Right to Be Rural

edited by Karen R. Foster, Jennifer Jarman, with contributions by Ray Bollman, Clement Chipenda, Innocent Chirisa, Logan Cochrane, Pallavi Das, Laura Domingo-Peñafiel, Laura Farré-Riera, Jens Kaae Fisker, Lesley Frank, Greg Hadley, Stacey Haugen, Kathleen Kevany, Eshetayehu Kinfu, Al Lauzon, Katie MacLeod, Jeofrey Matai, Ilona Matysiak, Kayla McCarney, Rachel McLay, Egon Noe, Howard Ramos, Katja Rinne-Koski, Sulevi Riukulehto, Sarah Rudrum, Ario Seto, Nuria Simo-Gil, M.A. (Peggy) Smith, Sara Tei...
In this collection, researchers...

Seat of Wisdom

James M. Jacobs
The Catholic Church has always recognized that philosophy is necessary both to understand the faith as well as to defend it. The need for a philosophically informed faith has become more acute with the rise of secularism. Seat of Wisdom demonstrates that the philosophical principles developed in the Catholic tradition, especially as articulated in Thomism, provide the intellectual foundation for belief in God and are also the only reliable basis for a fully...

Dancing Transnational Feminisms

edited by Ananya Chatterjea, Hui Niu Wilcox, Alessandra Lebea Williams, foreword by D. Soyini Madison, series edited by Piya Chatterjee
Through empowered movement that centers the lives, stories, and dreams of marginalized women, Ananya Dance Theatre has revealed how the practice of and commitment to artistic excellence can catalyze social justice. With each performance, this professional dance company of Black, Brown, and Indigenous gender non-conforming...

Pictures, Quotations, and Distinctions

Robert Sokolowski
One of the major contributions of Husserl's phenomenology has been to show that things present themselves to us in strikingly different ways. There are various kinds of presentations and something like logical structures in them that allow the truth of things to appear. Being pictured is different from being named, and also different from being distinguished from something else. The fourteen essays in this volume provide concrete and colorful examples...

The Falling Snow and other Stories

José Maria Eça de Queirós, translated by Robert Fedorchek
The great nineteenth-century Portuguese author José Maria Eça de Queirós (1845-1900) has long been known for his novels, especially The Crime of Father Amaro (1880) and The Maias (1888). However, he also wrote short stories, and a number of them, having stood the test of time, are now regarded as masterpieces. Although there is no question that Eça owes the lion's share of his reputation to his long fiction, the tales in this collection tell us that we are...

Public Policy Writing That Matters, second edition

David Chrisinger
foreword by Katherine Baicker
A thoroughly updated and expanded guide to honing your public policy writing skills—and making a significant impact on the world. Professionals across a variety of disciplines need to write about public policy in a manner that inspires action and genuine change. You may have amazing ideas about how to improve the world, but if you aren't able to communicate these ideas well, they simply won't become a reality. In Public Policy Writing That Matters,...

Olde Clerkis Speche

William A. Quinn
Olde Clerkis Speche affirms both the historical legitimacy and the interpretive benefits of reading Troilus and Criseyde as if the text were initially composed for Chaucer's own recital before a familiar audience. Proposing a qualification rather than contradiction of the "persona" as a reading premise, Quinn revitalizes the interpretive context of Chaucer's original performance milieu. The central five chapters offer a "close...

Marks of Distinction

Irven M. Resnick
For medieval Latin Christendom, authoritative texts such as the Bible and the writings of the Fathers of the Church provided a skeleton that gave form to Christian perceptions of Jews and Judaism. Eye-witness testimony, hearsay, reports of converts from Judaism, and the testimony of dreams, visions, and miraculous events helped fill in the body with concrete detail. In this newest work, renowned author and scholar Irven Resnick explores the additional...

Because I Have To

Jewher Ilham, edited by Adam Braver
When Jewher Ilham's father, Ilham Tohti, an internationally known advocate for peaceful dialogue between his Uyghur people and Han Chinese, was detained at the Beijing airport in February 2013 on charges of "separatism," and later sentenced to life in prison, Jewher was forced to begin a new life apart from her family in a new country. There, she found her voice as an advocate for her father, and for Uyghur people being forced into concentration camps...

Ryan's Daughter

Paul Benedict Rowan
The making of David Lean's Ryan's Daughter in Dingle, Ireland, between 1968 and 1970, is shrouded in myth and sensational stories. Robert Mitchum and the glamour and mischief of 1960s Hollywood, the Irish climate, the studio system, and one of film's greatest auteurs all converged to make a troubled and fabled production in an unsuspecting town in County Kerry. Fifty years on, Paul Benedict Rowan has written the definitive account of one of the great movie follies and its unique place...

The Psychology of Character

Rudolf Allers, foreword by Jude P. Dougherty, translated by Eric Benjamin Strauss
"How we became what we are. There are many explanations. One plausible account is found in the work of Rudolph Allers who writes about the European intellectual landscape from 1850 to the opening decades of the twentieth century...Allers is not alone in recognizing that a true account of human nature may await the recovery of classical antiquity. From Plato and Aristotle, modernity may learn that the immaterial or spiritual component of human...

Contemporary Indigenous Cosmologies and Pragmatics

edited by Françoise Dussart, Sylvie Poirier, with contributions by Anne-Marie Colpron, Robert R. Crépeau, Ingrid Hall, Laurent Jérôme, Frédéric Laugrand, James MacKenzie, Caroline Nepton Hotte, Ksenia Pimenova, Kathryn Rountree, Antonella Tassinari, Petronella Vaarzon-Morel
In this timely collection, the authors examine Indigenous peoples' negotiations with different cosmologies in a globalized world. Dussart and Poirier outline a sophisticated theory of change that accounts for the...

Manual de Doctrina Social de la Iglesia

edited by Martin Schlag, foreword by Peter K.A. Turkson
Los cristianos a lo largo de los siglos han buscado poner en práctica el mandamiento de Cristo de amar al prójimo, y con el paso del tiempo, la Iglesia ha formulado una enseñanza social para ayudar en esta tarea. Este manual es un resumen accesible del Compendio de la Doctrina Social de la Iglesia publicado por el Vaticano en 2004, en forma de cuestión y respuesta. Sigue la estructura y los...

The Orphans of Byzantium

Timothy Miller
Among the controversial issues in America today is the debate over how best to care for abandoned and neglected children. Largely absent from the debate, however, is any discussion of past practices. In this book, historian Timothy Miller argues that it is necessary to look at the history of orphanages, of their successes and failures, and of their complex roles as social institutions for unwanted and homeless children. In The Orphans of Byzantium, Miller provides a...

