Regional Titles




The Garrett Family, Collectors and Connoisseurs
Evergreen Museum & Library
Evergreen—the long-time home of the Garrett family in north Baltimore—offers a preeminent example of antebellum-American Italianate architecture. It also houses a remarkably diverse collection of over 50,000 objects, including paintings, furniture, sculpture, ceramics, and rare books. Acquired by two generations of the prominent Garrett family, self-described "collectors by instinct and by education," the assemblage of fine and decorative arts is remarkable in...
Kathleen Waters Sander
Chartered in 1827 as the country’s first railroad, the legendary Baltimore and Ohio played a unique role in the nation’s great railroad drama and became the model for American railroading. John W. Garrett, who served as president of the B&O from 1858 to 1884, ranked among the great power brokers of the time. In this gripping and well-researched account, historian Kathleen Waters Sander tells the story of the B&O’s beginning and its unprecedented plan to build a rail...
The African American Struggle on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, 1860–1915
C. Christopher Brown
Making extensive use of primary sources, C. Christopher Brown has broken new ground and filled a long overlooked gap in Maryland history. Here is the story of African Americans on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, from the promise-filled days following the end of slavery to the rise of lynch law, segregation, and systematic efforts at disenfranchisement. Resisting, as best they could, attempts of the Democratic "White Man’s Party" to render them...
Washington, DC
Carol Lancaster
This deeply felt memoir is a love letter to Washington, DC. Carol Lancaster, a third-generation Washingtonian who knew the city like few others, takes readers on a tour of the nation's capital from its swamp-infested beginnings to the present day, with an insider's view of the gritty politics, environment, society, culture, and larger-than-life heroes that characterize her beloved hometown. The former dean of Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service, a friend of presidents and dignitaries all...
Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte
Alexandra Deutsch
Alexandra Deutsch literally "unpacks" Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte’s personal belongings in this intuitively sophisticated material culture biography of the woman whose seductive beauty and tragic marriage repeatedly pulls us back for another look and, ideally, a deeper understanding of the person behind the celebrity. In addition to letters and portraits, Deutsch found bits of the story in previously overlooked objects in the vast Bonaparte family collections. Long overlooked...
An American Family in War and Peace, the Hambletons 1657 to the Present
Martha Frick Symington Sanger
At the dawn of the seventeenth century, immigrants to this country arrived with dreams of conquering a new frontier. Families were willing to embrace a life of strife and hardship but with great hopes of achieving prominence and wealth. Such is the case with the Hambleton family. From William Hambleton’s arrival on the Eastern Shore in 1657 and through every major conflict on land, sea, and air since, a member of the Hambleton...
Thomas McCreary, the Notorious Slave Catcher from Maryland
Milt Diggins
This is the story of Thomas McCreary, a slave catcher from Cecil County, Maryland. Reviled by some, proclaimed a hero by others, he first drew public attention in the late 1840s for a career that peaked a few years after passage of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850. Living and working as he did at the midpoint between Philadelphia, an important center for assisting fugitive slaves, and Baltimore, a major port in the slave...
John Shields
photographs by Jed Kirschbaum
Twenty-five years ago, Chesapeake Bay Cooking with John Shields introduced the world to the regional cuisine of the Mid-Atlantic. Nominated for a James Beard Award, the book was praised for its inspiring heritage recipes and its then-revolutionary emphasis on cooking with local and seasonal ingredients. Part history lesson, part travelogue, the book captured the unique character of the Chesapeake region and its people. In this anniversary edition, John...
Leslie Day
illustrated by Trudy Smoke
photographs by Beth Bergman
foreword by Don Riepe
Look around New York, and you’ll probably see birds: wood ducks swimming in Queens, a stalking black-crowned night-heron in Brooklyn, great horned owls perching in the Bronx, warblers feeding in Central Park, or Staten Island’s purple martins flying to and fro. You might spot hawks and falcons nesting on skyscrapers or robins belting out songs from trees along the street. America’s...
Michael Olesker
In Journeys to the Heart of Baltimore, veteran journalist Michael Olesker writes of Baltimore's melting pot in all its rollicking, sentimental, good-natured, and chaotic essence. The stories come from neighborhood street corners and front stoops, playgrounds and school rooms, churches and synagogues, and families gathered around late-night kitchen tables. The D'Alesandro political dynasty comes to life here, and so do Lenny Moore and Artie Donovan of the legendary Baltimore Colts. The old East...
