Health & Fitness




How Pharmaceutical Funding Changed the Breast Cancer Movement
Sharon Batt
07/2017 - UBC Press
Over the past several decades, a gradual reduction in state funding has pressured patient groups into forming private-sector partnerships. Health activist, scholar, award-winning journalist, and cancer survivor Sharon Batt investigates the relationship between patient advocacy groups and the pharmaceutical industry, as well as the contentious role of pharma funding. This analysis of Canada's breast cancer movement from 1990 to 2010 argues that the...
A Complete Guide to Ear Disorders and Health
Thomas J. Balkany, MD, FACS, FAAP, and Kevin D. Brown, MD, PhD
Intricately shaped and amazingly sensitive, ears are the organs of hearing and balance. When something goes wrong with the ears—whether infection or cancer, eardrum perforation or hearing loss—our overall well-being is generally disturbed. In The Ear Book, Drs. Thomas J. Balkany and Kevin D. Brown, recognized experts on ears and hearing, explain how the anatomy of the ear facilitates hearing and balance and then examine the causes,...
A Complete Guide for Caregiving
Freeman Miller, MD, Steven J. Bachrach, MD, and
the Cerebral Palsy Center at Nemours / Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children
When their child has cerebral palsy, parents need answers. They seek up-to-date advice they can count on to make sure their child has the best possible health and well-being. For three editions now, a team of experts associated with the Cerebral Palsy Program at the Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children have shared vital information through this authoritative resource for...
A Step-by-Step Guide for Coping Medically and Emotionally with a Serious Diagnosis
Vicki A. Jackson, MD, MPH, and David P. Ryan, MD, with Michelle D. Seaton
The prospect of entering treatment is overwhelming for anyone facing a diagnosis of cancer. While patients have access to a vast amount of medical information online, this advice is often unreliable or confusing. In Living with Cancer, Drs. Vicki A. Jackson and David P. Ryan have crafted the first step-by-step guide aimed at helping people with this life-defining...
A Family Guide to Caring for People Who Have Alzheimer Disease, Other Dementias, and Memory Loss
Nancy L. Mace, MA, and Peter V. Rabins, MD, MPH
Through five editions, The 36-Hour Day has been an essential resource for families who love and care for people with Alzheimer disease. Whether a person has Alzheimer disease or another form of dementia, he or she will face a host of problems. The 36-Hour Day will help family members and caregivers address these challenges and simultaneously cope with their own emotions and needs.
Making Meaningful Connections with the Person Who Has Alzheimer's Disease or Other Dementia or Memory Loss
Laura Wayman
Caring for someone with dementia means devotedly and patiently doing a hundred little things each day. Few care providers are trained to meet the challenges of dementia, however—and that is where A Loving Approach to Dementia Care can help. The book offers practical, compassionate advice on overcoming caregiving obstacles and maintaining meaningful relationships with loved ones who...
Jason Foster
02/2017 - UBC Press
This textbook provides workers and students with an introduction to effective injury prevention. It pays particular attention to how issues of precarious employment, gender, and ill-health can be better handled in Canadian occupational health and safety (OHS). Health and Safety in Canadian Workplaces offers an extensive overview of central OHS concepts and practices and provides practical suggestions for health and safety advocacy. It attempts to bring OHS into a twenty-first century...
Why Diets and Exercise Don't Work—and What Does
Robyn Toomath
In a world where charlatans promise to fix the alarming obesity epidemic with a silver-bullet diet or trendy new exercise program, Robyn Toomath, a physician and realist, steps out of the fray to deliver some tough news: it’s really hard to lose weight. Dispelling common myths and telling provocative truths about weight gain—and loss— The Obesity Epidemic is an engaging investigation into the complicated factors that lead to obesity. While genes certainly play a part,...
Why You Feel Dizzy and What Will Help You Feel Better
Gregory T. Whitman, MD, and Robert W. Baloh, MD
Anyone who has experienced the sensation of the room spinning around or the lightheadedness that signals an impending faint knows how bad it feels to be dizzy. Almost any medical condition can cause dizziness, but the most common include benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, transient drops in blood pressure, migraine, and anxiety. Inner ear disorders that cause dizziness are often associated with abnormal eye movements—in fact, it’s...
A Family Guide to Making a Difference
Jeffrey Rado, MD, and Philip G. Janicak, MD
An estimated 51 million people worldwide have schizophrenia, 2.2 million of them in the United States. While early diagnosis and appropriate treatment improve the long-term prognosis, schizophrenia is a disease that is difficult to manage. In Living with Schizophrenia, Drs. Jeffrey Rado and Philip G. Janicak, specialists in treating people who have schizophrenia, offer an easy-to-read primer for people with the disorder, along with...