Thriving with Kidney Disease, second edition

Walter A. Hunt, foreword by Ronald D. Perrone, MD
Kidney disease occurs when your kidneys are damaged and no longer function as well as they should. In the past, it was fatal, but thanks to new treatments, including dialysis and transplantation, people can live long and healthy lives. This book provides everything you need to know to help you cope with your kidney disease and maximize your health. Walter A. Hunt, a medical researcher who had kidney...

Adivasi Art and Activism

Alice Tilche, series edited by Padma Kaimal, K. Sivaramakrishnan, Anand A. Yang
As India consolidates an aggressive model of economic development, indigenous tribal people known as adivasis continue to be overrepresented among the country's poor. Adivasis make up more than eight hundred communities in India, with a total population of more than 100 million people who speak more than three hundred different languages. Although their historical presence is acknowledged by the state and they...

Coach Hall

Joe B. Hall, with Marianne Walker, foreword by Rick Bozich
Until I was nine or ten, everyone called me Joe or Joe Hall. Then one day my grandmother, for reasons known only to her, pulled me aside and told me my name was "too short and too plain." She said, "Let's add your middle initial to make it more interesting. From now on, you say your name is Joe B., not just Joe. It's Joe B. Hall." Joe B. Hall is one of only three men to both play on an NCAA championship team (1949, Kentucky) and coach an NCAA...

Integrated

James W. Miller
In Integrated: The Lincoln Institute, Basketball, and a Vanished Tradition, James W. Miller explores an often ignored aspect of America's struggle for racial equality. He relates the story of the Lincoln Institute—an all-black high school in Shelby County, Kentucky, where students prospered both in the classroom and on the court. In 1960, the Lincoln Tigers men's basketball team defeated three all-white schools to win the regional tournament and advance to one...

Empowering Communities

Lacy K. Ford, Jared Bailey, foreword by James E. Clyburn
Early in the twentieth century, for-profit companies such as Duke Power and South Carolina Electric and Gas brought electricity to populous cities and towns across South Carolina, while rural areas remained in the dark. It was not until the advent of publicly owned electric cooperatives in the 1930s that the South Carolina countryside was gradually introduced to the conveniences of life with electricity.

Giambatista Viko; or, The Rape of African Discourse

Georges Ngal, edited by David Damrosch, translated by David Damrosch
Georges Ngal's pathbreaking satire Giambatista Viko explores the vexed relations between metropolitan centers and peripheral former colonies through its titular antihero, an African professor at an African studies institute divided between European-focused cosmopolitans and Africanists. Struggling to write the great African novel and subject to abuse, Viko realizes he can no longer separate the African and the European...

Teaching World Languages for Specific Purposes

Diana M. Ruggiero
Learner-centered practical strategies, models, and resources for the development of world languages for specific purposes curricula The world today is changing, and college-level language departments are rethinking and revamping their vision and curricular offerings as a result. The field of world languages for specific purposes (WLSP) presents a solution to these challenges, helping students develop language skills and intercultural competencies as they...

Giambatista Viko; ou, Le viol du discours africain

Georges Ngal, edited by David Damrosch
Georges Ngal's pathbreaking satire Giambatista Viko explores the vexed relations between metropolitan centers and peripheral former colonies through its titular antihero, an African professor at an African studies institute divided between European-focused cosmopolitans and Africanists. Struggling to write the great African novel and subject to abuse, Viko realizes he can no longer separate the African and the European parts of his multilayered,...

Tales of a Minstrel of Reims in the Thirteenth Century

translated by Samuel N. Rosenberg, introduction by William C. Jordan, William Chester Jordan, annotations by Randall T. Pippenger
An anonymous minstrel in thirteenth-century France composed this gripping account of historical events in his time. Crusaders and Muslim forces battle for control of the Holy Land, while power struggles rage between and among religious authorities and their conflicting secular counterparts, pope and German emperor, the kings of England and the kings of...

The War in Ukraine's Donbas

edited by David R. Marples
This collective work analyzes the ongoing conflict in Ukraine, providing a coherent picture of Ukraine and Eastern Europe in the period 2013–2020. Giving voice to different social groups, scholarly communities and agencies relevant to Ukraine's recent history, The War in Ukraine's Donbas goes beyond simplistic media interpretations that limit the analysis to Vladimir Putin and Russian aims to annex Ukraine. Instead, the authors identify the deeper roots linked...

Lieutenant Sonia Vagliano

Sonia Vagliano Eloy, translated by Martha Noel Evans
Following the German occupation of France in 1940, French women moved deftly into the jobs and roles left by their male compatriots—even the role of soldier. In Lieutenant Sonia Vagliano: A Memoir of the World War II Refugee Crisis, Vagliano provides a gripping and compelling account of how her team of young French women was attached to a US First Army unit that arrived in Normandy two weeks after D-Day. From 1943 to 1945,...

Nothing Special

Dianne Bilyak
A memoir about disability and siblinghood that is candid and comical Nothing Special is a disarmingly candid tale of two sisters growing up in the 1970s in rural Connecticut. Older sister Chris, who has Down syndrome, is an extrovert with a knack for getting what she wants, while the author, her younger, typically developing sister shoulders the burdens and grief of her parents, especially their father's alcoholism. In Nothing Special Bilyak details wrestling...

The Age of Phillis

Honorée Fanonne Jeffers
Poems imagine the life and times of Phillis Wheatley NAACP Image Award Winner for Outstanding Literary Work for Poetry 2020 National Book Award for Poetry, Longlist 2020 LA Times Book Award Finalist In 1773, a young, African American woman named Phillis Wheatley published a book of poetry that challenged Western prejudices about African and female intellectual capabilities. Based on fifteen years of archival research, The Age of Phillis, by award-winning writer Honorée Fanonne Jeffers, imagines the life and...

The Neverending Quest for the Other Shore

Sylvie Kandé
In Kandé's epic poem, African history collides with the contemporary reality of migration Sylvie Kandé's neo-epic in three cantos is a double narrative combining today's tales of African migration to Europe on the one hand, with the legend of Abubakar II on the other: Abubakar, emperor of 14th-Century Mali, sailed West toward the new world, never to return. Kandé's language deftly weaves a dialogue between these two narratives and between the epic traditions of the...

Finalists

Rae Armantrout
A double book by Pulitzer Prize winning poet Rae Armantrout What will we call the last generation before the looming end times? With Finalists Rae Armantrout suggests one option. Brilliant and irascible, playful and intense, Armantrout nails the current moment's debris fields and super computers, its sizzling malaise and confusion, with an exemplary immensity of heart and a boundless capacity for humor. The poems in this book find (and create) beauty in midst of the ongoing crisis. CONTRAST What's to like if not...