Rebecca Seib and Helen C. Rountree
Here at last is the story of Southern Maryland’s Native people, from the end of the Ice Age to the present. Intended for a general audience, it explains how they have been adapting to changing conditions—both climatic and human—for all of that time in a way that is jargon-free and readable. The authors, cultural anthropologists with long experience of modern Indian people, convincingly demonstrate that all through their history, Native people have behaved like rational adults,...
A Journey through Potomac History
Mike High
A comprehensive guide to one of America's unique national parks, The C&O Canal Companion takes readers on a mile-by-mile, lock-by-lock tour of the 184-mile Potomac River waterway and towpath that stretches from Washington, D.C., to Cumberland, Maryland, and the Allegheny Mountains. Making extensive use of records at the National Archives and the C&O Canal Park Headquarters, Mike High demonstrates how events and places along the canal relate to the history of the nation, from Civil...
An Introduction
James DiLisio
When he first laid eyes on the countryside around Chesapeake Bay in 1608, records reveal, Captain John Smith exclaimed, "Heaven and earth seemed never to have agreed better to frame a place for man’s habitation." In Maryland Geography, James DiLisio—another admirer of the Free State—pays tribute to Maryland’s rich cultural, historical, and geographical heritage. This up-to-date, in-depth account interprets the contemporary environmental conditions of the "Marylandscape" by emphasizing its evolving...
A Guide for All Ages
Charles W. Mitchell
with maps by Elizabeth Church Mitchell
Winner of the Society for American Travel Writers’ Lowell Thomas Travel Journalism 2016 Gold Award in the Guidebook Category Few regions of the United States boast as many historically significant sites as the mid-Atlantic. Travels through American History in the Mid-Atlantic brings to life sixteen easily accessible historical destinations in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Washington, D.C., the Potomac Valley,...
The Unlikely Story of America's National Anthem
Marc Ferris
Nearly every American knows The Star-Spangled Banner, the national anthem of the United States of America. Yet many people dislike the song, contend that it glorifies militarism, and question its suitability as the musical embodiment of nationhood. Even professional vocalists have trouble singing the multi-octave melody and remembering the words. So why in 1931 did Congress designate it as the official national anthem, more than a century after Francis Scott Key...
A History of the Washington Metro
Zachary M. Schrag
with a new preface
Drivers in the nation's capital face a host of hazards: high-speed traffic circles, presidential motorcades, jaywalking tourists, and bewildering signs that send unsuspecting motorists from the Lincoln Memorial into suburban Virginia in less than two minutes. And parking? Don't bet on it unless you're in the fast lane of the Capital Beltway during rush hour. Little wonder, then, that so many residents and visitors rely on the Washington Metro, the...
The Story of Henry and Emily Folger
Stephen H. Grant
In Collecting Shakespeare, Stephen H. Grant recounts the American success story of Henry and Emily Folger of Brooklyn, a couple who were devoted to each other, in love with Shakespeare, and bitten by the collecting bug. Shortly after marrying in 1885, the Folgers started buying, cataloging, and storing all manner of items about Shakespeare and his era. Emily earned a master's degree in Shakespeare studies. The frugal couple worked passionately as a tight-knit team...
A Guide for Advanced Players and Coaches
Janine Tucker and Maryalice Yakutchik
photographs by Will Kirk and James T. Van Rensselaer
Women’s lacrosse is one of the fastest-growing sports in the United States. As stick technology advances, athleticism increases, and rules and regulations adapt, even the most experienced players and coaches need to keep current on all aspects of the game. Janine Tucker, head women’s lacrosse coach at Johns Hopkins University, and Maryalice Yakutchik, a writer and former lacrosse player, here...
The Smithsonian and the Problem of History
Robert C. Post
In 1994, when the National Air and Space Museum announced plans to display the Enola Gay, the B-29 sent to destroy Hiroshima with an atomic bomb, the ensuing political uproar caught the museum's parent Smithsonian Institution entirely unprepared. As the largest such complex in the world, the Smithsonian cares for millions of objects and has displayed everything from George Washington's sword to moon rocks to Dorothy’s ruby slippers from The Wizard of Oz. Why did...
History and Memorabilia from Colts to Ravens
Ted Patterson
with contributions by Dean Smith
photographs by Edwin H. Remsberg
forewords by Michael Gibbons and Raymond Berry
The second edition of Ted Patterson’s illustrated history of football in Baltimore continues the story of the Ravens' success—from their first Super Bowl victory in 2001 to the emotional parade through downtown Baltimore after winning Super Bowl XLVII. Patterson is joined by Baltimore poet and sports aficionado Dean Smith, whose new chapters...