Writings on Abortion in Canada
Shannon Stettner
10/2016 - UBC Press
Until the late 1960s, the authorities on abortion were for the most part men—politicians, clergy, lawyers, physicians, all of whom had an interest in regulating women's bodies. Even today, when we hear women speak publicly about abortion, the voices are usually those of the leaders of women's and abortion rights organizations, women who hold political office, and, on occasion, female physicians. We also hear quite frequently from spokeswomen for anti-abortion groups. Rarely, however,...
What to Do When Antidepressants Fail
Dean F. MacKinnon, MD
Major depressive disorder is a common medical condition that can be disabling and can persist for months, even years. Many people experience depression symptoms that resist treatment. Although they try various combinations of medications, psychotherapy, or electroconvulsive therapy, their symptoms don’t improve. What can people who have treatment-resistant depression do to overcome their depression and feel better? In Still Down, Dr. Dean F. MacKinnon, a psychiatrist at Johns...
Words to Say and Things to Do
Rachael Wonderlin
Life changes dramatically for the entire family when the decision is made to move a person who has dementia from home to community care. Rachael Wonderlin, a gerontologist, dementia care expert, and popular dementia care blogger, helps caregivers cope with the difficult behaviors, emotions, and anxieties that both they and their loved one may experience. Writing from her own practice and drawing on the latest research in...
The Battle over Involuntary Psychiatric Care
Dinah Miller, MD, and Annette Hanson, MD
foreword by Pete Earley
Battle lines have been drawn over involuntary treatment. On one side, there are those who oppose involuntary psychiatric treatments under any condition. Activists who take up this cause often don’t acknowledge that psychiatric symptoms can render people dangerous to themselves or others. They also don’t allow for the idea that the civil rights of an individual may be at odds with the heartbreak of a caring family. On the other...
What It Is and What You Can Do to Feel Better
Janice F. Wiesman, MD
Nearly one in fifteen people—that's 20 million people in the United States—suffers from peripheral neuropathy, or nerve damage. Caused by such conditions as diabetes, cancer, vitamin deficiencies, and kidney disease as well as certain drugs and toxins, neuropathy brings numbness, tingling, and burning in the feet, legs, and fingertips. Neuropathy can be more than uncomfortable—it can be disabling: people whose fingertips are numb may find it hard to button...
Words to Say and Things to Do
Kathleen Trainor, PsyD
Ten million children in the United States—two million of them preschoolers—suffer from anxiety. Anxious children may be afraid to be out of their parents’ sight; they may refuse to talk except to specific people or under specific circumstances; they may insist on performing tasks such as brushing teeth or getting ready for bed in a rigidly specific way. For many children these difficulties interfere with doing well in school and making friends as well as with daily...
Norman J. Temple
05/2016 - UBC Press
Written by both scholars and practitioners based in developing countries, this volume draws on their wealth of knowledge, experience, and understanding of nutrition to provide nutrition professionals with the proper tools for the assessment and evaluation of nutritional status. Each chapter addresses a specific nutrition challenge currently faced by developing countries such as food security, food safety, disease prevention, maternal health, and effective nutrition policy. With an...
Strategies That Work
Bernard Golden, PhD
Uncontrolled anger can be devastating, yet many people with serious anger issues don’t know how to change their behavior. In Overcoming Destructive Anger, psychologist Bernard Golden, an anger management specialist, offers concrete tools for turning destructive anger into healthy anger. Dr. Golden draws on both compassion-focused therapy—a model for change that encompasses and expands on cognitive behavioral therapy, mindfulness, and practices in compassion and...
HIV and Colonial Trauma in San Francisco's Two-Spirit Community
Andrew J. Jolivette
The first book to examine the correlation between mixed-race identity and HIV/AIDS among Native American gay men and transgendered people, Indian Blood provides an analysis of the emerging and often contested LGBTQ "two-spirit" identification as it relates to public health and mixed-race identity. Prior to contact with European settlers, most Native American tribes held their two-spirit members in high esteem, even considering them spiritually...
Words to Say and Things to Do
Susan J. Noonan, MD, MPH
foreword by Timothy J. Petersen, PhD, Jonathan E. Alpert, MD, PhD, and Andrew A. Nierenberg, MD
Mood disorders such as depression and bipolar disorder can be devastating to the person who has the disorder and to his or her family. Depression and bipolar disorder affect every aspect of how a person functions, including their thoughts, feelings, actions, and relationships with other people. Family members and close friends are often the first to...