The Writing of an Hour

Brenda Coultas
Language as a means to transcend the quotidian and to explore the senses What actually happens within the revolution of the clock's hands? In The Writing of an Hour the poet considers the effort and the deliberateness that brings her to her desk each day. Despite domestic and day job demands and pandemic lockdown, Coultas forges connections to the sublime and wonders what it means to be from the Americas. These poems verge on the surreal, transform the quotidian, and respond anew to the marvelous. The Writing of an...

Quarantine!, updated edition

Howard Markel
This riveting story of the typhus and cholera epidemics that swept through New York City in 1892 has been updated with a new preface that tackles the COVID-19 pandemic. Winner, 2003 Arthur J. Viseltear Prize for Outstanding Book in the History of Public Health, American Public Health Association In Quarantine! Howard Markel traces the course of the typhus and cholera epidemics that swept through New York City in 1892. The story is told from the...

Misreading the Bengal Delta

Camelia Dewan, series edited by K. Sivaramakrishnan, foreword by K. Sivaramakrishnan
Open access edition: DOI 10.6069/9780295749624 Perilously close to sea level and vulnerable to floods, erosion, and cyclones, Bangladesh is one of the top recipients of development aid earmarked for climate change adaptation. Yet, to what extent do adaptation projects address local needs and concerns? Combining environmental history and ethnographic fieldwork...

Approaches to Teaching the Works of Inca Garcilaso de la Vega

edited by Christian Fernández, José Antonio Mazzotti
The author of Comentarios reales and La Florida del Inca, now recognized as key foundational works of Latin American literature and historiography, Inca Garcilaso de la Vega was born in 1539 in Cuzco, the son of a Spanish conquistador and an Incan princess, and later moved to Spain. Recalling the family stories and myths he had heard from his Quechua-speaking relatives during his youth and gathering information from friends...

Pure and True

David R. Stroup, series edited by Stevan Harrell
The Chinese Communist Party points to the Hui—China's largest Muslim ethnic group—as a model ethnic minority and touts its harmonious relations with the group as an example of the party's great success in ethnic politics. The Hui number over ten million, but they lack a common homeland or a distinct language, and have long been partitioned by sect, class, region, and language. Despite these divisions, they still express a...

Marrow

darlene anita scott
"Grape is the sweetest betrayal. There is no removing the stain of it say moms everywhere & even if kids choose it last, they choose it, as loyal to its sugar as any." When authorities converged on the Guyanese settlement of the Peoples Temple Agricultural Project—founded by James "Jim" Jones and popularly known as Jonestown—on November 18, 1978, more than nine hundred members were found dead, the result of murder-suicide. The massacre was the largest mass loss of American lives before September 11, 2001. Although the...

The Secret Perfume of Birds

Danielle J. Whittaker
The untold story of a stunning discovery: not only can birds smell, but their scents may be the secret to understanding their world. The puzzling lack of evidence for the peculiar but widespread belief that birds have no sense of smell irked evolutionary biologist Danielle Whittaker. Exploring the science behind the myth led her on an unexpected quest investigating mysteries from how juncos win a fight to why cowbirds smell like cookies. In The Secret Perfume of...

Louisiana Creole Peoplehood

edited by Rain Prud'homme-Cranford, Darryl Barthé, Andrew J. Jolivétte
Over the course of more than three centuries, the diverse communities of Louisiana have engaged in creative living practices to forge a vibrant, multifaceted, and fully developed Creole culture. Against the backdrop of ongoing anti-Blackness and Indigenous erasure that has sought to undermine this rich culture, Louisiana Creoles have found transformative ways to uphold solidarity, kinship, and continuity, retaking...

The Georgetown Companion to Interreligious Studies

edited by Lucinda Mosher
A comprehensive collection provides guidance and deep insight from a variety of experts in this emerging field The rapidly developing field of interreligious studies fosters scholarship engaging two or more religious traditions at a time. Inherently multidisciplinary, the field brings the academic consideration of religions into conversation with the humanities and social sciences, employing relational, intersectional, experiential, and dialogical methodologies as it...

Ginseng Diggers

Luke Manget
The harvesting of wild American ginseng (panax quinquefolium), the gnarled, aromatic herb known for its therapeutic and healing properties, is deeply established in North America and has played an especially vital role in the southern and central Appalachian Mountains. Traded through a trans-Pacific network that connected the region to East Asian markets, ginseng was but one of several medicinal Appalachian plants that entered international webs of exchange. As the...

Reenvisioning Sexual Ethics

Karen Peterson-Iyer
A profound feminist Christian reframing of sexuality examines contemporary social practices and ethical sex From the sexual abuse crisis in the Roman Catholic Church to the US Supreme Court decision outlawing state-level bans on same-sex marriage, it has become clear that Catholics and other Christians cannot afford to downplay sex or rely on outdated normative understandings of its moral contours. Feminist theological approaches offer a way forward by considering not...

Awake in the River and Shedding Silence

Janice Mirikitani, foreword by Traise Yamamoto, Juliana Chang
Fierce, raw, and unapologetic, Janice Mirikitani's poetry and prose are as vibrant and resonant today as when these two collections were first published in 1978 and 1987. Now back in print in one volume, Awake in the River and Shedding Silence epitomizes Mirikitani's singular voice—one that is brash, sexual, politically outspoken, and unconcerned with pandering to mainstream audiences. An influential artist and activist, Mirikitani has...

On The Trail of the Catahoula

Walter LeBon
Descended from ancient European hounds and used for hunting, herding, and even as a stalker of feral swamp pigs, the history of the Catahoula Leopard Dog has a history that sheds light on the interdependent relationship Louisiana has with its natural environment. Today these energetic and loyal Catahoula is are beloved, serving as the official state dog of Louisiana. This full-color, illustrated reference guide by Walter LeBon synthesizes geography, history, and anthropology to provide a delightful and...

The Blue Ribbon Cook Book

Jennie C. Benedict, introduction by Susan Reigler
Jennie C. Benedict's The Blue Ribbon Cook Book represents the very best in the tradition of southern regional cooking. Recipes for such classic dishes as Parker House rolls, lamb chops, corn pudding, Waldorf salad, and cheese and nut sandwiches are nestled among longtime local favorites such as apple butter, rice pudding, griddle cakes, and Benedictine, the cucumber sandwich spread which bears Benedict's name. Throughout the cookbook, Benedict's delightful voice shines. Once...

Jesuit Higher Education in a Secular Age

Daniel S. Hendrickson
How Jesuit education can help students create meaningful connections in an age of secularism In A Secular Age, the philosopher Charles Taylor challenges us to appreciate the significance of genuine spiritual experience in human life, an occurrence he refers to as "fullness." Western societies, however, are increasingly becoming more secular, and personal occasions of fullness are becoming less possible. In Jesuit...