Documentary Photography from the Great Depression and World War II
Constance B. Schulz
foreword by Frederick N. Rasmussen
Between 1935 and 1943, the United States government commissioned forty-four photographers to capture American faces, along with living and working conditions, across the country. Nearly 180,000 photographs were taken—4,000 in Maryland—and they are now preserved in the Prints and Photographs Division of the Library of Congress. Constance B. Schulz presents a selection of these images in ...
Baltimore Legends Come of Age
Michael Olesker
Front Stoops in the Fifties recounts the stories of some of Baltimore's most famous personalities as they grew up during the "decade of conformity." Such familiar names as Jerry Leiber, Nancy Pelosi, Thurgood Marshall, and Barry Levinson figure prominently in Michael Olesker’s gripping account, which draws on personal interviews and journalistic digging. Olesker marks the end of the fifties with the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. "It’s as if millions will...
A Week-by-Week Guide to Discovering Nature in the Chesapeake Region
Bryan MacKay
When can you find ripe blueberries along the Appalachian Trail in Maryland? Where can you see the air filled with monarch butterflies as they migrate south each autumn? If you want to enjoy nature this weekend, where is the best place to visit? Bryan MacKay can tell you. Written as an almanac, A Year across Maryland invites you to explore the natural world throughout the year, from watching bald eagles nesting in January to harvesting...
The Sesquicentennial Collection
Ross J. Kelbaugh
Maryland’s role in the Civil War continues to attract wide interest, study, and collection at the war's 150th anniversary. One reason is a vast photographic record of the people, places, and events surrounding the war, a legacy that breathes life into the sepia-toned past. Maryland's Civil War Photographs presents the largest collection of original Maryland-related Civil War photographs ever published. Thanks to the dedicated efforts of institutions and a small...
The Maryland Campaign of September 1862
D. Scott Hartwig
In early September 1862 thousands of Union soldiers huddled within the defenses of Washington, disorganized and discouraged from their recent defeat at Second Manassas. Confederate General Robert E. Lee then led his tough and confident Army of Northern Virginia into Maryland in a bold gamble to force a showdown that would win Southern independence. The future of the Union hung in the balance. The campaign that followed lasted only two weeks, but it changed the course of...
Landscape, Architecture, and Design at Mount Vernon
Joseph Manca
On the banks of the Potomac River, Mount Vernon stands, with its iconic portico boasting breathtaking views and with a landscape to rival the great gardens of Europe, as a monument to George Washington’s artistic and creative efforts. More than one million people visit Mount Vernon each year—drawn to the stature and beauty of Washington’s family estate. Art historian Joseph Manca systematically examines Mount Vernon—its stylistic, moral, and historical...
An Easy Question-and-Answer Guide
Donald R. Hickey
Long overshadowed by the American Revolution and the Civil War, the War of 1812 remains a largely forgotten conflict. Its origins as part of the larger Napoleonic wars layered complex issues that to this day make the conflict difficult to understand. The bicentennial of the War of 1812 is now upon us. With an engaging question-and-answer format, this book offers a concise and informative introduction to the War of 1812, clearing much of...
Discovering the War of 1812 in the Chesapeake
Ralph E. Eshelman and Burton K. Kummerow
All but forgotten by Americans, the War of 1812 (1812–1815) was a dramatic watershed for the young, groundbreaking United States Republic. Ill-prepared to fight the powerful English nation, the U.S. struggled through three years of conflict but emerged more unified with new patriotic symbols like the "Star-Spangled Banner." Much of the fighting occurred in the Chesapeake region and this new book, In Full Glory Reflected, uncovers its...
G. Martin Moeller, Jr.
This lively and informative guide offers tourists, residents, and architecture aficionados alike insights into more than 400 of Washington, D.C.’s, most important landmarks. Organized into 19 discrete tours, this thoroughly redesigned and updated edition includes 45 new entries, encompassing the House of Sweden and the U.S. Institute of Peace, classic buildings that epitomize the city—the White House, the Capitol, Union Station—and a number of private buildings off...
Walter Lord
with a new foreword by Scott S. Sheads
In the summer of 1814, enemy naval and ground forces made a coordinated assault on Washington, DC, capital of the new republic, and then set their sights on Baltimore, home port to some of the most rapacious American privateers on the high seas. In The Dawn's Early Light, Walter Lord captures these events during the War of 1812. A native Baltimorean, Lord wrote with great force and feeling of the subsequent defense of Fort McHenry, the circumstances of Francis Scott Key’s...