Reclaiming Your Life from a Behavioral Addiction
Jon E. Grant, JD, MD, MPH, Brian L. Odlaug, PhD, MPH, and Samuel R. Chamberlain, MD, PhD
At some point in our lives, we all engage in behaviors that are risky, irrational, or unwise. We might find it exciting and temporarily rewarding to gamble on the lottery or impulsively buy an expensive gadget. But just as substances like alcohol and narcotics have the potential to become addictive, so do certain behaviors. A person addicted to gambling, shopping, the internet, food, or...
A History of Naturopathic Healing in America
Susan E. Cayleff
An alternative medical system emphasizing prevention through healthy living, positive mind-body-spirit strength, and therapeutics to enhance the body’s innate healing processes, naturopathy has gained legitimacy in recent years. In Nature’s Path—the first comprehensive book to examine the complex history and culture of American naturopathy—Susan E. Cayleff tells the fascinating story of the movement’s nineteenth-century roots. While early naturopaths were sometimes...
How Everyday People Catch STIs
Jill Grimes, MD
A 2009 Book of the Year, USA Book News "It can’t happen to me." Many high school students and young adults, seduced by their sense of invincibility, are stunned when they are diagnosed with a sexually transmitted infection (STI). But the fact is that anyone can catch an STI: no age group, social class, economic class, culture, religion, gender, or ethnic group is immune. To drive home the risks and realities of unprotected sex, Dr. Jill Grimes shares real-life stories of young...
A Patient's Guide
Elizabeth M. Adler, PhD
foreword by W. Jeffrey Baker, MD
introduction by Michael R. Bishop, MD
When neurobiologist Elizabeth M. Adler was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma almost twenty years ago, she learned everything she could about the disease, both to cope with the emotional stress of her diagnosis and to make the best possible decisions for her treatment. In Living with Lymphoma, she combines her scientific expertise and personal knowledge with a desire to help other people who have lymphoma...
A Guide for Women
Merry Noel Miller, MD
Women are twice as likely as men to become depressed. While they seek help for mental disorders more often than men, they also seek to help others, trying to keep everyone happy while taking care of parents, spouses, and children. Sometimes, doing it all is doing too much. In Finding Your Emotional Balance, Dr. Merry Noel Miller offers women of all ages advice for coping with life’s challenges while increasing its joys. Drawing on her three decades of experience as a...
A Guide for Parents
Francis Mark Mondimore, MD, and Patrick Kelly, MD
In Adolescent Depression, psychiatrists Francis Mark Mondimore, MD, and Patrick Kelly, MD, explain that serious depression in adolescents goes beyond "moodiness." Depression is in fact an illness—one that can be effectively treated. The authors describe the many forms of depression and the many symptoms of depression in young people—from sadness to irritability, self-harm, drug and alcohol abuse, and violent rages. Incorporating the latest research from...
A Family Guide to Understanding Mood, Memory, and Behavior after Brain Injury
Vani Rao, MBBS, MD, and Sandeep Vaishnavi, MD, PhD
foreword by Peter V. Rabins, MD, MPH
A traumatic brain injury is a life-changing event, affecting an individual’s lifestyle, ability to work, relationships—even personality. Whatever caused it—car crash, work accident, sports injury, domestic violence, combat—a severe blow to the head results in acute and, often, lasting symptoms. People with brain injury benefit from understanding, patience,...
edited by Robert E. Bristow, MD, MBA, FACOG, FACS, Terri L. Cornelison, MD, PhD, FACOG, and F. J. Montz, MD, KM, FACOG, FACS
This updated and expanded second edition offers a wealth of information to ease the physical and emotional suffering of women who have ovarian cancer. The expert authors include highly respected and experienced oncologists, gynecologic oncology nurse specialists, researchers, and ovarian cancer survivors. Throughout the book they emphasize the concepts of...
Heal Faster, Better, Stronger
Julie K. Silver, MD
A twelve-year cancer survivor and oncology rehabilitation specialist, Dr. Julie K. Silver wrote After Cancer Treatment to help others recover from the exhaustion and physical devastation that often follow treatment. This new edition of the book, retitled Before and After Cancer Treatment, describes improved therapies, better delivery of care, holistic care options, and energetics. In covering the benefits of prehabilitation strategies, which improve physical...
Improving Outcomes, Saving Lives
Vinayak K. Prasad, MD, MPH, and Adam S. Cifu, MD
We expect medicine to progress in an orderly fashion, with good medical practices being replaced by better ones. But some tests and therapies are discontinued because they are found to be worse, or at least no better, than what they replaced. Medications like Vioxx and procedures such as vertebroplasty for back pain caused by compression fractures are among the medical "advances" that turned out to be dangerous or useless. What Dr. Vinayak...