Our Whole Gwich'in Way of Life Has Changed / Gwich'in K'yuu Gwiidandài' Tthak Ejuk Gòonlih

Leslie McCartney, Gwich'in Tribal Council, foreword by Jordan Peterson, with contributions by Antoine Andre, Caroline Andre, Hyacinthe Andre, Annie Benoit, Pierre Benoit, Sarah Bonnetplume, Marka Bullock, Lydia Alexie Elias, Mary Martha Firth, Sarah Ann Gardlund, Elizabeth Greenland, Violet Therese Jerome, Peter Kay, Mary Rose Kendi, Ruby Anne McLeod, Catherine Martha Mitchell, Eunice Mitchell, Joan Ross Nazon, Annie Moses Norbert, Alfred Semple, Sarah Simon, Ellen Catherine Vittrekwa, Jim Juliu...
...

Everyday Life under Communism and After

Tibor Valuch
By providing a survey of consumption and lifestyle in Hungary during the second half of the twentieth century, this book shows how common people lived during and after tumultuous regime changes. After an introduction covering the late 1930s, the study centers on the communist era, and goes on to describe changes in the post-communist period with its legacy of state socialism. Tibor Valuch poses a series of questions. Who could be called...

Making Sense of Dictatorship

edited by Celia Donert, Ana Kladnik, Martin Sabrow , Martin Sabrow
How did political power function in the communist regimes of Central and Eastern Europe after 1945? Making Sense of Dictatorship addresses this question with a particular focus on the acquiescent behavior of the majority of the population until, at the end of the 1980s, their rejection of state socialism and its authoritarian world. The authors refer to the concept of Sinnwelt, the...

Growing in the Shadow of Antifascism

edited by Kata Bohus, Peter Hallama, Stephan Stach
Reined into the service of the Cold War confrontation, antifascist ideology overshadowed the narrative about the Holocaust in the communist states of Eastern Europe. This led to the Western notion that in the Soviet Bloc there was a systematic suppression of the memory of the mass murder of European Jews in the. Going beyond disputing the mistaken opposition between "communist falsification" of...

Trees and Shrubs of Kentucky

Mary E. Wharton, Roger W. Barbour
Finally in paperback, this authoritative volume provides a comprehensive guide to the 282 species of woody plants found in Kentucky, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Virginia, Tennessee, and eastern Missouri. Illustrated with more than 1,150 photographs, this book shows not only leaves and bark, but also buds, flowers, and fruits to help you recognize trees in any season. Complete with a user-friendly identification guide, this beautiful book will be valuable to...

Kentucky Heirloom Seeds

Bill Best, foreword by A. Gwynn Henderson, with Dobree Adams, afterword by Brook Elliott
Saving seeds to plant for the next year's crop has been key to human survival for millennia. However, the twentieth century witnessed a grand takeover of seed production by multinational companies aiming to select varieties ideal for mechanical harvest, long-distance transportation, and long shelf life. With the rise of the Slow Food and farm-to-table movements in recent years, the farmers and home gardeners who...

Outcomes of University Spanish Heritage Language Instruction in the United States

edited by Melissa A. Bowles, with contributions by Julio Torres, Sara M. Beaudrie, Bonnie C. Holmes, Adrian Bello-Uriarte, Celia Chomón Zamora, Melissa A. Bowles, Sara Fernández Cuenca, Damián Vergara Wilson, Claudia Holguín Mendoza
The first volume to explore the effectiveness of instructional methods for college-level Spanish heritage learners In the United States, heritage language speakers represent approximately 22 percent of the population and...

Byzantium after the Nation

Dimitris Stamatopoulos
Dimitris Stamatopoulos undertakes the first systematic comparison of the dominant ethnic historiographic models and divergences elaborated by Greek, Bulgarian, Serbian, Albanian, Romanian, Turkish, and Russian intellectuals with reference to the ambiguous inheritance of Byzantium. The title alludes to the seminal work of Nicolae Iorga in the 1930s, Byzantium after Byzantium, that argued for the continuity between the Byzantine and the...

Being Here

Manini Nayar
"We are all now writing stories. Sometimes in memory, sometimes in air. The wind lifts and passes us in gusts. Our stories scatter over continents, camouflaged histories we cannot share." In Being Here, Manini Nayar brings together a finely crafted collection of interconnected stories that follow "the daily miracle" of her characters' inner lives. Nayar brings to the forefront immigrant women making their way in the world as mothers, as wives, as outliers, and as rebels. She writes about their insistence on autonomy,...

Pakistan's Pathway to the Bomb

Mansoor Ahmed
A groundbreaking account of Pakistan's rise as a nuclear power draws on elite interviews and primary sources to challenge long-held misconceptions Pakistan's pathway to developing nuclear weapons remains shrouded in mystery and surrounded by misconceptions. While it is no secret why Pakistan became a nuclear power, how Pakistan became a nuclear state has been obscured by mythmaking. In Pakistan's Pathway to the Bomb, Mansoor Ahmed offers a revisionist history of...

Temples in the Cliffside

Sonya S. Lee
At sixty-two meters the Leshan Buddha in southwest China is the world's tallest premodern statue. Carved out of a riverside cliff in the eighth century, it has evolved from a religious center to a UNESCO World Heritage Site and popular tourist destination. But this Buddha does not stand alone: Sichuan is home to many cave temples with such monumental sculptures, part of a centuries-long tradition of art-making intricately tied to how local inhabitants made use of their natural...

The Moneywasting Machine

Dušan Pavlović
For five months in 2013–2014 Dušan Pavlović took time off from teaching to accept a senior position in Serbia's Ministry of Economy. This short period was long enough for him to make a penetrating diagnosis of the economic activity of the post-communist government. He found that a coterie of tycoons and politicians live off the wealth of the majority of citizens and smaller entrepreneurs, while the economy performs below its capacities. In academic terms,...

Quantum Steampunk

Nicole Yunger Halpern
The Industrial Revolution meets the quantum-technology revolution! A steampunk adventure guide to how mind-blowing quantum physics is transforming our understanding of information and energy. Victorian era steam engines and particle physics may seem worlds (as well as centuries) apart, yet a new branch of science, quantum thermodynamics, reenvisions the scientific underpinnings of the Industrial Revolution through the lens of today's roaring quantum information...

Dreaming in the Bone Boat

Raymond "Moose" Jackson
In Dreaming in the Bone Boat, Raymond Moose Jackson maps his worlds and roles. Anchored in New Orleans but wide-ranging, these poems chart the course of a rowdy pilgrim at the crossroads of blue-collar doldrums, punk epiphanies and the disappearing wetlands of dream. Jackson is a lyrical voyager walking a rebel road to end up wild-eyed in the fields of human compassion [feeling?], and we are along for the ride. With phrasings that land with the musical smack of destiny, Moose restores us to a...

Struggling to Learn

June M Thomas
The battle for equality in education during the civil rights era came at a cost to Black Americans on the frontlines. In 1964 when fourteen-year-old June Manning Thomas walked into Orangeburg High School as one of thirteen Black students selected to integrate the all-White school, her classmates mocked, shunned, and yelled racial epithets at her. The trauma she experienced made her wonder if the slow-moving progress was worth the emotional...

Black Power in Hemispheric Perspective

edited by Wilfried Raussert, Matti Steinitz
When SNCC leader Stokely Carmichael first called for "Black Power" on a Civil Rights march in 1966 he not only gave name to a movement that shaped one of the most significant periods of the African American struggle for freedom in the USA. His background as a son of migrants from Trinidad and Tobago also gives an indication on the international dimension of the Black Power movement. Black Power was...

The Artist as Eyewitness

edited by Charlene Villaseñor Black, Gabriela Rodriguez-Gomez, Miguel Samano
This first survey of Antonio Bernal's life and work, The Artist as Eyewitness features essays that assess his murals, situating them within the historical, political, and cultural frameworks of the Chicano movement. It also includes an analysis of Bernal's unpublished novel, Breaking the Silence; a biography of Bernal; reproductions of his artwork; and a selection of his writings. Drawing on personal correspondence...

Words in Space and Time

Tomasz Kamusella
With forty-two extensively annotated maps, this atlas offers novel insights into the history and mechanics of how Central Europe's languages have been made, unmade, and deployed for political action. The innovative combination of linguistics, history, and cartography makes a wealth of hard-to-reach knowledge readily available to both specialist and general readers. It combines information on languages, dialects, alphabets, religions, mass...

Appalachian Health

edited by F. Douglas Scutchfield, Douglas Scutchfield, Randolph Wykoff, with contributions by F. Douglas Scutchfield, Randolph Wykoff, foreword by Alonzo Plough, with contributions by Ron R. Roach, Julie Marshall, Logan Thomas, Kate Beatty, Melissa White, Robin C. Vanderpool, Angela L. Carman, Lindsay R. Stradtman, Kelly D. Blake, Richard C. Ingram, Rachel Hogg-Graham, Timothy Williams, Katherine Youngen, Alan Ducatman, Rachel E. Dixon, Michael Meit, Megan Heffernan, Erin Tanenbaum, Angela Hagam...
...

Arborophobia

Nancy Holmes
Arborophobia, the latest collection by award-winning poet Nancy Holmes, is a poetic spiritual reckoning. Its elegies, litanies, and indictments concern wonder, guilt, and grief about the journey of human life and the state of the natural world. When a child attempts suicide and western North America burns and the creep of mortality closes in, is spiritual and emotional solace possible or even desirable? Answers abound in measured, texturally intimate, and often surprising ways. The title sequence, named for a word that means...

Separation Anxiety

Gavin Bradley
This poignant debut by Gavin Bradley explores the emotional toll of different kinds of separation: from a partner, a previously held sense of self, or a home and the people left behind. The main narrative follows the deterioration of a long-term relationship, interweaving poems dealing with the loneliness of immigration and the anxiety of separation from Northern Ireland, the poet's homeland. These personal poems enter their stories through a variety of characters and places, from dock builders to dogs, from...

You Might Be Sorry You Read This

Michelle Poirier Brown
You Might Be Sorry You Read This is a stunning debut, revealing how breaking silences and reconciling identity can refine anger into something both useful and beautiful. A poetic memoir that looks unflinchingly at childhood trauma (both incestuous rape and surviving exposure in extreme cold), it also tells the story of coming to terms with a hidden Indigenous identity when the poet discovered her Métis heritage at age 38. This collection is a journey of pain, belonging, hope, and...

The Horses Pulled Me Back To Them

Aubrey Dawne Edwards
An exploration of living and working at Fair Grounds Race Course in New Orleans comprising photography, interviews, and personal correspondence of jockeys, horse groomers, trainers, and other key backside players.

An Empty Room

Michael Sakamoto
Reinterpreting butoh's history to reimagine its future An Empty Room is a transformative journey through butoh, an avant-garde form of performance art that originated in Japan in the late 1950's and is now a global phenomenon. This is the first book about butoh authored by a scholar-practitioner who combines personal experience with ethnographic and historical accounts alongside over twenty photos. Author Michael Sakamoto traverses butoh dance history from its roots in...

Sound Fragments

Noel Lobley
Groundbreaking study of the world's largest archive of field recordings of African music This book is an ethnographic study of sound archives and the processes of creative decolonization that form alternative modes of archiving and curating in the 21st century. It explores the histories and afterlives of sound collections and practices at the International Library of African Music. Sound Fragments follows what happens when a colonial sound archive is repurposed and...

Contemporary Asian American Activism

edited by Diane C. Fujino, Robyn Magalit Rodriguez
In the struggles for prison abolition, global anti-imperialism, immigrant rights, affordable housing, environmental justice, fair labor, and more, twenty-first-century Asian American activists are speaking out and standing up to systems of oppression. Creating emancipatory futures requires collective action and reciprocal relationships that are nurtured over time and forged through cross-racial solidarity and...

The Market in Birds

Andrea L. Smalley
with Henry M. Reeves
A fascinating look at how a commercial market for birds in the late nineteenth century set the stage for conservation and its legislation. Between the end of the Civil War and the 1920s, the United States witnessed the creation, rapid expansion, and then disappearance of a commercial market for hunted wild animals. The bulk of commercial wildlife sales in the last part of the nineteenth century were of...

Early Jewish Cookbooks

András Koerner
The seven essays in this volume focus such previously unexplored subjects as the world's first cookbook printed in Hebrew letters, published in 1854, and a wonderful 19th-century Jewish cookbook, which in addition to its Hungarian edition was also published in Dutch in Rotterdam. The author entertainingly reconstructs the history of bólesz, a legendary yeast pastry that was the specialty of a famous, but long defunct Jewish coffeehouse in Pest, and...

A Drum in One Hand, a Sockeye in the Other

Charlotte Coté
In the dense rainforest of the west coast of Vancouver Island, the Somass River (uumaas) brings sockeye salmon (miaat) into the Nuu-chah-nulth community of Tseshaht. uumaas and miaat are central to the sacred food practices that have been a crucial part of the Indigenous community's efforts to enact food sovereignty, decolonize their diet, and preserve their ancestral knowledge. In A Drum in One Hand, a Sockeye in the...

Oil, the State, and War

Emma Ashford
A comprehensive challenge to prevailing understanding of international implications of oil wealth that shows why it can create bad actors In a world where oil-rich states are more likely to start war than their oil-dependent counterparts, it's surprising how little attention is still paid to these so-called petrostates. These states' wealth props up the global arms trade, provides diplomatic leverage, and allows them to support violent and nonviolent proxies. In Oil, the...

Immune Nations

edited by Natalie Loveless
This catalogue documents a multi-year art-science project called Immune Nations, produced on the occasion of its exhibition at the McMaster Museum of Art in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Initiated in 2014 and co-led by Steven Hoffman (York University), Sean Caulfield (University of Alberta), and Natalie Loveless (University of Alberta), Immune Nations brought together scientists, policy experts, academic scholars, and artists to work on an interdisciplinary and...

Relentless

Deborah Schupack
Relentless is the compelling story of how one of America's leading health care systems — the Mount Sinai Health System in New York City — mobilized to confront the defining health crisis of our time: the coronavirus pandemic. This book is based on unprecedented access to internal hospital documents and more than 100 candid interviews with the chief executives of Mount Sinai's hospitals and its Icahn School of...

Only Wanna Be with You

Tim Sommer
Experience the exclusive, behind-the-scenes story of one of the biggest bands of the nineties In 1985, Mark Bryan heard Darius Rucker singing in a dorm shower at the University of South Carolina and asked him to form a band. For the next eight years, Hootie & the Blowfish—completed by bassist Dean Felber and drummer Soni Sonefeld—played every frat house, roadhouse, and rock club in the mid-Atlantic and Southeast, becoming one of the biggest independent acts in the...

Breaking Ranks

Colin Diver
Some colleges will do anything to improve their national ranking. That can be bad for their students—and for higher education. Since U.S. News & World Report first published a college ranking in 1983, the rankings industry has become a self-appointed judge, declaring winners and losers among America's colleges and universities. In this revealing account, Colin Diver shows how popular rankings have induced college applicants to focus solely on...

Republics of Myth

Hussein Banai, Malcolm Byrne, and John Tirman
Why does the rift between the US and Iran persist? Iran and the United States have been at odds for forty years, locked in a cold war that has run the gamut from harsh rhetoric to hostage-taking, from crippling sanctions to targeted killings. In Republics of Myth, Hussein Banai, Malcolm Byrne, and John Tirman argue that a major contributing factor to this tenacious enmity is how each nation views itself. The two nations have differing...

New Lives in Anand

Sanderien Verstappen, series edited by Padma Kaimal, K. Sivaramakrishnan, Anand A. Yang
Open access edition: DOI 10.6069/9780295749655 In 2002 widespread communal violence tore apart hundreds of towns and villages in rural parts of Gujarat, India. In the aftermath, many Muslims living in Hindu-majority villages sought safety in the small town of Anand, some relocating with the financial assistance of their relatives overseas. Following such dramatic displacement and disorientation, Anand...

Approaches to Teaching Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment

edited by Michael R. Katz, Alexander Burry
Recounting the murder of an elderly woman by a student expelled from university, Crime and Punishment is a psychological and political novel that portrays the strains on Russian society in the middle of the nineteenth century. Its protagonist, Raskolnikov, moves in a world of dire poverty, disillusionment, radicalism, and nihilism interwoven with religious faith and utopianism. In Dostoevsky's innovative style, which he called fantastic...

Espacio nómada en el ensayo autobiográfico del Accented Cinema

Madalina Stefan
La presente monografía aporta una nueva mirada sobre el Accented Cinema en relación con el espacio fílmico y significa una de las primeras contribuciones en español dedicadas a esta forma cinematográfica de índole autobiográfica que versa en torno a la experiencia de la migración. Al igual que los relatos fílmicos analizados, el libro pone el enfoque en la espacialización nómada, respondiendo así a la poca atención que desde los inicios de la cinematografía...

Understanding Philip Roth

Matthew A. Shipe
A panoramic and accessible guide to one of the most celebrated— and controversial—authors of the twentieth century With the publication of his debut Goodbye, Columbus in 1959, Philip Roth established himself as one of the most prominent and controversial American writers of his generation. By the time of his death in 2018, he had won the Pulitzer Prize, two National Book Awards, and three PEN/Faulkner Awards. In Understanding Philip Roth, Matthew Shipe offers an in-depth introduction to Roth's work and...

Three Early Mahāyāna Treatises from Gandhāra

Andrea Schlosser
The Gandhāran birch-bark scrolls preserve the earliest remains of Buddhist literature known today and provide unprecedented insights into the history of Buddhism. This volume presents three manuscripts from the Bajaur Collection (BC), a group of nineteen scrolls discovered at the end of the twentieth century and named after their findspot in northwestern Pakistan. The manuscripts, written in the Gāndhārī language and Kharohī script, date to...

Nuclear Command, Control, and Communications

edited by James J. Wirtz, Jeffrey A. Larsen, foreword by Rebecca K. C. Hersman, with contributions by James J. Wirtz, James Clay Moltz, Matthew R. Crook, Jon Lindsay, Wade L. Huntley, Michael S. Malley, Jeffrey A. Larsen
A unique overview of the United States' current nuclear command, control, and communications system and its modernization for the digital age Concerns about the security of nuclear command, control, and communications (NC3) systems...

Row Upon Row, fourth edition

Dale Rosengarten, McKissick Museum, preface by Jane Przybysz
An in-depth, illustrated history of South Carolina's Lowcountry baskets Coiled grass baskets are icons of Gullah culture. From their roots in Africa, through their evolution on Lowcountry rice plantations, to their modern appreciation as art objects sought by collectors and tourists, these vessels are carriers of African American history and the African-inspired culture that took hold along the coast of South Carolina and...

Underground Streams

edited by János M. Rainer
The authors of this edited volume address the hidden attraction that existed between the extremes of left and right, and of internationalism and nationalism under the decades of communist dictatorship in Eastern Europe. One might suppose that under the suppressive regimes based on leftist ideology and internationalism their right-wing opponents would have been defeated and ultimately removed. These essays, on the...

Blue Portugal and Other Essays

Theresa Kishkan
Using the richness of braided essays, Theresa Kishkan thinks deeply about the natural world, mourns and celebrates the aging body, interrogates and gently contests recorded history, and explores art and visual phenomenon. Gathering personal genealogies, medical histories, and early land surveys together with the liminal spaces of memory and insights from music, colour theory, horticulture, and textile production, Kishkan weaves patterns and dangles loose threads, welcoming readers to share her...

The New Health Economy

Gary Bisbee, Jr., Donald Trigg, Sanjula Jain, foreword by Ron Adner
A 360-degree look at health care politics, policy, providers, and personalization that offers leaders important perspectives to successfully shape US health care after COVID-19 Over the past decade, the health economy has experienced the most dramatic change since the passage of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965. The Affordable Care Act's expansion of Medicaid, demographic-driven Medicare growth, and the digitization of health records have...

Critique Is Creative

Liz Lerman, edited by John Borstel
A thorough introduction and lively exploration of a widely recognized method for giving and getting useful feedback Devised by choreographer Liz Lerman in 1990, Critical Response Process® (CRP) is an internationally recognized method for giving and getting feedback on creative works in progress. In this first in-depth study of CRP, Lerman and her long-term collaborator John Borstel describe in detail the four-step process, its origins...

Seeding the Tradition

Alexander M. Cannon
Critically evaluates assumptions of creativity by exploring the dynamism of southern Vietnamese traditional music For artists, creativity plays a powerful role in understanding, confronting, and negotiating the crises of the present. Seeding the Tradition explores conflicting creativities in traditional music in Hõ Chí Minh City, the Mekong Delta, and the Vietnamese diaspora, and how they influence contemporary southern Vietnamese culture. The book centers on the...

The Complete Guide to Food Allergies in Adults and Children

Scott H. Sicherer, MD, best-selling author of Food Allergies and Understanding and Managing Your Child’s Food Allergies
The most complete guide to preventing, testing, living with, and treating food allergies in children and adults. In this comprehensive, evidence-based guide for adults and children with food allergies and those who care for them, Dr. Scott H. Sicherer provides all the critical information you need on preventing, testing, living with, and treating food...

It's Not Free Speech

Michael Bérubé and Jennifer Ruth
How far does the idea of academic freedom extend to professors in an era of racial reckoning? The protests of summer 2020, which were ignited by the murder of George Floyd, led to long-overdue reassessments of the legacy of racism and white supremacy in both American academe and cultural life more generally. But while universities have been willing to rename some buildings and schools or grapple with their role in the slave trade, no one...

Precarious Workers

Eloisa Betti
The recent vast upsurge in social science scholarship on job precarity has generally little to say about earlier forms of this phenomenon. Eloisa Betti's monograph convincingly demonstrates on the example of Italy that even in the post-war phase of Keynesian stability and welfare state, precarious labor was an underlying feature of economic development. She examines how in this short period exceptional politics of labor stability prevailed. The volume...

The Children's Republic of Gaudiopolis

Gergely Kunt
Gaudiopolis (The City of Joy) was a pedagogical experiment that operated in a post–World War II orphanage in Budapest. This book tells the story of this children's republic that sought to heal the wounds of wartime trauma, address prejudice and expose the children to a firsthand experience of democracy. The children were educated in freely voicing their opinions, questioning authority, and debating ideas. The account...

Child

Judy Goldman
A 2022 Katie Couric Media Must-Read New Book • A personal meditation on love in the shadow of white privilege and racism In 1944, Mattie Culp, a 26-year-old African American woman, left her own young daughter, Minnie, in her family's care to work as a live-in maid and caregiver for a white couple and their three-year-old daughter, Judy, in Rock Hill, South Carolina. In Child, Judy Goldman tells the story of her relationship with Mattie, reflecting on the deep love that grew up around the unconscionable scaffolding of...

Enduring Shame

Heather Brook Adams
A study of the rhetorical power of shame and its effect on reproductive politics It was not long ago that unmarried pregnant women in the United States hid in maternity homes and relinquished their "illegitimate" children to "more deserving" two-parent families—all in the name of keeping secret shameful pregnancies. Although times and practices have changed, reproductive politics remain a fraught topic and site of injustice, especially for poor...

Restoring Ancient Beauty

edited by James Keating, James Keating
Until recently it has been commonplace to believe that Vatican II represents a permanent sidelining of the thought of St. Thomas Aquinas for theology. The documents of that council, it is said, moved away from the scholastic categories that had informed Catholic theological work since the Reformation, and most particularly since Vatican I. There is some truth to this, of course, since the council fathers preferred biblical formulations in a...

Uncle Rico's Encore

Peter Bacho
From the 1950s through the 1970s, blue-collar Filipino Americans, or Pinoys, lived a hardscrabble existence. Immigrant parents endured blatant racism, sporadic violence, and poverty while their US-born children faced more subtle forms of racism, such as the low expectations of teachers and counselors in the public school system. In this collection of autobiographical essays, acclaimed novelist and short-story writer Peter Bacho centers the experiences of the Pinoy generation...

Approaches to Teaching The Plum in the Golden Vase (The Golden Lotus)

edited by Andrew Schonebaum
The Plum in the Golden Vase (also known as The Golden Lotus) was published in the early seventeenth century and may be the first long work of Chinese fiction written by a single (though anonymous) author. Featuring both complex structural features and psychological and emotional realism, the novel centers on the rich merchant Ximen Qing and his household and describes the physical surroundings and material objects of a Ming dynasty city.

Why Sharks Matter

David Shiffman
Get submerged in the amazing world of sharks! Your expert host, award-winning marine biologist Dr. David Shiffman, will show you how—and why—we should protect these mysterious, misunderstood guardians of the ocean. Sharks are some of the most fascinating, most ecologically important, most threatened, and most misunderstood animals on Earth. More often feared than revered, their role as predators of the deep have earned them a reputation as a major threat...

We Know This Place

Sunni Patterson
When Sunni Patterson asserts that We Know This Place, she means every word. Should we break it down further? WE, the poet's collective, live in the sovereign wisdom of KNOWing THIS PLACE: post-Katrina New Orleans, where the poet's activism converges with her joyous celebration and impelling interrogations of class, gender, race, and place. In this collection, Sunni Patterson renews the timeless work of poetry, summoning all who are ready to listen up.

Troubling Truth and Reconciliation in Canadian Education

edited by Sandra D. Styres, Arlo Kempf, foreword by Jan Hare
Troubling Truth and Reconciliation in Canadian Education offers a series of critical perspectives concerning reconciliation and reconciliatory efforts between Canadian and Indigenous peoples. Indigenous and non-Indigenous scholars address both theoretical and practical aspects of troubling reconciliation in education across various contexts with significant diversity of thought, approach, and...

Theology without Borders

edited by Leo D. Lefebure, foreword by Thomas Banchoff, with contributions by Jonathan Tan, John O'Malley, Alan Mitchell, Dale T. Irvin, William P. Loewe, Chester Gillis, Brian Flanagan, Brian M. Doyle, Charles E. Curran, Gemma Tulud Cruz, John Borelli, Thomas Banchoff, Peter C. Phan, Keith Ward, Stephanie Wang
A comprehensive series of essays exploring Peter C. Phan's groundbreaking work to widen Christian theology beyond the Western world Peter C. Phan's wide-ranging contributions to...

Military Strategy, Joint Operations, and Airpower, Second Edition

edited by Ryan Burke, Michael Fowler, Jahara Matisek, with contributions by Thomas Swaim, Paul Bezerra, Mark E. Grotelueschen, Marybeth Ulrich, Danielle Gilbert, Buddhika Jayamaha, Brian Drohan, James R. Holmes, Kyleanne Hunter, Heather Venable, Michael Martindale, Jon McPhilamy, Judson C. Dressler, Frances V. Mercado, John T. Farquhar, Robert Grant, James Davitch, Ryan Burke, Michael Fowler
An essential introduction to contemporary strategy at the operational level of war,...

The Selected Letters of John Cage

John Cage, edited by Laura Kuhn, foreword by Mark Swed
Letters of an avant-garde icon This selection of over five hundred letters gives us the life of John Cage with all the intelligence, wit, and inventiveness that made him such an important and groundbreaking composer and performer. The missives range from lengthy reports of his early trips to Europe in the 1930s through his years with the dancer Merce Cunningham, and shed new light on his growing eminence as an iconic performance artist of the American...

Isle of Devils, Isle of Saints

Michael J. Jarvis
How can the small, isolated island of Bermuda help us to understand the early expansion of English America? First discovered by Europeans in 1505, the island of Bermuda had no indigenous population and no permanent European presence until the early seventeenth century. Settled five years after Virginia and eight years before Plymouth, Bermuda is a foundational site of English colonization. Its history reveals strikingly different paths of potential...

Rural Republican Realignment in the Modern South

M.V. Hood, III, Seth C. McKee
A detailed study of rural white southerners' decades-long shift from Democrats to Republicans Since the 1948 Dixiecrat revolt from the national Democratic Party, rural white southerners have experienced a painstakingly slow transformational shift from being fiercely loyal Democrats to stalwart Republicans. In Rural Republican Realignment in the Modern South, M. V. Hood III and Seth C. McKee examine the factors driving this movement as they...

Romani Liberation

Jan Selling
Centered on the trajectory of the emancipation of Roma people in Scandinavia, Romani Liberation is a powerful challenge to the stereotype describing Romani as passive and incapable of responsibility and agency. The author also criticizes benevolent but paternalistic attitudes that center on Romani victimhood. The first part of the book offers a comprehensive overview of the chronological phases of Romani emancipation in Sweden and other countries.

Beatrice's Ledger

Ruth R. Martin, with Vivian B. Martin
A vivid and moving story about family, courage, and the power of education Ruth remembers the day the sheriff pulled up in front of her family's home with a white neighbor claiming Ruth's father owed her recently deceased husband money. It was 1940 in Jim Crow South Carolina, and even at the age of 11, Ruth knew a Black person's word wasn't trusted. But her father remained calm as he waited on her mother's return from the house. She had retrieved a gray...

Walking Together, Working Together

edited by Leslie Main Johnson
This collection takes a holistic view of well-being, seeking complementarities between Indigenous approaches to healing and Western biomedicine. Topics include traditional healers and approaches to treatment of disease and illness; traditional knowledge and intellectual property around medicinal plant knowledge; the role of diet and traditional foods in health promotion; culturally sensitive approaches to healing work with urban...

The Tao of S

Sheng-mei Ma
A study of recent shifts in the depictions of Asian cultural stereotypes The Tao of S is an engaging study of American racialization of Chinese and Asians, Asian American writing, and contemporary Chinese cultural production, stretching from the nineteenth century to the present. Sheng-mei Ma examines the work of nineteenth-century "Sinophobic" American writers, such as Bret Harte, Jack London, and Frank Norris, and twentieth-century "Sinophiliac" authors, such...

The Democratic Ethos

A. Freya Thimsen
A multidisciplinary analysis of the lasting effects of the Occupy Wall Street protest movement What did Occupy Wall Street accomplish? While it began as a startling disruption in politics as usual, in The Democratic Ethos Freya Thimsen argues that the movement's long-term importance rests in how its commitment to radical democratic self-organization has been adopted within more conventional forms of politics. Occupy changed what counts as...

The Charleston Museum

edited by Carl P. Borick
A look inside the oldest museum in the United States Since its founding in 1773, the Charleston Museum has served as a mecca of learning and discovery. In celebration of its 250th anniversary, this commemorative volume brings its rich history to life, offering insights into many of its 2.4 million collected artifacts while detailing the contributions of key figures, such as Gabriel Manigault, Laura Bragg, and Milby Burton, who made it one of the premier museums in the southern...

The Man Who Started the Civil War

Anna Koivusalo
A study of the socially transformational role of honor and emotion through the lens of one man's life In the predawn hours of April 12, 1861, James Chesnut Jr. piloted a small skiff across the Charleston Harbor and delivered the fateful order to open fire on Fort Sumter—the first shots of the Civil War. In The Man Who Started the Civil War, Anna Koivusalo offers the first comprehensive biography of Chesnut and through him a history of...

The Flow of Illicit Funds

Ola M. Tucker
High-profile case studies provide compliance professionals with a deep, holistic understanding of modern-day money laundering to better detect and deter it Money laundering is a serious crime that presents a heightened, yet underrated, global threat. Although often thought of as a victimless crime, money laundering significantly impacts the global financial system, which leads to further crime, corruption, human exploitation, and environmental...

Al-Samt wa-al-Sakhab

Nihad Sirees, edited by Hanadi Al-Samman
The first annotated edition of Syrian writer Nihad Sirees's The Silence and the Roar, created for the Arabic language classroom Al-Samt wa-al-Sakhab (The Silence and the Roar) is an award-winning novella by Syrian author Nihad Sirees. This edition — abridged and in the original Arabic with vocabulary aids, reading questions, and supplementary materials — introduces intermediate and advanced Arabic language...

The Fur Trader

Einar Odd Mortensen, with Gerd Kjustad Mortensen, edited by Ingrid Urberg, Daniel Sims
The Fur Trader is a critical edition of Einar Odd Mortensen Sr.'s personal narrative detailing the years (1925–28) he spent as a free trader at posts in Pine Bluff and Oxford Lake in Manitoba during the waning days of the fur trade. Mortensen's original narrative has been translated from Norwegian to English, and supplemented with a scholarly introduction, thorough annotations, a bibliography, and a reading guide. This...

In Everything I See Your Hand

Naira Kuzmich
In these ten stories, we see the brilliance of Naira Kuzmich spinning variations of immigrant life in the Little Armenia neighborhood of Los Angeles, where the realities of exile exist alongside the realities of diasporic and intergenerational entanglement. What's the difference between leaving the motherland in order to pursue grander desires—a promised better life in the U.S.—and leaving the literal mother or family line? When does the journey toward self-possession become something closer to...